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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Revista Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Costarricense de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Cultura Teológica     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios e Investigación en Psicología y Educación     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología : Segunda Epoca     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Electrónica de Metodología Aplicada     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Wímb Lu     Open Access  
Revue de psychoéducation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée / European Review of Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revue québécoise de psychologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia     Open Access  
Roeper Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Rorschachiana     Hybrid Journal  
RUDN Journal of Psychology and Pedagogics     Open Access  
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Satir International Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
School Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Seeing and Perceiving     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexual Abuse A Journal of Research and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Offending : Theory, Research, and Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Simmel Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 3)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Issues and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Psychological and Personality Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Somnologie - Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Suma Psicologica     Open Access  
Tajdida : Jurnal Pemikiran dan Gerakan Muhammadiyah     Open Access  
Teaching of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Terapia Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tesis Psicologica     Open Access  
TESTFÓRUM     Open Access  
The Arts in Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Brown University Psychopharmacology Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Clinical Neuropsychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The International Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series B : Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Sport Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Therapeutic Communities : The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Thinking & Reasoning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tobacco Use Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transactional Analysis Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Undecidable Unconscious : A Journal of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Universal Journal of Psychology     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Vinculo - Revista do NESME     Open Access  
VIVESIANA     Open Access  
Voices : The Art and Science of Psychotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Yaşam Becerileri Psikoloji Dergisi / Life Skills Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Arbeits - und Organisationspsychologie A&O     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Differentielle und Diagnostische Psychologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Erziehungswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gesundheitspsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Neuropsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Pädagogische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie, Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie / Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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Open Mind
Number of Followers: 2  

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ISSN (Online) 2470-2986
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  • Better Together: 14-Month-Old Infants Expect Agents to Cooperate

    • Pages: 1 - 16
      Abstract: AbstractHumans engage in cooperative activities from early on and the breadth of human cooperation is unparalleled. Human preference for cooperation might reflect cognitive and motivational mechanisms that drive engagement in cooperative activities. Here we investigate early indices of humans’ cooperative abilities and test whether 14-month-old infants expect agents to prefer cooperative over individual goal achievement. Three groups of infants saw videos of agents facing a choice between two actions that led to identical rewards but differed in the individual costs. Our results show that, in line with prior research, infants expect agents to make instrumentally rational choices and prefer the less costly of two individual action alternatives. In contrast, when one of the action alternatives is cooperative, infants expect agents to choose cooperation over individual action, even though the cooperative action demands more effort from each agent to achieve the same outcome. Finally, we do not find evidence that infants expect agents to choose the less costly alternative when both options entail cooperative action. Combined, these results indicate an ontogenetically early expectation of cooperation, and raise interesting implications and questions regarding the nature of infants’ representations of cooperative actions and their utility.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Feb 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00115
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • “Now I Get It!”: Eureka Experiences During the Acquisition of
           Mathematical Concepts

    • Pages: 17 - 41
      Abstract: AbstractMany famous scientists have reported anecdotes where a new understanding occurred to them suddenly, in an unexpected flash. Do people generally experience such “Eureka” moments when learning science concepts' And if so, do these episodes truly vehicle sudden insights, or is this impression illusory' To address these questions, we developed a paradigm where participants were taught the mathematical concept of geodesic, which generalizes the common notion of straight line to straight trajectories drawn on curved surfaces. After studying lessons introducing this concept on the sphere, participants (N = 56) were tested on their understanding of geodesics on the sphere and on other surfaces. Our findings indicate that Eureka experiences are common when learning mathematics, with reports by 34 (61%) participants. Moreover, Eureka experiences proved an accurate description of participants’ learning, in two respects. First, Eureka experiences were associated with learning and generalization: the participants who reported experiencing Eurekas performed better at identifying counterintuitive geodesics on new surfaces. Second, and in line with the firstperson experience of a sudden insight, our findings suggest that the learning mechanisms responsible for Eureka experiences are inaccessible to reflective introspection. Specifically, reports of Eureka experiences and of participants’ confidence in their own understanding were associated with different profiles of performance, indicating that the mechanisms bringing about Eureka experiences and those informing reflective confidence were at least partially dissociated. Learning mathematical concepts thus appears to involve mechanisms that operate unconsciously, except when a key computational step is reached and a sudden insight breaks into consciousness.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Feb 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00116
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • The Missing VP Illusion in Spanish: Assessing the Role of Language
           Statistics and Working Memory

    • Pages: 42 - 66
      Abstract: AbstractIn English, double center-embedded sentences yield a so-called “missing VP illusion”: When they are ungrammatical due to a missing verb, they are judged as equally or even more acceptable than their grammatical counterparts. The illusion is often attributed to working memory limitations. Additionally, it has been suggested that statistical differences across languages—e.g., the lower frequency of consecutive verb clusters in verb-initial languages—play a role, since languages with verb-final embedded clauses are less susceptible to the illusion than English. In two speeded acceptability experiments, we demonstrate that the illusion arises in Spanish, a verb-initial language. We also find that the strength of the illusion is modulated by the number of consecutive verbs, consistent with the involvement of language statistics. By contrast, we do not find that participants’ working memory modulates the illusion, failing to support a role of memory limitations. Our results support the generalization that cross-linguistic variation in the missing VP illusion is associated with language statistics and verb position and they demonstrate that this is the case even in languages in which word order is not a reliable processing cue.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Feb 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00118
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Expecting the Unexpected: Infants Use Others’ Surprise to Revise
           Their Own Expectations

    • Pages: 67 - 83
      Abstract: AbstractHuman infants show systematic responses to events that violate their expectations. Can they also revise these expectations based on others’ expressions of surprise' Here we ask whether infants (N = 156, mean = 15.2 months, range: 12.0–18.0 months) can use an experimenter’s expression of surprise to revise their own expectations about statistically probable vs. improbable events. An experimenter sampled a ball from a box of red and white balls and briefly displayed either a surprised or an unsurprised expression at the outcome before revealing it to the infant. Following an unsurprised expression, the results were consistent with prior work; infants looked longer at a statistically improbable outcome than a probable outcome. Following a surprised expression, however, this standard pattern disappeared or was even reversed. These results suggest that even before infants can observe the unexpected events themselves, they can use others’ surprise to expect the unexpected. Starting early in life, human learners can leverage social information that signals others’ prediction error to update their own predictions.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00117
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Davinci the Dualist: The Mind–Body Divide in Large Language Models
           and in Human Learners

    • Pages: 84 - 101
      Abstract: AbstractA large literature suggests that people are intuitive Dualists—they consider the mind ethereal, distinct from the body. Furthermore, Dualism emerges, in part, via learning (e.g., Barlev & Shtulman, 2021). Human learners, however, are also endowed with innate systems of core knowledge, and recent results suggest that core knowledge begets Dualism (Berent, 2023a; Berent et al., 2022). The resulting question, then, is whether the acquisition of Dualism requires core knowledge, or whether Dualism is learnable from experience alone, via domain-general mechanism. Since human learners are equipped with both systems, the evidence from humans cannot decide this question. Accordingly, here, we probe for a mind–body divide in Davinci—a large language model (LLM) that is devoid of core knowledge. We show that Davinci still leans towards Dualism, and that this bias increases systematically with the learner’s inductive potential. Thus, davinci (which forms part of the GPT-3 suite) exhibits mild Dualist tendencies, whereas its descendent, text-davinci-003 (a GPT-3.5 model), shows a stronger bias. It selectively considers thoughts (epistemic states) as disembodied—as unlikely to show up in the body (in the brain). Unlike humans, GPT 3.5 categorically rejected the persistence of the psyche after death. Still, when probed about life, GPT 3.5 showed robust Dualist tendencies. These results demonstrate that the mind–body divide is partly learnable from experience. While results from LLMs cannot fully determine how humans acquire Dualism, they do place a higher burden of proof on nativist theories that trace Dualism to innate core cognition (Berent, 2023a; Berent et al., 2022).
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00120
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Quantifying Bias in Hierarchical Category Systems

    • Pages: 102 - 130
      Abstract: Categorization is ubiquitous in human cognition and society, and shapes how we perceive and understand the world. Because categories reflect the needs and perspectives of their creators, no category system is entirely objective, and inbuilt biases can have harmful social consequences. Here we propose methods for measuring biases in hierarchical systems of categories, a common form of category organization with multiple levels of abstraction. We illustrate these methods by quantifying the extent to which library classification systems are biased in favour of western concepts and male authors. We analyze a large library data set including more than 3 million books organized into thousands of categories, and find that categories related to religion show greater western bias than do categories related to literature or history, and that books written by men are distributed more broadly across library classification systems than are books written by women. We also find that the Dewey Decimal Classification shows a greater level of bias than does the Library of Congress Classification. Although we focus on library classification as a case study, our methods are general, and can be used to measure biases in both natural and institutional category systems across a range of domains.11
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00121
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • The Accuracy and Precision of Memory for Natural Scenes: A Walk in the
           Park

    • Pages: 131 - 147
      Abstract: AbstractIt is challenging to quantify the accuracy and precision of scene memory because it is unclear what ‘space’ scenes occupy (how can we quantify error when misremembering a natural scene'). To address this, we exploited the ecologically valid, metric space in which scenes occur and are represented: routes. In a delayed estimation task, participants briefly saw a target scene drawn from a video of an outdoor ‘route loop’, then used a continuous report wheel of the route to pinpoint the scene. Accuracy was high and unbiased, indicating there was no net boundary extension/contraction. Interestingly, precision was higher for routes that were more self-similar (as characterized by the half-life, in meters, of a route’s Multiscale Structural Similarity index), consistent with previous work finding a ‘similarity advantage’ where memory precision is regulated according to task demands. Overall, scenes were remembered to within a few meters of their actual location.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00122
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Systematic Human Learning and Generalization From a Brief Tutorial With
           Explanatory Feedback

    • Pages: 148 - 176
      Abstract: We investigate human adults’ ability to learn an abstract reasoning task quickly and to generalize outside of the range of training examples. Using a task based on a solution strategy in Sudoku, we provide Sudoku-naive participants with a brief instructional tutorial with explanatory feedback using a narrow range of training examples. We find that most participants who master the task do so within 10 practice trials and generalize well to puzzles outside of the training range. We also find that most of those who master the task can describe a valid solution strategy, and such participants perform better on transfer puzzles than those whose strategy descriptions are vague or incomplete. Interestingly, fewer than half of our human participants were successful in acquiring a valid solution strategy, and this ability was associated with completion of high school algebra and geometry. We consider the implications of these findings for understanding human systematic reasoning, as well as the challenges these findings pose for building computational models that capture all aspects of our findings, and we point toward a role for learning from instructions and explanations to support rapid learning and generalization.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00123
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Word Frequency and Predictability Dissociate in Naturalistic Reading

    • Pages: 177 - 201
      Abstract: AbstractMany studies of human language processing have shown that readers slow down at less frequent or less predictable words, but there is debate about whether frequency and predictability effects reflect separable cognitive phenomena: are cognitive operations that retrieve words from the mental lexicon based on sensory cues distinct from those that predict upcoming words based on context' Previous evidence for a frequency-predictability dissociation is mostly based on small samples (both for estimating predictability and frequency and for testing their effects on human behavior), artificial materials (e.g., isolated constructed sentences), and implausible modeling assumptions (discrete-time dynamics, linearity, additivity, constant variance, and invariance over time), which raises the question: do frequency and predictability dissociate in ordinary language comprehension, such as story reading' This study leverages recent progress in open data and computational modeling to address this question at scale. A large collection of naturalistic reading data (six datasets, >2.2 M datapoints) is analyzed using nonlinear continuous-time regression, and frequency and predictability are estimated using statistical language models trained on more data than is currently typical in psycholinguistics. Despite the use of naturalistic data, strong predictability estimates, and flexible regression models, results converge with earlier experimental studies in supporting dissociable and additive frequency and predictability effects.
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00119
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Infants Infer Social Relationships Between Individuals Who Engage in
           Imitative Social Interactions

    • Pages: 202 - 216
      Abstract: AbstractInfants are born into rich social networks and are faced with the challenge of learning about them. When infants observe social interactions, they make predictions about future behavior, but it is not clear whether these predictions are based on social dispositions, social relationships, or both. The current studies (N = 188, N = 90 males) address this question in 12-month-old infants and 16- to 18-month-old toddlers who observe social interactions involving imitation. In Studies 1 and 3, infants and toddlers expected that imitators, compared to non-imitators, would respond to their social partners’ distress. Likewise, they expected the targets of imitation, compared to non-targets, to respond to their partner’s distress. In Study 2, these expectations did not generalize to interactions with a new partner, providing evidence that infants learned about the relationships between individuals as opposed to their dispositions. In Study 3, infants did not make predictions about responses to laughter, suggesting that infants see imitation as indicative of a specific kind of social relationship. Together, these results provide evidence that imitative interactions support infants’ and toddlers’ learning about the social relationships connecting unknown individuals.
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00124
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Signal Smoothing and Syntactic Choices: A Critical Reflection on the UID
           Hypothesis

    • Pages: 217 - 234
      Abstract: AbstractThe Smooth Signal Redundancy Hypothesis explains variations in syllable length as a means to more uniformly distribute information throughout the speech signal. The Uniform Information Density hypothesis seeks to generalize this to choices on all linguistic levels, particularly syntactic choices. While there is some evidence for the Uniform Information Density hypothesis, it faces several challenges, four of which are discussed in this paper. First, it is not clear what exactly counts as uniform. Second, there are syntactic alternations that occur systematically but that can cause notable fluctuations in the information signature. Third, there is an increasing body of negative results. Fourth, there is a lack of large-scale evidence. As to the fourth point, this paper provides a broader array of data—936 sentence pairs for nine syntactic constructions—and analyzes them in a test setup that treats the hypothesis as a classifier. For our data, the Uniform Information Density hypothesis showed little predictive capacity. We explore ways to reconcile our data with theory.
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00125
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • A Deep Learning Approach to Analyzing Continuous-Time Cognitive Processes

    • Pages: 235 - 264
      Abstract: AbstractThe dynamics of the mind are complex. Mental processes unfold continuously in time and may be sensitive to a myriad of interacting variables, especially in naturalistic settings. But statistical models used to analyze data from cognitive experiments often assume simplistic dynamics. Recent advances in deep learning have yielded startling improvements to simulations of dynamical cognitive processes, including speech comprehension, visual perception, and goal-directed behavior. But due to poor interpretability, deep learning is generally not used for scientific analysis. Here, we bridge this gap by showing that deep learning can be used, not just to imitate, but to analyze complex processes, providing flexible function approximation while preserving interpretability. To do so, we define and implement a nonlinear regression model in which the probability distribution over the response variable is parameterized by convolving the history of predictors over time using an artificial neural network, thereby allowing the shape and continuous temporal extent of effects to be inferred directly from time series data. Our approach relaxes standard simplifying assumptions (e.g., linearity, stationarity, and homoscedasticity) that are implausible for many cognitive processes and may critically affect the interpretation of data. We demonstrate substantial improvements on behavioral and neuroimaging data from the language processing domain, and we show that our model enables discovery of novel patterns in exploratory analyses, controls for diverse confounds in confirmatory analyses, and opens up research questions in cognitive (neuro)science that are otherwise hard to study.
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00126
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Response to Difficulty Drives Variation in IQ Test Performance

    • Pages: 265 - 277
      Abstract: AbstractIn a large (N = 300), pre-registered experiment and data analysis model, we find that individual variation in overall performance on Raven’s Progressive Matrices is substantially driven by differential strategizing in the face of difficulty. Some participants choose to spend more time on hard problems while others choose to spend less and these differences explain about 42% of the variance in overall performance. In a data analysis jointly predicting participants’ reaction times and accuracy on each item, we find that the Raven’s task captures at most half of participants’ variation in time-controlled ability (48%) down to almost none (3%), depending on which notion of ability is assumed. Our results highlight the role that confounding factors such as motivation play in explaining individuals’ differential performance in IQ testing.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00127
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Multiple Object Tracking Without Pre-attentive Indexing

    • Pages: 278 - 308
      Abstract: AbstractMultiple object tracking (MOT) involves simultaneous tracking of a certain number of target objects amongst a larger set of objects as they all move unpredictably over time. The prevalent explanation for successful target tracking by humans in MOT involving visually identical objects is based on the Visual Indexing Theory. This assumes that each target is indexed by a pointer using a non-conceptual mechanism to maintain an object’s identity even as its properties change over time. Thus, successful tracking requires successful indexing and the absence of identification errors. Identity maintenance and successful tracking are measured in terms of identification (ID) and tracking accuracy respectively, with higher accuracy indicating better identity maintenance or better tracking. Existing evidence suggests that humans have high tracking accuracy despite poor identification accuracy, suggesting that it might be possible to perform MOT without indexing. Our work adds to existing evidence for this position through two experiments, and presents a computational model of multiple object tracking that does not require indexes. Our empirical results show that identification accuracy is aligned with tracking accuracy in humans for tracking up to three, but is lower when tracking more objects. Our computational model of MOT without indexing accounts for several empirical tracking accuracy patterns shown in earlier studies, reproduces the dissociation between tracking and identification accuracy produced earlier in the literature as well as in our experiments, and makes several novel predictions.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00128
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • It’s All in the Interaction: Early Acquired Words Are Both Frequent
           and Highly Imageable

    • Pages: 309 - 332
      Abstract: AbstractPrior studies have found that children are more likely to learn words that are frequent in the input and highly imageable. Many theories of word learning, however, predict that these variables should interact, particularly early in development: frequency of a form is of little use if you cannot infer its meaning, and a concrete word cannot be acquired if you never hear it. The present study explores this interaction, how it changes over time and its relationship to syntactic category effects in children acquiring American English. We analyzed 1461 monolingual English-speaking children aged 1;4–2;6 from the MB-CDI norming study (Fenson et al., 1994). Word frequency was estimated from the CHILDES database, and imageability was measured using adult ratings. There was a strong over-additive interaction between frequency and imageability, such that children were more likely to learn a word if it was both highly imageable and very frequent. This interaction was larger in younger children than in older children. There were reliable differences between syntactic categories independent of frequency and imageability, which did not interact with age. These findings are consistent with theories in which children’s early words are acquired by mapping frequent word forms onto concrete, perceptually available referents, such that highly frequent items are only acquired if they are also imageable, and vice versa.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00130
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Preliminary Evidence for Global Properties in Human Listeners During
           Natural Auditory Scene Perception

    • Pages: 333 - 365
      Abstract: AbstractTheories of auditory and visual scene analysis suggest the perception of scenes relies on the identification and segregation of objects within it, resembling a detail-oriented processing style. However, a more global process may occur while analyzing scenes, which has been evidenced in the visual domain. It is our understanding that a similar line of research has not been explored in the auditory domain; therefore, we evaluated the contributions of high-level global and low-level acoustic information to auditory scene perception. An additional aim was to increase the field’s ecological validity by using and making available a new collection of high-quality auditory scenes. Participants rated scenes on 8 global properties (e.g., open vs. enclosed) and an acoustic analysis evaluated which low-level features predicted the ratings. We submitted the acoustic measures and average ratings of the global properties to separate exploratory factor analyses (EFAs). The EFA of the acoustic measures revealed a seven-factor structure explaining 57% of the variance in the data, while the EFA of the global property measures revealed a two-factor structure explaining 64% of the variance in the data. Regression analyses revealed each global property was predicted by at least one acoustic variable (R2 = 0.33–0.87). These findings were extended using deep neural network models where we examined correlations between human ratings of global properties and deep embeddings of two computational models: an object-based model and a scene-based model. The results support that participants’ ratings are more strongly explained by a global analysis of the scene setting, though the relationship between scene perception and auditory perception is multifaceted, with differing correlation patterns evident between the two models. Taken together, our results provide evidence for the ability to perceive auditory scenes from a global perspective. Some of the acoustic measures predicted ratings of global scene perception, suggesting representations of auditory objects may be transformed through many stages of processing in the ventral auditory stream, similar to what has been proposed in the ventral visual stream. These findings and the open availability of our scene collection will make future studies on perception, attention, and memory for natural auditory scenes possible.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00131
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • What Does That Mean' Complementizers and Epistemic Authority

    • Pages: 366 - 394
      Abstract: AbstractA core goal of research in language is to understand the factors that guide choice of linguistic form where more than one option is syntactically well-formed. We discuss one case of optionality that has generated longstanding discussion: the choice of either using or dropping the English complementizer that in sentences like I think (that) the cat followed the dog. Existing psycholinguistic analyses tie that-usage to production pressures associated with sentence planning (Ferreira & Dell, 2000), avoidance of ambiguity (Hawkins, 2004), and relative information density (Jaeger, 2010). Building on observations from cross-linguistic fieldwork, we present a novel proposal in which English that can serve to mark a speaker’s “epistemic authority” over the information packaged within the embedded clause; that is, it indicates that the speaker has more knowledge of the embedded proposition compared with their addressee and thus has a perspective that they believe their addressee doesn’t share. Testing this proposal with a forced-choice task and a series of corpus surveys, we find that English that is keyed to the use of embedded speaker (first-person) subject pronouns and occurs in sentences containing newsworthy information. Our account of that-optionality takes into account why that is associated with both (i) a dense information signal and (ii) semantic-pragmatic content, as well as extending to cases of non-optionality in subject/sentence-initial clauses (e.g., *(That) the cat is following the dog, I already know) and fragment answers (e.g., What do you already know' *(That) the cat is following the dog), where that is required.
      PubDate: Tue, 26 Mar 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00135
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Bayesian Reinforcement Learning With Limited Cognitive Load

    • Pages: 395 - 438
      Abstract: AbstractAll biological and artificial agents must act given limits on their ability to acquire and process information. As such, a general theory of adaptive behavior should be able to account for the complex interactions between an agent’s learning history, decisions, and capacity constraints. Recent work in computer science has begun to clarify the principles that shape these dynamics by bridging ideas from reinforcement learning, Bayesian decision-making, and rate-distortion theory. This body of work provides an account of capacity-limited Bayesian reinforcement learning, a unifying normative framework for modeling the effect of processing constraints on learning and action selection. Here, we provide an accessible review of recent algorithms and theoretical results in this setting, paying special attention to how these ideas can be applied to studying questions in the cognitive and behavioral sciences.
      PubDate: Tue, 16 Apr 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00132
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Evidence for Infant-directed Speech Preference Is Consistent Across
           Large-scale, Multi-site Replication and Meta-analysis

    • Pages: 439 - 461
      Abstract: AbstractThere is substantial evidence that infants prefer infant-directed speech (IDS) to adult-directed speech (ADS). The strongest evidence for this claim has come from two large-scale investigations: i) a community-augmented meta-analysis of published behavioral studies and ii) a large-scale multi-lab replication study. In this paper, we aim to improve our understanding of the IDS preference and its boundary conditions by combining and comparing these two data sources across key population and design characteristics of the underlying studies. Our analyses reveal that both the meta-analysis and multi-lab replication show moderate effect sizes (d ≈ 0.35 for each estimate) and that both of these effects persist when relevant study-level moderators are added to the models (i.e., experimental methods, infant ages, and native languages). However, while the overall effect size estimates were similar, the two sources diverged in the effects of key moderators: both infant age and experimental method predicted IDS preference in the multi-lab replication study, but showed no effect in the meta-analysis. These results demonstrate that the IDS preference generalizes across a variety of experimental conditions and sampling characteristics, while simultaneously identifying key differences in the empirical picture offered by each source individually and pinpointing areas where substantial uncertainty remains about the influence of theoretically central moderators on IDS preference. Overall, our results show how meta-analyses and multi-lab replications can be used in tandem to understand the robustness and generalizability of developmental phenomena.
      PubDate: Tue, 16 Apr 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00134
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • The Role of Uniform Textures in Making Texture Elements Visible in the
           Visual Periphery

    • Pages: 462 - 482
      Abstract: AbstractThere are important differences between central and peripheral vision. With respect to shape, contours retain phenomenal sharpness, although some contours disappear if they are near other contours. This leads to some uniform textures to appear non-uniform (Honeycomb illusion, Bertamini et al., 2016). Unlike other phenomena of shape perception in the periphery, this illusion is showing how continuity of the texture does not contribute to phenomenal continuity. We systematically varied the relationship between central and peripheral regions, and we collected subjective reports (how far can one see lines) as well as judgments of line orientation. We used extended textures created with a square grid and some additional lines that are invisible when they are located at the corners of the grid, or visible when they are separated from the grid (control condition). With respects to subjective reports, we compared the region of visibility for cases in which the texture was uniform (Exp 1a), or when in a central region the lines were different (Exp 1b). There were no differences, showing no role of objective uniformity on visibility. Next, in addition to the region of visibility we measured sensitivity using a forced-choice task (line tilted left or right) (Exp 2). The drop in sensitivity with eccentricity matched the size of the region in which lines were perceived in the illusion condition, but not in the control condition. When participants were offered a choice to report of the lines were present or absent (Exp 3) they confirmed that they did not see them in the illusion condition, but saw them in the control condition. We conclude that mechanisms that control perception of contours operate differently in the periphery, and override prior expectations, including that of uniformity. Conversely, when elements are detected in the periphery, we assign to them properties based on information from central vision, but these shapes cannot be identified correctly when the task requires such discrimination.
      PubDate: Tue, 16 Apr 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00136
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Toddlers Prefer Agents Who Help Those Facing Harder Tasks

    • Pages: 483 - 499
      Abstract: AbstractCapacities to understand and evaluate others’ actions are fundamental to human social life. Infants and toddlers are sensitive to the costs of others’ actions, infer others’ values from the costs of the actions they take, and prefer those who help others to those who hinder them, but it is largely unknown whether and how cost considerations inform early understanding of third-party prosocial actions. In three experiments (N = 94), we asked whether 16-month-old toddlers value agents who selectively help those who need it most. Presented with two agents who attempted two tasks, toddlers preferentially looked to and touched someone who helped the agent in greater need, both when one agent’s task required more effort and when the tasks were the same but one agent was weaker. These results provide evidence that toddlers engage in need-based evaluations of helping, applying their understanding of action utilities to their social evaluations.
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Apr 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00129
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • On the Role of Loopholes in Polite Communication: Linking Subjectivity and
           Pragmatic Inference

    • Pages: 500 - 510
      Abstract: AbstractExisting proposals on the attenuating uses of indirect, negated expressions (e.g., not happy to mean sad) agree that speakers exploit indirectness for pragmatic purposes but differ on the underlying sources they attribute to these uses. Here, we synthesize existing proposals via adjective subjectivity, which operationalizes the notion of loopholes for plausible deniability. We present experimental evidence that the degree of subjectivity of an adjective predicts the degree to which participants strengthen the negated adjective’s meaning, but only if the adjective under consideration has an evaluatively-positive meaning. This finding indicates that speakers may intentionally use negation to leave themselves the option to retract the implicated face-threatening meaning if openly challenged.
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Apr 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00133
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Does Distance Matter' How Physical and Social Distance Shape Our
           Perceived Obligations to Others

    • Pages: 511 - 534
      Abstract: AbstractDebates within moral philosophy have long centered on the question of whether we are more obligated to help those close to us compared to those who are farther away. Despite these debates, we have little understanding of our psychological intuitions about these issues. In the current study, we presented adults and children (5- to 9-year-olds) in the United States (N = 406) with hypothetical scenarios involving pairs of socially and physically close and far strangers and asked about their obligations to help one another. In general, younger children (∼6-year-olds) were more inclined to describe strangers as obligated to help one another compared to older children (∼8-year-olds) and adults. For physical distance, we documented an age-related trend where younger children were less inclined to consider physical distance when ascribing obligations to help compared to older children and adults. For social distance, we found different results depending on how social distance was manipulated. In Study 1, where social distance was manipulated via mere similarity, we found an age-related effect where adults, but not younger or older children, judged that individuals are more obligated to help socially close others relative to far ones. In Study 2, where social distance was manipulated via explicit group membership, we did not find an age trend. Instead, participants generally described individuals as more obligated to help an ingroup member relative to an outgroup one. These results demonstrate that the tendency to deny obligations towards distant others is a belief that emerges relatively late in development.
      PubDate: Sun, 05 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00138
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Examining the Impact of Reading Fluency on Lexical Decision Results in
           French 6th Graders

    • Pages: 535 - 557
      Abstract: AbstractPurpose: How does lexical decision behavior vary in students with the same grade level (all students were in their first year of middle-school), but different levels of reading fluency' Here, we tested a prediction of the dual-route model: as fluency increases, variations in the results may reflect a decreasing reliance on decoding and an increasing reliance on the lexical route. Method: 1,501 French 6th graders passed a one-minute speeded reading-aloud task evaluating fluency, and a ten-minute computerized lexical decision task evaluating the impact of lexicality, length, word frequency and pseudoword type. Results: As predicted, the word length effect varied dramatically with reading fluency, with the least fluent students showing a length effect even for frequent words. The frequency effect also varied, but solely in proportion to overall reading speed, suggesting that frequency affects the decision stage similarly in all readers, while length disproportionately impacts poor readers. Response times and errors were also affected by pseudoword type (e.g., letter substitutions or transpositions), but these effects showed minimal variation with fluency. Overall, lexical decision variables were excellent predictors of reading fluency (r = 0.62). Conclusion: Our results highlight the variability in middle-school reading ability and describe how a simple lexical decision task can be used to assess students’ mental lexicon (vocabulary) and the automatization of reading skills.
      PubDate: Sun, 05 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00140
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Neural Networks as Cognitive Models of the Processing of Syntactic
           Constraints

    • Pages: 558 - 614
      Abstract: AbstractLanguages are governed by syntactic constraints—structural rules that determine which sentences are grammatical in the language. In English, one such constraint is subject-verb agreement, which dictates that the number of a verb must match the number of its corresponding subject: “the dogs run”, but “the dog runs”. While this constraint appears to be simple, in practice speakers make agreement errors, particularly when a noun phrase near the verb differs in number from the subject (for example, a speaker might produce the ungrammatical sentence “the key to the cabinets are rusty”). This phenomenon, referred to as agreement attraction, is sensitive to a wide range of properties of the sentence; no single existing model is able to generate predictions for the wide variety of materials studied in the human experimental literature. We explore the viability of neural network language models—broad-coverage systems trained to predict the next word in a corpus—as a framework for addressing this limitation. We analyze the agreement errors made by Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) networks and compare them to those of humans. The models successfully simulate certain results, such as the so-called number asymmetry and the difference between attraction strength in grammatical and ungrammatical sentences, but failed to simulate others, such as the effect of syntactic distance or notional (conceptual) number. We further evaluate networks trained with explicit syntactic supervision, and find that this form of supervision does not always lead to more human-like syntactic behavior. Finally, we show that the corpus used to train a network significantly affects the pattern of agreement errors produced by the network, and discuss the strengths and limitations of neural networks as a tool for understanding human syntactic processing.
      PubDate: Mon, 06 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00137
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Two Determinants of Dynamic Adaptive Learning for Magnitudes and
           Probabilities

    • Pages: 615 - 638
      Abstract: AbstractHumans face a dynamic world that requires them to constantly update their knowledge. Each observation should influence their knowledge to a varying degree depending on whether it arises from a stochastic fluctuation or an environmental change. Thus, humans should dynamically adapt their learning rate based on each observation. Although crucial for characterizing the learning process, these dynamic adjustments have only been investigated empirically in magnitude learning. Another important type of learning is probability learning. The latter differs from the former in that individual observations are much less informative and a single one is insufficient to distinguish environmental changes from stochasticity. Do humans dynamically adapt their learning rate for probabilities' What determinants drive their dynamic adjustments in magnitude and probability learning' To answer these questions, we measured the subjects’ learning rate dynamics directly through real-time continuous reports during magnitude and probability learning. We found that subjects dynamically adapt their learning rate in both types of learning. After a change point, they increase their learning rate suddenly for magnitudes and prolongedly for probabilities. Their dynamics are driven differentially by two determinants: change-point probability, the main determinant for magnitudes, and prior uncertainty, the main determinant for probabilities. These results are fully in line with normative theory, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Overall, our findings demonstrate a remarkable human ability for dynamic adaptive learning under uncertainty, and guide studies of the neural mechanisms of learning, highlighting different determinants for magnitudes and probabilities.
      PubDate: Mon, 06 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00139
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Instruction on the Scientific Method Provides (Some) Protection Against
           Illusions of Causality

    • Pages: 639 - 665
      Abstract: AbstractPeople tend to overestimate the efficacy of an ineffective treatment when they experience the treatment and its supposed outcome co-occurring frequently. This is referred to as the outcome density effect. Here, we attempted to improve the accuracy of participants’ assessments of an ineffective treatment by instructing them about the scientific practice of comparing treatment effects against a relevant base-rate, i.e., when no treatment is delivered. The effect of these instructions was assessed in both a trial-by-trial contingency learning task, where cue administration was either decided by the participant (Experiments 1 & 2) or pre-determined by the experimenter (Experiment 3), as well as in summary format where all information was presented on a single screen (Experiment 4). Overall, we found two means by which base-rate instructions influence efficacy ratings for the ineffective treatment: 1) When information was presented sequentially, the benefit of base-rate instructions on illusory belief was mediated by reduced sampling of cue-present trials, and 2) When information was presented in summary format, we found a direct effect of base-rate instruction on reducing causal illusion. Together, these findings suggest that simple instructions on the scientific method were able to decrease participants’ (over-)weighting of cue-outcome coincidences when making causal judgements, as well as decrease their tendency to over-sample cue-present events. However, the effect of base-rate instructions on correcting illusory beliefs was incomplete, and participants still showed illusory causal judgements when the probability of the outcome occurring was high. Thus, simple textual information about assessing causal relationships is partially effective in influencing people’s judgements of treatment efficacy, suggesting an important role of scientific instruction in debiasing cognitive errors.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00141
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • How Do You Know If You Were Mind Wandering' Dissociating Explicit Memories
           of Off Task Thought From Subjective Feelings of Inattention

    • Pages: 666 - 687
      Abstract: AbstractMind wandering is a common experience in which your attention drifts away from the task at hand and toward task-unrelated thoughts. To measure mind wandering we typically use experience sampling and retrospective self-reports, which require participants to make metacognitive judgments about their immediately preceding attentional states. In the current study, we aimed to better understand how people come to make such judgments by introducing a novel distinction between explicit memories of off task thought and subjective feelings of inattention. Across two preregistered experiments, we found that participants often indicated they were “off task” and yet had no memory of the content of their thoughts—though, they were less common than remembered experiences. Critically, remembered experiences of mind wandering and subjective feelings of inattention differed in their behavioral correlates. In Experiment 1, we found that only the frequency of remembered mind wandering varied with task demands. In contrast, only subjective feelings of inattention were associated with poor performance (Experiments 1 and 2) and individual differences in executive functioning (Experiment 2). These results suggest that the phenomenology of mind wandering may differ depending on how the experiences are brought about (e.g., executive functioning errors versus excess attentional resources), and provide preliminary evidence of the importance of measuring subjective feelings of inattention when assessing mind wandering.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00142
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Toward the Emergence of Intelligent Control: Episodic Generalization and
           Optimization

    • Pages: 688 - 722
      Abstract: AbstractHuman cognition is unique in its ability to perform a wide range of tasks and to learn new tasks quickly. Both abilities have long been associated with the acquisition of knowledge that can generalize across tasks and the flexible use of that knowledge to execute goal-directed behavior. We investigate how this emerges in a neural network by describing and testing the Episodic Generalization and Optimization (EGO) framework. The framework consists of an episodic memory module, which rapidly learns relationships between stimuli; a semantic pathway, which more slowly learns how stimuli map to responses; and a recurrent context module, which maintains a representation of task-relevant context information, integrates this over time, and uses it both to recall context-relevant memories (in episodic memory) and to bias processing in favor of context-relevant features and responses (in the semantic pathway). We use the framework to address empirical phenomena across reinforcement learning, event segmentation, and category learning, showing in simulations that the same set of underlying mechanisms accounts for human performance in all three domains. The results demonstrate how the components of the EGO framework can efficiently learn knowledge that can be flexibly generalized across tasks, furthering our understanding of how humans can quickly learn how to perform a wide range of tasks—a capability that is fundamental to human intelligence.
      PubDate: Fri, 10 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00143
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Large Language Models and the Wisdom of Small Crowds

    • Pages: 723 - 738
      Abstract: AbstractRecent advances in Large Language Models (LLMs) have raised the question of replacing human subjects with LLM-generated data. While some believe that LLMs capture the “wisdom of the crowd”—due to their vast training data—empirical evidence for this hypothesis remains scarce. We present a novel methodological framework to test this: the “number needed to beat” (NNB), which measures how many humans are needed for a sample’s quality to rival the quality achieved by GPT-4, a state-of-the-art LLM. In a series of pre-registered experiments, we collect novel human data and demonstrate the utility of this method for four psycholinguistic datasets for English. We find that NNB > 1 for each dataset, but also that NNB varies across tasks (and in some cases is quite small, e.g., 2). We also introduce two “centaur” methods for combining LLM and human data, which outperform both stand-alone LLMs and human samples. Finally, we analyze the trade-offs in data cost and quality for each approach. While clear limitations remain, we suggest that this framework could guide decision-making about whether and how to integrate LLM-generated data into the research pipeline.
      PubDate: Mon, 20 May 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00144
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
  • Unconscious Perception of Vernier Offsets

    • Pages: 739 - 765
      Abstract: AbstractThe comparison between conscious and unconscious perception is a cornerstone of consciousness science. However, most studies reporting above-chance discrimination of unseen stimuli do not control for criterion biases when assessing awareness. We tested whether observers can discriminate subjectively invisible offsets of Vernier stimuli when visibility is probed using a bias-free task. To reduce visibility, stimuli were either backward masked or presented for very brief durations (1–3 milliseconds) using a modern-day Tachistoscope. We found some behavioral indicators of perception without awareness, and yet, no conclusive evidence thereof. To seek more decisive proof, we simulated a series of Bayesian observer models, including some that produce visibility judgements alongside type-1 judgements. Our data are best accounted for by observers with slightly suboptimal conscious access to sensory evidence. Overall, the stimuli and visibility manipulations employed here induced mild instances of blindsight-like behavior, making them attractive candidates for future investigation of this phenomenon.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Jun 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1162/opmi_a_00145
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2024)
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Revista Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Costarricense de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Cultura Teológica     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios e Investigación en Psicología y Educación     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología : Segunda Epoca     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Electrónica de Metodología Aplicada     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Wímb Lu     Open Access  
Revue de psychoéducation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée / European Review of Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revue québécoise de psychologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia     Open Access  
Roeper Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Rorschachiana     Hybrid Journal  
RUDN Journal of Psychology and Pedagogics     Open Access  
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Satir International Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
School Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Seeing and Perceiving     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexual Abuse A Journal of Research and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Offending : Theory, Research, and Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Simmel Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 3)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Issues and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Psychological and Personality Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Somnologie - Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Suma Psicologica     Open Access  
Tajdida : Jurnal Pemikiran dan Gerakan Muhammadiyah     Open Access  
Teaching of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Terapia Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tesis Psicologica     Open Access  
TESTFÓRUM     Open Access  
The Arts in Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Brown University Psychopharmacology Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Clinical Neuropsychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The International Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series B : Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Sport Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Therapeutic Communities : The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Thinking & Reasoning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tobacco Use Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transactional Analysis Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Undecidable Unconscious : A Journal of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Universal Journal of Psychology     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Vinculo - Revista do NESME     Open Access  
VIVESIANA     Open Access  
Voices : The Art and Science of Psychotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Yaşam Becerileri Psikoloji Dergisi / Life Skills Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Arbeits - und Organisationspsychologie A&O     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Differentielle und Diagnostische Psychologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Erziehungswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gesundheitspsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Neuropsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Pädagogische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie, Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie / Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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