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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 1023 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 179)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 82)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 248)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Pilquen : Sección Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access  
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 122)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 151)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers d’Études sur la Représentation     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.924
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1099-9809 - ISSN (Online) 1939-0106
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Chinese American adolescents’ experiences of COVID-19 racial
           discrimination: Risk and protective factors for internalizing
           difficulties.

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      Abstract: Objective: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has fueled anti-Asian racism and xenophobia in the United States, which negatively impact Asian Americans’ adjustment. To identify risk and protective factors for Chinese American adolescents’ mental health, the present study examined: (1) the associations between Chinese American adolescents’ experiences of COVID-19-related racial discrimination and their internalizing difficulties; (2) the moderating roles of: (a) adolescents’ bicultural identity integration (BII; harmony and blendedness dimensions separately) and (b) parents’ promotion of mistrust ethnic–racial socialization (PMERS); and (c) the interplay between BII and PMERS in the associations between racial discrimination and internalizing difficulties. Method: Participants included 211 Chinese American adolescents of 10–18 years old (M age = 13.92, SD = 2.33; 48% girls) and their parents (M age = 46.18 years, SD = 5.17; 81% mothers). Results: Overall, adolescents’ experiences of COVID-19-related racial discrimination were associated with more internalizing difficulties, and this association was buffered by BII harmony and blendedness and exacerbated by PMERS. However, a complex interplay among specific BII dimensions and parental PMERS in the associations between racial discrimination and adolescent internalizing problems was revealed. Adolescents with lower levels of BII blendedness were more vulnerable to the negative effects of racial discrimination on their internalizing problems and more susceptible to their parents’ PMERS; adolescents who reported higher levels of BII harmony and perceived lower levels of parental PMERS were more protected from the negative effects of racial discrimination on their internalizing problems. Conclusion: Both adolescents’ and parents’ contributions should be considered simultaneously in promoting resilience in Chinese American families. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 26 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Unpacking the “backpack of shame”: Exploring intersections of stigma
           among Latinx people living with HIV in San Francisco, CA.

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      Abstract: Objective: Ending the HIV epidemic requires addressing structural determinants of health, including stigma. In this qualitative study, we applied an intersectional framework to study various forms of stigma among Latinx people living with HIV (PLWH). Method: We conducted focus groups and individual interviews with Spanish- and English-speaking Latinx PLWH (N = 19) at an HIV safety-net clinic in San Francisco, California. Using thematic analysis, we identified co-occurring forms of stigma impacting the participants’ lives. Results: Participants described the weight of co-occuring stigma related to their multiple identities, including homophobia and HIV-related stigma, both of which participants experienced in the U.S. and in their Latin American home countries. Importantly, many participants faced anti-immigrant stigma in their day-to-day interactions, which manifested as structural inequities such as difficulty finding stable housing and employment. Conclusions: Our findings illustrate experiences of intersectional stigma and systems of oppression. They can be used to inform policies that address social exclusion, discrimination, and stigma among Latinx PLWH. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 19 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Can I belong in school and sports': The intersectional value of
           athletic identity in high school and across the college transition.

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      Abstract: Objective: This study investigates whether being identified with both school and sports affords benefits for Black male and female students in high school and across the transition to college. Given gendered concerns about being academically identified and cultural associations of athletics with Black masculinity, being both academically and athletically identified is expected to play a larger role in the sociocultural and academic experiences of Black male students. Method: Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Freshmen (NLSF), Study 1 (N = 1,011) employs a cross-sectional analysis of Wave 1 and Study 2 (N = 822) employs a longitudinal analysis of Waves 1–3 to test these hypotheses. Results: Identifying with athletics in high school is found to afford sociocultural benefits for academically identified Black male, but not Black female, students in the short-term and longitudinally across the college transition. In high school, Black male students identified with both academics and athletics reported greater identification with other young Black men compared to those identified with academics only (Study 1). Longitudinally, identification with athletics in high school was positively associated with sociocultural adjustment in the first year of college (e.g., interdependent studying behaviors), explained through this increased identification with young Black men (Study 2). Conclusions: Athletics is found to serve as a culturally valued identity with important benefits for Black male students’ experiences in secondary and postsecondary contexts. Although centered on athletics, these findings more broadly point to the importance of academically engaged Black students, across gender identities, being able to feel secure in their intersectional identities. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The individual development of cultural identity and psychological
           well-being among adolescents with a migrant background in Austria: A
           longitudinal study.

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      Abstract: Objectives: Research has shown that cultural identity and psychological well-being are associated. We suggest that negative stereotypes challenge the psychological well-being of people with a migrant background. This research focused on the dynamics of adolescents’ ethnic/racial identity (ERI), national identity, stereotype vulnerability, and psychological well-being on the individual level. The study was conducted in Austria over the course of one school year, providing insights on developmental implications of cultural identity for adolescents with a migrant background in Europe. Methods: The sample consisted of 317 (T1) adolescents with a migrant background, recruited at Austrian high schools (age: M = 15.19, SD = 1.11; 233 female; ethnic background: mainly Turkey and Ex-Yugoslavian countries). Longitudinal data from a three-wave study were analyzed by means of a random-intercept cross-lagged panel model. Results: Within-person effects provided a better explanation than the between-person approach. Within-person processes suggest that higher levels of ERI commitment and higher national identity predict higher levels of psychological well-being at a later time point, whereas higher levels of ERI exploration and higher stereotype vulnerability predict lower levels of psychological well-being. At the between-person level, findings indicate a positive correlation between ERI exploration and stereotype vulnerability. Conclusion: The cultural identity and psychological well-being of adolescents with a migrant background fluctuate over time, influenced by the social context. Stereotype vulnerability contributes to lower levels of psychological well-being among adolescents with a migrant background in Austria. Our findings highlight the necessity to partition the variance of constructs to avoid confounding of between-person and within-person effects. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 02 Aug 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Exploring mechanisms of racial disparities in intimate partner violence
           among sexual and gender minorities assigned female at birth.

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      Abstract: Objective: Sexual and gender minority people of color (SGM-POC) report higher rates of intimate partner violence (IPV) than White SGM, adding to growing evidence that people holding multiple stigmatized social identities are at particular risk for adverse experiences. We aimed to identify mechanisms underlying the racial/ethnic disparities in IPV among SGM, focusing on childhood experiences of violence, structural inequalities, and sexual minority stress. Method: 308 SGM assigned female-at-birth (AFAB; 82 White, 133 Black, 93 Latinx; age 16–31) self-reported on minor psychological, severe psychological, physical, and sexual IPV victimization and perpetration, and three proposed mechanisms: childhood violence (child abuse, witnessing interparental violence), structural inequalities (economic stress, racial discrimination), and sexual minority stressors (internalized heterosexism, anti-SGM victimization, low social support). Indirect effects of race on IPV victimization via hypothesized mechanisms were estimated using logistic regression with 5,000 bootstrapped samples. Results: Compared to White participants, Black participants were 2.5–7.03 times more likely to report all eight IPV types; Latinx participants were 2.5–4.8 times more likely to experience four IPV types. Univariate indirect effects analyses indicated that these racial/ethnic disparities were partially explained by higher economic stress, racial/ethnic discrimination, and childhood violence experiences (for Black and Latinx participants) and lower social support (Black participants). In multivariate models, the most robust indirect effects were through racial/ethnic discrimination and childhood violence. Conclusions: Findings underscore the need for policy and interventions aimed at preventing IPV among SGM-POC by targeting factors that contribute to IPV disparities in this group, particularly racial/ethnic discrimination and family violence. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Mexican-origin parents’ workplace discrimination and well-being: The
           roles of familism values, family conflict, and gender.

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      Abstract: Objective: This study examined Mexican-origin parents’ perceived workplace discrimination, familism, family conflict, and gender as related to parents’ well-being (i.e., self-esteem, depressive symptoms, and general physical health) over a 2-year period during the 2007–2009 “Great Recession” in the U.S. Method: Data were drawn from two waves of a larger study of 246 Mexican-origin predominantly immigrant families with adolescents. Using a matched-pairs sample of mothers and fathers, path analyses were conducted to test the hypothesized relations. Results: Moderation analyses revealed that high levels of familism weakened the link between workplace discrimination and parents’ depressive symptoms, whereas high levels of parent–youth conflict exacerbated the association to parents’ psychosocial well-being. There was variation by parent gender, with parent–youth conflict being more strongly associated with fathers’ self-esteem than mothers’. Conclusions: Findings indicate that Mexican-origin parents’ familism can mitigate and family conflict can exacerbate the risks of workplace discrimination on parents’ psychosocial well-being. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • In or out of the game' Counter-stereotype paradoxes and
           Asian-identified student-athlete mental health.

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      Abstract: Objective: This study examines stressors (i.e., discrimination and stereotypes) and buffers (i.e., exercise) relevant to Asian-identified student-athletes’ mental health. The study tests a set of counter-stereotype paradox hypotheses positing that conforming to idealized stereotypes of Asians exacerbates discrimination-mental health links. Method: Data were drawn from the 2015–2019 cohorts of the Healthy Minds Study. Regression-based moderations were used to test counter-stereotype paradox hypotheses and a buffering model of exercise. Results: A-student status was a moderator of the discrimination and lower positive mental health link, and gender and body mass index (BMI) were moderators of the discrimination and anxiety and lower positive mental health links. Consistent with counter-stereotype paradoxes, discrimination and these mental health indicators were significantly correlated for Asian-identified student-athletes who reported being A-students or being underweight/normal-weight women. Results contradicted the counter-stereotype paradox for the discrimination–suicidality relation, which was significant for student-athletes reporting B-grades or lower and not significant for A-students. Exercise appeared to buffer discrimination-mental health associations for depression, anxiety, positive mental health, and disordered eating concerns. Conclusions: Results challenge the oft-celebrated Asian American model minority image and signify how both conforming and failing to conform to stereotypes can have benefits and liabilities for Asian-identified student-athletes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • A validation of the Perceived Negative Context of Reception Scale with
           

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      Abstract: Objectives: Millions of Venezuelans have left their country in search of safety and stability in the United States (U.S.) and Colombia, two countries where recent increases in anti-immigrant rhetoric and sentiment have occurred. The Perceived Negative Context of Reception Scale captures the degree to which immigrants report feeling that people from their country are unwanted/marginalized within their new receiving context. In the present study, we examine the psychometric properties of the Perceived Negative Context of Reception Scale with recent Venezuelan immigrant adolescents and adults in the U.S. and Colombia. Method: We conducted confirmatory factor analysis using data from the Colombia and Miami’s Newest Arrivals (CAMINAR) Study, which collected data from Venezuelan adults in Bogotá, Colombia, and South Florida in October–November 2017, and the Venezolanos en Nuevos Entornos (VENE) Youth Project which surveyed Venezuelan youth living in Florida between November 2018 and July 2019. Results: We found that the negative context of reception evidenced strong psychometric properties among immigrants in both the U.S. and in Colombia, among adolescents and adults, and among male and female respondents. We also found that negative context of reception scores was associated with elevated scores on criterion-related factors—that is, perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms—in ways that are theoretically coherent and support measure validity. Conclusion: We provide new evidence that the Perceived Negative Context of Reception scale is reliable and valid for use with Venezuelan immigrants in the U.S. and Colombia. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Diversity fatigue: A survey for measuring attitudes towards diversity
           enhancing efforts in academia.

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      Abstract: Objectives: Academia is grappling with how to address persistent underrepresentation and reduce inequities. With so many diversity-enhancing initiatives underway, some within the academic community might experience “diversity fatigue,” a construct we use to understand majority groups’ feelings of weariness toward diversity efforts. Method: For our testing purposes, we focused on ethnic and minority underrepresentation, and collected data in four studies from 473 White American students and faculty. Using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis and latent profile analysis, we develop and confirm the single factor structure of the final 6-item Diversity Fatigue scale. We measured associations with other established measures and examined the strength of the association between diversity fatigue and faculty’s support for a diversity-enhancing intervention. Results: Results demonstrated scale reliability, convergent validity with system-justifying beliefs, and offer suggestive evidence of discriminant validity with inclusion concerns and implicit race-based associations. Although mean levels of diversity fatigue were low overall, diversity fatigue scores were related to concerns about the effort involved with diversity work and were significantly associated with faculty’s motivation to adopt a diversity-enhancing classroom activity. Conclusions: Diversity fatigue in academia is a dampening in people’s response to or enthusiasm for efforts that improve the experience of underrepresented people. This state experience is connected to system-justifying beliefs and is related to concerns about the effort required to do diversity interventions. Understanding and measuring this construct has implications for the psychology of intergroup relations, as well as practical implications for campus communities committed to diversity programs. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • “I am affected in all the ways … ”: A phenomenographic analysis of
           Latinx adolescents’ perceptions of family separations at the border.

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      Abstract: Objectives: This phenomenographic analysis examines how news of family separations at the U.S.-Mexico border shaped variations of experience and perceptions among U.S. Latinx adolescents across parental residency status. Method: In 2018–2019, 340 15–18-year-old Latinx adolescents in the Washington D.C. area participated in a study on immigration actions and responded to an open-ended question detailing how news of family separations at the border affected them and their families. The sample was comprised of equivalent numbers of adolescents whose parents had U.S. citizenship, permanent residency, temporary protected status, or were undocumented. Utilizing a phenomenographic analysis, we compared data across the participants’ parental residency status. Results: Three categories captured the complex influences that news of family separations had on Latinx adolescents not directly affected. Perceptual Experiencing described the sympathetic and vicarious emotions produced by the news of family separations. Lived Experiencing described the tangible effects experienced by participants, including incidents of increased racism and fear. Catalyzing effects described spillover effects of the first two themes where internalized feelings induced fear and catalyzed family behaviors. All themes were noted across residency status; however, the third was most strongly supported by those whose parents had precarious statuses. Conclusions: Findings suggest Latinx families across residency statuses can be negatively affected by news of the adversities experienced by a subgroup. Service and healthcare providers, and educators must be prepared to support Latinx youth faced with fear, discrimination, and isolation arising from exposure to news on immigration actions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Spiritual connectedness through prayer as a mediator of the relationship
           between Indigenous language use and positive mental health.

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      Abstract: Objective: The objective of this study is to understand how Indigenous language and spirituality revitalization efforts may affect mental health within Indigenous communities. Although Indigenous communities experience disproportionate rates of mental health problems, research supporting language and spirituality’s role in improving mental health is under-researched and poorly understood. Method: Data for this study are from a Community-based Participatory Research Project involving five Anishinaabe tribes in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Participants were sampled from clinic records of adults with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, living on or near the reservation, and self-identifying as American Indian (mean age = 46.3; n = 191). Result: Structural equation modeling illustrates that language use in the home is associated with positive mental health through spiritual connectedness. Conclusion: Results support tribal community expressions of the positive effects of cultural involvement for Indigenous wellbeing, and improve what is known about the interconnectedness of language and spirituality. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Parenting despite discrimination: Does racial identity matter'

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      Abstract: Background: Previous research suggests that parents’ characteristics and race-related experiences shape the racial socialization messages they give their children. Parents’ beliefs about race may also relate to how they interpret and respond to race-related stressors. The current study drew on the Sociohistorical Integrative Model for the Study of Stress in Black Families to examine the moderating roles of gender and racial identity subscales (i.e., racial centrality, private regard, and public regard) on the relations between race-related stressors (i.e., personal, vicarious, and anticipated racial discrimination) and racial socialization. Method: Path analyses were conducted in Mplus 8.2 using online survey data from a national sample of 567 African American parents of adolescents. Results: There were seven significant three-way interactions. Racial centrality and gender moderated the relations between both personal and vicarious racial discrimination and each racial socialization message. Private regard and gender moderated the relations between personal racial discrimination and preparation for bias and between vicarious racial discrimination and cultural socialization. Public regard and parent gender moderated the relation between personal racial discrimination and cultural socialization. Conclusions: The findings highlighted that parents’ experiences of personal, vicarious, and anticipated racial discrimination have different relations with their racial socialization messages. In addition, they highlighted that racial identity and parent gender are related to the type of racial socialization messages African American parents who are exposed to race-related stressors give their children. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Implications of Mexican-origin youth’s work experiences for
           relationships with fathers.

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      Abstract: Objective: To illuminate family implications of youth’s work, we examined longitudinal links between the work experiences of Mexican-origin youth in late adolescence and young adulthood and father-youth relationships. Method: Using data from 187 Mexican-origin youth and their employed fathers, we tested youth’s (52.4% female; Mage = 19.64, SD = 1.78) work hours and workplace discrimination as predictors of paternal acceptance two years later (Time 1 paternal acceptance controlled), and tested moderation by youth gender and maternal employment. Results: Multivariate multilevel models revealed a curvilinear association between youth workplace discrimination and father-reported acceptance. Moderation effects of youth gender and mother employment in linear links between youth work experiences and youth-reported acceptance also emerged. Work hours were stronger negative predictors of paternal acceptance for sons than daughters and youth with employed compared to nonemployed mothers. Workplace discrimination was a positive predictor of paternal acceptance of daughters but not sons. Conclusions: Findings highlight complex patterns in links between youth’s work and family relationships, an understudied area. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Facets of family achievement guilt for low-income, Latinx and Asian
           first-generation students.

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      Abstract: Objectives: For many low-income, Latinx and Asian first-generation students, family is a central motivator for obtaining a college degree. Yet, striving for upward mobility yields unanticipated psychological consequences. Specifically, family achievement guilt is a socioemotional experience related to “leaving family” to attend college. As a relatively understudied phenomenon, prior work has likely underrepresented the ways low-income, Latinx and Asian first-generation students experience guilt in the university. To address this gap, the current study aimed to refine the concept of family achievement guilt by exploring its different facets. Method: We utilized in-depth, semistructured interviews with 34 low-income, Latinx and Asian first-generation students. Results: Using both inductive and deductive analytic methods, we constructed four facets of guilt. Participants shared feeling guilt related to leaving family behind, having more privileges in the university context, becoming culturally different than family members, and experiencing financial distress. Conclusions: Unpacking family achievement guilt experiences of a fast-growing student population contributes to our understanding of theory and of possible support mechanisms. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Latinx adolescents facing multiple stressors and the protective role of
           familismo.

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      Abstract: Objective: In this study, we cumulatively examined how a number of cultural and general stressors as well as familismo differentially related to Latinx adolescents’ psychological well-being as measured by depressive symptoms, anxiety, and future orientation. In addition, we examined whether familismo buffered Latinx adolescents from the negative psychological outcomes associated with both cultural and general stressors. Method: Two hundred and twenty-four low-income, Latinx 9th graders (Mage = 14.5) attending three high schools in the Northeastern United States were surveyed. Results: Findings demonstrated that family-based cultural stressors were associated with increased depressive symptoms whereas familismo was associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Language conflicts and racial discrimination were also positively associated with anxiety. However, when both cultural and general stressors were accounted for, only greater material need was associated with increased depressive symptoms and a less positive future orientation. Moreover, familismo protected adolescents from depressive symptoms linked to material hardship. Conclusions: Cultural stressors may be less distressing to Latinx adolescents than more general stressors, like financial hardship, and familismo helps buffer the stress of material hardship. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Bicultural stress and internalizing symptoms among U.S. Latinx youth: The
           moderating role of peer and parent support.

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      Abstract: Objective: U.S. Latinx youth are at increased risk for internalizing problems, perhaps due to high levels of bicultural stress. Taking a resilience perspective, this study examined peer and parent support as potential protective factors that might buffer the effects of bicultural stress on depression and anxiety symptoms among U.S. Latinx youth. Method: Participants were 306 Midwestern U.S. Latinx adolescents (M age = 15.50%, 46.2% girls) and their primary caregivers who completed individual interviews. Measures included two types of cultural stress (acculturative and enculturative stress) and, for each type, distinguished the extent of exposure to stressors from the subjective intensity of stress reported. Results: Results indicated that acculturative and enculturative stress were positively associated with internalizing symptoms, while social support from peers and parents was negatively associated with symptoms. Evidence regarding a stress-buffering effect of social support was mixed. Whereas higher levels of peer support mitigated the effects of subjective acculturative stress on depression and anxiety symptoms, parental support did not show a buffering effect. Moreover, in some cases, cultural stress appeared to attenuate the beneficial effect of social support. Conclusions: Although there was some support for the stress-buffering hypothesis, the impact of bicultural stressors depended on the type of stress considered and whether the focus was on exposure to stressors or subjective stress, as well as the source of social support. The findings highlight the complex effects of bicultural stress on U.S. Latinx youth mental health. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Implicit support differs across five groups in the U.S., Taiwan, and
           Mexico.

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      Abstract: Objective: Prior research documents numerous psychological and physiological benefits of implicit support particularly for Asians/Asian Americans. However, potential variation in how two different kinds of collectivism—Harmony and Convivial—shape support has been overlooked. Additionally, implicit support has largely been studied using quantitative approaches, whereas qualitative methods may best illuminate how implicit support is used in everyday life. The present mixed-methods investigation aims to better understand implicit support “in practice” and to unpack previously overlooked nuances between different subsets of collectivism in implicit support processes. Method: We collected qualitative accounts of implicit support interactions from 216 female participants (U.S. Whites, U.S. Latinas, U.S. Asians, Mexican, Taiwanese) who were prompted to describe an implicit support experience and then quantitatively assess its helpfulness. Results: Qualitative analysis using a thematic analysis approach identified three subcategories of implicit support (traditional, semi-disclosure, non-verbal cues). Cultural patterns emerged in how implicit support was used across different groups that align with high-context and low-context communication theories and cultural values. Conclusions: The current research highlights the benefit of qualitative approaches to understanding nuanced support processes, and the need to study culture beyond the individualism–collectivism dichotomy. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Testimony and meaning: A qualitative study of Black women with cancer
           diagnoses.

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      Abstract: Objective: Research has established religion and spirituality as important resources for Black people in the U.S. coping with adversity. Most research has been from an etic perspective, examining religious variables that are valid across multiple religions. In the present study, we asked what emic aspects of the Black church’s practices and theological emphases women with cancer drew on in constructing meaning-making narratives from their cancer experience. Method: In this consensual qualitative research study, we interviewed 30 Black women with cancer histories with an average age of 64.5. Results: The religious practice of testimony emerged as the predominant theme. Testimony (a) provided a meaningful purpose to the cancer experience; (b) had a specific content of describing what God had done in their lives as well as some common theological emphases; (c) had dual desired outcomes of helping others and bringing glory to God; and (d) had an associated practice of giving testimony. Conclusion: We discuss testimony as a narrative structure and highlight its importance in informing culturally sensitive interventions aimed at supporting Black women with cancer. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Filial responsibility, bicultural competence, and socioemotional
           well-being among Latina college students.

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      Abstract: Objective: Filial responsibility includes instrumental and expressive caregiving. Research on the perceptions of filial responsibility has examined perceived unfairness—the perception of the lack of equity and mutuality in the distribution of such tasks. Previous research on filial responsibility among Latinx young adults is inconsistent and limited but has indicated that examining dimensions of filial responsibility is key to understanding its impact on socioemotional outcomes. Furthermore, it is important to consider how dimensions of bicultural competence (comfort, facility, and advantages perceived in navigating two cultural contexts), moderate these relations. The current study examined filial responsibility and socioemotional well-being among Latina college students. We also examined the moderating role of dimensions of bicultural competence. Method: Latina college students (N = 312, Mage = 19.12, SD = 1.15) provided self-reports on filial responsibility, bicultural competence, depressive symptoms, and self-esteem. Stepwise regression and moderation analyses were conducted to examine the aims of the study. Results: For filial responsibility, we found that expressive caregiving related to more depressive symptoms. Instrumental caregiving is related to higher self-esteem. Perceived unfairness was related to more depressive symptoms and lower self-esteem. Although the global measure of bicultural competence was not a significant moderator, certain dimensions of bicultural competence moderated these relations. Bicultural facility amplified the relations between expressive caregiving and depressive symptoms. Bicultural comfort amplified the relation between perceived unfairness and depressive symptoms. Bicultural comfort and advantages amplified the relations between perceived unfairness and self-esteem. Conclusion: The study has implications for improving the socioemotional well-being of Latina college students. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Latinx identity and intersectional responses to stigma.

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      Abstract: Objectives: Belonging to a stigmatized group presents a predicament between relying on your group as a source of support versus renouncing your group to avoid stigma and discrimination. We investigate how perceived stigma affects changes in group identification and whether this depends on other axes of advantage to which participants have access. We hypothesized that for Latinx undergraduate students, perceptions of stigma would predict increased ethnic identification but that access to other markers of advantage would dampen this effect. Methods: We measured ethnic identification, perceived stigma against one’s ethnic group, gender, income, and first-generation college status among Latinx undergraduates (N = 171). One year later, we assessed changes in ethnic identification using the same measure. Regression analyses assessed whether gender, income, and first-generation college status moderated the effect of perceived stigma on end-of-year ethnic identification, controlling for initial ethnic identification. Results: Controlling for initial ethnic identification, end-of-year ethnic identification was higher when participants perceived that their ethnic group was regarded negatively by others. However, this effect was only present among relatively low-income and first-generation college students. Conclusion: Intersectional perspectives are needed to understand how individuals manage stigmatized identities. Stigmatized individuals who face disadvantages in other areas may be more likely to depend on their devalued groups as a source of esteem and belonging. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Culturally informed shift-&-persist: A higher-order factor model and
           prospective associations with discrimination and depressive symptoms.

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      Abstract: Objectives: Based on the conceptual overlap between shift-&-persist (S&P) and culturally based strategies (critical civic engagement [CCE] and spiritually based coping), this study tests whether associations between these three previously disparate strategies are attributable to the existence of a higher-order coping construct: culturally informed S&P. Methods: Among 364 diverse minoritized youth (Mage = 18.79, 85.2% female), we tested for the existence of this higher-order factor through confirmatory factor analysis. Results: We found theoretical and empirical support for the existence of a higher-order factor structure and for our higher-order factor—culturally informed S&P. Culturally informed S&P promotes fewer depressive symptoms as a main effect in addition to completely protecting against the negative impact of discrimination on depressive symptoms when culturally informed S&P is high. Conclusions: The current study illustrates relations between three previously distinct coping strategies through their association with culturally informed S&P. Results highlight culturally informed S&P’s promotive and protective effects in the face of ethnic–racial discrimination. Implications for subsequent study of culturally based coping are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Internalized model minority myth among Asian Americans: Links to
           anti-Black attitudes and opposition to affirmative action.

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      Abstract: Objectives: The current study contributes to the field’s limited knowledge about the sociopolitical consequences of internalized Model Minority Myth (MMM) among Asian Americans. In particular, we examine how the MMM serves as a legitimizing ideology, in which the perpetuation of beliefs about society as fair ultimately maintain racial inequality. Methods: Using path analysis with 251 Asian American college students, we tested a model linking internalized MMM (i.e., attitudes towards Asian Americans as achievement oriented and as having unrestricted mobility, compared to other racial minorities) to anti-Black attitudes and opposition to affirmative action for Black Americans. We examined direct effects of internalized MMM on such outcomes, as well as indirect effects through other legitimizing ideologies, including just world beliefs and racial colorblindness. Results: Findings demonstrated that greater levels of internalized MMM among Asian American college students predicted greater anti-Black attitudes and opposition to affirmative action. Greater internalized MMM achievement orientation and unrestricted mobility also directly predicted greater just world beliefs and colorblindness. Results from our test of indirect effects showed that internalized MMM achievement orientation and unrestricted mobility both indirectly predicted opposition to affirmative action through colorblindness, and unrestricted mobility also indirectly predicted anti-Black attitudes through colorblindness. Also, achievement orientation and unrestricted mobility indirectly predicted anti-Black attitudes through just world beliefs. Conclusions: Our findings have implications for research and practice that promotes awareness of and seeks to challenge the MMM, anti-Blackness, and beliefs about affirmative action among Asian Americans. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 11 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
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