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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
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Dreaming
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.43
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1053-0797 - ISSN (Online) 1573-3351
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Relationship between trait anxiety and emotions in dreams, evaluated in
           older adults.

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      Abstract: The relationship between the level of anxiety and emotions in dreams is a subject that has been fairly studied, particularly in young adults. However, there exists a limited body of research on this subject among older adults. This study examines the relationship between trait anxiety levels, emotions in dreams, dream recall frequency (DRF), and potential gender differences within older adults. A total of 22 participants (nine men and 13 women) were recruited from the seniors group at Complutense University of Madrid (Mage = 64.9 years). Each participant initially completed the trait subscale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T) questionnaire and also maintained a dream diary for 2 weeks, providing assessments of the valence, arousal, and intensity of each of the basic emotions experienced in dreams. Results showed a modest correlation between the average STAI-T and sadness in dreams and a significant correlation between the level of fear and that of emotional arousal, but only in the women group. No additional gender distinctions were identified. Furthermore, it was observed that recalled dreams tended to exhibit a neutral valence and moderate arousal and there was a reduced level of anxiety and a lower DRF in comparison to the results obtained in studies involving young adults. The findings suggest that DRF in older adults is not correlated with anxiety levels. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/drm0000258
       
  • Dangerous waters: The impact of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami on survivor
           dream content.

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      Abstract: Episodic memories of emotionally salient and personally significant events are often incorporated into dreams, although rarely replayed identically to the original waking event except in replicative posttraumatic nightmares. We investigated, in five Swedish female 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami survivors, how episodic memories of the catastrophe were reflected in their dreams after trauma, both in retrospectively recalled nightmares and bad dreams, and in prospective dream diaries completed several months after the catastrophe. We also assessed whether the emotional and threatening dream content differed between the trauma and a matched control group. Based on the threat simulation theory, we predicted that the trauma group dreams would portray notable similarities with elements related to the original tsunami trauma, and that the trauma group would demonstrate a higher prevalence of negative emotional states, and a higher frequency of threatening dream events as well as more severe threats in their dreams. Only the first hypothesis was partially supported, with retrospective nightmares bearing higher similarity to the trauma experience than the prospective dream diary dreams. However, we observed no statistically significant differences in emotional or threatening dream content between the groups, suggesting that the trauma group participants were not suffering from significant posttraumatic dreaming at the time of systematic dream data collection. Yet, specific features of the trauma group dreams might be interpreted as remnants of episodic tsunami-related memories: Their dreams had a higher percentage of life-threatening events depicting realistic but improbable threats, and an analysis of water-related themes evidenced stressful themes related to waves. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/drm0000254
       
  • You are what you dream: The dark tetrad and dream content.

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      Abstract: Previous research has found behaviors associated with personality traits can be found in the dreams of those who possess them, suggesting a continuum between dreaming and waking life. The present study sought to investigate the association between dark tetrad traits (psychopathy, narcissism, Machiavellianism, and sadism) and dream content. One hundred thirty-seven participants completed questionnaires measuring dark tetrad traits and fighting, sexual, and grandiosity themes of dream content. Correlation analyses revealed significant positive relationships between all dark tetrad traits and fighting, sexual and grandiosity dreams. Regression analyses revealed that psychopathy and gender predicted fighting dreams, and sadism uniquely predicted sexual and grandiosity dreams. The results suggest that waking life dark tetrad personality traits are reflected in dream content. The continuity hypothesis, which posits a continuity between waking life and dreaming, may in part explain the results. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 03 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/drm0000252
       
  • Dreaming reflects neural resynchronization after sleep-dependent
           neuroplastic adaptations.

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      Abstract: Synchronous and coordinated neural electrical activity is essential for proper mental functioning in the wake state. Sleep-dependent neuroplastic repair and adaptation that occur because of oxidative damage, inflammation, learning, and memory formation fostered by wake state experiences alter the finely tuned electrical activity of neurons. Resynchronization after neuroplastic repair and adaptation, but before waking, is needed to redress such adverse effects. These circuit-specific resynchronizations restore the unique sequential activity patterns needed for the diversity of mental functions. Dreaming is the result of neural circuit activations during sleep as part of resynchronization processes. Dream content is explained by the information load of neural circuits that underwent extensive neuroplastic repair and adaptation and that were activated during resynchronization. Neural circuit activation sequences and their combinations during resynchronization determine the narratives and bizarreness of dreams. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/drm0000250
       
  • Real-time transferring of music from lucid dreams into reality by
           electromyography sensors.

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      Abstract: In lucid dreams (LDs), people maintain consciousness and can make predetermined actions while asleep. Since the 1970s, electrooculography and other sensors have been used to send signals from LDs into reality. In this study, we test whether electromyography (EMG) can help transfer melodies from LDs, which can expand our abilities to transfer information from LDs into reality. Software was developed to translate EMG impulses into sounds. Four LD practitioners were trained to play musical rhythms by straining their arm muscles, which had EMG sensors on them. Then, these volunteers were asked to induce LDs and repeat the task under polysomnographic observation in a laboratory. Each volunteer induced from one to three confirmed LDs. Three of them were able to transfer musical rhythms into reality, as the EMG sensors detected electrical spikes in the arm muscles despite sleep paralysis. The researchers heard the sounds from the dreams in real time and in recordings. The results prove the concept that people can transfer rhythmical EMG impulses from LD, which could be potentially useful for transferring sounds or music from LD into reality. As one practitioner failed to transfer proper EMG signals, the method needs further investigation. Since LD practitioners sometimes create original music in LDs, it could be possible to transfer these insights into reality. These melodies can be broadcasted via the Internet, TV, or radio in real time. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/drm0000244
       
  • The role of dream sensations in Lucid dreams.

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      Abstract: Lucid dreams (LDs) are dreams in which the dreamer can remain conscious and control the dream plot. Although most people are familiar with this phenomenon, its nature remains unclear in many aspects. This pilot study aims to investigate the role of dream sensations (DSs) in the etiology of LDs. We hypothesize that avoidance of DSs reduces LD duration and leads to the quick termination of LDs. The results of the current study will improve the current understanding of rapid eye movement sleep's neurobiology. To check the hypothesis through an online resource, we instructed 100 volunteers to deliberately avoid any DSs during an LD and estimate how much time has passed in an LD by means of counting seconds. A control group (n = 155) was asked to “follow the flow,” experience all arising DSs, and estimate how much time passed in the same manner as the experimental group. For most of the participants in the experimental group, deliberate avoidance of DSs resulted either in awakening (40% of cases) or falling asleep with a loss of consciousness (12%). Both unpaired and paired t-tests applied to participants of either one or both experiments demonstrated a significant decrease (p < .05) in the duration of the LD experience in the experimental group. The results of the current study suggest that DSs play an important role in the etiology of LDs and contribute to prolonging LDs, though other factors are apparently involved, which should be addressed in further studies. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 20 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/drm0000242
       
  • Waking-life and dream social networks: People mix differently but their
           centrality is similar.

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      Abstract: An individual draws on memory of people and their relations during deliberate recall of his or her social network and during spontaneous generation of people while dreaming. We compare social networks produced by each use of memory in a case study. A dream social network was made for major people in a long series of dreams of a woman. Two people were linked if they occurred in a dream together. The dreamer responded to a questionnaire about relations between major people in waking life. A waking-life social network was made by linking two people if the individual indicated they knew each other. A similarity between the two networks is that people important (central) in one network tend to be important in the other network. The networks have differences. Community structure is more diffuse in the dream social network. The dream social network has fewer completed triangles than the waking-life social network. Assortativity, a network measure, is positive in the waking-life social network, but negative in the dream social network. Differences are consistent with findings that rapid eye movement sleep, the stage from which most dreams are reported, facilitates remote associations in memory. During dreaming, the dreamer's memory of people and their relations is not so much searched as explored. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 09 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/drm0000236
       
  • Client experiences and understandings of dreams in contemporary Australian
           psychological practice: An IPA study.

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      Abstract: Identifying and understanding the beliefs, experiences, and expectations of clients around dreams in psychological practice can assist psychologists to avoid or minimize unintended, negative consequences of mismatches in expectations between the client and the psychologist. In this study, 5 adult Australian clients undertook semistructured interviews in which they explained their experiences and perceptions of dreams in psychological practice. An interpretative phenomenological analysis approach was used, and the themes emerging from the analysis clustered around participants’ experiences (with emotions ranging from feeling pressured, frustrated, or vulnerable, to feeling relief or validation), and their underlying assumptions or rules, around what to share (or not share) with whom, and when. The participants’ explanations for their experiences and opinions reflected their underlying individual and sociocultural understandings of both psychotherapy and dreams, with references made to dream beliefs, the stage of therapy, and psychologist cues. The findings highlight the value of approaching therapy (and dream sharing in therapy) from a social/cultural practice framework. This framework understands interactions or exchanges between psychologists and clients as being influenced by a range of cultural assumptions, which both parties bring into the therapy room with them. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/drm0000228
       
  • Bodily Self-Consciousness in Dreams Questionnaire (BSD-Q) and its relation
           to waking dissociative experiences.

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      Abstract: According to virtual reality dream theory (Hobson & Friston, 2014), while dreaming, brains generate a dream world similar to a virtual reality environment, and this world uses the same predictive self/world modeling capacity as that used during wakefulness. The theory proposes that phenomenology of dreaming experience is based on the waking experience, a view widely accepted by dream researchers. In the current research, we argued that individuals with different intensities of dissociative experiences during waking, will report corresponding differences in the profoundness of sensory modality experiences, such as touching in dreams. To test this hypothesis, first, we developed a novel Bodily Self-Consciousness in Dreams Questionnaire, that was completed by 414 participants. The questionnaire measured the intensity of different sensory modality experiences in past dreams. The results showed that a four-factor solution explains 64% of the total variance, and yielded sufficient reliability with McDonald’s ω ranging from .62 to .84, and Cronbach’s α ranged from .61 to .84. Along with the Bodily Self-Consciousness in Dreams Questionnaire, we administered the Dissociation Questionnaire (Vanderlinden et al., 1993), which showed a significant positive correlation between the bodily self-consciousness in dreams and dissociative experiences during waking. In conclusion, the results showed that all of the modalities pertain to bodily self-consciousness in dreams and are significantly correlated with waking state dissociative experiences. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/drm0000217
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
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