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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 1023 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 179)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 82)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 248)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Pilquen : Sección Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access  
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 123)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 152)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers d’Études sur la Représentation     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Health Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.775
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 56  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0278-6133 - ISSN (Online) 1930-7810
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Health Psychology’s 40th anniversary.

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      Abstract: This special issue of Health Psychology marks the conclusion of the journal’s 40th volume. George C. Stone founded Health Psychology in 1982 and served as our first Editor-in-Chief. He was also an accomplished behavioral scientist and the founder in 1975 of America’s first academic department of health psychology at the University of California at San Francisco. Many of us believe that health psychology is fundamentally an applied science, that the principal value of basic biopsychosocial research resides in its translational potential, and that we have to be a “solution-oriented” branch of science (Watts, 2017) in order to meet critical societal needs. By extension, we believe that health psychology and health psychologists have vital roles to play in the promotion of physical health, the prevention of medical illness, and the care of medically ill patients. Accordingly, we hope that rigorous research on prevention and intervention will comprise a substantially larger percentage of the next 40 volumes of Health Psychology. May George Stone’s activism and vision continue to inspire us in our efforts to move from ideas to efficacy and to advance both the field of health psychology and its flagship journal. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • An introduction to the special issue: From ideas to efficacy in health
           psychology.

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      Abstract: The impetus for the special issue, “From Ideas to Efficacy” was the perceived need to stimulate and support a more vibrant research base that translates basic behavioral and social science research (bBSSR) discoveries to clinical and public health interventions. This special issue presents novel research that advances translational behavioral science, focusing primarily on the early phases of behavioral translation that are not as well recognized as later-phase translational science (e.g., dissemination and implementation research). The special issue includes a series of empirical, conceptual, and methodological papers, and a shining example of translational research that has had important clinical implications for the treatment of obesity and prevention of people with prediabetes from transitioning to Type II diabetes. In this introduction we will first set the context of the special issue and briefly comment on the papers. We end with several ideas in the areas of funding, training and publication of early phase translational behavioral science that can accelerate the process through which new ideas from our deepening understanding of human behavior can be more rapidly and fully brought to bear on the pressing health problems facing our nation and our world. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • From ideas to interventions: A review and comparison of frameworks used in
           early phase behavioral translation research.

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      Abstract: Developing and testing more effective health-related behavioral interventions is critical to making progress in improving disease prevention and treatment. One way to achieve this goal is to use a systematic and progressive framework that outlines the steps needed to translate theories, findings, and basic understandings about human behavior into risk factor and disease management or mitigation strategies. Although several frameworks and process models have been designed to inform the development and optimization of health-related behavioral interventions, little guidance is available to compare key aspects of these models, clarify their common and unique features, and aid in selecting the best approach for a specific research question. This article describes the major frameworks that focus on early phase translation—that is, approaches that address the design and optimization of behavioral interventions before testing in Phase III efficacy trials. Differences between and common features of these models are described, opportunities for combining frameworks to maximize their impact are noted, and guidance is provided to enable investigators to choose the most useful model(s) when designing and optimizing health-related behavioral interventions. The goal of this article is to promote the consistent use of frameworks that encourage a systematic, progressive approach to behavioral intervention development and testing as one way to encourage the creation of well-characterized, optimized, and potentially more effective health-related behavioral interventions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Optimizing Making Every Contact Count (MECC) interventions: A strategic
           behavioral analysis.

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      Abstract: Objective: This Strategic Behavioral Analysis aimed to: identify barriers and facilitators to health care professionals’ implementation of Making Every Contact Count (MECC); code behavioral components of nationally delivered interventions to improve MECC implementation; assess the extent to which these components are theoretically congruent with identified theoretical domains representing barriers and facilitators. Comparing national interventions that aim to support implementation of behavior change related activity to the barriers and facilitators for the target behavior enables identification of opportunities being missed in practice; thereby, facilitating intervention optimization. Method: A mixed-method study involving: a systematic review to identify barriers and facilitators to implementing MECC classified using the COM-B model and Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF); a content analysis of national interventions to improve MECC implementation in England using the Behavior Change Wheel (BCW) and Behavior Change Techniques Taxonomy (BCTTv1); linking intervention content to barriers identified in the systematic review. Results: Across 27 studies, the most frequently reported barriers related to eight TDF domains: Environmental Context and Resources, Beliefs About Capabilities, Knowledge, Beliefs About Consequences, Intentions, Skills, Social Professional Role and Identity, and Emotions. National interventions aimed at supporting MECC implementation included on average 5.1 BCW intervention functions (Education, Modeling, Persuasion, and Training were used in all interventions) and 8.7 BCTs. Only 21% of BCTs potentially relevant to key domains were used across interventions. The majority of BCTs linked to seven of the eight most important domains were not used in any existing interventions. Conclusions: Intervention developers should seize missed opportunities by incorporating more theoretically relevant BCTs to target barriers to implementing MECC. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Translating strategies for promoting engagement in mobile health: A
           proof-of-concept microrandomized trial.

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      Abstract: Objective: Mobile technologies allow for accessible and cost-effective health monitoring and intervention delivery. Despite these advantages, mobile health (mHealth) engagement is often insufficient. While monetary incentives may increase engagement, they can backfire, dampening intrinsic motivations and undermining intervention scalability. Theories from psychology and behavioral economics suggest useful nonmonetary strategies for promoting engagement; however, examinations of the applicability of these strategies to mHealth engagement are lacking. This proof-of-concept study evaluates the translation of theoretically-grounded engagement strategies into mHealth, by testing their potential utility in promoting daily self-reporting. Method: A microrandomized trial (MRT) was conducted with adolescents and emerging adults with past-month substance use. Participants were randomized multiple times daily to receive theoretically-grounded strategies, namely reciprocity (the delivery of inspirational quote prior to self-reporting window) and nonmonetary reinforcers (e.g., the delivery of meme/gif following self-reporting completion) to improve proximal engagement in daily mHealth self-reporting. Results: Daily self-reporting rates (62.3%; n = 68) were slightly lower than prior literature, albeit with much lower financial incentives. The utility of specific strategies was found to depend on contextual factors pertaining to the individual’s receptivity and risk for disengagement. For example, the effect of reciprocity significantly varied depending on whether this strategy was employed (vs. not employed) during the weekend. The nonmonetary reinforcement strategy resulted in different outcomes when operationalized in various ways. Conclusions: While the results support the translation of the reciprocity strategy into this mHealth setting, the translation of nonmonetary reinforcement requires further consideration prior to inclusion in a full scale MRT. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 04 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Looking back and forward from the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP): A
           commentary on the importance of research aimed at intervention
           optimization.

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      Abstract: This article discusses the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). DPP was an extremely successful clinical trial that demonstrated the efficacy of lifestyle intervention in the prevention of type 2 diabetes in those at increased risk. Many have asked how this study came to be. The author presents a historical perspective on the DPP trial, stressing both the many years of research that preceded and permitted this successful study and its impact on both clinical approaches and subsequent research directions. The author discusses the tension that seems to exist between two important types of research—conducting systematic research aimed at optimizing an intervention to ensure that it will successfully change the targeted behavior versus moving more rapidly to clinical trials testing the health benefits derived from changing the targeted behavior. Today studies that propose to conduct programmatic research related to intervention optimization are criticized for not also testing if these interventions produce clinically important health outcomes. It is not cost-effective to seek answers to questions about health outcomes before developing and demonstrating the efficacy of the intervention on changing the behavioral targets. There are many examples of large clinical trials examining the effect of changing a behavior on an important health outcome that have failed to achieve significant differences in health outcomes because the intervention was not successful in changing the behavior relative to the control condition. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Single case designs for early phase behavioral translational research in
           health psychology.

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      Abstract: Objective: The biomedical research community has long recognized that much of the basic research being conducted, whether in the biological, behavioral or social sciences, is not readily translated into clinical and public health applications. This translational gap is due in part to challenges inherent in moving research findings from basic or discovery research to applied research that addresses clinical or public health problems. In the behavioral and social sciences, research designs typically used in the early phases of translational research are small, underpowered “pilot” studies that may lack sufficient statistical power to test the research question of interest. While this approach is discouraged, these studies are often employed to estimate effect sizes before embarking on a larger trial with adequate statistical power to test the research hypothesis. The goal of this paper is to provide an alternative approach to early phase studies using single case designs (SCDs). Method: Review basic principles of SCDs; provide a series of hypothetical SCD replication experiments to illustrate (1) how data from SCDs can be analyzed to test the effects of an intervention on behavioral and biological outcomes and (2) how sample sizes can be derived for larger randomized controlled trials (RCTs) based on clinically meaningful effects from SCDs; and review feedback between SCDs and RCTs. Results: The paper illustrates the use of SCD reversal and multiple baseline designs for early phase translational research. Conclusion: SCDs provide a flexible and efficient platform for the use of experimental methods in early phase translational research. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Tailored motivational interviewing (TMI): Translating basic science in
           skills acquisition into a behavioral intervention to improve community
           health worker motivational interviewing competence for youth living with
           HIV.

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      Abstract: Objective: Interventions to promote evidence-based practices are particularly needed for paraprofessional staff working with minority youth with HIV who have higher rates of HIV infection but lower rates of linkage and retention in care compared to older adults. Utilizing the ORBIT model for behavioral intervention development, we defined and refined a behavioral intervention for providers, Tailored Motivational Interviewing (TMI), to improve provider competence in previous studies (Phase 1a and 1b). The current study focuses on ORBIT Phase 2a—proof of concept. We hypothesized that TMI would be acceptable and feasible and would show a signal of efficacy of improving and maintaining community health worker (CHW) MI competence scores using an innovative statistical method for small N proof-of-concept studies. Method: Longitudinal data were collected from 19 CHWs at 16 youth HIV agencies. CHWs from 8 sites were assigned to the TMI group per the cofunders request. The remaining 8 sites were randomly assigned to TMI or services as usual. MI competence was assessed at baseline and up to 15 times over 2 years. Random coefficient models were utilized to examine time trajectories of competence scores and the impact of the intervention on competence trajectories. Semistructured interviews were conducted to determine barriers and facilitators of TMI. Results: Competence scores in the TMI group significantly increased while the scores of the control group significantly decreased. Further analysis of the intervention group demonstrated that scores significantly increased during the first 3 months after initial workshop and was sustained through the end of the study. Qualitative findings revealed insufficient time and competing priorities as perceived barriers whereas integrating MI into routine agency practices and ongoing training might facilitate implementation. Conclusions: Following a successful proof-of-concept, the next step is a fully randomized pilot study of TMI relative to a control condition in preparation for a stepped-wedge cluster randomized full scale trial. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Mechanisms of change in a go/no-go training game for young adult smokers.

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      Abstract: Objective: Smoking is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality. Evidence-based intervention programs to help young adults quit smoking are largely lacking; identifying targets for intervention is therefore critical. A candidate target is inhibitory control, with previous studies on Go/No-Go trainings showing behavior change in the food and alcohol domain. The current study examined the mechanisms of change of HitnRun, a Go/No-Go game, in a smoking population that was motivated to quit. Method: A 2-armed experimental study (n = 106) was conducted and young adults (Mage = 22.15; SDage = 2.59) were randomly assigned to either play HitnRun or to read a psychoeducational brochure. Prior to and directly following the intervention period, smoking-specific and general inhibitory control, perceived attractiveness of smoking pictures, and weekly smoking behavior were assessed. Results: Results indicated that Go/No-Go training seems to decrease evaluations of smoking stimuli rather than top-down smoking-specific and general control processes. Similar reductions for weekly smoking were found in both groups. Conclusions: Go/No-Go training did not differentially influence smoking-specific inhibitory control, general inhibitory control and weekly smoking behavior. Go/No-Go training might be able to decrease evaluations of smoking stimuli, yet based on the current study we cannot rule out the possibility of regression to the mean. More research and iterative design is needed to better understand the potential role of Go/No-Go training in smoking cessation interventions, as well as exploring other evidence-based mechanisms (e.g., peer processes, self-efficacy) that might be an important addition to smoking cessation interventions for young people. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Mechanisms of self-persuasion intervention for HPV vaccination: Testing
           memory and autonomous motivation.

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      Abstract: Objective: Optimizing a self-persuasion intervention app for adolescent HPV vaccination requires investigating its hypothesized mechanisms. Guided by the experimental medicine approach, we tested whether (a) self-persuasion intervention components (verbalize vaccination reasons, choose HPV topics) changed putative mechanisms (memory, autonomous motivation) and (b) measures of the putative mechanisms were associated with HPV vaccination. Method: These are secondary analyses from a randomized 2 (cognitive processing: verbalize reasons vs. listen) × 2 (choice: choose HPV topics vs. assigned) factorial trial (Tiro et al., 2016). Undecided parents (N = 161) with an unvaccinated child (11–17 years old) used the self-persuasion app, recalled reasons for vaccination (memory measure), and completed an autonomous motivation measure. Adolescent vaccination status was extracted from electronic medical records 12 months postintervention. Results: The verbalize component resulted in greater recall accuracy of vaccination reasons (p < .001); however, the choose topics component did not increase autonomous motivation scores (p = .74). For associations with HPV vaccination, recall accuracy was not associated (ps> .51), but autonomous motivation scores significantly predicted vaccination (ps < .03), except when controlling for baseline motivation (p = .22). Conclusion: The intervention app engages parents in reasons for vaccination; however, memory may not be a viable mechanism of vaccination. Although the intervention did not affect autonomous motivation, associations with vaccination status suggest it is a viable intervention target for HPV vaccination but alternative strategies to change it are needed. Future testing of a refined app should examine implementation strategies to optimize delivery in clinical or community settings. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Digitally characterizing the dynamics of multiple health behavior change.

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      Abstract: Objective: We applied the ORBIT model to digitally define dynamic treatment pathways whereby intervention improves multiple risk behaviors. We hypothesized that effective intervention improves the frequency and consistency of targeted health behaviors and that both correlate with automaticity (habit) and self-efficacy (self-regulation). Method: Study 1: Via location scale mixed modeling we compared effects when hybrid mobile intervention did versus did not target each behavior in the Make Better Choices 1 (MBC1) trial (n = 204). Participants had all of four risk behaviors: low moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and fruit and vegetable consumption (FV), and high saturated fat (FAT) and sedentary leisure screen time (SED). Models estimated the mean (location), between-subjects variance, and within-subject variance (scale). Results: Treatment by time interactions showed that location increased for MVPA and FV (Bs = 1.68, .61; ps < .001) and decreased for SED and FAT (Bs = −2.01, −.07; ps < .05) more when treatments targeted the behavior. Within-subject variance modeling revealed group by time interactions for scale (taus = −.19, −.75, −.17, −.11; ps < .001), indicating that all behaviors grew more consistent when targeted. Method: Study 2: In the MBC2 trial (n = 212) we examined correlations between location, scale, self-efficacy, and automaticity for the three targeted behaviors. Results: For SED, higher scale (less consistency) but not location correlated with lower self-efficacy (r = −.22, p = .014) and automaticity (r = −.23, p = .013). For FV and MVPA, higher location, but not scale, correlated with higher self-efficacy (rs = .38, .34, ps < .001) and greater automaticity (rs = .46, .42, ps < .001). Conclusions: Location scale mixed modeling suggests that both habit and self-regulation changes probably accompany acquisition of complex diet and activity behaviors. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • An attachment-based intervention for patients with cardiovascular disease
           and their partners: A proof-of-concept study.

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      Abstract: Couple distress is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, whereas support is associated with heart-healthy behaviors and better CVD outcomes. Objective: To assess the clinical benefit of the Healing Hearts Together (HHT) intervention, an attachment-based relationship enhancement program for couples in which 1 partner has CVD, on relationship quality, mental health, and quality of life (QoL). Method: Patients from a tertiary cardiac care center and their partners (N = 78; 39 couples) attended the 8-session HHT group. Participants completed validated, self-report questionnaires pre- and postintervention, including the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS), Couple Satisfaction Index (CSI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the SF-36 (QoL). At intervention completion, participants completed a satisfaction survey. Between-groups comparisons (patient/partner) were examined with analysis of variance. Paired-sample t tests were used to assess changes over time with HHT participation for the complete sample and for patients and partners separately. Results: Many participants reported relationship and psychological distress at baseline. Clinically and statistically significant changes from pre to postintervention were observed for relationship distress (DAS: +7.8 points; p < .001; CSI changes [+3.6] were clinically significant) and depression (−1.8; p < .001), whereas statistically significant changes occurred for anxiety (−1.5; p < .001), and physical (+2.1; p = .047) and mental (+3.3; p < .001) QoL. Patients, but not partners, reported statistically significant changes in QoL-mental component summary. Clinically and statistically significant changes were observed for anxiety for partners, but not patients. Conclusions: The HHT intervention was beneficial for patients’ and partners’ relationship quality, mental health, and QoL. A larger randomized controlled trial evaluating the impact of this intervention on relationship quality, mental health and QoL is warranted. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Dec 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Alcohol-involved sexual aggression: Emotion regulation as a mechanism of
           behavior change.

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      Abstract: Objective: Sexual aggression remains a significant public health problem, with the majority of sexual assaults involving alcohol. Founded upon an experimental medicine approach to behavior change, the current study used a proximal change experiment to target and test emotion regulation (ER) as a mechanism underlying alcohol-involved sexual aggression. Method: Heavy episodic drinking men aged 21–30 with a sexual assault perpetration history (N = 209) were randomly assigned to a brief, online, ER-focused cognitive restructuring or mindfulness intervention or to control. Intervention effects were evaluated during sober and intoxicated states through laboratory-based alcohol administration (target BrAC = .08%). Intoxicated and sober participants completed a proximal change protocol that included implementing ER skills during a sexual aggression analogue that assessed relevant emotions and intentions. Results: Path analysis demonstrated that relative to control, the cognitive restructuring intervention improved emotional modulation and emotional clarity, resulting in lower sexual arousal and anger, respectively, followed by decreased sexual coercion intentions. The mindfulness intervention yielded mixed results, predicting decreased sexual aggression intentions compared to control but also predicting stronger coercive tactic intentions in intoxicated men with more severe sexual aggression histories. Both interventions improved emotional acceptance relative to control, but only for sober men. Conclusions: Overall, the current study demonstrated that ER-focused interventions improved proximal ER skills associated with reduced sexual aggression intentions, signifying ER as an important mechanism for changing sexually aggressive behavior. Because intervention efficacy varied by intoxication state, further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of ER interventions targeting real-world alcohol-involved sexual aggression. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Adapting pharmacological dose-finding designs for early phase behavioral
           intervention development research.

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      Abstract: The use of systematic dose-finding designs to develop behavioral health interventions is lacking. In contrast, drug development research consistently follows a prescribed, regulated, and iterative pathway that begins with empirically establishing optimal drug dose. Adapting dose-finding methodologies from the drug development literature offers several advantages to increasing the feasibility, efficiency, and rigor of this important intervention refining step for behavioral intervention development. This article discusses the current state of the science for dose finding within the behavioral intervention development literature. A detailed overview of one drug development dose-finding methodology (the Accelerated Biased Coin Up-and-Down design) is then presented, using our work to adapt the Prevention Plus Intervention for treatment of pediatric obesity for mHealth delivery as an example of how this design can be applied to empirically derive the dose for a behavioral intervention. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Nov 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Reinforcer pathology’s alternative reinforcer hypothesis: A
           preliminary examination.

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      Abstract: Background and objective: The novel theory of Reinforcer Pathology states that the temporal window of integration, measured by delay discounting (DD), determines the value of reinforcers. Based on the Reinforcer Pathology theory, the valuation of alternative reinforcers is positively associated with the length of the temporal window (negatively with rates of discounting). The objective of this article is to test the Reinforcer Pathology theory by reanalyzing data from a prior report (Carr & Epstein, 2018) in order to examine the association between the reinforcing value of alternative reinforcement and the length of the measured temporal window. Method: Participants (N = 250) who completed an adjusting delay discounting task and the Pleasant Events Schedule (PES) were included in the study. PES provides a measurement of a reinforcement score (a cross-product of PES measures of frequency and pleasantness) for 45 noneating alternative activities. Analysis of Variance and Spearman product-moment correlations were completed. Results: Delay discounting was significantly positively correlated with sedentary reinforcement and significantly negatively correlated with cognitively enriching activities. A significant interaction was observed in the preference for between food and cognitive-enriching context as a function ln(k) in predicting the cognitive-enriching activity class. Nonsignificant relationships were also observed with the correlation of delay discounting to the reinforcement of social and physical activities. Conclusions: These findings provide initial support for Reinforcer Pathology theory and indicate that the temporal window over which reinforcers are integrated may be a factor contributing to a preference for some healthy or unhealthy alternative reinforcers. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Sep 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Modeling longitudinal variation in affective response to exercise across a
           16-week randomized control trial (RCT).

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      Abstract: Objective: Consistent with the Science of Behavior Change (SOBC) experimental medicine approach, this early phase intervention development study examines the influence of an intervention strategy (exercise training) on a behavioral health outcome (exercise engagement) in the service of addressing a widespread threat to public health (physical inactivity). Method: Physically inactive participants (N = 201) were randomly assigned to one of four exercise training conditions fully crossed on intensity (moderate, vigorous) and duration (short, long). Training occurred over 16-weeks and in-bout assessments of affective response (valence) and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were collected during Weeks 1, 4, 8, and 16. Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO₂max) was assessed pre- or postintervention and exercise behavior was assessed at 6-months postintervention follow-up. Results: Across conditions, affective response to exercise did not change, on average, over 16-weeks. Conversely, RPE decreased slightly, on average, over time. Participants completing vigorous intensity exercise reported more negatively valenced affective response and higher RPE, on average, across weeks. Greater total exercise volume completed and greater change in VO₂max were associated with more negatively valenced affective response, on average. Baseline affective response scores were positively associated with exercise minutes at follow-up; however, average affective response scores across the intervention were not associated with minutes of exercise at follow-up. Conclusions: Affective response to exercise did not become more positive in valence over time as a function of training volume or change in VO₂max. Implications for translating these findings to inform future intervention development efforts are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Sep 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Translation of findings from laboratory studies of food and alcohol intake
           into behavior change interventions: The experimental medicine approach.

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      Abstract: Objectives: Laboratory studies have contributed important information about the determinants of food and alcohol intake, and they have prompted the development of behavior change interventions that have been evaluated in randomized controlled trials conducted in the field. In this article we apply a recent experimental medicine (EM) framework to this body of research. Method: A conceptual review and focused discussion of the relevant literature is presented. Results: We illustrate how it is possible to translate findings from studies of food and alcohol intake in the laboratory into interventions that are effective for changing behavior in the real world. We go on to demonstrate how systematic failures can occur at different stages within the EM framework, and how these failures ultimately result in interventions that are ineffective for changing behavior. We also consider methodological issues that may constrain the external validity of findings from laboratory studies including demand effects, participant characteristics, and the timing and dose of behavioral interventions. Throughout, we make recommendations to improve the translation of findings from laboratory studies into behavior change interventions that are effective in the field. Conclusions: Consideration of the EM framework will help to ensure that promising candidate interventions for eating and drinking that are identified in laboratory studies can fulfill their translational promise. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Sep 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The operating conditions framework: Integrating mechanisms and moderators
           in health behavior interventions.

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      Abstract: Efficacious translational research in health psychology relies on specifying why intervention strategies change health behaviors and when, for what behaviors, and for whom, do these strategies promote change. Whereas interventions’ mechanism of action (the why question) has attracted considerable attention, there is a need to conceptualize and integrate factors that moderate intervention effectiveness. Intervention effects on health behaviors are a function of 2 change processes: how effectively interventions change mechanisms of action (target engagement), and how effectively those mechanisms change behavior (target validity). We outline the Operating Conditions Framework (OCF) to articulate theoretical linkages between mechanisms and moderators and begin the process of specifying circumstances that promote target engagement and target validity. A review of 46 meta-analyses of behavioral interventions offers impetus for the OCF by revealing that heterogeneity of effect sizes is frequent, substantial, and largely unexplained in traditional moderator analyses. We present an approach to moderation grounded on the distinction between 2 foci—engagement moderation and validity moderation—and reveal that little is known about variation in how interventions change targets and how changing targets promotes behavior change. The OCF addresses this need by maintaining researchers’ focus on mechanisms of behavior change but doing so while embracing the conditional nature of these processes. Because the OCF prioritizes consideration of contextual factors at the outset of a research program, early-phase translational research will be critical in specifying operating conditions and, ultimately, generating guidelines regarding why, when, for whom, and for what behaviors are intervention strategies effective. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Sep 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Heartphone: Mobile evaluative conditioning to enhance affective processes
           and promote physical activity.

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      Abstract: Objective: Most American adults fail to achieve recommended levels of physical activity and, as a result, are at elevated risk for many chronic diseases. Affective processes have been validated as targets for increasing physical activity but are rarely targeted directly by behavioral interventions. This article describes 2 early phase studies used to develop HeartPhone, a smartphone application for conditioning associations between physical activity and pleasure. HeartPhone exposes users to brief doses of evaluative conditioning stimuli via background images on a smartphone lock screen. Method: Study 1 evaluated the feasibility of delivering mobile evaluative conditioning and estimated doses received over 7–21 days in a small sample of users (n = 6). Study 2 used a single-group prepost design to evaluate user experience and determine whether any change in reflective motivation or physical activity was possible over 8 weeks of HeartPhone use (n = 19). Results: In Study 1, users accumulated almost 2 min/day of exposure to conditioning stimuli, indicating the feasibility of delivering microdoses of evaluative conditioning via smartphone lock screens. In Study 2, adults reported accepting the application and conditioning stimuli, improved affective judgments of physical activity (enjoyment, intrinsic motivation, integrated regulations), and increased physical activity. Conclusions: These results provide proof-of-concept for a low-friction approach for enhancing affective processing and increasing physical activity. Based on early phase success as a tool for engaging smartphone users in behavior change, the HeartPhone intervention is ready for a Phase IIb pilot and III efficacy trials. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Jun 2020 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
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