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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
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Decision
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.687
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2325-9965 - ISSN (Online) 2325-9973
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • “You can’t pound a nail if you don’t have a hammer”: The role of
           methodology in advice research (comment on Kämmer et al., 2022).

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      Abstract: How methodology shaped the two lines of research identified in Kämmer et al. (2022) is explored in this short commentary. Behavioral research has generally used methodology with lab experiments and focused on advice utilization and whether advice can improve decision-making, but this line of research has been less able to study advice solicitation or the advising relationship. Organizational research has generally used survey methodology and examined solicitation of advice but due to the longitudinal nature of organizational decision-making, it has focused less on advice utilization. However, given trends in new methodology toward big data online and natural language processing, methods in the field of advice research are likely to change substantially in the coming decade. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dec0000200
       
  • Advice as a subjective subject: A commentary on Kämmer et al. (2023).

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      Abstract: Kämmer et al. (2023)’s systematic review of recent advice articles illuminates the increasingly subjective focus of advice research, highlighting advice researchers’ greater emphasis on questions that are not readily measurable or observable but reside in the minds of seekers and advisors. In this commentary on their insightful review, we consider three distinct benefits of this subjective focus: providing greater insight into when advice-related perceptions do not match reality, expanding the scope of our understanding of advice interactions, and deepening our knowledge of advice interaction mediators and moderators. We conclude with the ideas for how researchers can continue to adopt this subjective lens. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dec0000202
       
  • Operationalizing advice utilization for productive research and
           application: Commentary on Kämmer et al. (2023).

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      Abstract: Answers to substantive questions about advice utilization may depend on how advice utilization is operationalized. In this article, we briefly review common advice utilization operationalizations from existing research. We then advocate for the use, when possible, of regression-based and in particular polynomial-regression-based operationalizations, rather than formula-based operationalizations. We moreover advocate for the study of alternative forms of advice that, though seemingly common in the “real world,” have received hardly any research attention. Similarly, we advocate for the study of additional (beyond changes in judgments or choices) decision-maker cognitive, affective, and behavioral responses to advice. We end by discussing how advice utilization can be operationalized for these alternative forms of advice and additional decision-maker responses to advice. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dec0000203
       
  • The methodology and theory of future research on advice-based decisions.

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      Abstract: We summarize and respond to the three commentaries on our systematic review of advice research in management and psychology (Kämmer et al., 2023). All three commentaries focus on empirical methodology, perhaps in reaction to the research's bottom-up approach. We discuss the opportunity for developing more ambitious, broader theoretical frameworks. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dec0000205
       
  • Changes in preferences reported after choices are informative, not merely
           statistical artifacts.

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      Abstract: Decades of research has shown that people rate things more favorably if they have recently chosen them and less favorably if they have recently rejected them. This spreading apart of the ratings of the alternative options (“spreading of alternatives” or SoA) has been described as choice-induced preference change, where the act of choosing causes evaluations to systematically differ after choices relative to before. An important study pointed out that SoA can be detected in the data even without it being caused by a choice, as the result of a statistical artifact. This potential alternative source of SoA has encumbered researchers who investigate the phenomenon, impeding progress in the field—and a deeper investigation of the cognitive mechanisms behind SoA. Here, we present a novel approach to control for the statistical artifact explanation through the use of regression analysis supported by computational simulations. Our approach provides a logical and computational manner of distinguishing the possible sources of SoA in experimental data that is quick and easy to implement. We demonstrate our approach by comparing theoretical predictions of the statistical artifact and other possible explanations of SoA with empirical data and show that the statistical artifact alone cannot account for the data. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 09 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dec0000207
       
  • A systematic review of empirical studies on advice-based decisions in
           behavioral and organizational research.

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      Abstract: We conducted a systematic review of 143 empirical studies of advice-based decision making published in management or psychology between 2006 and 2020. We identified two distinct streams of the literature. The first, behavioral research, features experimental research on advice-based decisions conducted in laboratories. The second, organizational research, features observational field research on advice-based decisions in organizations. We organized the findings from the two research streams around three sequential stages: advice solicitation and provision, advice utilization, and the outcomes of advice-based decisions. Our review reveals the two streams to be highly complementary—with behavioral research focusing primarily on advice utilization and organizational research focusing primarily on advice solicitation. We consolidate key findings across the two streams. We also identify key challenges for future research, such as greater emphasis on the social aspects of advice-based decisions and the continued development and refinement of normative benchmarks. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dec0000199
       
  • Testing transitivity of preference in individuals.

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      Abstract: This experiment tested transitivity of preferences in individuals using the stimulus design of Butler and Pogrebna (2018). That design was constructed to find violations of transitivity that would occur if people chose the alternative with a higher probability of yielding better outcomes. Each choice problem was presented 60 times (replicated twice in each of 30 sessions). The individual true and error (TE) model was used to estimate incidence of transitive and intransitive preference patterns and error rates for each choice problem for each person. Although the data of most participants were consistent with transitivity, 7 of 22 participants showed significant evidence of intransitive preferences patterns at least part of the time, and 14 participants showed evidence of changing true preferences over time. Systematic violations of the assumption that responses are independently and identically distributed (iid) were observed. Although TE models assume errors are mutually independent, they do not imply that responses will satisfy iid; instead, responses will violate independence when there is a mixture of preference patterns. Markov true and error (MARTER) models in which parameters can change gradually over sessions imply positive correlations between the frequency of preference reversals and the gaps between sessions. Positive correlations were observed for 21 of 22 participants; these were significant for all but 7, 4 of whom were compatible with a single true preference pattern throughout the study. Advantages of TE models (which can analyze response patterns and choice proportions) over older approaches (which analyze only binary choice proportions) are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dec0000185
       
 
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