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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
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Voices : A World Forum for Music Therapy
Number of Followers: 5  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 1504-1611
Published by U of Bergen Homepage  [8 journals]
  • English An Assessment of Indigenous Knowledge of Music Therapy in Nigeria

    • Authors: Charles Onomudo Aluede, Arugha A. Ogisi , Fatelyn I. Okakah
      Abstract: Indigenous knowledge of music as therapy as it is understood in Nigeria has to do with the acquisition of information about the application of music for healing in traditional settings. There is no doubt that the use of music to educate, rehabilitate, and bring about healing in Nigerian indigenous societies is an age-long tradition. A survey of traditional music which was carried out through questionnaire and interview methods allude to the fact that most Nigerian cultures firmly believe in the therapeutic potency of music. From the perspectives of some selected Nigerian traditional communities (Esan, Urhobo, Itsekiri, Igbo, Yoruba, Hausa, Bini, and others) this study, therefore, reveals the various forms of manifestations of music healing traditions in different Nigerian communities. Potent as music may be in healing, if the indigenous must beget the modern, there remains a growing need to examine the indigenous understanding of music therapy. As a major aim of this study, we examined the Nigerian construct of illness; illness causation; and how Nigerian people understand music healing and its associated healing techniques. While this work reveals that music in therapy in Nigerian traditional societies has been in use over the ages, regrettably few incidences have been captured in literature. This suggests that this very important branch of music should be introduced into tertiary institutions as an academic field that should embrace cultural and clinical approaches.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3073
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Leaving the Profession

    • Authors: Jenny L. Branson
      Abstract: Published studies indicate that burnout and job satisfaction impact music therapists’ longevity in the profession in the United States. It is unclear whether these factors are related to clinical or professional factors. No studies have been published exploring the reasons that music therapists in the United States have left the profession. The purpose of this grounded theory study was to develop a theoretical framework that describes the decisions and experiences of board-certified music therapists when leaving the profession. The specific aims were to (1) identify factors that influenced therapists’ decisions to leave the profession, and (2) identify any unmet needs in training and supervision that may contribute to these decisions. Thirteen participants participated in the study. Each participant obtained board certification in the United States, worked in a music therapy job, and remain in the workforce but are no longer working in the music therapy profession. Participants completed semi-structured interviews. Interview transcripts were analyzed to understand the experiences and decisions that led to their departure from the profession. Music therapists from the U.S. who participated in this study left the profession due to: (1) availability of sustainable jobs, (2) access to professional support or supervision, and (3) burden of advocacy. These results did not vary according to individual factors such as age, level of education, or the year the therapist entered the profession. Further exploration of this theory and music therapists’ experiences may point to opportunities for changes in training and development of support programs for new as well as experienced professionals.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3259
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Experience of Authenticity Across Three Music Disciplines; Music
           Therapy, Music Teaching and Music Performance

    • Authors: Julie Ørnholt Bøtker, Stine Lindahl Jacobsen
      Abstract: Across music disciplines, authenticity has been referred to in various ways. Within music therapy and music teaching, only sparsely has it been discussed focusing on the intrapersonal aspects of authenticity. This study seeks to explore and understand authenticity as experienced and expressed by three music professionals practicing within the areas of music therapy, music teaching, and music performance, the goal being primarily to deepen, enrich, and understand the authenticity experience to possibly benefit professionals and their clients, students, and audiences. Three music professionals holding various professional backgrounds were selected based on their assumed ability to reflect on this rather philosophical topic. Preparatory materials were sent out to participants prior to conducting two semi-structured interviews – 1 solo interview and 1 group interview. The interviews were transcribed and analyzed through a thematic coding analysis revealing four meta themes: 1) paradoxes in language and action, 2) imbalance and inauthenticity, 3) roles, relationships, masks, and 4) the field of authenticity. Findings were discussed with chosen theory synthesizing the experience of authenticity as being associated with several interconnected elements: relationship (with self and others), role (self-chosen and assigned), context (role fits the context), professionalism (having skills needed, letting go of control), and personality (transparent persona).
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3464
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Entering the Ambient

    • Authors: Michael Viega, Victoria Druziako , Josh Millrod, Al Hoberman
      Abstract: Since the 1980s, there has been an interest in the clinical benefits and challenges with the use of digital music technology in music therapy, yet there is still little information about the experiential potentialities of digital music technologies from relational, psychodynamic, and ecological frameworks. The ambient mode of being presents a heuristic approach to clinical listening when using digital music technology. Performative collaborative autoethnography was utilized by a group of four music therapy clinicians who wanted to understand their shared experience of entering the ambient while improvising using digital music technologies. Seven video excerpts from six different improvisation sessions were chosen to explore this topic and its implications for being a music therapy clinician. In keeping with the values of performative collaborative autoethnography, the results and discussion of this study are presented as a dialogue between the researchers. Each group members’ experience of entering the ambient was unique, but they shared a common reverence for how they were able to create an ambient space using digital music technology, which acted as a co-agent within their group process. The group members discuss clinical implications for this research including the benefits, challenges, and the role of gender/identity when using digital music technologies.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3510
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Community Music Therapy in the United States: A Thematic Analysis

    • Authors: Kathleen M. Murphy, Viggo Krüger, Noah Pomerselig, Brynjulf Stige, Rhé Washington-Guillemet
      Abstract: Community Music Therapy (CoMT) practices are continuing to develop within the international music therapy community. However, the development and implementation of music therapy through a CoMT lens in the United States has not been widely written about. Only a handful of published studies and clinical reports detail music therapy programs that seemingly fit within a CoMT framework. In comparison to more traditional approaches to music therapy practice, CoMT practices in the United States are underrepresented. This thematic analysis informed by a hermeneutical method was undertaken to begin a dialogue with music therapists who consider their music therapy practice to fall within the boundaries of CoMT, in order to increase awareness of ways in which CoMT principles are being implemented within the US healthcare and educational systems. We interviewed 6 board certified music therapists asking them to 1) define CoMT, 2) explain role relationships (therapist, client, and community), and 3) speculate on how their approach to the work could influence health policy and access to services in the United States. Our findings suggest that participatory, performative, and social action elements of CoMT are evident in the clinical work of the music therapists who were interviewed, and that there is a place for CoMT practices within the United States healthcare system.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3615
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Music Therapy Assessment with the IMCAP-ND: A Pilot Study

    • Authors: Marisa M. Raposo, Ana Maria Abreu, Leticia L. Dionizio, Teresa Leite, Alexandre Castro-Caldas
      Abstract: Background: Music therapy (MT) appears to be a valuable complementary intervention for children diagnosed with neurodevelopmental conditions, namely, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), who often present cognitive, academic, communicative, and social difficulties. Music therapy has been increasingly recommended as a standard support service for communication and social interaction in this specific neuropediatric setting. Objective: The aim of this pilot study was to determine the recruitment and protocol feasibility of music therapy for autistic children and explore trends towards the clinical utility of the IMCAP-ND[i] quantitative measure on assessing the focus on sound receptions, joint attention, turn-taking, auditory perception, sensory integration, social interaction, entrainment, and empathy, as a preparation for a future study wherein we will pursue with an MT intervention assessment. Furthermore, here we use the European Portuguese translated version of the IMCAP-NDPT scales to contribute to its validation and adaptation. Methods: Five autistic children received a weekly music therapy session of approximately 45 minutes for six months, totaling a minimum of 20 and maximum of 24 completed sessions per child. The IMCAP-NDPT and the Griffiths Mental Development Scales (GMDS) scales were applied pre- and post-test. Results: We tested the research design and the session’s protocol. All participants completed MT intervention and showed increase in social-emotional capacities, cognitive and perception skills, and overall responsiveness. However, our results indicate a need to review the inclusion criteria concerning participants with a single diagnosis (ASD), previous contacts with musical instruments, and the application of standardized music therapy settings. Conclusions: The design and protocol were perceived as acceptable and feasible, though some improvements were suggested for subsequent original research, and the IMCAP-NDPT version was considered usable. Our initial findings suggest the potential of music therapy for autistic children. Further intervention with efficacy assessment through a larger-scale randomized trial is needed, considering the content based on pilot findings. [i] The Individual Music-Centered Assessment Profile for Neurodevelopmental Disorders (IMCAP-ND) is a criterion-referenced assessment of musical interaction, communication, cognition and perception, and responsiveness in musical-play for individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders at various developmental levels and chronological ages from children to adults. It is comprised by a set of three scales: Musical Emotional Assessment Rating Scale (MEARS), Musical Cognitive/Perception Scale (MCPS) and Musical Responsiveness Scale (MRS) (Carpente, 2013).
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3423
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Exploring the Potential for Music Therapy to Support 21st Century
           Education Goals

    • Authors: Viggo Krüger, Alex Crooke, David Solberg, Eirik Sæle
      Abstract: School engagement is a global crisis predicted to intensify in the context of COVID-19. As a consequence, education agendas have increasingly adopted whole-child and inclusive approaches, leading to new mandates and curriculums designed to curb the associated individual and social outcomes of school dropout. Yet, teachers are often left to implement these initiatives with little to no support, and within the context of competing neoliberal aims. The subsequent pressure on teachers undermines whole-child and inclusive approaches, and has led to calls for increased teacher support. This includes support in novel teaching and learning approaches which meet the needs of a greater range of students. To investigate the potential role that music can play in this space, the present paper explores the experiences and attitudes of six Norwegian educators who attended two university-accredited continuing education courses on the use of music therapy with adolescents. Interviews sought to explore whether teachers gained new insights into the use of music in the contemporary Norwegian school context. Results showed that teachers did grow their understanding of how music can be used in schools, with a focus on the ability to use music to teach the new Norwegian curriculum. Findings also revealed the challenges faced by teachers wanting to use music in this way. Overall, results suggest music does offer great potential in contemporary school contexts, particularly when its implementation is informed by music therapy theory. Findings have implications for schools, educators, and policymakers.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3642
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Music Therapists’ Insights Regarding a Shift in Practice Orientation

    • Authors: Susan C. Gardstrom, Marie Reddy Ward
      Abstract: This report details a clinical retrospective self-study that we undertook to gain insights into our experiences as an undergraduate practicum student and clinical supervisor. We studied our lived experiences of a shift in practice orientation that we implemented with a child with communication and behavioral challenges. Recognizing a few weeks into treatment that our initial outcome orientation and behavioral approach was not meeting the child’s needs, we abruptly shifted to an experience orientation and music-centered approach, commensurate with Bruscia’s (2014) Integral Thinking and Practice model. Curious as to whether our initial perceptions of this shift would hold up to investigative scrutiny, we undertook this retrospective study to answer the following questions: (1) What factors and circumstances may have precipitated (i.e., activated) the shift in orientation' (2) What factors and circumstances may have enabled (i.e., supported) a shift in orientation' and (3) What individual and collective insights might we gain about our lived experience of the shift relative to integral thinking and practice' Findings from thematic analysis of clinical artifacts inform recommendations aimed at helping music therapists to recognize theoretical influences and feel freedom and confidence to make shifts in practice as warranted. We advance reflexivity as a key strategy to improve clinical services and supervisory practices.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3421
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Applying Integral Thinking to Music Therapy Education

    • Authors: Lauren DiMaio, Trish Winter
      Abstract: Educating music therapy students is a complex task as a result of laws and regulations, professional biases, and a desire to produce students who will be competent and thoughtful music therapists. The purpose, or outcome, of this article is to outline a curriculum re-design implementing Integral Thinking in Music Therapy (ITMT) as applied to the academic and clinical aspects of two university music therapy training programs in the United States. The history and philosophy of ITMT are explained to give context to this approach. An overview of the innovative curriculum design and teaching resources are included for direct implementation of experiences into the classroom. Recommendations include the uses of ITMT in music therapy education as well as possible limitations to this pedagogical approach.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3334
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Peace Camp

    • Authors: Zein Hassanein
      Abstract: Community Music Therapy (COMT) is a development increasingly referenced and often nebulous in the field of music therapy. Depending on its description in the literature, COMT seems to be situated between an aspiration to stretch beyond boundaries of the ‘consensus model’ and serve atypical populations, and a working practical approach with clear guidelines. Curiosity around this phenomenon inspired an initial inquiry by the author into potential theoretical underpinnings to provide context and definition for its aims, namely critical theory. Through identifying the links between CoMT, critical theory/psychology, and conflict transformation–the approach utilized in modern peacekeeping–the author hoped to inspire more intentional efforts by music therapists working at the convergence of those ideas. This research culminated in the author’s master’s thesis, a critical review and attempted integration of these topics, in 2018. This article aspires to build upon that research by remapping the knowledge gained onto the experiences that catalyzed the inquiry. Through vignettes and commentary, the author uses a reflexive, critical lens to examine his tenure as a music counselor at Seeds of Peace Camp, a conflict transformation camp. By re-examining trial-by-fire moments and their aftermath, the author identifies relevant research in the aforementioned fields that may have enhanced or explained participant responses. This serves to broaden the collective understanding of the overlapping goals and practices of CoMT, critical theory/psychology and conflict transformation.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3335
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Music and Mandala

    • Authors: Elaine Abbott
      Abstract: It is recommended that music therapists engage in self-care, supervision, and personal therapy to cope with professional stressors. As a result, it is important that they can determine when one or more are needed. The purpose of this paper is to describe a self-administered, seven-step music and mandala method that can be used to determine those needs. Music therapists’ understanding of the purpose of each step will support successful use of the method. Therefore, the description of each step is accompanied by an explanation of the key concept(s) related to it, and a case example. The desired outcome of participation is for music therapists to increase self-awareness and identify their needs for self-care, supervision, and/or personal therapy.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3614
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The Question of Copyright in Music Therapy Practice and Research with
           Children

    • Authors: Viggo Krüger, Kathleen M. Murphy
      Abstract: This short essay discusses the relationship between ownership of creative works and music therapy. We ask the following question: what do we mean by ownership of stories and songs in music therapy' We answer this question by highlighting examples from music therapy literature. We base the essay on the notion that children may have certain rights concerning their intellectual properties and products made in therapy, but these rights are not always honored. Musical products such as lyrics or narratives made in music therapy are protected by most countries' national copyright laws, and music therapists working with music should pay close attention to the rights of the creator. Music therapy should not be a free zone or grey area where the laws on copyright do not matter. The essay offers suggestions for practitioners and researchers.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3392
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Postmodern Music Therapy

    • Authors: Robert Gross
      Abstract: Postmodern music therapy is an approach to music therapy that defines itself in diametric opposition to modernist, or medical-model, music therapy. Where modernist music therapy ignores power dynamics and assumes itself to be value neutral, postmodern music therapy is concerned with power dynamics between client, therapist, and broader society. Postmodern music therapy is based on the theories of Bradley Lewis: Lewis (2006) believes that a postmodern psychiatry (or as he calls it, postpsychiatry) will be more aware of politics and social structures in general and will move toward democratization. This article proposes a postmodern music therapy in parallel to postpsychiatric ideas and ideals. Further, the article explores the intersectional nexus between postmodern music therapy and critical race, disability, queer, and feminist studies.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3629
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Voice, Style, and Censorship: A Copyeditor’s Perspective

    • Authors: Tim Honig
      Abstract: This is the editorial for the March 2023 issue.
      PubDate: 2023-03-01
      DOI: 10.15845/voices.v23i1.3905
      Issue No: Vol. 23, No. 1 (2023)
       
 
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