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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 1066 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 79)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 498)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 60)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 308)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 99)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 364)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Pilquen : Sección Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Applied and Preventive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 264)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Organisational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Australian Journal of Rehabilitation Counseling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 238)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 237)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 77)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Burnout Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers d’Études sur la Représentation     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 92)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access  
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  

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Journal Cover
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2198-7335
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2658 journals]
  • Testosterone, Athletic Context, Oral Contraceptive Use, and Competitive
           Persistence in Women

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      Abstract: Objectives The purpose of this study is to provide a descriptive account of salivary testosterone levels in women in relation to being an athlete, sporting level, competitive context, and oral contraceptive (OC) use and, to explore the relationship between testosterone levels and performance in a task of competitive persistence. Methods Saliva samples were collected from teams of women athletes at the recreational, collegiate varsity, and elite-international levels, and a university participant-pool sample of athletes and non-athletes (N = 253). Among the elite athletes, additional saliva samples were collected before and after on- and off-field training sessions and competition. University participants competed in a timed weight-holding competition in the laboratory. Results Testosterone levels were highest in elite athletes compared to university students (η2 = .07) and were elevated in the context of competitive training (+13–51%) and formal competition (69%) contexts. OC users had significantly lower testosterone levels than non-users (η2 = .14). For university athletes, testosterone levels were positively correlated with performance in a task of competitive persistence (R2 = .23). OC use was associated with lower competitive persistence (d = .42) – a relationship explained by OC users’ lower testosterone levels relative to non-users (d = 1.32). Conclusions Results suggest that salivary testosterone levels in women may depend on sport participation and OC use, are malleable to competitive contexts, and among athletes, are positively related to competitive task persistence. Given the testosterone suppressing effects of OC use, this study provides insight on psychophysiological risks of OC use that could be relevant to sport performance.
      PubDate: 2021-10-16
       
  • Cortisol, Temperament and Serotonin in Karate Combats: An Evolutionary
           Psychobiological Perspective

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      Abstract: Objectives There is evidence suggesting that in martial arts competitions athletes characterized by higher anxiety and harm avoidance may be more likely to lose a fight. This psychological profile has been hypothesized to explain in part the observation that cortisol is higher in losers before and in response to a competition. An important research target that needs further exploration is the identification of phenotypic traits that can be helpful in predicting athletes’ performance. Here we present a brief description of the theoretical bases that drives our research in the evolutionary psychobiology of sports and illustrate preliminary data on the relationship between the 5HTTLPR genotype, salivary cortisol, temperament and competition. Methods Sixty-five healthy male non-professional athletes provided saliva samples 10 min before and after a kumite session and filled out the Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire. Results Salivary cortisol levels 10 min before the competition were higher in losers and in athletes with the S allele. Temperament was associated with competition outcome and cortisol: losers were characterized by higher scores of harm avoidance and harm avoidance was positively correlated with cortisol levels. Conclusions The results confirm previous findings linking temperamental traits, pre-and post- competition physiological stress response with competition outcome in kumite fight. Moreover, they indicate an association between the 5HTTLPR polymorphism and pre-competition salivary cortisol, thus providing a preliminary but non-conclusive evidence on the role played by the 5HTTLPR genotype as a vulnerability factor in sport competition.
      PubDate: 2021-10-04
       
  • Family and Gendered Fitness Interests Effects on Attitudes Toward
           Women’s Veiling, Status-Seeking and Stereotyping of Women in Pakistan

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      Abstract: Objective Although male relatives tend to sway people toward, and female relatives tend to sway people away from conservative political attitudes, there exist many ways in which family composition might cause these effects. Here we test several pathways whereby family might influence attitudes toward female veiling, gender stereotypes, and status-seeking in Pakistan. Methods Research assistants administered a survey to a diverse sample of 538 adults in Karachi neighborhoods of varying socio-economic status. Within each neighborhood we selected households and available adults within households randomly. Surveys captured socio-demographic data about the participant and their household, and their opinion on family structures, culture, gender roles, religion, and female attire. Results We find that likelihood of deriving future reproductive fitness from males increases status-seeking and stereotypes of women as warm and kind but decreases support for women having the right to choose whether to wear a veil in public. In contrast, deriving future fitness from females leads people to stereotype women as less warm but highly competent. Family effects were distinguishable from those deriving from an individual’s own sex. Conclusions Findings suggest that the inclusive fitness people gain through relatives of each gender may be one of the factors responsible for family effects, shifting dimensions of social cognition and swaying attitudes relevant to sexual conflict.
      PubDate: 2021-10-02
       
  • Do Early Life Experiences Predict Variation in the General Factor of
           Personality (GFP)'

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      Abstract: Objective The controversial General Factor of Personality (GFP) has been proposed as an indicator of social effectiveness and a slower life history strategy. An alternative hypothesis holds that only meta-trait alpha, comprising agreeableness, conscientiousness, and emotional stability, is a slow life history indicator. This study tested whether the GFP and/or alpha emerges from both self- and stranger-ratings, and whether either is predicted by indicators of harsh childhood ecologies. Methods U.S. undergraduate participants (N = 366) completed a Big Five instrument, a measure of socially desirable response bias, and brief (thin slice) videotaped interviews. Raters scored the interviews using the same Big Five instrument. Results Structural equation modeling of the self-report data yielded a well-fitting GFP, which was positively associated with father closeness. Meta-trait alpha, based on self-report, was associated with both father closeness and neighborhood stress, but showed positive loadings only for agreeableness and emotional stability. Stranger-rating data failed to yield either a well-fitting GFP or metatrait alpha. Conclusions Our findings are equivocal regarding the usefulness of the GFP specifically, and higher-order personality factors generally, in evolutionary personality science.
      PubDate: 2021-09-29
       
  • Crowd Salience Heightens Tolerance to Healthy Facial Features

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      Abstract: Objective Recent findings suggest crowd salience heightens pathogen-avoidant motives, serving to reduce individuals’ infection risk through interpersonal contact. Such experiences may similarly facilitate the identification, and avoidance, of diseased conspecifics. The current experiment sought to replicate and extend previous crowding research. Methods In this experiment, we primed participants at two universities with either a crowding or control experience before having them evaluate faces manipulated to appear healthy or diseased by indicating the degree to which they would want to interact with them. Results Crowding-primed participants reported a more heightened preferences for healthy faces than control-primed participants. Additionally, crowd salience reduced aversion toward healthy faces but did not heighten aversion to diseased faces. Conclusion Results suggest crowding appears to heighten tolerance for health cues given the heightened proximal threat of infections through interpersonal contact within crowded environments. Conversely, this work extends previous findings by indicating this preference is not rooted in an aversion to cues of poor health. We frame findings from a threat management perspective in understanding how crowding fosters sensitivity toward pathogenic threats.
      PubDate: 2021-09-21
       
  • Maternal Cortisol and Paternal Testosterone Correlated with Infant Growth
           via Mini Puberty

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      Abstract: Objectives Infant testosterone (T) surges early in life. This period (known as mini puberty) is crucial to development. Little is known as to what the ultimate function of mini puberty might be. We predicted that parents with putative endocrine signatures of challenging environments (elevated levels of maternal cortisol and paternal T) may be related to elevated levels of infant T. In turn, these endocrine relationships are hypothesized to influence infant growth. Methods In a U.S. sample (n = 225 families) of first-time parents and their infants, we measured infant length and weight at three occasions—birth, 3 months old, and 10 months old. We conducted salivary assays of infants for T, mothers for cortisol, and paternal T during the early postnatal period. Results We utilized latent growth curve modeling to explore changes in length and weight as predicted by infant T. Infant T predicted the slope of length gains across the study period. Maternal cortisol and paternal T (positively correlated with one another) were positively related to infant T. Neither maternal cortisol nor paternal T predicted the slope of length gains. In an exploratory model, temperament was not related to neuroendocrine measures. Gains in weight—unlike length—were not related to infant T. Conclusions The ultimate function of mini puberty in infant growth is nuanced. In addition—at a time of rapid hormone changes across mothers, fathers, and infants—our results suggest that a tripartite neuroendocrine relationship is conceivable. Discussion surrounds the potential role of mini puberty and the numerous limitations of the study.
      PubDate: 2021-09-18
       
  • Correction to: Do Testosterone and Cortisol Jointly Relate to Adolescent
           Dominance' A Pre‑registered Multi‑method Interrogation of the
           Dual‑Hormone Hypothesis

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      PubDate: 2021-09-01
       
  • Do 3D Face Images Capture Cues of Strength, Weight, and Height Better than
           2D Face Images do'

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      Abstract: Objectives A large literature exists investigating the extent to which physical characteristics (e.g., strength, weight, and height) can be accurately assessed from face images. While most of these studies have employed two-dimensional (2D) face images as stimuli, some recent studies have used three-dimensional (3D) face images because they may contain cues not visible in 2D face images. As equipment required for 3D face images is considerably more expensive than that required for 2D face images, we here investigated how perceptual ratings of physical characteristics from 2D and 3D face images compare. Methods We tested whether 3D face images capture cues of strength, weight, and height better than 2D face images do by directly comparing the accuracy of strength, weight, and height ratings of 182 2D and 3D face images taken simultaneously. Strength, height and weight were rated by 66, 59 and 52 raters respectively, who viewed both 2D and 3D images. Results In line with previous studies, we found that weight and height can be judged somewhat accurately from faces; contrary to previous research, we found that people were relatively inaccurate at assessing strength. We found no evidence that physical characteristics could be judged more accurately from 3D than 2D images. Conclusion Our results suggest physical characteristics are perceived with similar accuracy from 2D and 3D face images. They also suggest that the substantial costs associated with collecting 3D face scans may not be justified for research on the accuracy of facial judgments of physical characteristics.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
       
  • Testing Mate Choice Hypotheses in a Transitional Small Scale Population

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      Abstract: Objective Tests of theories of mate choice often rely on data gathered in White, industrialised samples and this is especially the case for studies of facial attraction. Our understanding of preferences for sexual dimorphism is currently in flux and a number of hypotheses require testing in more diverse participant samples. The current study uses opportunistically gathered facial dimorphism preference data from 271 participants in rural Nicaragua, and 40 from the national capital Managua. We assess pre-registered hypotheses drawn from sexual selection theory, and from more recent approaches which consider the impacts of economic development and cultural ‘modernisation’ on mate preferences. Methods Participants verbally reported demographic data, and indicated preferences for five male and five female pairs of faces manipulated to differ in sexually dimorphic facial structure based on a sample of Salvadoran individuals. Results While urban participants showed a preference for more feminine female faces, this preference was not evident in the rural participants. Neither urban nor rural participants showed any directional preference for masculinised/feminised male faces. Furthermore, there was no support for any other pre-registered hypothesis. Conclusions Our results are consistent with previous studies showing no interest in facial dimorphism in less globally-acculturated, or market integrated, populations. Together, this suggests that while facial dimorphism may be subject to systematically varying preferences amongst some low-fertility, industrialised populations, it is not a feature which is likely to have been important in ancestral populations. We call for further work attempting to replicate well known mate choice phenomena in more diverse samples.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
       
  • Voice Pitch – A Valid Indicator of One’s Unfaithfulness in
           Committed Relationships'

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      Abstract: Objectives When judging a male speakers’ likelihood to act sexually unfaithful in a committed relationship, listeners rely on the speakers’ voice pitch such that lower voice pitch is perceived as indicating being more unfaithful. In line with this finding, a recent study (Schild et al. Behavioral Ecology, 2020) provided first evidence that voice pitch might indeed be a valid cue to sexual infidelity in men. In this study, male speakers with lower voice pitch, as indicated by lower mean fundamental frequency (mean F0), were actually more likely to report having been sexually unfaithful in the past. Although these results fit the literature on vocal perceptions in contexts of sexual selection, the study was, as stated by the authors, underpowered. Further, the study solely focused on male speakers, which leaves it open whether these findings are also transferable to female speakers. Methods We reanalyzed three datasets (Asendorpf et al. European Journal of Personality, 25, 16–30, 2011; Penke and Asendorpf Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 95, 1113–1135, 2008; Stern et al. 2020) that include voice recordings and infidelity data of overall 865 individuals (63,36% female) in order to test the replicability of and further extend past research. Results A significant negative link between mean F0 and self-reported infidelity was found in only one out of two datasets for men and only one out of three datasets for women. Two meta-analyses (accounting for the sample sizes and including data of Schild et al. 2020), however, suggest that lower mean F0 might be a valid indicator of higher probability of self-reported infidelity in both men and women. Conclusions In line with prior research, higher masculinity, as indicated by lower mean F0, seems to be linked to self-reported infidelity in both men and women. However, given methodological shortcomings, future studies should set out to further delve into these findings.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
       
  • Does Verbal Street Harassment Signal Perpetrator Dominance to Male and
           Female Observers'

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      Abstract: Objective It is difficult to explain why verbal street harassment, where typically a male harasser yells sexually harassing statements at a female victim, has survived as a behaviour. We propose that verbal street harassment may signal a harasser’s dominance and aimed to test this in our registered report. Methods Participants (N = 443) read one of two vignettes describing either a street harassment incident (in which a male perpetrator harasses a female victim) or a street incident without harassment. Participants were asked to evaluate whether the male target possessed a range of traits (including dominance) and to evaluate any harm the female target suffered from the incident. Results Results suggested that the male target who verbally harassed a female victim on the street was perceived by participants as more dominant and as having a darker personality than a male target who did not engage in street harassment. Participants also perceived the female target as more harmed when she was harassed. However, results did not support the predicted interaction of participant sex and incident type on participants’ perceptions of the male and female targets. Conclusions These results suggest that verbal street harassment may signal a harasser’s dominance which may be why the behaviour has been maintained. To establish whether verbal street meets the conditions to be classed as a costly signal, these findings should be replicated and extended. Understanding why street harassment persists as a behaviour is critical to designing effective intervention to prevent street harassment and protect harassment victims.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
       
  • Estimating the Associations between Big Five Personality Traits,
           Testosterone, and Cortisol

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      Abstract: Objective Hormones are often conceptualized as biological markers of individual differences and have been associated with a variety of behavioral indicators and characteristics, such as mating behavior or acquiring and maintaining dominance. However, before researchers create strong theoretical models for how hormones modulate individual and social behavior, information on how hormones are associated with dominant models of personality is needed. Although there have been some studies attempting to quantify the associations between personality traits, testosterone, and cortisol, there are many inconsistencies across these studies. Methods In this registered report, we examined associations between testosterone, cortisol, and Big Five personality traits. We aggregated 25 separate samples to yield a single sample of 3964 (50.3% women; 27.7% of women were on hormonal contraceptives). Participants completed measures of personality and provided saliva samples for testosterone and cortisol assays. Results The results from multi-level models and meta-analyses revealed mostly weak, non-significant associations between testosterone or cortisol and personality traits. The few significant effects were still very small in magnitude (e.g., testosterone and conscientiousness: r = −0.05). A series of moderation tests revealed that hormone-personality associations were mostly similar in men and women, those using hormonal contraceptives or not, and regardless of the interaction between testosterone and cortisol (i.e., a variant of the dual-hormone hypothesis). Conclusions Altogether, we did not detect many robust associations between Big Five personality traits and testosterone or cortisol. The findings are discussed in the context of biological models of personality and the utility of examining heterogeneity in hormone-personality associations.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
       
  • Mate Availability and Sexual Disgust

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      Abstract: Objective One of the factors that sexual disgust should be calibrated to is the size of the mating pool. This study tested this hypothesis by examining whether perceptions of mate availability explain variance in levels of sexual disgust towards potential mates. Methods Participants (N = 853; 373 women) rated how sexually disgusting they found 60 potential mates that have previously been rated on attractiveness by a separate group of raters. We also measured participants’ perceptions of mate availability in their local environment, self-perceived attractiveness and mate value, and relevant control variables. Results Multilevel models revealed a negative association between sexual disgust towards potential mates and perceived mate availability—the opposite of what we predicted. We found support for our prediction that women had higher levels of sexual disgust than men, but only after addressing the confounding sex difference in target attractiveness. We also found the predicted negative association between target attractiveness and sexual disgust. Finally, as predicted, sexual disgust levels were more strongly related to potential mates’ attractiveness in individuals who perceived there to be many available mates in their local environment. Conclusions These findings generally bolster functional accounts of sexual disgust while highlighting the need for more evidence to ascertain the role of mate availability in the calibration of sexual disgust. Specifically, future research should examine the extent to which disgust levels may truncate mental representations of the mating pool instead of being calibrated by them.
      PubDate: 2021-09-01
       
  • Self-Perceived Facial Attractiveness, Fluctuating Asymmetry, and Minor
           Ailments Predict Mental Health Outcomes

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      Abstract: Objective Phenotypic markers associated with developmental stability such as fluctuating asymmetry, facial attractiveness, and reports of minor ailments can also act as indicators of overall physical health. However, few studies have assessed whether these markers might also be cues of mental health. We tested whether self- and other-perceived facial attractiveness, fluctuating asymmetry, and minor ailments are associated with psychopathological symptoms in a mixed sample of 358 college students, controlling for the effects of body mass index, age, and sex. Methods We applied the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) questionnaire to assess psychopathological symptoms, a battery of questionnaires about self-perceptions of facial attractiveness, and gathered information about the number of previous minor ailments as well as demographic data. Other-perceived attractiveness was assessed by an independent mixed sample of 109 subjects. Subjects’ facial fluctuating asymmetry was determined by geometric morphometrics. Results The results revealed that in both men and women, higher self-perceived attractiveness and fewer minor ailments predicted lower scores of Somatization, Obsessive–Compulsive, Interpersonal Sensitivity, Depression, Anxiety, Phobic Anxiety, Paranoid Ideation, Psychoticism, and a General Psychopathology Index. Higher facial fluctuating asymmetry was associated with higher Interpersonal Sensitivity, but did not contribute to its prediction when controlling for the other studied variables. Conclusions The observed strong associations between self-perceived attractiveness, minor ailments, and psychopathology indicate common developmental pathways between physiological and psychological symptomatology which may reflect broader life history (co)variation between genetics, developmental environment, and psychophysiological functioning.
      PubDate: 2021-08-31
       
  • Beards Increase the Speed, Accuracy, and Explicit Judgments of Facial
           Threat

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      Abstract: Objectives To test whether intra-sexual selection has influenced perceptions of male facial hair. We predicted that beards would increase the speed and accuracy of perceptions of angry but not happy facial expressions. We also predicted that bearded angry faces would receive the highest explicit ratings of masculinity and aggressiveness, whereas higher prosociality ratings would be ascribed to clean-shaven happy faces. Methods A total of 106 participants, ranging from 17 to 59 years of age (M = 27.27, SD = 10.03); 59 were female and 47 were male (44.3%) completed an emotion categorization tasks and an explicit ratings task. Participants viewed faces of the same men when bearded, clean-shaven, and 10 days of natural growth (i.e. stubble) when posing angry and happy facial expressions. Results Angry facial expressions were categorised most rapidly and with the greatest accuracy on bearded faces, followed by faces with stubble then clean-shaven faces. Conversely, happy facial expressions were categorised most rapidly and with the greatest accuracy on clean-shaven faces, followed by stubbled faces then bearded faces. Irrespective of facial expression, full bearded faces received the highest ratings of masculinity followed by faces with stubble then clean-shaven faces. Aggressiveness ratings were highest for angry faces with full beards, followed by angry faces with stubble, with clean-shaven angry faces receiving the lowest ratings. In contrast to our prediction, bearded smiling faces were rated as significantly more prosocial than stubbled and clean-shaven smiling faces. Conclusions These findings contribute further evidence that men’s beardedness represents an intra-sexually selected badge of status that enhances nonverbal threat potentially by augmenting underlying masculine facial structures.
      PubDate: 2021-06-22
       
  • Differences between Behavior and Maturation: Developmental Effects of
           Father Absence

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      Abstract: Objective A substantial body of research has investigated the effects of early family environments on sexual maturity and behavior, focusing mostly on effects on females. The purpose of the current study was to test the assumption that physiological maturation and casual sexual behavior are similarly influenced by early environmental stressors such as father absence (FA). Specifically, the current study investigated whether FA affects males’ and females’ casual sexual behavior and pubertal timing in the same way. Methods Young adults (89 females, 46 males) were asked to report the ages at which they lived with their biological father, their casual sexual behavior, and the age at which they experienced a major pubertal marker (menarche for females, first nocturnal emission for males). Results FA by itself did not predict casual sexual behavior, although it did predict pubertal timing such that FA was associated with earlier pubertal timing. Interaction effects, however, indicate the effect of FA on behavior and maturation was sex-specific. For females, FA was associated with more casual sexual behavior; whereas, for males, FA was associated with less casual sexual behavior. With regard to maturation, FA was associated with earlier pubertal timing for males but did not have much an effect on females’ pubertal timing. Conclusions Findings from the current study suggest the effects of FA on pubertal timing and casual sexual behavior are not specific to females. Furthermore, these findings suggest that sexual maturation and behavior may not be influenced in the same way by early environmental stressors.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
       
  • Parenting, Cortisol, and Risky Behaviors in Emerging Adulthood: Diverging
           Patterns for Males and Females

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      Abstract: Objective Parenting behaviors in early development are associated with risk-taking behaviors in emerging adulthood. Risky behaviors are also shown to be associated with cortisol response to stressors. This study examined the moderating effect of neuroendocrine response to stressors on the link between parenting behaviors in early development and risky behaviors in emerging adulthood. Methods Participants were 78 healthy college students (38 males). Following a habituation session, participants completed a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Task prior to completing measures of risky behavior. Salivary cortisol was measured before the stressor, 20, and 40 min post-stressor. Results Parenting behaviors and cortisol response to stressor were seen to be linked risky behavior. For males, the link between harsh father behaviors and risky behavior was significantly moderated by cortisol response to stressor such that higher cortisol response was related to decreased risky behaviors. For females, risk-taking was associated with harsh and warm parenting behaviors, but the link between parenting and risky behaviors was not related to or moderated by cortisol response. Conclusions These results provide evidence that parents might have separate effect on predicting risky behaviors and provides support for literature that chronic stressors can influence sensitivity to acute stressors and subsequent risk-taking behaviors.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
       
  • Do Testosterone and Cortisol Jointly Relate to Adolescent Dominance' A
           Pre-registered Multi-method Interrogation of the Dual-Hormone Hypothesis

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      Abstract: Objective The goal of the present study was to extend the findings of the dual-hormone hypothesis (DHH) literature by assessing whether the interaction between testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) is associated with dominance in an adolescent sample via multiple methods of measuring T, C, and dominance, and with pre-registration of hypotheses and analyses. Methods In a sample of 337 adolescents (Mage = 14.98, SD = 1.51; 191 girls) and their caregivers, hormonal assays were obtained from hair and saliva, and dominance behavior was assessed across four operationalizations (behavioral ratings in a leadership task, self- and caregiver reported dominance motivations, and self-reported social potency). Results T and C main effects were generally null across hormone and dominance operationalizations, except that observer-rated dominance was negatively associated with salivary T, and social potency was positively associated with salivary T and negatively associated with salivary C. Support for the DHH was weak. Point estimates reflected a small negative T × C interaction for behavioral ratings of dominance, consistent with the DHH, whereas interaction effects for report-based dominance measures were close to zero or positive. Conclusions The results contribute to a growing evidence base suggesting T × C interaction effects are variable across measures and methods used to assess hormones and dominance and highlight the need for comprehensive, multi-method examinations employing best practices in scientific openness and transparency to reduce uncertainty in estimates. Measurement of hormones and dominance outcomes vary across labs and studies, and the largely null results should be considered in that context.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
       
  • Diurnal Within-Person Coupling Between Testosterone and Cortisol in
           Healthy Men: Evidence of Positive and Bidirectional Time-Lagged
           Associations Using a Continuous-Time Model

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      Abstract: Objective The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and -adrenal (HPA) axes are traditional viewed as mutually inhibitory systems. However, several diurnal studies have reported positive within-person testosterone and cortisol relationships, as evidence of facilitative processes, but with some constraints (e.g., low-frequency sampling, use of static longitudinal models). Continuous-time (CT) models can help illuminate testosterone-cortisol “coupling” by testing for bidirectional, cross-lagged effects. Methods This study investigated diurnal testosterone and cortisol coupling in healthy males (n = 30) using high-frequency sampling protocols. Participants self-collected saliva at work or home using one of three sampling formats; every 10 mins for 9 h, 15 mins for 8 h, and 30 mins for 10 h. After detrending, daily within-person fluctuations in testosterone and cortisol concentration were modeled in a CT framework. Results Autoregressive effects for each hormone indicated moderate stability over a shorter period (~6 mins), as a mean-reverting process, and higher stability over longer time periods. Cross-lagged effects were also demonstrated, with testosterone showing a positive relationship to cortisol (.12 within-person standardized effect) and cortisol to testosterone (.08). Both linkages followed a non-linear trajectory, rising in strength from a zero-time lag to peak with a lag of ~8 mins before dissipation beyond this period. Conclusion We verified reports of positive within-person coupling between testosterone and cortisol across the day in healthy men. Added novelty comes from bidirectional and time-lagged associations on hormonal pulses, although the effect sizes were small. Hence, we offer a more nuanced understanding of HPG and HPA crosstalk within a CT framework.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
       
  • Motives and Laterality: Exploring the Links

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      Abstract: Objectives We explored associations between the needs for power, achievement, and affiliation and functional cerebral asymmetries (FCAs), guided by three established hypotheses about the nature of these associations. Methods One-hundred-and-seven participants completed picture-story measures of dispositional motives and activity inhibition (AI), a frequent moderator of motive-behavior associations, tasks measuring FCAs (line bisection, chimeric emotional face judgments, turning bias, perceptual and response asymmetries on the Poffenberger task), self-reported laterality preferences (handedness, footedness, ear and eye preference), and interhemispheric interaction (crossed-uncrossed difference). They also completed an experiment manipulating hand contractions (left, right, both, neither) while they worked on a second picture-story motive measure. Results Dispositional power motivation was associated with stronger rightward asymmetry and less interhemispheric transfer in high-AI and stronger leftward asymmetry and more interhemispheric transfer in low-AI individuals. For the affiliation motive, findings were fewer and in the opposite direction of those for the power motive. These findings emerged for men, but not for women. Left- or right-hand contractions led to increases in power and achievement motivation, but not affiliation motivation. Only left-hand contractions led to decreased AI. Conclusions We discuss these findings in the context of sex-dimorphic organizing and activating effects of steroids on motives and laterality.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
       
 
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