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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
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Music Therapy Perspectives
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.308
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0734-6875 - ISSN (Online) 2053-7387
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • Trauma-informed music therapy theory and practice

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      Pages: e58 - e59
      Abstract: BeerL. E. & BirnbaumJ. C. (Eds.). (2023). Trauma-informed music therapy theory and practice (1st edition). Routledge. e58 pages. ISBN: 9781032061276, ISBN: 9781032061269, E-ISBN: 9781003200833, $128 hardback, $31.96 paperback, $31.96 ebook.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad001
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Collaborative Editorial for Music Therapy Perspectives

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      Pages: 103 - 106
      PubDate: Wed, 27 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad022
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • The Voice Essential: Exploring Oral Traditions in the Study of Vocal
           Improvisation

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      Pages: 107 - 113
      Abstract: AbstractThe voice—from the utility of oral traditions to the pedagogy of singing as performance—is essential to the human experience, yet its use of it has become the narrow purview of those privileged enough to study or make a career out of teaching or performing. In this article, the authors lend unique perspectives on the voice as an instrument of tremendous capacity by providing a lens on its utility in oral traditions. Lullaby, chants, work songs, and vendor songs as specific oral traditions offer entry points to understanding vocal utility that synthesizes both practicalities with aesthetics. Their study within the context of vocal improvisation offers much value to those seeking an understanding of the voice’s potential and for those whose access and comfort with their own voice has been diminished. Such liberation afforded by the exploration of these oral traditions can inform the work of music therapists, voice coaches, students, and everyday singers.
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad009
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Integrative Review of Introductory Guitar Teaching Research and
           Recommendations for Music Therapy Education

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      Pages: 114 - 122
      Abstract: AbstractGuitar is a primary clinical instrument for many music therapists; however, minimal research focuses on effective guitar teaching methods (GTMs) in music therapy education. The purpose of this integrative review was to synthesize and critically evaluate the existing literature on GTMs to develop recommendations for music therapy guitar education. The research questions included: (a) What are the characteristics (i.e. participants, study design, teaching method, course type, dosage) of studies using GTMs in music therapy education and training' (b) What are the measures, outcomes, and de/limitations from GTMs studies in music therapy education' Three studies met the criteria. These studies included GTMs of behavioral contracting, audio and video modeling, and learning music “by ear.” Studies indicated that (a) playing “by ear” may improve student musicianship, (b) experienced instructor modeling improves learning, (c) evaluation could include accuracy behavioral markers, and (d) experiential and social learning benefit students in introductory guitar courses. Implications for music therapy education and training and recommendations for further research are discussed.
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad006
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • A Seat at the Table for Music Therapy: Perceptions of Music Therapy Within
           the Hospice Interdisciplinary Team

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      Pages: 123 - 134
      Abstract: AbstractMusic therapy is a newer profession within hospice, with limited evidence of other disciplines’ perceptions of a music therapist’s role in hospice care. The purpose of this study was to examine if perception differences exist between music therapists and interdisciplinary team (IDT) members regarding how 25 job tasks related to the music therapist’s role within a clinical interdisciplinary hospice team. Two groups consisting of board-certified music therapists (MT-BC) and IDT members completed an online Qualtrics survey to rate how 25 job tasks were perceived to pertain to the music therapist’s role in hospice care. A two-way mixed ANOVA indicated the significant differences between the 2 groups for 13 of the 25 tasks, suggesting less understanding of an MT-BC’s role within a hospice IDT. For the 13 tasks perceived significantly different, a one-way ANOVA was run and indicated significant between discipline perceptual differences for nine of the 13 tasks. Qualitative statements indicated contracted and employed MT-BCs experienced similar perceived barriers of IDT colleagues lack of understanding music therapy and the MT-BC not being able to attend IDT or participate regularly. Overall, required IDT groups’ qualitative statements were positive, with the most common responses across disciplines indicating that MT-BCs elicited positive responses from patients and caregivers, provided a distraction from pain or agitation, and increased patients’ quality of life. The current study’s outcomes highlight the need for music therapists to provide more education to colleagues regarding a music therapist’s role in the hospice setting.
      PubDate: Fri, 09 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad011
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • An Exploration of Accessibility to Trauma-Focused Education and Knowledge
           Among Music Therapists

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      Pages: 135 - 143
      Abstract: AbstractA substantial number of children and adults in American society have been exposed to violence, marginalization, prejudice, or other traumatic experiences. Thus, it is imperative that those in helping professions have adequate training and resources to recognize and respond to the signs, symptoms, and risks of trauma. Like other helping professionals, music therapists are increasingly called to recognize the impact trauma can have on the communities they serve, but little is known about music therapists’ knowledge and awareness of trauma concepts. A survey was distributed to all board-certified music therapists in the United States that sought to examine the accessibility of educational and professional trainings related to trauma, as well as self-perceived competency in working with service users who have experienced trauma. Of the 8,602 emails distributed (CBMT), 958 different responses were returned, 945 of which consented to participate for a 10.9% response rate. Results indicated a substantial interest in trauma work among music therapists (88.04%); however, almost half of respondents (48.86%) have indicated a lack of access to these trainings for any given reason, leading to limited self-perceived competency in trauma work. This limitation in self-perceived competency in trauma work might exist due to a lack of consistent education and training provided to music therapists, regardless of the mode of education. By not addressing this gap in the profession, harm might be done to those who utilize music therapy services. A breakdown of conglomerate music therapist trauma-specific knowledge is provided, along with identified areas of trauma-concept interest.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad005
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Undergraduate Music Therapy Students’ Perspectives on Curricular
           Self-Experiences

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      Pages: 144 - 151
      Abstract: AbstractExperiential learning is a key component of the education and training of music therapists in the United States. Currently, there is limited peer-reviewed, English-language literature that explores undergraduate student perspectives of curricular self-experiences. The purpose of this study is to help fill this gap and better understand undergraduate music therapy students’ experiences of participating in curricular self-experiences in order to inform best practices for implementation. Three recent graduates of a music therapy program engaged in semi-structured, individual interviews. Interview transcripts were analyzed using the process of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Group superordinate themes emerged from the research question and subquestions about benefits and drawbacks of curricular self-experiences and what facilitated or impeded students’ participation. Participants identified empathy and skill development as benefits and that peer relationships and clear expectations facilitated participation. They also identified vulnerability and boundaries as drawbacks, and that professor/student relationships and cohort interactions impeded participation. Findings from this study highlight shared experiences among students and provide concrete examples of what educators should consider when designing curricular self-experiences.
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad002
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Perspectives on Music Healing by Traditional Healers and Music Therapists

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      Pages: 152 - 158
      Abstract: AbstractThe majority of South Africans use both traditional and Western healthcare services. Although traditional healers have long since recognized and utilized the healing power of music, music therapy as a profession in this country is largely aligned with Western medical approaches, as it is regulated by the Health Professions Council of South Africa. This alignment leaves little recognition to traditional health practitioners. In the current study, we explored music therapists’ and traditional healers’ perceptions of their roles and relationships with each other in South African healthcare with the hope of initiating dialogue. Four traditional healers (TH) and four music therapists (MT) participated in interviews within this multiple case study, and thematic analysis was used to interpret the data. We identified eight overarching themes that appeared most salient to the music therapists and traditional healers (framed from their perspectives): (1) Both our practices support wellbeing, with music as a tool; (2) We both seek to enhance general well-being, but with different specializations; (3) We both focus on relational connection; (4) We both emphasize the importance of culture; (5) THs emphasize spirituality; (6) We hold curious, yet cautious regard for each other’s practices; (7) MT may aid in addressing psychosocial needs in South Africa; and (8) We both welcome a pluralism of approaches. Both groups of practitioners envisioned a future healthcare system that embraces multiple modalities while reflecting on the need to engage in issues related to boundaries of scopes of practice. They highlighted the need for greater trust between practitioners from different approaches to serve a diverse population better.
      PubDate: Wed, 03 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad003
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Music Therapy Knowledge, Interest, and Career Recommendations: A Survey of
           Music Educators

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      Pages: 159 - 168
      Abstract: AbstractThe purpose of this study was to examine high school music teachers’ knowledge of music therapy, interest in music therapy, and career recommendations for music therapy relative to other music careers. High school music teachers (N = 65) from one southeastern state completed a researcher-designed survey instrument designed to investigate these areas. Results indicated varied levels of knowledge about music therapy, although teachers who previously attended institutions that offered music therapy degree programs provided higher knowledge ratings than those who had not attended institutions with music therapy programs. Additionally, participants reported a relatively high interest in music therapy and a willingness to promote it as a career to their students. Participants reported that they were most likely to recommend music education as a career to their students, followed by music performance and music therapy. In response to open-ended questions, participants indicated that they believed personal characteristics were the most important qualities of prospective music therapists and that musical characteristics were the most important qualities of prospective music educators. They also expressed an interest in more information about music therapy, especially related to job characteristics. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.
      PubDate: Fri, 09 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad014
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Comparison Between Neuroscience- and DIRFloortime┬«-Informed Approaches
           Within Music Therapy: A Descriptive Case Study

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      Pages: 169 - 177
      Abstract: AbstractMusic therapists practice from different clinical approaches; however, these approaches have not been compared in a research study. The purpose of this descriptive case study was to examine differences in behaviors for one participant on the autism spectrum and their therapist practicing from two different clinical approaches. We examined five videos where treatment was delivered in a neuroscience-informed approach and five videos in a DIRFloortime®-informed approach. We used observational behavioral coding for three nonmusical social skill behaviors, three musical social skill behaviors, and four therapist behaviors. We also examined the presence of critical elements of each approach within the videos. Results indicated that the therapist overall showed the critical elements for each approach within the examined videos. Targeted participant social behaviors were present in each of the approaches; however, the manner in which they were facilitated was different. Descriptive statistics and visual analysis were used to show similarities and differences between the approaches. Further studies are needed to explore different approaches in music therapy clinical practice.
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad007
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Therapeutic Group Singing for Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease:
           A Conceptual Framework

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      Pages: 178 - 186
      Abstract: AbstractParkinson’s disease (PD) is a complex, progressive, and degenerative neurological disorder. With millions affected worldwide, music therapists may have the opportunity to work with individuals with PD and their families. To better understand biological, psychological, and social factors associated with PD, and the interactions between these three systems, researchers encourage a biopsychosocial approach. A biopsychosocial approach supports the idea that biological, psychological, and social systems influence and interact with each other, affecting overall health and quality of life. Music therapy affects biopsychosocial functioning through the use of evidence-based music interventions. One such music therapy intervention supported in the literature for use with individuals with PD and their families is therapeutic group singing. However, this research evidence is diverse and complex. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to present a conceptual framework of the biopsychosocial approach in music therapy focused on therapeutic group singing for individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Our aims include: (1) identifying biopsychosocial (i.e., physical, psychological, and social) factors associated with PD, (2) presenting evidence-based outcomes of therapeutic group singing on biopsychosocial functioning, and (3) crafting a conceptual framework to consolidate evidence about therapeutic group singing as an effective intervention for this population. Research outcomes from various studies demonstrate benefits in biological, psychological, and social functioning from therapeutic group singing interventions. Overall, evidence suggests that therapeutic group singing – as visualized in the conceptual framework – is an effective intervention to address biopsychosocial functioning for individuals with PD and their families.
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad008
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Genre-Bending: A Discourse on Globalization and Culture with Implications
           for Music Therapy

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      Pages: 187 - 197
      Abstract: AbstractGenre-bending is an evolving term that indicates the tendency for musical and cultural elements to interact with each other, often defying previously established genre distinctions. Evolutions of technology have expanded the way music is both created and consumed, and together with globalization, has shaped the development of a global music landscape. Hybrid elements and dynamics of music and culture have important implications for the development and exchange of musical identities outside of and within music therapy. In this article, there is a brief review of the digitalization of music technology related to consumers and curators. We highlight how digitalization and globalization have increased access through media democratization and afforded a global digital agency. This agency is explored with both the access and engagement of consumers, and the impact on curation by music creators. Those introductory elements are used for grounding the article’s main idea of genre-bending; including what it is, the ways it functions in popular music today, sociocultural and relational elements, and implications for music therapy. As part of this discourse, we highlight how the global music landscape has encouraged diverse music tastes and normalized inclusive engagement, and the subsequent importance of understanding individuals as being situated through multicultural music personhood. These shifts shape the intersubjective meaning making between therapist and client, impacting musical identities. The article concludes by delving into the ways these realities influence how music therapists hold space for curation, clients’ resources, and cultural assets through hybrid therapeutic dynamics.
      PubDate: Sat, 15 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad004
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Aligning Kitwood’s Model of Person-Centered Dementia Care with Music
           Therapy Practice

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      Pages: 198 - 206
      Abstract: AbstractPerson-centered dementia care has been extensively integrated into music therapy practice; its central aim being to meet the core psychological needs of people with dementia, uphold personhood, and contribute to enhanced quality of life. Furthermore, Kitwood’s model has been widely referenced as the theoretical framework underpinning multiple studies with people with dementia. However, few studies explore it in more concrete terms, expand on how it is implemented in practice, or describe how “positive person work” can be facilitated in music therapy with this population. This paper aims to address these lacunae, by presenting a comprehensive overview of Kitwood’s model; identifying how it has informed music therapy practice, and highlighting current applications of “person-centered music therapy” in relation to meeting the core psychological needs of people with dementia. Furthermore, the authors present practical considerations on facilitating “positive person work” in music therapy, drawing on their experiences of providing music therapy in dementia care.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad015
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Correction to: The Voice Essential: Exploring Oral Traditions in the Study
           of Vocal Improvisation

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      Pages: 207 - 207
      Abstract: This is a correction to: John Mondanaro, PhD, LCAT, MT-BC, CCLS, Emily Nicholas-Curnutte, MS, MT-BC, LCAT-P, The Voice Essential: Exploring Oral Traditions in the Study of Vocal Improvisation, Music Therapy Perspectives, 2023;, miad009, https://doi.org/10.1093/mtp/miad009
      PubDate: Fri, 26 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/mtp/miad012
      Issue No: Vol. 41, No. 2 (2023)
       
 
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