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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 348)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 66)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 267)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 346)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 209)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 200)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 199)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

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Clocks & Sleep
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2624-5175
Published by MDPI Homepage  [258 journals]
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 6, Pages 24-39: Match and Mismatch between Lived
           Experiences of Daytime Sleepiness and Diagnostic Instruments: A
           Qualitative Study amongst Patients with Sleep Disorders

    • Authors: Vaida T. R. Verhoef, Karin C. H. J. Smolders, Lysanne Remmelswaal, Geert Peeters, Sebastiaan Overeem, Yvonne A. W. de Kort
      First page: 24
      Abstract: Excessive daytime sleepiness is a common symptom of sleep disorders. Despite its prevalence, it remains difficult to define, detect, and address. The difficulties surrounding sleepiness have been linked to an ambiguous conceptualization, a large variety of scales and measures, and the overlap with other constructs, such as fatigue. The present study aims to investigate patients’ descriptions of sleepiness-related daytime complaints and their phenomenology. We performed semi-directed interviews with patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (N = 15) or narcolepsy (N = 5). The interviewers took care of utilizing the participants’ terminology when describing daytime complaints related to their sleep disorder. Various aspects of the daytime complaints were investigated, such as their description and temporality. The transcribed content was thematically analyzed using an eclectic coding system, yielding five themes. The participants used different interchangeable descriptors (tired, sleepy, fatigued, exhausted) to express their daytime complaints. They enriched their description with indexes of magnitude (ranging from ‘not especially’ to ‘most gigantic, extreme’), oppositions to other states (using antipodes like energy, alertness, wakefulness, or rest), and indications of fluctuations over the day. Interestingly, the participants often used metaphors to express their experiences and their struggles. The lived experiences of the patients were found to not always align with common self-reported monitoring tools of sleepiness and to relate only in part with current conceptions. In practice, it is important to probe daytime complaints, such as daytime sleepiness, with a broader consideration, for example, by exploring antipodes, consequences, and time-of-day fluctuations.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2024-01-05
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep6010003
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 6, Pages 40-55: Sleep Efficiency and Sleep Onset
           Latency in One Saskatchewan First Nation

    • Authors: Chandima P. Karunanayake, Punam Pahwa, Shelley Kirychuk, Mark Fenton, Vivian R. Ramsden, Jeremy Seeseequasis, Warren Seesequasis, Robert Skomro, Donna C. Rennie, Kathleen McMullin, Brooke P. Russell, Niels Koehncke, Sylvia Abonyi, Malcolm King, James A. Dosman
      First page: 40
      Abstract: Background: Sleep efficiency and sleep onset latency are two measures that can be used to assess sleep quality. Factors that are related to sleep quality include age, sex, sociodemographic factors, and physical and mental health status. This study examines factors related to sleep efficiency and sleep onset latency in one First Nation in Saskatchewan, Canada. Methods: A baseline survey of the First Nations Sleep Health project was completed between 2018 and 2019 in collaboration with two Cree First Nations. One-night actigraphy evaluations were completed within one of the two First Nations. Objective actigraphy evaluations included sleep efficiency and sleep onset latency. A total of 167 individuals participated, and of these, 156 observations were available for analysis. Statistical analysis was conducted using logistic and linear regression models. Results: More females (61%) than males participated in the actigraphy study, with the mean age being higher for females (39.6 years) than males (35.0 years). The mean sleep efficiency was 83.38%, and the mean sleep onset latency was 20.74 (SD = 27.25) minutes. Age, chronic pain, ever having high blood pressure, and smoking inside the house were associated with an increased risk of poor sleep efficiency in the multiple logistic regression model. Age, chronic pain, ever having anxiety, heart-related illness, and smoking inside the house were associated with longer sleep onset latency in the multiple linear regression model. Conclusions: Sleep efficiency and sleep onset latency were associated with physical and environmental factors in this First Nation.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2024-01-10
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep6010004
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 6, Pages 56-71: Bright Light Therapy for Major
           Depressive Disorder in Adolescent Outpatients: A Preliminary Study

    • Authors: Rachel Ballard, John T. Parkhurst, Lisa K. Gadek, Kelsey M. Julian, Amy Yang, Lauren N. Pasetes, Namni Goel, Dorothy K. Sit
      First page: 56
      Abstract: Background: Bright light therapy (BLT) has not been well-studied in adolescents with major depressive disorder, particularly in outpatient settings. Methods: We conducted an 8-week clinical trial of BLT in adolescents recruited from a primary care practice with moderate to severe major depression. Acceptability and feasibility were defined by daily use of the light box and integration into daily routines. To assess treatment effects, we utilized the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ) and actigraphic sleep variables. Results: Of the nine enrolled adolescents, the rate of daily use of the light therapy box was 100% at week 2, 78% at week 4 (n = 7), and 67% at weeks 6 and 8 (n = 6). Participants were better able to integrate midday BLT compared to morning BLT into their day-to-day routines. Mean depression scores improved during the 2-week placebo lead-in (dim red light—DRL) and continued to show significant improvement through 6 weeks of BLT. Sleep efficiency increased significantly (p = 0.046), and sleep onset latency showed a trend toward a significant decrease (p = 0.075) in the BLT phase compared to the DRL phase. Conclusion: Bright light treatment that was self-administered at home was feasible, acceptable, and effective for adolescent outpatients with depression. Findings support the development of larger, well-powered, controlled clinical trials of BLT in coordination with primary care.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2024-01-30
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep6010005
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 6, Pages 72-84: Insomnia and Migraine: A Missed
           Call'

    • Authors: Angelo Torrente, Lavinia Vassallo, Paolo Alonge, Laura Pilati, Andrea Gagliardo, Davide Ventimiglia, Antonino Lupica, Vincenzo Di Stefano, Cecilia Camarda, Filippo Brighina
      First page: 72
      Abstract: Migraine is one of the most prevalent and disabling neurological conditions, presenting episodes of throbbing headache that limit activities of daily living. Several factors may influence migraine frequency, such as lifestyle or alcohol consumption. Among the most recognised ones, sleep plays a biunivocal role, since poor sleep quality may worsen migraine frequency, and a high migraine frequency may affect sleep quality. In this paper, the authors evaluate the relationship between migraine and insomnia by exploring a cohort of patients affected by episodic or chronic migraine. To do so, a phone interview was performed, asking patients about their migraine frequency and mean pain intensity, in addition to the questions of the Insomnia Severity Index. The last one explores several symptoms impairing sleep that focus on insomnia. Patients complaining of insomnia showed an increased migraine frequency, and a weak but significant correlation was found between headache days per month and insomnia scores. Such results were particularly evident in patients affected by chronic migraine. Such results suggest how insomnia, in the presented data, seems to be associated with migraine frequency but not with pain intensity.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2024-02-05
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep6010006
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 6, Pages 85-96: The Impact of Education Level on
           

    • Authors: Joanna Popiolek-Kalisz, Cansu Cakici, Karolina Szczygiel, Agata Przytula
      First page: 85
      Abstract: Lifestyle and habits are acquired in the family environment and then shaped by the potential influence of the environment and received education. In recent years, there has been growing interest in understanding the relationship between sleep and dietary behaviors in various health professionals, including medical and dietetics professionals and students, as well as their self-perceived knowledge and attitudes. Despite the importance of this topic, there is a lack of research on the assessment of individual behaviors in dietetics students and professionals. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of education level on individual behaviors regarding nutrition, sleep, and physical activity in dietetics students and professionals. 71 dietetics students and professionals were enrolled in this study. Their overall knowledge, sleep, and nutritional behavior were assessed with a validated Questionnaire of Eating Behaviors at the beginning of their dietetics university education and then prospectively after a year. It was also compared to dieticians who already graduated. The analysis showed that the educational level did not correlate with sleep length or the physical activity level. However, the educational level was correlated with dietary knowledge and properly self-assessed by the participants. Significant differences were observed in both the prospective and comparative analyses. The educational level and knowledge were not correlated with eating behaviors. The self-assessment of nutritional behaviors also did not correlate with the objective assessment. Sleep length did not correlate with BMI, but it was inversely correlated with overall and healthy diet scores and knowledge levels. On the other hand, physical activity levels were positively correlated with healthy diet scores. Dietary education results in better nutritional knowledge; however, it does not significantly impact individual nutritional behaviors among dietetics students and professionals. Moreover, the inverse relationship between sleep length and nutritional knowledge and behaviors, as well as the positive relationship between physical activity level and dietary behaviors, shows that nutritional aspects of lifestyle are probably prioritized among dietetic students and professionals, with an acknowledgment of the role of physical activity and a neglect of sleep hygiene importance. Dietetics students should be advised to use their theoretical knowledge not only to guide their patients but also to implement it in their own lives.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2024-02-10
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep6010007
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 6, Pages 97-113: Can the Brain’s Thermostatic
           Mechanism Generate Sleep-Wake and NREM-REM Sleep Cycles' A Nested Doll
           Model of Sleep-Regulating Processes

    • Authors: Arcady A. Putilov
      First page: 97
      Abstract: Evidence is gradually accumulating in support of the hypothesis that a process of thermostatic brain cooling and warming underlies sleep cycles, i.e., the alternations between non-rapid-eye-movement and rapid-eye-movement sleep throughout the sleep phase of the sleep-wake cycle. A mathematical thermostat model predicts an exponential shape of fluctuations in temperature above and below the desired temperature setpoint. If the thermostatic process underlies sleep cycles, can this model explain the mechanisms governing the sleep cyclicities in humans' The proposed nested doll model incorporates Process s generating sleep cycles into Process S generating sleep-wake cycles of the two-process model of sleep-wake regulation. Process s produces ultradian fluctuations around the setpoint, while Process S turns this setpoint up and down in accord with the durations of the preceding wake phase and the following sleep phase of the sleep-wake cycle, respectively. Predictions of the model were obtained in an in silico study and confirmed by simulations of oscillations of spectral electroencephalographic indexes of sleep regulation obtained from night sleep and multiple napping attempts. Only simple—inverse exponential and exponential—functions from the thermostatic model were used for predictions and simulations of rather complex and varying shapes of sleep cycles during an all-night sleep episode. To further test the proposed model, experiments on mammal species with monophasic sleep are required. If supported, this model can provide a valuable framework for understanding the involvement of sleep-wake regulatory processes in the mechanism of thermostatic brain cooling/warming.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2024-02-19
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep6010008
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 6, Pages 114-128: Power Analysis for Human Melatonin
           Suppression Experiments

    • Authors: Manuel Spitschan, Parisa Vidafar, Sean W. Cain, Andrew J. K. Phillips, Ben C. Lambert
      First page: 114
      Abstract: In humans, the nocturnal secretion of melatonin by the pineal gland is suppressed by ocular exposure to light. In the laboratory, melatonin suppression is a biomarker for this neuroendocrine pathway. Recent work has found that individuals differ substantially in their melatonin-suppressive response to light, with the most sensitive individuals being up to 60 times more sensitive than the least sensitive individuals. Planning experiments with melatonin suppression as an outcome needs to incorporate these individual differences, particularly in common resource-limited scenarios where running within-subjects studies at multiple light levels is costly and resource-intensive and may not be feasible with respect to participant compliance. Here, we present a novel framework for virtual laboratory melatonin suppression experiments, incorporating a Bayesian statistical model. We provide a Shiny web app for power analyses that allows users to modify various experimental parameters (sample size, individual-level heterogeneity, statistical significance threshold, light levels), and simulate a systematic shift in sensitivity (e.g., due to a pharmacological or other intervention). Our framework helps experimenters to design compelling and robust studies, offering novel insights into the underlying biological variability in melatonin suppression relevant for practical applications.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2024-02-26
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep6010009
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 6, Pages 1-10: Primer on Reproducible Research in R:
           Enhancing Transparency and Scientific Rigor

    • Authors: Mushfiqul Anwar Siraji, Munia Rahman
      First page: 1
      Abstract: Achieving research reproducibility is a precarious aspect of scientific practice. However, many studies across disciplines fail to be fully reproduced due to inadequate dissemination methods. Traditional publication practices often fail to provide a comprehensive description of the research context and procedures, hindering reproducibility. To address these challenges, this article presents a tutorial on reproducible research using the R programming language. The tutorial aims to equip researchers, including those with limited coding knowledge, with the necessary skills to enhance reproducibility in their work. It covers three essential components: version control using Git, dynamic document creation using rmarkdown, and managing R package dependencies with renv. The tutorial also provides insights into sharing reproducible research and offers specific considerations for the field of sleep and chronobiology research. By following the tutorial, researchers can adopt practices that enhance the transparency, rigor, and replicability of their work, contributing to a culture of reproducible research and advancing scientific knowledge.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-12-20
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep6010001
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 6, Pages 11-23: Thematic Daily Sleep Routine Analysis
           of Adults Not in Employment Living with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    • Authors: Rachael M. Kelly, John H. McDermott, Andrew N. Coogan
      First page: 11
      Abstract: Background: Day-to-day variations in sleep timing have been associated with poorer glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus, although the factors that influence this sleep timing variability are poorly understood. Methods: Daily routines of sleep in a sample of seventeen adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus who were either retired or not currently working were examined qualitatively through the application of semi-structured interviews and a thematic analysis of the resulting transcripts. Results: Four themes were identified: “Consistent Sleeping Patterns”, “Fluctuating Sleep Timing”, “Night-Time Disruptions” and “Lasting Effort Needed with Type Two Diabetes Mellitus”. The subthemes reflected that many participants had consistent sleep schedules across the seven-day week, but that a desire to maintain a sense of normality, household routines, television schedules and socializing were associated with different sleep timing on weekends. Active disease monitoring and timed medication taking were not identified as important factors in shaping sleep timing. Nocturia, stress and rumination were identified as important factors linked to disrupted sleep. Sleep was not reported as an issue discussed during routine clinical care. Conclusion: Sleep timing in participants appears to be driven by interacting psychosocial and physiological factors, although active disease management does not emerge as a major influence on sleep schedules.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-12-29
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep6010002
      Issue No: Vol. 6, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 581-589: Assessment of the Brazilian Version
           of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale Using Item Response Theory: A Psychometric
           Study

    • Authors: Cleber Lopes Campelo, Rosângela Fernandes Lucena Batista, Victor Nogueira da Cruz Silveira, Kely Nayara dos Reis Silva Figueiredo, Patrícia Maria Abreu Machado, Adriano Ferreti Borgatto, Alcione Miranda dos Santos
      First page: 581
      Abstract: There seems to be a consensus that adolescents worldwide are not getting enough sleep. This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) in adolescents using the item response theory. A psychometric study was conducted with 2206 adolescents aged 18 and 19 years in the city of São Luís, Maranhão, Brazil. The dimensionality of the ESS was assessed by principal component analysis. A Samejima’s graded response model (SGRM) was fitted to it. The findings of this study showed a good internal consistency and the unidimensionality of the ESS. Considering the latent trait continuum, we obtained three levels, with anchor items. For the item ‘Sitting still in a public place’, the adolescents presented a small possibility of dozing in level 1, and a medium and great possibility in level 2. The item ‘Sitting around talking to someone’ presented small, medium, and great possibilities of dozing in level 3. The ESS with five items showed satisfactory psychometric properties. In addition, the results from the SGRM showed that adolescents with high levels of sleepiness are likely to nod off or sleep sitting up while talking to someone. This study allows us to understand excessive daytime sleepiness in adolescents.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-09-26
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040038
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 590-603: On the Efficacy of a CBT-I-Based
           Online Program for Sleep Problems: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    • Authors: Esther-Sevil Eigl, Theresa Hauser, Pavlos I. Topalidis, Manuel Schabus
      First page: 590
      Abstract: There is an urgent need for easily accessible treatment options for sleep problems to reduce the current treatment gap in receiving cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I). Using a randomized controlled trial, we evaluated the efficacy of a CBT-I-based online program on sleep. Fifty-three volunteers (21–71 years; MAge = 44.6 ± 12.5; 27 female) suffering from impaired sleep were randomly allocated either to the experimental group (EG, n = 27) or to an active control group (CG, n = 26). The EG participated in a 6-week CBT-I-based online program, while the CG received psychoeducation and sleep hygiene instructions. Sleep was assessed both objectively via ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) as well as subjectively via questionnaires at three time points (baseline, pre- and post-intervention). A one-month follow-up assessment was performed using questionnaires. The EG showed small but reliable improvements from pre- to post-intervention in PSG-derived wake after sleep onset (from 58.6 min to 42.5 min; p < 0.05) and sleep efficiency (from 86.0% to 89.2%; p < 0.05). Furthermore, subjective sleep quality (assessed via Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) improved significantly during intervention (p = 0.011) and follow-up (p = 0.015) in the EG alone. The Insomnia Severity Index decreased from pre- to post-intervention in both groups (EG: p = 0.003, CG: p = 0.008), while it further improved during follow-up (p = 0.035) in the EG alone. We show that a CBT-I-based online program can improve sleep not only subjectively but also objectively and can be a viable alternative when face-to-face interventions are not available.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-10-09
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040039
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 604-614: Relationship between Telework
           

    • Authors: Yuuki Matsumoto, Ayako Hino, Kunitaka Kumadaki, Osamu Itani, Yuichiro Otsuka, Yoshitaka Kaneita
      First page: 604
      Abstract: Social jetlag is associated with physical and mental health problems. With the increased popularity of telework, we investigated a specific form of social jetlag that we termed “telework jetlag”. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between telework jetlag—the difference in sleep and wake-up times between in-office and telework days—and mental health problems among Japanese hybrid workers. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 1789 participants from October to December 2021 using an online-based questionnaire. Telework jetlag, defined as the difference in the midsleep point between in-office and telework days, was investigated using two groups according to telework jetlag—those lagging <1 h versus ≥1 h. We used the six-item Kessler Scale as a nonspecific psychological distress scale for the outcome. Telework jetlag was significantly associated with psychological distress, and the ≥1 h group had a higher risk (odds ratio: 1.80) of developing high psychological distress (HPD) than the <1 h group in the multivariate analysis. Since most teleworkers are forced to have a hybrid work style that mixes going to work and teleworking, telework jetlag must be addressed to maintain the health of teleworkers.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-10-16
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040040
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 615-626: Relationship between Circadian
           Phase Delay without Morning Light and Phase Advance by Bright Light
           Exposure the Following Morning

    • Authors: Michihiro Ohashi, Taisuke Eto, Toaki Takasu, Yuki Motomura, Shigekazu Higuchi
      First page: 615
      Abstract: Humans have a circadian rhythm for which the period varies among individuals. In the present study, we investigated the amount of natural phase delay of circadian rhythms after spending a day under dim light (Day 1 to Day 2) and the amount of phase advance due to light exposure (8000 lx, 4100 K) the following morning (Day 2 to Day 3). The relationships of the phase shifts with the circadian phase, chronotype and sleep habits were also investigated. Dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was investigated as a circadian phase marker on each day. In the 27 individuals used for the analysis, DLMO was delayed significantly (−0.24 ± 0.33 h, p < 0.01) from Day 1 to Day 2 and DLMO was advanced significantly (0.18 ± 0.36 h, p < 0.05) from Day 2 to Day 3. There was a significant correlation between phase shifts, with subjects who had a greater phase delay in the dim environment having a greater phase advance by light exposure (r = −0.43, p < 0.05). However, no significant correlations with circadian phase, chronotype or sleep habits were found. These phase shifts may reflect the stability of the phase, but do not account for an individual’s chronotype-related indicators.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-10-23
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040041
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 627-638: Effects of Vortioxetine on Sleep
           Architecture of Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder

    • Authors: Zuzana Mlyncekova, Peter Hutka, Zuzana Visnovcova, Nikola Ferencova, Veronika Kovacova, Andrea Macejova, Ingrid Tonhajzerova, Igor Ondrejka
      First page: 627
      Abstract: The relationship between depression and insomnia is bidirectional and both conditions need to be treated adequately, especially in a vulnerable neurodevelopmental stage of adolescence. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of antidepressant treatment using vortioxetine (VOR) on the sleep architecture of depressed adolescents by using video-polysomnography (v-PSG), which has not been researched before. The v-PSG was performed on 30 adolescent in-patients (mean age of 15.0 years ± 1.5 SD, 21 girls) treated with VOR (dosage of 10/15/20 mg/day) administered orally once a day, before and after VOR treatment. The evaluated parameters were conventional sleep parameters, sleep fragmentation parameters, and selected spectral power indices. Symptoms of depression and insomnia before and after the treatment period were evaluated using valid and reliable questionnaires (the Children´s Depression Inventory and the Athens Insomnia Scale). Depressed adolescents showed higher REM latency and decreased REM sleep percentage after treatment than before the treatment period (p = 0.005, p = 0.009, respectively). Our study revealed REM suppression (increased REM latency and reduced REM sleep percentage), indicating altered sleep architecture as a potential result of VOR treatment, which seems to be dose-dependent.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-10-24
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040042
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 639-650: The Antihypertensive Guanabenz
           Exacerbates Integrated Stress Response and Disrupts the Brain Circadian
           Clock

    • Authors: Hao Lin, Muhammad Naveed, Aidan Hansen, Tracy G. Anthony, Ruifeng Cao
      First page: 639
      Abstract: The circadian clock regulates a variety of biological processes that are normally synchronized with the solar day. Disruption of circadian rhythms is associated with health problems. Understanding the signaling mechanisms that couple cell physiology and metabolism to circadian timekeeping will help to develop novel therapeutic strategies. The integrated stress response (ISR) is activated by the cellular stressors to maintain physiological homeostasis by orchestrating mRNA translation. Aberrant ISR has been found in a number of neurological diseases that exhibit disrupted circadian rhythms and sleep. Recent work has started to uncover a critical role for the ISR in regulating the physiology of the circadian clock. Guanabenz (2,6-dichlorobenzylidene aminoguanidine acetate) is an orally bioavailable α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that has been used as an antihypertensive for decades. Recent studies demonstrated that guanabenz can regulate the ISR. Here, we assessed the effects of guanabenz on cellular and behavioral circadian rhythms using a multidisciplinary approach. We found that guanabenz can induce the ISR by increasing eIF2α phosphorylation in cultured fibroblasts as well as in the mouse brain. The hyperphosphorylation of eIF2α by guanabenz is associated with the shortened circadian period in cells and animals and the disruption of behavioral circadian rhythms in mice. Guanabenz administration disrupted circadian oscillations of the clock protein Per1 and Per2 in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus, the master pacemaker. These results uncover a significant yet previously unidentified role of guanabenz in regulating circadian rhythms and indicate that exacerbated ISR activation can impair the functions of the brain’s circadian clock by disrupting clock gene expression.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-10-31
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040043
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 651-666: Seasonal Variation in the
           Responsiveness of the Melanopsin System to Evening Light: Why We Should
           Report Season When Collecting Data in Human Sleep and Circadian Studies

    • Authors: Isabel Schöllhorn, Oliver Stefani, Christine Blume, Christian Cajochen
      First page: 651
      Abstract: It is well known that variations in light exposure during the day affect light sensitivity in the evening. More daylight reduces sensitivity, and less daylight increases it. On average days, we spend less time outdoors in winter and receive far less light than in summer. Therefore, it could be relevant when collecting research data on the non-image forming (NIF) effects of light on circadian rhythms and sleep. In fact, studies conducted only in winter may result in more pronounced NIF effects than in summer. Here, we systematically collected information on the extent to which studies on the NIF effects of evening light include information on season and/or light history. We found that more studies were conducted in winter than in summer and that reporting when a study was conducted or measuring individual light history is not currently a standard in sleep and circadian research. In addition, we sought to evaluate seasonal variations in a previously published dataset of 72 participants investigating circadian and sleep effects of evening light exposure in a laboratory protocol where daytime light history was not controlled. In this study, we selectively modulated melanopic irradiance at four different light levels (<90 lx). Here, we aimed to retrospectively evaluate seasonal variations in the responsiveness of the melanopsin system by combining all data sets in an exploratory manner. Our analyses suggest that light sensitivity is indeed reduced in summer compared to winter. Thus, to increase the reproducibility of NIF effects on sleep and circadian measures, we recommend an assessment of the light history and encourage standardization of reporting guidelines on the seasonal distribution of measurements.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-11-01
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040044
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 667-685: Associations between
           Rest–Activity Rhythms and Liver Function Tests: The US National
           Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2011–2014

    • Authors: Chris Ho Ching Yeung, Cici Bauer, Qian Xiao
      First page: 667
      Abstract: Liver functions are regulated by the circadian rhythm; however, whether a weakened circadian rhythm is associated with impaired liver function is unclear. This study aims to investigate the association of characteristics of rest–activity rhythms with abnormal levels of biomarkers of liver function. Data were obtained from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2011–2014. Seven rest–activity rhythm parameters were derived from 24 h actigraphy data using the extended cosine model and non-parametric methods. Multiple logistic regression and multiple linear regression models were used to assess the associations between rest–activity rhythm parameters and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), gamma-glutamyl transaminase (GGT), albumin and bilirubin. Weakened overall rhythmicity characterized by a lower F statistic was associated with higher odds of abnormally elevated ALP (ORQ1vs.Q5: 2.16; 95% CI 1.19, 3.90) and GGT (ORQ1vs.Q5: 2.04; 95% CI 1.30, 3.20) and abnormally lowered albumin (ORQ1vs.Q5: 5.15; 95% CI 2.14, 12.38). Similar results were found for a lower amplitude, amplitude:mesor ratio, interdaily stability and intradaily variability. Results were robust to the adjustment of confounders and cannot be fully explained by individual rest–activity behaviors, including sleep and physical activity. Weakened rest–activity rhythms were associated with worse liver function as measured by multiple biomarkers, supporting a potential role of circadian rhythms in liver health.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-11-02
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040045
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 686-716: The Wave Model of Sleep Dynamics
           and an Invariant Relationship between NonREM and REM Sleep

    • Authors: Vasili Kharchenko, Irina V. Zhdanova
      First page: 686
      Abstract: Explaining the complex structure and dynamics of sleep, which consist of alternating and physiologically distinct nonREM and REM sleep episodes, has posed a significant challenge. In this study, we demonstrate that a single-wave model concept captures the distinctly different overnight dynamics of the four primary sleep measures—the duration and intensity of nonREM and REM sleep episodes—with high quantitative precision for both regular and extended sleep. The model also accurately predicts how these polysomnographic measures respond to sleep deprivation or abundance. Furthermore, the model passes the ultimate test, as its prediction leads to a novel experimental finding—an invariant relationship between the duration of nonREM episodes and the intensity of REM episodes, the product of which remains constant over consecutive sleep cycles. These results suggest a functional unity between nonREM and REM sleep, establishing a comprehensive and quantitative framework for understanding normal sleep and sleep disorders.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-11-17
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040046
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 717-733: Diagnostic Accuracy of a Portable
           Electromyography and Electrocardiography Device to Measure Sleep Bruxism
           in a Sleep Apnea Population: A Comparative Study

    • Authors: Rosana Cid-Verdejo, Adelaida A. Domínguez Gordillo, Eleuterio A. Sánchez-Romero, Ignacio Ardizone García, Francisco J. Martínez Orozco
      First page: 717
      Abstract: Background: The gold standard for diagnosing sleep bruxism (SB) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is polysomnography (PSG). However, a final hypermotor muscle activity often occurs after apnea episodes, which can confuse the diagnosis of SB when using portable electromyography (EMG) devices. This study aimed to compare the number of SB episodes obtained from PSG with manual analysis by a sleep expert, and from a manual and automatic analysis of an EMG and electrocardiography (EKG) device, in a population with suspected OSA. Methods: Twenty-two subjects underwent a polysomnographic study with simultaneous recording with the EMG-EKG device. SB episodes and SB index measured with both tools and analyzed manually and automatically were compared. Masticatory muscle activity was scored according to published criteria. Patients were segmented by severity of OSA (mild, moderate, severe) following the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) criteria. ANOVA and the Bland–Altman plot were used to quantify the agreement between both methods. The concordance was calculated through the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: On average, the total events of SB per night in the PSG study were (8.41 ± 0.85), lower than the one obtained with EMG-EKG manual (14.64 ± 0.76) and automatic (22.68 ± 16.02) analysis. The mean number of SB episodes decreases from the non-OSA group to the OSA group with both PSG (5.93 ± 8.64) and EMG-EKG analyses (automatic = 22.47 ± 18.07, manual = 13.93 ± 11.08). However, this decrease was minor in proportion compared to the automatic EMG-EKG analysis mode (from 23.14 to 22.47). The ICC based on the number of SB episodes in the segmented sample by severity degree of OSA along the three tools shows a moderate correlation in the non-OSA (0.61) and mild OSA (0.53) groups. However, it is poorly correlated in the moderate (0.24) and severe (0.23) OSA groups: the EMG-EKG automatic analysis measures 14.27 units more than PSG. The results of the manual EMG-EKG analysis improved this correlation but are not good enough. Conclusions: The results obtained in the PSG manual analysis and those obtained by the EMG-EKG device with automatic and manual analysis for the diagnosis of SB are acceptable but only in patients without OSA or with mild OSA. In patients with moderate or severe OSA, SB diagnosis with portable electromyography devices can be confused due to apneas, and further study is needed to investigate this.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-11-20
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040047
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 734-754: Light–Dark and Activity
           Rhythm Therapy (L-DART) to Improve Sleep in People with Schizophrenia
           Spectrum Disorders: A Single-Group Mixed Methods Study of Feasibility,
           Acceptability and Adherence

    • Authors: Sophie Faulkner, Altug Didikoglu, Rory Byrne, Richard Drake, Penny Bee
      First page: 734
      Abstract: People with a diagnosis of schizophrenia often have poor sleep, even when their psychotic symptoms are relatively well managed. This includes insomnia, sleep apnoea, hypersomnia, and irregular or non-24 h sleep–wake timing. Improving sleep would better support recovery, yet few evidence-based sleep treatments are offered to this group. This paper presents a mixed methods feasibility and acceptability study of Light–Dark and Activity Rhythm Therapy (L-DART). L-DART is delivered by an occupational therapist over 12 weeks. It is highly personalisable to sleep phenotypes and circumstances. Ten participants with schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses and sleep problems received L-DART; their sleep problems and therapy goals were diverse. We measured recruitment, attrition, session attendance, and adverse effects, and qualitatively explored acceptability, engagement, component delivery, adherence, activity patterns, dynamic light exposure, self-reported sleep, wellbeing, and functioning. Recruitment was ahead of target, there was no attrition, and all participants received the minimum ‘dose’ of sessions. Acceptability assessed via qualitative reports and satisfaction ratings was good. Adherence to individual intervention components varied, despite high participant motivation. All made some potentially helpful behaviour changes. Positive sleep and functioning outcomes were reported qualitatively as well as in outcome measures. The findings above support testing the intervention in a larger randomised trial ISRCTN11998005.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-12-04
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040048
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 755-769: Interstitial Lung Disease Is
           Associated with Sleep Disorders in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    • Authors: Natalia Mena-Vázquez, Rocío Redondo-Rodriguez, Pablo Cabezudo-García, Aimara Garcia-Studer, Fernando Ortiz-Márquez, Paula Borregón-Garrido, Manuel Martín-Valverde, Inmaculada Ureña-Garnica, Sara Manrique-Arija, Laura Cano-García, Antonio Fernández-Nebro
      First page: 755
      Abstract: Objective: To evaluate sleep disorders and associated factors in patients with rheumatoid-arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD). Methods: We performed an observational study of 35 patients with RA-ILD (cases) and 35 age- and sex-matched RA patients without ILD (controls). We evaluated sleep disorders (Oviedo Sleep Questionnaire), positive psychological factors (resilience using the Wagnild and Young Resilience Scale, emotional intelligence using the 24-item Trait Meta-Mood Scale), anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (36-item short-form survey), and fatigue (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Questionnaire). Other variables studied included the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and RA activity according to the DAS28-ESR. Results: Compared to the controls, the cases were characterized by poorer sleep quality with a higher prevalence of insomnia (42% vs. 20%; p = 0.039), greater severity of insomnia (p = 0.001), and lower sleep satisfaction (p = 0.033). They also had poorer resilience and emotional recovery and more severe anxiety and depression. A diagnosis of ILD was the only factor independently associated with the three dimensions of sleep quality. The predictors of poorer sleep satisfaction in patients with RA-ILD were age (β = −0.379), DAS28-ESR (β = −0.331), and usual interstitial pneumonia pattern (β = −0.438). The predictors of insomnia were DAS28-ESR (β = 0.294), resilience (β = −0.352), and CCI (β = 0.377). Conclusions: RA-ILD is associated with significant sleep disorders. RA-ILD seems to be an independent risk factor for sleep alterations, with a greater impact on insomnia. Age, disease activity, and comorbidity also play a role in sleep disorders in patients with RA-ILD.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-12-04
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040049
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 770-792: Microbiota Composition and
           Probiotics Supplementations on Sleep Quality—A Systematic Review and
           Meta-Analysis

    • Authors: Daniele Santi, Valentina Debbi, Francesco Costantino, Giorgia Spaggiari, Manuela Simoni, Carla Greco, Livio Casarini
      First page: 770
      Abstract: The gut microbiota (GM) plays a crucial role in human health. The bidirectional interaction between GM and the central nervous system may occur via the microbiota–gut–brain axis, possibly regulating the sleep/wake cycle. Recent reports highlight associations between intestinal dysbiosis and sleep disorders, suggesting that probiotics could ameliorate this condition. However, data are poor and inconsistent. The aim of this quantitative metanalytic study is to assess the GM composition in sleep disturbances and evaluate probiotics’ effectiveness for managing sleep disorders. A systematic review was carried out until July 2022 in online databases, limiting the literature research to human studies and English language articles. No significant GM diversity between patients with sleep disturbances versus healthy controls was found, revealed by α-diversity, while β-diversity is missing due to lack of proper reporting. However, probiotics supplementation significantly reduced the self-assessed parameter of sleep quality and disturbances Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) score compared with the placebo. No difference in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was found. While available data suggest that GM diversity is not related to sleep disturbances, probiotics administration strongly improves sleep quality as a subjective perception. However, heterogeneity of data reporting in the scientific literature should be considered as a limitation.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-12-13
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040050
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 793-805: Methods for REM Sleep Density
           Analysis: A Scoping Review

    • Authors: Tamires Tiemi Kishi, Monica Levy Andersen, Ygor Matos Luciano, Viviane Akemi Kakazu, Sergio Tufik, Gabriel Natan Pires
      First page: 793
      Abstract: Rapid eye movements (REM) sleep density is the parameter proposed to explain the variability in the amount of eye movements during REM sleep. Alterations in REM sleep density have been proposed as a screening criterion for individuals with depression and other mental health conditions, but its accuracy has not been properly evaluated. The lack of consensus and the variability of the methods used to score it reduces the external validity of the results, hindering an adequate analysis of its diagnostic accuracy and clinical applicability. This scoping review aimed to identify and quantify the methods used to score REM sleep density, describing their main characteristics. A literature search was conducted in PubMed, Scopus, PsycInfo, and Web of Science. Only studies with objective measures for REM sleep density analysis in individuals with depression were considered eligible. The final sample comprised 57 articles, covering 64 analyses of REM sleep density. The relative frequency methods were the predominant measurement parameter for analyzing REM sleep density across studies. The most frequently adopted REM estimation unit was the number of REM events followed by mini-epochs containing REM. The most common unit of measurement were frequency/time measures. The results demonstrate that there is no consistency in the methods used to calculate REM sleep density in the literature, and a high percentage of studies do not describe their methods in sufficient detail. The most used method was the number of REM episodes per minute of REM sleep, but its use is neither unanimous nor consensual. The methodological inconsistencies and omissions among studies limit the replicability, comparability, and clinical applicability of REM sleep density. Future guidelines should discuss and include a specific methodology for the scoring of REM sleep density, so it can be consensually implemented in clinical services and research.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-12-14
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040051
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 806-830: Integrative Lighting Aimed at
           Patients with Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders

    • Authors: Xinxi Zeng, Thierry Silvio Claude Soreze, Martin Ballegaard, Paul Michael Petersen
      First page: 806
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of circadian lighting-induced melatonin suppression on patients with psychiatric and neurological disorders in hospital wards by using an ad-hoc metrology framework and the subsequent metrics formalized by the CIE in 2018. A measurement scheme was conducted in hospital ward rooms in the Department of Neurology, Zealand University Hospital, at Roskilde in Denmark, to evaluate the photometric and colorimetric characteristics of the lighting system, as well as its influence on the circadian rhythm of the occupants. The measurement scheme included point measurements and data logging, using a spectrophotometer mounted on a tripod with adjustable height to assess the newly installed circadian lighting system. The measured spectra were uploaded to the Luox platform to calculate illuminance, CCT, MEDI, etc., in accordance with the CIE S026 standard. Furthermore, the MLIT based on MEDI data logging results was calculated. In addition to CIE S026, we have investigated the usefulness of melatonin suppression models for the assessment of circadian performance regarding measured light. From the results, the lighting conditions in the patient room for both minimal and abundant daylight access were evaluated and compared; we found that access to daylight is essential for both illumination and circadian entrainment. It can be concluded that the measurement scheme, together with the use of the Luox platform and Canva template, is suitable for the accurate and satisfactory measurement of integrative lighting that aligns with CIE requirements and recommendations.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-12-15
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5040052
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 4 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 350-357: The Timing of the Melatonin Onset
           and Phase Angle to Sleep Onset in Older Adults after Uncontrolled vs.
           Controlled Lighting Conditions

    • Authors: Arturo Arrona-Palacios, Jung-Hie Lee, Charles A. Czeisler, Jeanne F. Duffy
      First page: 350
      Abstract: The main aim of this study was to explore how melatonin onset timing and phase angle to bedtime in healthy older adults are impacted by prior light exposure. A total of 13 healthy older (ages 56–74) individuals were studied on two successive evenings. Prior to the first evening, the participants were in self-selected lighting conditions for the first 4–6 h of the day and then were in dim light (3 lux) until their scheduled bedtime. On the second day, individuals from Project A remained in the dim lighting conditions throughout the entire day but those in Project B were in more typical indoor lighting (~90 lux) throughout the day. On both evenings, hourly blood samples were collected and assayed for melatonin, and melatonin onset timing and phase angle to sleep onset was determined. Overall, melatonin onset was earlier and the phase angle was larger on Night 1 than on Night 2. In Project A there was no significant difference between melatonin onset on night 1 vs. night 2. However, in Project B melatonin onset was significantly later on Night 2 (in typical indoor lighting) than on Night 1 (in dim lighting). Our results suggest that in older people, uncontrolled bright light early in the day did not impact the timing of dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) when assessed later that same evening. However, in older adults, exposure to ordinary room light during melatonin phase assessment appeared to suppress melatonin, leading to a later observed time of melatonin onset, as has been reported previously for young adults.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-06-25
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030026
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 358-372: Time Spent Outdoors and
           Associations with Sleep, Optimism, Happiness and Health before and during
           the COVID-19 Pandemic in Austria

    • Authors: Simon Schamilow, Isabel Santonja, Jakob Weitzer, Susanne Strohmaier, Gerhard Klösch, Stefan Seidel, Eva Schernhammer, Kyriaki Papantoniou
      First page: 358
      Abstract: Social restriction measures (SRM) implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic led to a reduction in time spent outdoors (TSO). The aim of this study was to describe TSO and evaluate its association with sleep outcomes, optimism, happiness and health-status before and during SRM. Two online surveys were conducted in 2017 (N = 1004) and 2020, during SRM (N = 1010), in samples representative of the age, sex and region of the Austrian population. Information on the duration of TSO, sleep, optimism, happiness and health-status was collected. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models were used to study the association of TSO with chronic insomnia, short sleep, late chronotype, optimism, happiness and self-rated health-status. The mean TSO was 3.6 h (SD: 2.18) in 2017 and 2.6 h (SD: 1.87) during times of SRM. Men and participants who were older, married or in a partnership and lived in a rural area reported longer TSO. Participants who spent less time outdoors were more likely to report short sleep or a late chronotype in both surveys and, in 2020, also chronic insomnia. Less TSO was associated with lower happiness and optimism levels and poor health-status. Our findings suggest that TSO may be a protective factor for sleep, mood and health, particularly during stressful and uncertain times.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-06-25
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030027
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 373-383: Better Mental Health and Sleep
           under Behavioral Restrictions Due to COVID-19 in Japanese University
           Students: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    • Authors: Hideki Shimamoto, Masataka Suwa, Hiroyoshi Adachi, Manabu Adachi, Koh Mizuno
      First page: 373
      Abstract: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is a global pandemic, which is not only a severe public health issue but also significantly impacts the physical activity, sleep habits, and mental health of university students. Thus, we examined the association between behavioral restrictions due to COVID-19 and sleep patterns and mental health in first-year Japanese university students. Four hundred and twenty-two students (253 males and 169 females; age, 18.7 ± 1.0 years) participated in our questionnaire study. Under the behavioral restrictions due to COVID-19, 193 students (127 males and 66 females) responded to the questionnaire online from home. The participants did not visit the university during the survey period. The data acquired the year before the COVID-19 pandemic (2018 and 2019) were used as control data (126 males and 103 females). The questionnaire consisted of four sections: (1) demographic and lifestyle variables, (2) the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, (3) the Japanese version of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and (4) the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Our data revealed that self-restraint due to COVID-19 was associated with better sleep and mental health. In addition, mental health was independent of sleep, while sleep was related to mental health. These differences were more pronounced in male than in female students. This finding could be due to physical activity at night, part-time work, and long commuting times during the pre-pandemic period.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-07-05
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030028
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 384-398: A Review of Evidence for the
           Involvement of the Circadian Clock Genes into Malignant Transformation of
           Thyroid Tissue

    • Authors: Arcady A. Putilov, Elena V. Budkevich, Roman O. Budkevich
      First page: 384
      Abstract: (1) Background: In 2013, the results of a pioneer study on abnormalities in the levels and circadian rhythmicity of expression of circadian clock genes in cancerous thyroid nodules was published. In the following years, new findings suggesting the involvement of circadian clockwork dysfunction into malignant transformation of thyroid tissue were gradually accumulating. This systematic review provides an update on existing evidence regarding the association of these genes with thyroid tumorigenesis. (2) Methods: Two bibliographic databases (Scopus and PubMed) were searched for articles from inception to 20 March 2023. The reference lists of previously published (nonsystematic) reviews were also hand-searched for additional relevant studies. (3) Results: Nine studies published between 2013 and 2022 were selected. In total, 9 of 12 tested genes were found to be either up- or downregulated. The list of such genes includes all families of core circadian clock genes that are the key components of three transcriptional–translational feedback loops of the circadian clock mechanism (BMAL1, CLOCK, NPAS2, RORα, REV-ERBα, PERs, CRYs, and DECs). (4) Conclusions: Examination of abnormalities in the levels and circadian rhythmicity of expression of circadian clock genes in thyroid tissue can help to reduce the rate of inadequate differential preoperative diagnosis for thyroid carcinoma.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-07-13
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030029
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 399-413: Social Deprivation and Ethnicity
           Are Associated with More Problematic Sleep in Middle-Aged and Older Adults
           

    • Authors: John A. Groeger, Piril Hepsomali
      First page: 399
      Abstract: Objectives: We test the hypothesis that the incidence of sleep problems is influenced by socio-demographic variables, particularly social deprivation and ethnicity. Methods: Self-reports of sleep duration and sleep difficulties (waking in the night, sleeping in the day, difficulty waking and snoring), personal wealth (household income, property-owning, etc.), ethnic group, employment, education, as well as post-code-based Townsend Social Deprivation, were extracted from UK Biobank’s cohort of c500,000 British-domiciled adults (40–70 years). Analyses contrasted the incidence of different sleep problems and a composite measure of these (the Problematic Sleep Index) across groups. Results: Almost one-third of participants reported sleeping shorter (24.7%), or longer (7.7%) than age-corrected recommended sleep durations. The incidence of shorter or longer sleep increased with social deprivation and varied with ethnicity. Snoring, waking during the night, finding it difficult to get up in the morning and sleeping in the daytime were subject to similar effects. The Problematic Sleep Index showed being younger, male, employed, home-owning, having a higher household income, having a higher level of educational achievement, and time in education were all associated with better sleep, as was living in a more affluent area and being White. Conclusions: Sleep problems in Britain show a social gradient, independently of a range of other demographic and social influences, suggesting that sleep quality differs with and between ethnic groups. These sleep inequalities suggest that the protective and recuperative effects of sleep are disproportionately distributed across society and should encourage us to consider the potential benefits of community-specific sleep interventions.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-08-07
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030030
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 414-482: 34th Annual Meeting of the Society
           for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms (SLTBR), 30 May–1 June,
           Lausanne, Switzerland

    • Authors: Christian Cajochen
      First page: 414
      Abstract: The Society for Light Treatment and Biological Rhythms (SLTBR) held this year’s annual meeting at the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale (EPFL) in Lausanne, Switzerland from 30 May to 1 June in conjunction with the Day Light Academy (DLA) [...]
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-08-24
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030031
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 476-498: Influence of the Human Field of
           View on Visual and Non-Visual Quantities in Indoor Environments

    • Authors: Johannes Zauner, Kai Broszio, Karin Bieske
      First page: 476
      Abstract: The visual and non-visual effectiveness of light is often determined by measuring the spectrally weighed irradiance on the corneal plane. This is typically achieved using spectral irradiance or illuminance measurements, captured in a hemispheric (2π) geometry with a diffuser. However, the human binocular field of view (FOV) is not a perfect hemisphere, as it is occluded both upward and downward. Previous research on FOV-restricted measurements is limited, leaving the error from using hemispheric measurements for non-visual quantities undefined. In our study, we tackled this issue by designing and 3D printing FOV occlusions as attachments to spectral measurement devices. We took measurements with and without the occlusion in various laboratory (light from different directions) and real-world lighting situations (light typically from above). Our findings reveal a reduction of visual and melanopic values due to the FOV occlusion. These ranged from negligible to more than 60% in realistic scenarios. Interestingly, the reduction was consistent for both visual and melanopic parameters, as the distribution of light in the FOV was generally spectrally homogeneous. An exception occurred in a specific artificial laboratory situation, where the melanopic daylight (D65) efficacy ratio changed by more than a factor of 2 solely because of the FOV occlusion. Additionally, we observed that head orientation had a marked effect on all quantities measured. In conclusion, our results highlight the potential for substantial errors when solely relying on vertical, hemispheric measurements in experiments and non-visual lighting design projects. We encourage the (additional) use of FOV occlusion in eye-level measurements for typical viewing directions, and we are providing open-source 3D-print files to facilitate this practice.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-08-29
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030032
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 499-506: Keep It Simple: Using README Files
           to Advance Standardization in Chronobiology

    • Authors: Tomasz Zieliński, James J. L. Hodge, Andrew J. Millar
      First page: 499
      Abstract: Standardization plays a crucial role in ensuring the reliability, reproducibility, and interoperability of research data in the biomedical sciences. Metadata standards are one foundation for the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) principles of data management. They facilitate data discovery, understanding, and reuse. However, the adoption of metadata standards in biological research lags in practice. Barriers such as complexity, lack of incentives, technical challenges, resource constraints, and resistance to change hinder widespread adoption. In the field of chronobiology, standardization is essential but faces particular challenges due to the longitudinal nature of experimental data, diverse model organisms, and varied measurement techniques. To address these challenges, we propose an approach that emphasizes simplicity and practicality: the development of README templates tailored for particular data types and species. Through this opinion article, our intention is to initiate a dialogue and commence a community-driven standardization process by engaging potential contributors and collaborators.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-08-30
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030033
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 507-535: Timing Matters: The Interplay
           between Early Mealtime, Circadian Rhythms, Gene Expression, Circadian
           Hormones, and Metabolism—A Narrative Review

    • Authors: Ahmed S. BaHammam, Abdulrouf Pirzada
      First page: 507
      Abstract: Achieving synchronization between the central and peripheral body clocks is essential for ensuring optimal metabolic function. Meal timing is an emerging field of research that investigates the influence of eating patterns on our circadian rhythm, metabolism, and overall health. This narrative review examines the relationship between meal timing, circadian rhythm, clock genes, circadian hormones, and metabolic function. It analyzes the existing literature and experimental data to explore the connection between mealtime, circadian rhythms, and metabolic processes. The available evidence highlights the importance of aligning mealtime with the body’s natural rhythms to promote metabolic health and prevent metabolic disorders. Specifically, studies show that consuming meals later in the day is associated with an elevated prevalence of metabolic disorders, while early time-restricted eating, such as having an early breakfast and an earlier dinner, improves levels of glucose in the blood and substrate oxidation. Circadian hormones, including cortisol and melatonin, interact with mealtimes and play vital roles in regulating metabolic processes. Cortisol, aligned with dawn in diurnal mammals, activates energy reserves, stimulates appetite, influences clock gene expression, and synchronizes peripheral clocks. Consuming meals during periods of elevated melatonin levels, specifically during the circadian night, has been correlated with potential implications for glucose tolerance. Understanding the mechanisms of central and peripheral clock synchronization, including genetics, interactions with chronotype, sleep duration, and hormonal changes, provides valuable insights for optimizing dietary strategies and timing. This knowledge contributes to improved overall health and well-being by aligning mealtime with the body’s natural circadian rhythm.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-09-06
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030034
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 536-551: Evaluation of Sleep Behavior and
           the Use of Sleep Aids among Adults Living in Saudi Arabia: A
           Cross-Sectional Study

    • Authors: Ahmed Aldhafiri, Nawaf Almutairi, Mohammed Alharbi, Abdullah Aloufi, Abdulaziz Hakeem, Abdulmalik Kattan, Fahad Alzahrani
      First page: 536
      Abstract: A negative attitude toward sleep has greatly affected sleep habits. In addition to contributing to physical and metabolic disorders, poor sleep quality may cause emotional disturbances. This study aimed to measure sleep behavior and factors contributing to poor sleep quality in the Madinah region, Saudi Arabia. We also assessed whether the use of sleeping aids improved peoples sleep. Three hundred and ninety-nine adults in the Madinah region of Saudi Arabia participated in this cross-sectional study. Three data domains were collected using an online questionnaire between 30 January and 26 April 2022. In the first domain, the characteristics of participants were discussed. In the second domain, questions about sleep behavior were asked. In the third domain, we examined the types, frequency, and impact of sleep aid use. Out of the 399 participants, 154 (38.59%) reported sleep problems. A total of 64.94% of the 154 participants blamed stress as the leading cause of their sleep disorders, and 74.68% of those with sleep problems reported reduced productivity. Among those who reported having sleep problems, 46.10% used sleep aids, with Panadol night (antihistamine) being the most used, 49.30%, followed by Melatonin at 39.44%. Sleep quality improved by 67.6% among those who used sleep aids. A total of 71.8% of the participants think it is not safe to use sleep aids in the long term. Our findings suggest that sleep problems are a prevalent concern in Madinah, Saudi Arabia, and even though the use of sleep aids improved sleep quality, it should be considered an emerging and important public health objective in Saudi Arabia. Further studies are needed to evaluate sleep quality and the level of sleep aid usage among other Saudi Arabian regions.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-09-11
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030035
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 552-565: Links between Sleep Apnoea and
           Insomnia in a British Cohort

    • Authors: Yizhou Yu
      First page: 552
      Abstract: Poor sleep is a major public health problem with implications for a wide range of critical health outcomes. Insomnia and sleep apnoea are the two most common causes of poor sleep, and recent studies have shown that these disorders frequently co-occur. Comorbid insomnia and sleep apnoea can substantially impair quality of life and increase the overall risk of mortality. However, the causal and physiological links between sleep apnoea and insomnia are unclear. It is also unknown whether having a higher risk for one condition can increase the risk of developing the other. Here, we investigated links between sleep apnoea and insomnia in a British population using a combination of self-reported questionnaires and causal inference. We found that 54.3% of the cohort had moderate insomnia, 9.4% had moderate sleep apnoea, and that 6.2% scored high for both conditions. Importantly, having a higher risk of sleep apnoea was associated with a higher risk of insomnia and vice versa. To determine the causal directionality between sleep apnoea and insomnia, we used Mendelian randomisation and found evidence that sleep apnoea could cause insomnia, but not the reverse. To elucidate how both sleep apnoea and insomnia were linked to each other, we looked at the behavioural markers of poor sleep. We found that feeling fatigued after sleeping and having noticeable sleep problems were linked to a higher burden of both sleep apnoea and insomnia. In conclusion, our results show that sleep apnoea increases the risk of developing insomnia, and both conditions can result in fatigue. We highlight the importance of considering and treating the symptoms of both conditions.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-09-11
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030036
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 566-580: Causal Effects of Gut Microbiota on
           Sleep-Related Phenotypes: A Two-Sample Mendelian Randomization Study

    • Authors: Min Yue, Chuandi Jin, Xin Jiang, Xinxin Xue, Nan Wu, Ziyun Li, Lei Zhang
      First page: 566
      Abstract: Increasing evidence suggests a correlation between changes in the composition of gut microbiota and sleep-related phenotypes. However, it remains uncertain whether these associations indicate a causal relationship. The genome-wide association study summary statistics data of gut microbiota (n = 18,340) was downloaded from the MiBioGen consortium and the data of sleep-related phenotypes were derived from the UK Biobank, the Medical Research Council-Integrative Epidemiology Unit, Jones SE, the FinnGen consortium. To test and estimate the causal effect of gut microbiota on sleep traits, a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) approach using multiple methods was conducted. A series of sensitive analyses, such as horizontal pleiotropy analysis, heterogeneity test, MR Steiger directionality test and “leave-one-out” analysis as well as reverse MR analysis, were conducted to assess the robustness of MR results. The genus Anaerofilum has a negative causal effect on getting up in the morning (odd ratio = 0.977, 95% confidence interval: 0.965–0.988, p = 7.28 × 10−5). A higher abundance of order Enterobacteriales and family Enterobacteriaceae contributed to becoming an “evening person”. Six and two taxa were causally associated with longer and shorter sleep duration, respectively. Specifically, two SCFA-produced genera including Lachnospiraceae UCG004 (odd ratio = 1.029, 95% confidence interval = 1.012–1.046, p = 6.11 × 10−4) and Odoribacter contribute to extending sleep duration. Two obesity-related genera such as Ruminococcus torques (odd ratio = 1.024, 95% confidence interval: 1.011–1.036, p = 1.74 × 10−4) and Senegalimassilia were found to be increased and decreased risk of snoring, respectively. In addition, we found two risk taxa of insomnia such as the order Selenomonadales and one of its classes called Negativicutes. All of the sensitive analysis and reverse MR analysis results indicated that our MR results were robust. Our study revealed the causal effect of gut microbiota on sleep and identified causal risk and protective taxa for chronotype, sleep duration, snoring and insomnia, which has the potential to provide new perspectives for future mechanistic and clinical investigations of microbiota-mediated sleep abnormal patterns and provide clues for developing potential microbiota-based intervention strategies for sleep-related conditions.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-09-12
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5030037
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 3 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 152-166: Effects on Sleep Quality of
           Physical Exercise Programs in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-Analysis

    • Authors: Lilian Solis-Navarro, Olga Masot, Rodrigo Torres-Castro, Matías Otto-Yáñez, Carles Fernández-Jané, Mireia Solà-Madurell, Andrea Coda, Erika Cyrus-Barker, Mercè Sitjà-Rabert, Laura Mónica Pérez
      First page: 152
      Abstract: Background: Given the beneficial effects of exercise in different populations and the close relationship between healthy ageing and sleep quality, our objective was to determine if physical exercise delivered through a structured program improves sleep quality in older adults. Methods: Embase, PubMed/MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Register of Clinical Trials (CENTRAL) were searched to 15 January 2023. Studies that applied physical exercise programs in older adults were reviewed. Two independent reviewers analysed the studies, extracted the data, and assessed the quality of evidence. Results: Of the 2599 reports returned by the initial search, 13 articles reporting on 2612 patients were included in the data synthesis. The articles used interventions based on yoga (n = 5), multicomponent exercise (n = 3), walking (n = 2), cycling (n = 1), pilates (n = 1), elastic bands (n = 1), and healthy beat acupunch (n = 1). In the intervention group, we found significant improvement in Pittsburgh sleep quality index of −2.49 points (95% CI −3.84 to −1.14) in comparison to the control group (p = 0.0003) and sleep efficiency measured with objective instruments (MD 1.18%, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.50%, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: Our results found that physical exercise programs in older adults improve sleep quality and efficiency measured with objective instruments.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-03-23
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020014
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 167-176: Association of Sleep Reactivity and
           Anxiety Sensitivity with Insomnia-Related Depression and Anxiety among
           City Government Employees in Japan

    • Authors: Isa Okajima, Hiroshi Kadotani, on behalf of the NinJa Sleep Study Group on behalf of the NinJa Sleep Study Group
      First page: 167
      Abstract: It has recently been noted that a reduction in sleep reactivity, characterized as the trait-like degree to which exposure to stress interferes with sleep, and anxiety sensitivity are associated with reduced insomnia severity. This study aimed to examine whether sleep reactivity and anxiety sensitivity are associated with insomnia-related depression and anxiety among city government employees in Japan. This cross-sectional study included 1810 city government employees of Koka City, Japan (mean age (standard deviation): 45.33 (12.20) years) who completely answered the scales for sleep reactivity, anxiety sensitivity, anxiety, and depression. Stepwise multiple regression analysis adjusted for demographic data showed that anxiety sensitivity (β = 0.39) was significantly linked to anxiety, and sleep reactivity (β = 0.36) was significantly linked to depression in individuals with insomnia. Additionally, the results of a logistic regression analysis adjusted for demographic data showed that anxiety sensitivity and sleep reactivity were relevant factors for anxious insomnia (OR = 12.69) and depressive insomnia (OR = 8.73), respectively. Whereas both sleep reactivity (OR = 14.67) and anxiety sensitivity (OR = 6.14) were associated with combined insomnia. These findings indicate that sleep reactivity is strongly associated with depressive symptoms, and anxiety sensitivity is strongly associated with anxiety symptoms in individuals with insomnia.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-03-28
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020015
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 177-203: Traumatic Brain Injury, Sleep, and
           Melatonin—Intrinsic Changes with Therapeutic Potential

    • Authors: Allen Bell, Bryson Hewins, Courtney Bishop, Amanda Fortin, Jonathan Wang, Jennifer L. Creamer, Jacob Collen, J. Kent Werner
      First page: 177
      Abstract: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most prevalent causes of morbidity in the United States and is associated with numerous chronic sequelae long after the point of injury. One of the most common long-term complaints in patients with TBI is sleep dysfunction. It is reported that alterations in melatonin follow TBI and may be linked with various sleep and circadian disorders directly (via cellular signaling) or indirectly (via free radicals and inflammatory signaling). Work over the past two decades has contributed to our understanding of the role of melatonin as a sleep regulator and neuroprotective anti-inflammatory agent. Although there is increasing interest in the treatment of insomnia following TBI, a lack of standardization and rigor in melatonin research has left behind a trail of non-generalizable data and ambiguous treatment recommendations. This narrative review describes the underlying biochemical properties of melatonin as they are relevant to TBI. We also discuss potential benefits and a path forward regarding the therapeutic management of TBI with melatonin treatment, including its role as a neuroprotectant, a somnogen, and a modulator of the circadian rhythm.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-04-06
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020016
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 204-225: Deletion of the Circadian Clock
           Gene Per2 in the Whole Body, but Not in Neurons or Astroglia, Affects
           Sleep in Response to Sleep Deprivation

    • Authors: Katrin S. Wendrich, Hamid Azimi, Jürgen A. Ripperger, Yann Ravussin, Gregor Rainer, Urs Albrecht
      First page: 204
      Abstract: The sleep–wake cycle is a highly regulated behavior in which a circadian clock times sleep and waking, whereas a homeostatic process controls sleep need. Both the clock and the sleep homeostat interact, but to what extent they influence each other is not understood. There is evidence that clock genes, in particular Period2 (Per2), might be implicated in the sleep homeostatic process. Sleep regulation depends also on the proper functioning of neurons and astroglial cells, two cell-types in the brain that are metabolically dependent on each other. In order to investigate clock-driven contributions to sleep regulation we non-invasively measured sleep of mice that lack the Per2 gene either in astroglia, neurons, or all body cells. We observed that mice lacking Per2 in all body cells (Per2Brdm and TPer2 animals) display earlier onset of sleep after sleep deprivation (SD), whereas neuronal and astroglial Per2 knock-out animals (NPer2 and GPer2, respectively) were normal in that respect. It appears that systemic (whole body) Per2 expression is important for physiological sleep architecture expressed by number and length of sleep bouts, whereas neuronal and astroglial Per2 weakly impacts night-time sleep amount. Our results suggest that Per2 contributes to the timing of the regulatory homeostatic sleep response by delaying sleep onset after SD and attenuating the early night rebound response.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-04-13
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020017
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 226-233: Equivalent Improvements in Sleep
           Duration and Sleep Quality Regardless of Program Delivery Modality: The
           SLeep Education for Everyone Program (SLEEP)

    • Authors: Dawn A. Contreras, Elizabeth Williams, Robin M. Tucker
      First page: 226
      Abstract: Sleep issues are pervasive, and treatment can be difficult to access, if available at all. The purpose of this study was to test whether the delivery modality (online vs. in person) of the SLeep Education for Everyone Program (SLEEP) influenced programmatic outcomes. A total of 60 participants completed the study, 28 in the online group and 32 in the in-person group. Across all participants, SLEEP improved sleep duration, sleep quality, and sleep hygiene behaviors (p < 0.001 for all). When comparing delivery modality, sleep duration and quality improved similarly between groups; however, sleep hygiene behaviors improved more in the in-person group (p = 0.033). Sleep hygiene scores did not correlate with sleep duration or quality after the program. Based on these findings, SLEEP appears to be equally effective in improving sleep duration and quality when delivered online or in person. These findings suggest that SLEEP can be delivered based on the organization’s and participant’s resources, needs, and preferred style of interaction.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-04-18
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020018
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 234-248: Shift Happens: Emergency Physician
           Perspectives on Fatigue and Shift Work

    • Authors: Zachary Klinefelter, Emily L. Hirsh, Thomas W. Britt, Caroline L. George, Margaret Sulzbach, Lauren A. Fowler
      First page: 234
      Abstract: Research has shown that shiftworkers experience poor sleep and high levels of fatigue. Although considerable research has been performed on fatigue within many shift-work occupations, very little has been done with emergency physicians (EPs). This qualitative study was conducted with the goal of gaining insight into EPs’ perceptions of fatigue at work. Twenty EPs from an academic medical center participated in virtual interviews, with nine open-ended questions asked in a semi-structured interview format. Twelve common topics with four main themes emerged from the interviews. Three of these common themes included sources of fatigue (including both work- and home-related sources), consequences of fatigue (including impacts on individuals and performance), and prevention and mitigation strategies to cope with fatigue. The fourth main theme was the belief in the inevitability of fatigue due to high cognitive load, emotionally taxing work experiences, work unpredictability, and the 24/7 shift-work nature of emergency medicine. EPs’ experiences with fatigue are consistent with but extend those of other types of shiftworkers. Our findings suggest that EPs tend to incorporate the inevitability of fatigue at work into their identity as EPs and experience a sense of learned helplessness as a result, suggesting areas for future interventions.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-04-18
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020019
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 249-259: Sleep Disturbances in At-Risk
           Mental States and First Episode of Psychosis: A Narrative Review on
           Interventions

    • Authors: Lorena Marin, Armand Guàrdia, Alexandre González-Rodríguez, José Haba-Rubio, Mentxu Natividad, Elena Bosch, Noelia Domínguez, José Antonio Monreal
      First page: 249
      Abstract: Sleep disturbances are a common yet often overlooked symptom of psychosis that can drastically affect the quality of life and well-being of those living with the condition. Sleep disorders are common in people diagnosed with schizophrenia and have significant negative effects on the clinical course of the illness and the functional outcomes and quality of life of patients. There is a limited number of studies addressing this question in first-episode psychosis (FEP). In this narrative review, we aimed to provide an overview of sleep disorders in populations with FEP and at-risk mental states (ARMS). The review was focused on the various treatments currently used for sleep disorders, including both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatments. A total of 48 studies were included. We found that sleep disturbances are associated with attenuated psychotic symptoms and other psychopathological symptoms in ARMSs. The association of sleep disturbances with the transition to psychosis has been poorly investigated. Sleep disturbances have an impact on the quality of life and the psychopathological symptoms of people suffering from FEP. The non-pharmacological treatments include cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia, bright light therapy, cognitive restructuring techniques, sleep restriction therapy, basic sleep hygiene education, and the provision of portable sleep trackers. Other treatments include antipsychotics in acute phases and melatonin. The early intervention in sleep disturbances may improve overall prognosis in emerging psychosis populations.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-04-29
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020020
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 260-275: Relationship between the Biological
           Clock and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    • Authors: Jonathan Giebfried, Axel Lorentz
      First page: 260
      Abstract: The biological clock is a molecular oscillator that generates a 24-hour rhythm in accordance with the earth’s rotation. Physiological functions and pathophysiological processes such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are closely linked to the molecular clock. This review summarizes 14 studies in humans and mice on the interactions between the biological clock and IBD. It provides evidence that IBD negatively affect core clock gene expression, metabolism and immune functions. On the other hand, disruption of the clock promotes inflammation. Overexpression of clock genes can lead to inhibition of inflammatory processes, while silencing of clock genes can lead to irreversible disease activity. In both human and mouse studies, IBD and circadian rhythms have been shown to influence each other. Further research is needed to understand the exact mechanisms and to develop potential rhythm-related therapies to improve IBD.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-05-12
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020021
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 276-294: The Devastating Effects of Sleep
           Deprivation on Memory: Lessons from Rodent Models

    • Authors: Pinqiu Chen, Weikang Ban, Wenyan Wang, Yuyang You, Zhihong Yang
      First page: 276
      Abstract: In this narrative review article, we discuss the role of sleep deprivation (SD) in memory processing in rodent models. Numerous studies have examined the effects of SD on memory, with the majority showing that sleep disorders negatively affect memory. Currently, a consensus has not been established on which damage mechanism is the most appropriate. This critical issue in the neuroscience of sleep remains largely unknown. This review article aims to elucidate the mechanisms that underlie the damaging effects of SD on memory. It also proposes a scientific solution that might explain some findings. We have chosen to summarize literature that is both representative and comprehensive, as well as innovative in its approach. We examined the effects of SD on memory, including synaptic plasticity, neuritis, oxidative stress, and neurotransmitters. Results provide valuable insights into the mechanisms by which SD impairs memory function.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-05-15
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020022
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 295-312: The Relationship between Sleep,
           Chronotype, and Dental Caries—A Narrative Review

    • Authors: Anamaria Kurtović, Jasminka Talapko, Sanja Bekić, Ivana Škrlec
      First page: 295
      Abstract: This article provides an overview of how sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances mutually influence the occurrence of dental caries and how it is possible to reduce the risk of circadian rhythm disturbances, sleep, and associated adverse effects. Dental caries is a global problem worldwide that contributes to sociological limitations. Numerous factors influence the occurrence of dental caries, from socioeconomic factors to cariogenic bacteria, dietary habits, and oral hygiene. However, sleep disorders and circadian rhythm disturbances represent a new approach in the fight against the increasing prevalence of dental caries worldwide. Bacteria in the oral cavity and the oral microbiome are mainly responsible for the development of caries, and saliva plays an important role in their regulation. The circadian rhythm regulates numerous physiological functions, including sleep and saliva production. Disturbances in sleep and circadian rhythms affect saliva production, which impacts the development of dental caries, as saliva is necessary for regulating and maintaining oral health, especially for controlling oral infections. A person’s preference for a particular time of day depends on the circadian rhythm called chronotype. Individuals with an evening chronotype have a less healthy lifestyle that can lead to a higher caries risk than individuals with a morning chronotype. Because circadian rhythms are critical to maintaining sleep homeostasis and oral health, sleep disturbances can disrupt circadian rhythms and lead to a vicious cycle.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-05-15
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020023
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 313-332: Mindfulness, Subjective Cognitive
           Functioning, Sleep Timing and Time Expansion during COVID-19 Lockdown: A
           Longitudinal Study in Italy

    • Authors: Marco Fabbri
      First page: 313
      Abstract: During the COVID-19 lockdown, a distortion of time passage has been widely reported in association with a change in daily rhythm. However, several variables related to these changes have not been considered. The purpose of the present study was to assess the changes in dispositional mindfulness, time experience, sleep timing and subjective memory functioning. A longitudinal study was conducted on 39 Italian adults (53.85% males; 35.03 ± 14.02 years) assessing mindfulness, ad hoc questions of sleep habits during workdays and free days, chronotypes, subjective time experience, and memory functioning before (December 2019–March 2020) and during (April 2020–May 2020) the first Italian COVID-19 lockdown. Participants reported delayed sleep timing, a slowdown in the perception of the present time, a decrease of time pressure, and an increase in the feeling of time expansion/boredom. In addition to correlations between mindfulness, memory functioning, and subjective sleep duration during workdays, a mediation model showed that changes in the dispositional mindfulness determined a delay of bedtime during workdays through the mediation effect of increased feeling of time expansion/boredom. This finding highlighted the role of mindfulness in reducing the feeling of time expansion/boredom for regulating the sleep timing. The theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-05-30
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020024
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 333-349: The Burden of Comorbidities in
           Obstructive Sleep Apnea and the Pathophysiologic Mechanisms and Effects of
           CPAP

    • Authors: Victoria Sircu, Silvia-Iaroslava Colesnic, Serghei Covantsev, Olga Corlateanu, Anna Sukhotko, Cristian Popovici, Alexandru Corlateanu
      First page: 333
      Abstract: Micro-arousals and the repeated desaturation of oxyhemoglobin, which are typical in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), have adverse effects on the health of patients, leading to a wide range of complications such as cardiovascular (arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, chronic heart failure, arrhythmias, myocardial infarction), cerebrovascular (strokes), metabolic (insulin resistance, obesity, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome), gastrointestinal (non-alcoholic liver disease), urinary (chronic renal failure), and neuropsychiatric complications as well as a wide range of malignancies. These, in turn, have multilateral effects on familial, occupational, and social life, as well as increasing the risks of road traffic accidents and accidents at the workplace. Awareness, timely screening, and the prevention of complications play important roles in diagnosing and treating comorbid conditions. This review focuses on comorbidities in OSAS and the effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) therapy on their prognoses.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-06-19
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5020025
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 21-33: Habitual Sleep Patterns and Chronic
           Sleep Problems in Relation to Sex, Age, and Circadian Preference in a
           Population-Based Sample of Norwegian Adults

    • Authors: Ingvild West Saxvig, Bjørn Bjorvatn, Siri Waage
      First page: 21
      Abstract: Sleep patterns and problems vary in relation to internal (e.g., sex, age, circadian preference) and external (e.g., social structures) factors. The main aim of the present study was to describe habitual sleep patterns and chronic sleep problems in a population-based sample of Norwegian adults. During spring 2022, a sample of 1028 adults completed an online survey on sleep habits and problems. Response rate was 33.5%. The survey included the Munich ChronoType Questionnaire and items on circadian preference and chronic sleep problems. Mean workday sleep duration was 7:19 h (±199 min), and shorter in males (p = 0.035) and evening persons (p = 0.003). Short workday sleep duration (<6 h) was reported by 3.1% and was associated with evening preference (p = 0.001). Mean social jetlag was 0:51 h (±75 min), and longer in males (p = 0.036), younger adults (p < 0.001) and evening persons (p < 0.001). Long social jetlag (≥2 h) was reported by 11.2% and associated with younger age (p < 0.001) and evening preference (p < 0.001). Chronic sleep problems (≥3 months) were reported by 44.1%, and associated with female sex (p < 0.001) and evening preference (p = 0.002). Results underscore the importance of considering evening circadian preference as a risk factor for short workday sleep duration, long social jetlag and self-reported chronic sleep problems.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-01-06
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010003
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 34-44: Pregnant Women’s Attitudes and
           Beliefs towards Sleep and Exercise: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    • Authors: Summer Cannon, Melanie Hayman, Michele Lastella
      First page: 34
      Abstract: As many as 80% of women report experiencing poor sleep throughout pregnancy. Exercise is associated with many health benefits during pregnancy and is established as a non-pharmacological method to improve sleep in both pregnant and non-pregnant populations. Given the importance of sleep and exercise during pregnancy, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to (1) examine pregnant women’s attitudes and beliefs towards sleep and exercise during pregnancy, and (2) investigate the barriers women face to achieving good sleep and engaging in healthy levels of exercise. Participants were comprised of 258 pregnant Australian women (31.3 ± 5.1 years) who completed a 51-question online survey. Almost all (98%) participants believed exercise during pregnancy to be safe, whilst over half (67%) believed participating in more exercise will improve their sleep. Over 70% of participants reported experiencing barriers such as physical symptoms related to pregnancy that negatively impacted their ability to exercise. Almost all (95%) participants reported experiencing barriers to sleep in their current pregnancy. Present findings suggest that overcoming intrapersonal barriers should be a priority for any intervention aiming to improve sleep or increase exercise levels in pregnant populations. Findings from the present study highlight the need for a better understanding of women’s sleep experiences during pregnancy, and demonstrate how exercise may improve sleep and health outcomes.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010004
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 45-46: Acknowledgment to the Reviewers of
           Clocks & Sleep in 2022

    • Authors: Clocks & Sleep Editorial Office
      First page: 45
      Abstract: High-quality academic publishing is built on rigorous peer review [...]
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-01-28
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010005
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 47-61: The Influence of Light and Physical
           Activity on the Timing and Duration of Sleep: Insights from a Natural
           Model of Dance Training in Shifts

    • Authors: Ignacio Estevan, Natalia Coirolo, Bettina Tassino, Ana Silva
      First page: 47
      Abstract: Environmental, social, and behavioral variables influence sleep timing and duration. Using wrist-worn accelerometers, we recorded 31 dancers (age = 22.6 ± 3.5) for 17 days and who trained either in the morning (n = 15) or in the late evening (n = 16). We estimated the dancers’ daily sleep pattern: onset, end, and duration. In addition, their minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and mean light illuminance were also calculated daily and for the morning-shift and late-evening-shift time windows. On training days, the shifts involved differences in sleep timing, alarm-driven waking frequency, and the pattern of light exposure and MVPA duration. Sleep was strongly advanced when dancers trained in the morning and when alarms were used, while morning light had a low influence. Sleep was delayed when dancers were more exposed to light and displayed longer MVPA during the late evening. Sleep duration was strongly reduced on weekends and when alarms were used. A small reduction in sleep duration was also observed when morning illuminance was lower or when late evening MVPA was longer. Training in shifts influenced the timing of environmental and behavioral factors, which added up to shape dancers’ sleep timing and duration.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-01-31
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010006
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 62-71: Cavefishes in Chronobiological
           Research: A Narrative Review

    • Authors: Vera V. Pavlova, Viacheslav V. Krylov
      First page: 62
      Abstract: Cavefish are vertebrates living in extreme subterranean environments with no light, temperature changes, and limited food. Circadian rhythms in these fish are suppressed in natural habitats. However, they can be found in artificial light–dark cycles and other zeitgebers. The molecular circadian clock has its peculiarities in cavefish. In Astyanax mexicanus, the core clock mechanism is tonically repressed in the caves due to the overactivation of the light input pathway. A lack of functional light input pathway but rather the entrainment of circadian genes’ expression by scheduled feeding were revealed in more ancient Phreatichthys andruzzii. Different evolutionarily determined irregularities in the functioning of molecular circadian oscillators can be expected in other cavefish. The unique property of some species is the existence of surface and cave forms. Along with the ease of maintenance and breeding, it made cavefish a promising model for chronobiological studies. At the same time, a divergence of the circadian system between cavefish populations requires the strain of origin to be indicated in further research.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-02-10
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010007
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 72-84: Does Motor Memory Reactivation
           through Practice and Post-Learning Sleep Modulate Consolidation'

    • Authors: Whitney Stee, Philippe Peigneux
      First page: 72
      Abstract: Retrieving previously stored information makes memory traces labile again and can trigger restabilization in a strengthened or weakened form depending on the reactivation condition. Available evidence for long-term performance changes upon reactivation of motor memories and the effect of post-learning sleep on their consolidation remains scarce, and so does the data on the ways in which subsequent reactivation of motor memories interacts with sleep-related consolidation. Eighty young volunteers learned (Day 1) a 12-element Serial Reaction Time Task (SRTT) before a post-training Regular Sleep (RS) or Sleep Deprivation (SD) night, either followed (Day 2) by morning motor reactivation through a short SRTT testing or no motor activity. Consolidation was assessed after three recovery nights (Day 5). A 2 × 2 ANOVA carried on proportional offline gains did not evidence significant Reactivation (Morning Reactivation/No Morning Reactivation; p = 0.098), post-training Sleep (RS/SD; p = 0.301) or Sleep*Reactivation interaction (p = 0.257) effect. Our results are in line with prior studies suggesting a lack of supplementary performance gains upon reactivation, and other studies that failed to disclose post-learning sleep-related effects on performance improvement. However, lack of overt behavioural effects does not detract from the possibility of sleep- or reconsolidation-related covert neurophysiological changes underlying similar behavioural performance levels.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-02-17
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010008
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 85-93: Creating the Cave: Conducting
           Circadian Science in Early Childhood

    • Authors: Lauren E. Hartstein, Sachi D. Wong, Leen Abbas, Sophia Choubai, Jonah N. Wilson, Trace Jablin, Monique K. LeBourgeois
      First page: 85
      Abstract: In humans, physiological outputs of the body’s internal clock (i.e., saliva, serum, and temperature) can be collected to quantify the timing of the circadian system. In-lab assessment of salivary melatonin in a dimly lit environment is a common approach for adolescents and adults; however, the reliable measurement of melatonin onset in toddlers and preschoolers requires a modification of laboratory methods. For > 15 years, we have successfully collected data from ~250 in-home dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) assessments of children aged 2–5 years. Although in-home studies of circadian physiology may introduce a host of challenges and may increase the risk of incomplete data (e.g., accidental light exposure), in-home studies afford more comfort (e.g., less arousal in children) and flexibility for families. Here, we provide effective tools and strategies to assess children’s DLMO, a reliable marker of circadian timing, through a rigorous in-home protocol. We first describe our basic approach, including the study protocol, collection of actigraphy data, and strategies for training child participants to complete procedures. Next, we detail how to convert the home into a “cave”, or dim-light environment, and present guidelines for timing the salivary data collection. Lastly, we provide helpful tips to increase participants’ compliance based upon behavioral and developmental science tenets.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-02-20
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010009
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 94-97: Obituary for Dr. Konstantin Danilenko
           (19.03.1962–18.01.2023)

    • Authors: Arcady A. Putilov
      First page: 94
      Abstract: Dr [...]
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-03-02
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010010
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 98-115: Motus Vita Est: Fruit Flies Need to
           Be More Active and Sleep Less to Adapt to Either a Longer or Harder Life

    • Authors: Lyudmila P. Zakharenko, Dmitrii V. Petrovskii, Margarita A. Bobrovskikh, Nataly E. Gruntenko, Ekaterina Y. Yakovleva, Alexander V. Markov, Arcady A. Putilov
      First page: 98
      Abstract: Background: Activity plays a very important role in keeping bodies strong and healthy, slowing senescence, and decreasing morbidity and mortality. Drosophila models of evolution under various selective pressures can be used to examine whether increased activity and decreased sleep duration are associated with the adaptation of this nonhuman species to longer or harder lives. Methods: For several years, descendants of wild flies were reared in a laboratory without and with selection pressure. To maintain the “salt” and “starch” strains, flies from the wild population (called “control”) were reared on two adverse food substrates. The “long-lived” strain was maintained through artificial selection for late reproduction. The 24 h patterns of locomotor activity and sleep in flies from the selected and unselected strains (902 flies in total) were studied in constant darkness for at least, 5 days. Results: Compared to the control flies, flies from the selected strains demonstrated enhanced locomotor activity and reduced sleep duration. The most profound increase in locomotor activity was observed in flies from the starch (short-lived) strain. Additionally, the selection changed the 24 h patterns of locomotor activity and sleep. For instance, the morning and evening peaks of locomotor activity were advanced and delayed, respectively, in flies from the long-lived strain. Conclusion: Flies become more active and sleep less in response to various selection pressures. These beneficial changes in trait values might be relevant to trade-offs among fitness-related traits, such as body weight, fecundity, and longevity.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-03-03
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010011
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 116-140: Light as a Modulator of
           Non-Image-Forming Brain Functions—Positive and Negative Impacts of
           Increasing Light Availability

    • Authors: Islay Campbell, Roya Sharifpour, Gilles Vandewalle
      First page: 116
      Abstract: Light use is rising steeply, mainly because of the advent of light-emitting diode (LED) devices. LEDs are frequently blue-enriched light sources and may have different impacts on the non-image forming (NIF) system, which is maximally sensitive to blue-wavelength light. Most importantly, the timing of LED device use is widespread, leading to novel light exposure patterns on the NIF system. The goal of this narrative review is to discuss the multiple aspects that we think should be accounted for when attempting to predict how this situation will affect the NIF impact of light on brain functions. We first cover both the image-forming and NIF pathways of the brain. We then detail our current understanding of the impact of light on human cognition, sleep, alertness, and mood. Finally, we discuss questions concerning the adoption of LED lighting and screens, which offer new opportunities to improve well-being, but also raise concerns about increasing light exposure, which may be detrimental to health, particularly in the evening.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-03-17
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010012
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Clocks & Sleep, Vol. 5, Pages 141-151: Determinants of Health Inequalities
           in Iran and Saudi Arabia: A Systematic Review of the Sleep Literature

    • Authors: Comsar Ndiaye, Yosr Ayedi, Faustin Armel Etindele Sosso
      First page: 141
      Abstract: Sleep health inequalities represent an increasing public health concern. Among multiple determinants affecting sleep health, there is people’s socioeconomic status (SES), and no systematic review on the relationship between SES and sleep health has been previously conducted in Iran and Saudi Arabia. Following the Prisma protocol, ten articles were selected. Findings revealed that the combined number of participants was N = 37,455 participants, including 73.23% of children and adolescents (n = 27,670) and 26.77% of adults (n = 10,026). The smallest sample was N = 715 and the larger was N = 13,486. In all these studies, sleep variables were assessed using self-reported questionnaires. The studies conducted in Iran assessed the risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), while those in Saudi Arabia were interested in sleep duration, nap time, bedtime, rise time and insomnia. The studies performed on adult populations in Iran and Saudi Arabia concluded that there is no significant association between SES determinants and sleep components in adult populations. One study in Iran found a significant association between parent’s low SES and children and adolescent insomnia; and one study in Saudi Arabia found a significant association between the father’s education and the longer sleep duration of their children. More longitudinal studies are necessary to establish a causal relationship between public health policies and sleep health inequalities. An extension of the investigation to more sleep disturbances is required to cover the entirety of sleep health inequalities in Iran and Saudi Arabia.
      Citation: Clocks & Sleep
      PubDate: 2023-03-22
      DOI: 10.3390/clockssleep5010013
      Issue No: Vol. 5, No. 1 (2023)
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 348)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 66)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 267)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 346)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 209)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 200)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 199)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

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