A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Occupational Health Science
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2367-0134 - ISSN (Online) 2367-0142
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • A Review of “Occupational Stress” by Peter Chen

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2024-02-15
       
  • Work-Health Conflict among Breast Cancer Survivors: Associations with
           Cancer Self-Management, Quality of Life, and Anticipated Turnover

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Breast cancer and its treatment can affect a survivor’s work role, potentially resulting in job loss or work withdrawal. Survivors are encouraged to adopt self-management behaviors as part of their health role to minimize treatment after-effects, prevent cancer recurrence, and improve health-related quality of life. We examined work-health conflict, an under-recognized form of inter-role conflict that occurs when work role demands make it difficult to engage in the health role. We hypothesized that work-health conflict is directly associated with poorer quality of life and anticipated turnover, and indirectly associated with both outcomes through self-management behaviors. An online cross-sectional survey was administered to working breast cancer survivors. We conducted ordinary least square regressions path analysis to test hypothesized associations of work-health conflict, quality of life, anticipated turnover, and cancer self-management. Respondents (n = 157) had a mean age of 51 and were primarily female (98%), White and non-Hispanic (85%), married or partnered (74%), and college-educated (94%). Hypothesis-testing showed that work-health conflict had direct effects on health-related quality of life and anticipated turnover, as well as indirect effects through self-management. We provide evidence for the adverse health and work impacts of work-health conflict, a potentially modifiable variable that is of growing interest within the literature on work-life interface. Employers should focus on supporting survivors’ long-term health-related quality of life and opportunities for health-supporting activities, which may promote work retention. Upstream interventions may be needed to address sources of work-health conflict, and may include minimizing spillover of work stress and reducing drains on time and energy resources.
      PubDate: 2024-02-07
       
  • Exploring the Impact of Incivility on Psychological Distress: The Unique
           Lived Experiences of Women Identifying as Indigenous and as part of the
           LGBTQ + Community

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Organizations are increasingly facing complex issues related to diversity and inclusion. Although overt forms of discrimination might have declined significantly, researchers are now alarmed in the face of insidious forms of “modern” discrimination that are flying under organizational radars despite policies and laws. While incivility has been broadly conceptualized and examined as “generalized” behaviors in organizations, less attention has been dedicated to the “selective” form it can take. The present study tested different aspects of Cortina’s theory of selective incivility as a “modern” manifestation of discrimination. This study extends the theory by being the first to investigate uncivil experiences Indigenous employees might be confronted with in organizations and how it might lead to experiencing higher symptoms of psychological distress. To do so, we collected data from 6706 employees working in a large Canadian public organization who were asked to complete measures of psychological distress and incivility from co-workers and supervisors. According to analyses of parallel mediation, women were less likely to report uncivil treatment from co-workers and direct supervisors than men. Evidence of moderated mediation also emerged, with target gender and Indigenous identity interacting to predict uncivil experiences, such that Indigenous women reported worse treatment from direct supervisors (b = .92, p = .03, ΔR2 = .0007), impacting their level of psychological distress (index = -.21, 95% CI [.01, .41]). Overall, our findings suggest that incivility does not work consistently against women in organizations and that intersectionality plays a role in predicting identity-based mistreatment. Our results also suggest that practitioners should consider an intersectional approach when implementing policies and interventions regarding identity-based mistreatment.
      PubDate: 2024-02-01
       
  • A Framework for Protecting and Promoting Employee Mental Health through
           Supervisor Supportive Behaviors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The attention to workplace mental health is timely given extreme levels of burnout, anxiety, depression and trauma experienced by workers due to serious extraorganizational stressors – the COVID-19 pandemic, threats to climate change, and extreme social and political unrest. Workplace-based risk factors, such as high stress and low support, are contributing factors to poor mental health and suicidality (Choi, 2018; Milner et al., 2013, 2018), just as low levels of social connectedness and belonging are established risk factors for poor mental health (Joiner et al., 2009), suggesting that social support at work (e.g., from supervisors) may be a key approach to protecting and promoting employee mental health. Social connections provide numerous benefits for health outcomes and are as, or more, important to mortality as other well-known health behaviors such as smoking and alcohol consumption (Holt-Lundstad et al., 2015), and can serve as a resource or buffer against the deleterious effects of stress or strain on psychological health (Cohen & Wills, 1985). This manuscript provides an evidence-based framework for understanding how supervisor supportive behaviors can serve to protect employees against psychosocial workplace risk factors and promote social connection and belongingness protective factors related to employee mental health. We identify six theoretically-based Mental Health Supportive Supervisor Behaviors (MHSSB; i.e., emotional support, practical support, role modeling, reducing stigma, warning sign recognition, warning sign response) that can be enacted and used by supervisors and managers to protect and promote the mental health of employees. A brief overview of mental health, mental disorders, and workplace mental health is provided. This is followed by the theoretical grounding and introduction of MHSSB. Suggestions for future research and practice follow, all with the focus of developing a better understanding of the role of supervisors in protecting and promoting employee mental health in the workplace.
      PubDate: 2024-01-30
       
  • The Effects of Workplace Substance Use Programs, Policies, and Practices
           on Current Substance Use Among A National Sample of Low-Income Workers:
           Differences by Race/Ethnicity and Education Level

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Poverty and substance use are inextricably and bidirectionally related, but the workplace may represent an opportunity for substance use intervention among low-income workers. Although many employers have policies regarding substance use, they vary with respect to punitiveness and approach. Using cross-sectional data from the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (N = 7,953 low-income workers), we examined the separate associations between several organizational-level workplace factors and current substance use and whether these associations differed by race/ethnicity and education level. We also examined the simultaneous effects of multiple workplace programs, policies, and practices on current substance use. Having any written policy on employee substance use was associated with lower odds of cannabis use, illicit substance use, and misuse of prescription drugs. Having a policy to terminate employees who test positive for illicit substances was not associated with any substance use outcome and pre-employment substance screening was only associated with lower odds of cannabis use. Workers who received education on substance use at their workplace and workers with an employee assistance program were both less likely to report current use of cannabis and illicit substances. However, these effects were not universal across all racial/ethnic groups or levels of educational attainment and were no longer significant when examining their simultaneous effects.
      PubDate: 2023-12-26
       
  • An Evaluation of Indoor Sex Workers’ Psychosocial Occupational Health
           and Safety in Metro Vancouver, Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Criminalization of sex work is linked to increased risk of violence and lack of workplace protections for sex workers. Most jurisdictions globally prohibit some or all aspects of sex work with New Zealand constituting a notable exception, where sex work has been decriminalized and regulated via OHS guidelines. We used the Guide to Occupational Health and Safety in the New Zealand Sex Industry (NZ Guide) as an analytical framework to examine the lived-experiences of psychosocial OHS conditions of indoor sex workers in Metro Vancouver under end-demand criminalization. We drew on 47 semi-structured interviews, conducted in English, Mandarin, and Cantonese in 2017–2018, with indoor sex workers and third parties providing services for them. Participants’ narratives were analyzed using a coding framework based on the NZ Guide’s psychosocial factors section, including safety and security from violence and complaints processes, which highlighted specific OHS shortcomings in the context of end-demand sex work legislation in indoor sex work environments. Participants identified a significant lack of OHS support, including a lack of safety training, right to refuse services, and access to justice in the context of labour rights violations or fraud, robbery or violence. Our findings emphasize the benefits of full decriminalization of sex work to facilitate sex workers’ access to OHS through development and implementation of OHS guidelines designed by and for the indoor sex industry. OHS guidelines should focus on labour rights and protections, including development of sex workers’ right to refuse services and access to justice.
      PubDate: 2023-12-08
       
  • Office Openess Affects Stress Regulation and Teamwork: A
           Neurophysiological Field Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Stimulating and sustaining teamwork can be a strategic asset for an organization. Yet, little has been done to objectively assess how office design affects team performance. We conducted a neuroscience field experiment of employees (N = 96) to examine how different open-office configurations impact three measures of neurophysiologic stress, affect, and creative problem-solving in three existing office configurations that varied in their degree of openness. Physiologic stress was lowest in the most open work setting resulting in higher performance and more rapid post-work physiologic recovery compared to less open configurations. We identified three core factors driving these results: high perceived privacy, a more pleasant ambience, and increased autonomy. This multimodal approach identifies neurophysiologic mechanisms linking office design to team performance.
      PubDate: 2023-12-04
       
  • The Impact of Telework on Conflict between Work and Family: A
           Meta-Analytic Investigation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract There is a common assumption that the use of telework is beneficial for managing one’s work and non-work roles due to perceptions of increased flexibility while teleworking. In this meta-analysis we investigate the relationship between telework and bi-directional indicators of work-family conflict, such as work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW). We also test whether gender and continuous versus dichotomous measurement of telework (e.g., proportion of working hours spent teleworking versus groups of teleworkers and non-teleworkers) moderate these relationships. Following Schmidt and Hunter’s (2015) random-effects method, we find telework to be associated with significantly lower levels of WIF and not significantly related to FIW. Additionally, gender and measurement of telework both moderate the relationship between telework and WIF. Our findings speak to the nuanced relationship between telework and work-family conflict.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • Faculty Time Expenditure Across Research, Teaching, and Service: Do Gender
           Differences Persist'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Faculty members are continually confronted with a multitude of activities among which they must divide their time. Prior research suggests that while men and women academics spend the same number of weekly hours working, women tend to expend more time on teaching and service relative to men while men expend more time on research relative to women. Based on cross-sectional survey data from a sample of 783 tenured or tenure-track faculty members from multiple universities, we examine gender differences in time spent in research, teaching, and university service. Regression analyses show that gender differences in time allocation continue to persist after controlling for work and family factors. More specifically, women report more time on teaching and university service than do men, while men report more time spent on research than do women. Results provide evidence that gendered differences in faculty time allocation are robust across time. Potential implications for policy are discussed.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • The Relationship Between Organizational Dehumanization and Family
           Functioning

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Organizational dehumanization may affect employees’ work behaviors and well-being. However, whether the impact of organizational dehumanization goes beyond the work domain and influences family functioning remains unclear. Following the spillover theory, this study examines the association between employees’ perception of organizational dehumanization and family functioning. Path analysis was used on a two-wave dataset of 372 participants. Results showed that organizational dehumanization at T1 significantly predicted family functioning at T1. Similarly, dehumanization at T2 significantly predicted family functioning at T2. However, organizational dehumanization at T1 did not predict family functioning at T2 when family functioning at T1 was considered. Limitations and implications are discussed.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • Navigating a Context of Severe Uncertainty: The Effect of Industry
           Unsafety Signals on Employee Well-being During the COVID-19 Crisis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Complex disaster situations like the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) create macro-level contexts of severe uncertainty that disrupt industries across the globe in unprecedented ways. While occupational health research has made important advances in understanding the effects of occupational stressors on employee well-being, there is a need to better understand the employee well-being implications of severe uncertainty stemming from macro-level disruption. We draw from the Generalized Unsafety Theory of Stress (GUTS) to explain how a context of severe uncertainty can create signals of economic and health unsafety at the industry level, leading to emotional exhaustion through paths of economic and health anxiety. We integrate recent disaster scholarship that classifies COVID-19 as a transboundary disaster and use this interdisciplinary perspective to explain how COVID-19 created a context of severe uncertainty from which these effects unfold. To test our proposed model, we pair objective industry data with time-lagged quantitative and qualitative survey responses from 212 employees across industries collected during the height of the initial COVID-19 response in the United States. Structural equation modeling results indicate a significant indirect effect of industry COVID-19 unsafety signals on emotional exhaustion through the health, but not economic, unsafety path. Qualitative analyses provide further insights into these dynamics. Theoretical and practical implications for employee well-being in a context of severe uncertainty are discussed.
      PubDate: 2023-12-01
       
  • Identifying Different Patterns of Citizenship Motives: A Latent Profile
           Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Examining organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) motives is important as different citizenship motives influence work and health outcomes. However, the current understanding of citizenship motives is limited in that most studies have not considered that multiple citizenship motives can coexist within individuals as well as how many different combinations of citizenship motives can exist. Therefore, we adopted a person-centered approach and examined latent profiles of citizenship motives using the most well-known motives in the literature: organizational concern, prosocial values, and impression management. Results identified four profile groups and showed that participants with high levels of all three types of motives gave and received the most OCB. Additionally, participants with high levels of organizational concern and prosocial values (regardless of whether they had high or low levels of impression management) reported the lowest levels of burnout. Our results suggest that having high impression management can yield positive outcomes when accompanied by high prosocial values and high organizational concern. From a practical standpoint, this study indicates that organizations should consider promoting the development of all forms of citizenship motives among employees to facilitate giving OCB and receiving OCB and to reduce burnout in the workplace.
      PubDate: 2023-11-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s41542-023-00166-8
       
  • Methodological and Demographic Variation in Estimates of Economic
           Dependence Across Two Types of Gig Work

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Economic dependence is consistently identified as a key factor in understanding gig workers’ experiences (e.g., Kuhn & Maleki, 2017; Schor et al., 2020; Spreitzer et al., 2017), but empirical estimates of the rate of economically dependent gig workers vary considerably across sources (e.g., from 3% to 56%). To obtain a reliable estimate of this rate, this work used an inductive approach and an experimental survey design to investigate the significance and size of (1) methodological (i.e., survey item wording) effects and (2) demographic predictors of whether gig workers endorse economic dependence items. Results are also compared across nonrandom but representative samples from two common types of gig work – crowdwork (N = 447, Study 1) and rideshare driving (N = 919, Study 2). This study offers a conservative estimate that 45% of crowdworkers and 74% of rideshare drivers are economically dependent on their gig. Three predictors of economic dependence were significant across both groups – item wording, marital status, and hours worked on-platform. Four more predictors were significant for one group only – hours worked off-platform for crowdworkers only; and age, sex, and gig tenure for rideshare drivers only. Methodological effects were larger among crowdworkers, and sex and marital status showed opposite effects compared to previous research on financial stress. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed with a focus on better understanding economic dependence and improving gig workers’ experiences.
      PubDate: 2023-11-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s41542-023-00168-6
       
  • Exploring the Dynamic Relationship of Transformational Leadership Behavior
           and Leader Well-Being: A Three-Wave Cross-Lagged Panel Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Leadership behavior is associated with leader well-being. Yet, existing research, with the majority representing cross-sectional studies, limits our understanding of the association over time, potential mediating mechanisms, and potential reciprocal relations. Based on Conservation of Resources (COR) theory, we test between- and within-person relationships between transformational leadership and leader vigor as well as emotional exhaustion over time. In addition, we include leaders’ occupational self-efficacy, information exchange with followers, and meaning of work as mediators. 132 leaders participated in a fully cross-lagged study across three consecutive weeks. We analyzed the data with a random intercept cross-lagged panel model (RI-CLPM) that allows separating the within- and between-person variance in our variables. At the between-person level, transformational leadership was positively related to vigor, occupational self-efficacy, information exchange, and meaning of work. At the within-person level, there were no lagged associations of transformational leadership and well-being, but a positive lagged effect of vigor in one week on information exchange and meaning of work in the next week. Within one week, transformational leadership was related to occupational self-efficacy, meaning of work, and vigor (positive, respectively) and to emotional exhaustion (negative) within persons. In line with COR theory, we discuss transformational leadership as a resource for leaders associated with greater well-being for leaders. Our study contributes to the literature on dynamic leadership behavior and the mechanisms between leadership and leader well-being
      PubDate: 2023-10-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s41542-023-00165-9
       
  • How Positive Activities Shape Emotional Exhaustion and Work-Life Balance:
           Effects of an Intervention via Positive Emotions and Boundary Management
           Strategies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract The positive-activity model (PAM) proposes how and for whom positive activity interventions work best. This article evaluates the effectiveness of a web-based self-regulation intervention that teaches participants positive activities. Over six weeks, participants engage in different positive activities to meet the particular challenges in flexible work designs (FWD) such as remote work or mobile work. In line with the PAM, we expected the intervention to decrease emotional exhaustion and increase satisfaction with work-life balance via increases in both positive emotions and boundary management. Moreover, individuals’ depressive symptoms were expected to moderate this relationship. In a randomized controlled trial, participants were assigned to a waitlist control group or an intervention group. Study participants received questionnaires before and after the intervention and at a four-week follow-up. The final sample included 288 participants (intervention group: n = 105; control group: n = 183). Results of mixed variance analyses were in line with our predictions. Findings indicate that the intervention is an effective tool for improving well-being and work-life balance for workers with FWD. Changes in positive emotions and boundary management explained intervention effects. The intervention was effective regardless of participants’ baseline level of depressive symptoms.
      PubDate: 2023-09-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s41542-023-00163-x
       
  • The Unique Impact of Commuting Time, Quality, and Predictability on Worker
           Well-Being and Performance

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Navigating the complexities of the daily commute, this research explores the relationship between commuting characteristics and their impact on worker well-being and performance. Through two studies, we dissect the commuting experience, examining the influence of commute time, quality, and predictability on worker wellbeing and work outcomes. This research addresses long-standing questions in the field, such as the link between commute time and well-being and the quest for an optimal commute time. It also uncovers fresh insights by simultaneously scrutinizing multiple commuting characteristics. Drawing on resource and positive psychology theories, we hypothesize that these commuting characteristics independently and uniquely shape worker well-being and outcomes. Contrary to popular belief, we found that commute time had little bearing on worker well-being and work outcomes. Instead, our findings reveal that commute quality stands out as the sole commuting characteristic that uniquely influences worker wellbeing. Moreover, our second study unveils that the commuting experience can shape certain work outcomes, such as job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behaviors, while leaving others, like task performance, untouched. Interestingly, commute predictability did not significantly influence well-being or work outcomes when considering commute quality. This work responds to the call for a more nuanced understanding of commute spillover effects and paves the way for future research. It underscores the importance of the commuting experience, shedding light on its far-reaching implications for worker wellbeing, performance, and, ultimately, organizational success. This research not only answers existing questions but also opens new avenues for exploring the impact of commuting on work and life.
      PubDate: 2023-09-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s41542-023-00164-w
       
  • Brave New Workplace Designing Productive, Healthy and Safe Organizations,
           Julian Barling, Oxford University Press, 2023

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      PubDate: 2023-08-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s41542-023-00162-y
       
  • How Supervisor Incivility Begets Employee Silence: The Role of Trust in
           Supervisor and Perceived Organizational Support

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Despite the extensive literature on the effects of workplace incivility on employees’ affective, attitudinal, cognitive, and active behavioral reactions, it is unclear whether and how workplace incivility might affect employee silence, a more passive form of employee behavior with harmful consequences. Using social exchange theory as the theoretical framework, the current study explores the mediating role of trust in supervisor in the relationship between supervisor incivility and employee silence. The moderating role of perceived organizational support (POS) is also explored. We collected data from 196 participants across three waves using CloudResearch (formally known as TurkPrime) and results showed that supervisor incivility positively predicted employee silence, and trust in supervisor mediated this relationship. Further, the negative effect of trust in supervisor on employee silence was stronger for employees who perceive high POS. The findings contribute to our theoretical understanding of employees’ passive behavioral responses to supervisor incivility and the social exchange process in the relationship between supervisor incivility and silence.
      PubDate: 2023-07-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s41542-023-00159-7
       
  • Reciprocal Effects of Sickness Presence, Job Satisfaction, and Health: A
           Six-Wave Longitudinal Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Numerous cross-sectional studies have examined associations of employees’ sickness presence (i.e., working while being ill) with job satisfaction and health. However, these studies conflate between- and within-person variance and do not allow disentangling the direction of effects among these constructs. Sickness presence may have positive or negative within-person effects on job satisfaction and health, and vice versa. Based on conservation of resources theory, the effort-recovery model, and the job demands-resources model, we test a set of competing hypotheses using a six-wave longitudinal study over 15 months with N = 363 employees. Results of random-intercept cross-lagged panel modeling showed that both sickness presence spells and frequency had negative within-person effects on job satisfaction, but did not predict health. In addition, job satisfaction had a negative within-person effect on sickness presence spells, and health had a negative within-person effect on sickness presence frequency. Overall, these findings contribute to the organizational literature by providing evidence for reciprocal and negative effects among sickness presence and job satisfaction, as well as a negative effect of health on sickness presence at the within-person level. Based on the findings, organizational practitioners could implement programs to enhance job satisfaction and health and to raise awareness about the potential negative consequences of sickness presence.
      PubDate: 2023-06-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s41542-023-00154-y
       
  • Worry About Guest Mistreatment and Endorsement of COVID-19 Safety Policies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Abstract Organizations can introduce a variety of policies that mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and encourage vaccinations to promote public health. Previous research suggests employees are hesitant about organizational changes because they may be perceived as threatening. In the current study, we suggest that employees may support the introduction of some policies precisely because these policies help reduce threats to well-being and safety in the work environment, especially those concerns that rise to the level of worry. Using a two-wave sample of frontline theme park workers surveyed at a time when COVID-19 safety policies had not yet been decided, we test the idea that workers are more likely to endorse COVID-19 safety policies when they are worried about COVID-related environmental risk in the form of mistreatment by guests and, subsequently, guest and worker vaccination status. Results suggest that worry about guest mistreatment predicts later endorsement of COVID-19 safety policies, and this effect is partly explained by worry about others’ vaccination status. These effects occur independent of workers’ dispositional tendencies to worry (trait neuroticism) and general optimism (trait optimism) about the future.
      PubDate: 2023-06-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s41542-023-00153-z
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.220.62.183
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.220.62.183
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-