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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lamella     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Evolution, Mind and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediation Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Family Trauma, Child Custody & Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Creativity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Psychosocial Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Play in Adulthood     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychology and Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Performance and Mindfulness     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School & Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jungian Journal for Scholarly Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
KULA : knowldge creation, dissemination, and preservation studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Service Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
JCPP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Know and Share Psychology     Open Access  
Methods in Psychology     Open Access  
Gadjah Mada Journal of Professional Psychology     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Katharsis     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
Human Arenas : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Psychology, Culture, and Meaning     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cognitive Enhancement     Hybrid Journal  
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Dhammathas Academic Journal     Open Access  
INSAN Jurnal Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Heroism Science     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Psychology     Open Access  
Gogoa     Open Access  
Journal of Global Engagement and Transformation     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Journal of Cognitive Systems     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi Terapan     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Jurnal Educatio : Jurnal Pendidikan Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal  
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Musiktherapeutische Umschau : Forschung und Praxis der Musiktherapie     Hybrid Journal  

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Psychological Reports
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.347
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0033-2941 - ISSN (Online) 1558-691X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Attitudes Toward Dating Violence, Social Impact, and Alexithymia in
           University Students: A Structural Equation Modeling

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yeter Şener, Yurdagül Günaydın
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This research was conducted to determine the effects of social impact and alexithymia on attitudes toward dating violence. Additionally, the interaction between them was examined. In this context, the effect of social impact on alexithymia was also examined. In addition, this research tried to determine whether alexithymia has a mediating role between social impact and attitudes toward dating violence. The study was descriptive and cross-sectional. There was a total of 582 participants in the study. The study used the Sociodemographic Questionnaire Form, Social Impact Scale (SIS), 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and Dating Violence Scale (DVS) for data collection. The study used the descriptive statistics, spearman correlation analysis and structural equation modeling in the evaluation of the data. Participants’ SIS scores had a statistically significant and positive correlation with their TAS-20 scores (p < .01), while they had a statistically significant and negative correlation with their DVS scores (p < .01). In addition, a statistically significant and negative correlation was found between TAS-20 scores and DVS scores (p < .01). SIS scores directly affected the TAS-20 (effect value = 0.481; p = .001) and DVS scores (effect value = −0.405; p = .001). Similarly, the TAS-20 scores had a direct effect on the DVS scores (effect value = −0.261; p = .008). In addition to this direct effect of TAS-20 scores, there was a significant mediator effect between the SIS scores and DVS scores (effect value = −0.126; p = .008). In this study, it was established that social impact effects both alexithymia and attitudes toward dating violence, and moreover, alexithymia influences attitudes toward dating violence. Additionally, it was identified that alexithymia serves as a mediator in the relationship between social impact and attitudes toward dating violence.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-07-20T12:15:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241265618
       
  • The Relationship Between Negative Urgency and Anxiety and Worry in
           American College Students

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      Authors: Michael Fensken, Lori-Ann B. Forzano, Lauren Soda
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The primary objective was to assess the degree to which intolerance of uncertainty accounts for the association between negative urgency and anxiety and worry. The sample included 389 American college students from a state college in the Northeastern United States. Hayes’ PROCESS v4.1 (2022) macro was used to investigate the mediating effects of intolerance of uncertainty on the relationship between negative urgency and worry and anxiety. A direct effect of negative urgency on worry was found and a mediating effect of intolerance of uncertainty was observed. A direct effect of negative urgency on state anxiety was found, and a mediating effect of intolerance of uncertainty was observed. The study advances support for the mediatory role of intolerance of uncertainty between negative urgency and anxiety and worry in American college students.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-07-20T07:45:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241264483
       
  • Factors Associated With Gun Possession Among High-School Students in the
           U.S. Before and During the Pandemic

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      Authors: Soumyadeep Mukherjee, Jonathan Gordils
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Adolescents’ possession of guns was a matter of concern even before the pandemic. It is pertinent to examine whether students continued possessing guns after schools reopened, and if so, identify factors that might have been associated with such behaviors. Towards this end, the present study examined the relationship between highschool students’ experiences and their propensity to possess guns. Methods: This used responses from multiple nationally representative cross-sectional surveys of high school students from the 2019 and 2021 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) and the 2021 Adolescent Behaviors and Experiences Survey (ABES). Gun possession within the past year was the main outcome of interest. Experiences of violence, assault, injury, and other adverse experiences were the independent variables. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions, adjusting for sample weights, were performed using SAS. Results: Out of a total of more than 25,000 and 38,000 valid responses, respectively in 2019 and 2021 to the question on gun possession, 4.7% and 4.2% reported carrying a gun at least once within the past year. Experiences of sexual violence, involvement in physical fight, perceived lack of safety, and being threatened/injured by weapons, were associated with higher adjusted odds of guns possession among males and females. Among ABES 2021 respondents (more than 7500), those who witnessed violence in the neighborhood were more likely to possess guns. This association was significant among males, whereas parents being informed about whereabouts was significant for females. Conclusion: This study shows that adverse experiences were associated with a higher odds of guns possession among female and male highschool students. Witnessing violent attack on someone in the neighborhood emerged as a risk factor for males. This suggests that social determinants of health as well as adverse experiences are associated with gun possession among high-school students.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-24T05:19:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241263750
       
  • Examining the Mediating Role of Resilience and Life Satisfaction in the
           Relationship Between Anxiety Sensitivity and Perceived Stress

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      Authors: Hasan Batmaz, Eyüp Çelik
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the mediation role of life satisfaction and resilience variables in the relationships between anxiety sensitivity and perceived stress. The data was collected with the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3, Life Satisfaction Scale, Perceived Stress Scale, and Brief Psychological Resilience Scale from 347 university students (Mage = 23.15, SD = 5.15; 70% girls, 30% boys). The analyses were examined by structural equation modeling using AMOS 24. The findings suggest that students with high anxiety sensitivity and perceived stress have low resilience and life satisfaction levels. More importantly, resilience and life satisfaction were found to have partial mediation. As a result, it is seen that anxiety sensitivity has a significant effect on reducing perceived stress by increasing students’ resilience and life satisfaction. Therefore, this situation facilitates decreased anxiety levels, greater satisfaction with life, and more robust mental health.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-22T10:27:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241263572
       
  • Mentalizing as a Predictor of Well-Being and Emotion Regulation:
           Longitudinal Evidence from a Community Sample of Young Adults

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      Authors: Nicola-Hans Schwarzer, Nikolas Heim, Stephan Gingelmaier, Peter Fonagy, Tobias Nolte
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Background: In recent years, mentalizing – the capacity to understand one’s own and others’ intentional mental states in social contexts – has been considered to be a protective capacity that enables adaptive processing of stress-related emotional arousal, benefits general well-being and underpins adaptive emotion regulation. Objective: Several studies using cross-sectional research designs have demonstrated the potential health-promoting effect of mentalizing in non-clinical samples. However, longitudinal evidence is scarce. The present study aimed to investigate whether mentalizing predicts well-being and emotion regulation strategies in a non-clinical sample of mainly young adults using a prospective longitudinal design. Methods: In a prospective research design, 135 participants completed questionnaires assessing well-being, psychological symptom severity and mentalizing capacity at baseline (T1). Twelve months later (T2), emotion regulation strategies (suppression and cognitive reappraisal), well-being and psychological symptom severity were assessed by self-report. The data were analyzed using multivariate linear regression analysis. Results: Impairments in mentalizing were a significant negative predictor of well-being 12 months later. Furthermore, impairments in mentalizing positively predicted suppression of emotional states at T2. No association was found between deficits in mentalizing and cognitive reappraisal of emotional states over the course of 1 year. Conclusion: The findings indicate that mentalizing is longitudinally associated with mental health indicators in a non-clinical adult sample. Specifically, ineffective mentalizing was associated with impaired psychological well-being and a tendency to suppress intense emotional states over a period of 1 year. Future research should replicate these findings using multiple measurement timepoints to etablish causality.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-15T02:02:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241261902
       
  • Examining Indirect and Direct Effects of Risk and Resilience on the
           Relation Between Perceived Discrimination and Eating Disorder Symptoms in
           Ethnic Minority American Women

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      Authors: Maria A. Kalantzis, Abby L. Braden
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Direct relationships between perceived discrimination and eating pathology in ethnic minorities are well-documented. However, theoretical work examining unique risk and resilience factors that strengthen or weaken the relation between these constructs in ethnic minorities is lacking. The current study aims to address this gap by incorporating stress-process and tripartite frameworks to examine social and personal resources as they relate to perceived discrimination and eating pathology. In a sample of Black, Asian, and Latine women (N = 296, M age = 30.82), social support did not mediate the relationship between perceived discrimination and eating pathology. A significant interaction effect was observed for thin-ideal internalization strengthening the relation between perceived discrimination and negative emotional eating. Thin-ideal internalization moderated the relation between perceived discrimination and negative emotional eating in Latine Women, and disordered eating in Black Women. Overall, findings suggest ethnic minority Women have both personal and social resources that may influence the strength of effect on the relation between perceived discrimination on eating pathology.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-14T06:09:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241256884
       
  • Emotional Invalidation and Relationship Quality: A Mediational Model
           Through a Social Learning Lens

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      Authors: Meredith B. Elzy, Ashton Keaton, Melanie Bogus, Kristen Raymond
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      While we know childhood experiences are influential on a child’s later socioemotional awareness and behavior, we are still searching for specific mechanisms that influence the transferability of childhood experiences and adult relationship functioning. In this study, we seek to further this area of investigation by examining the interpretation of ambiguous social interactions and perceptions of emotional invalidation as potential mediators of the relationship between perceptions of childhood emotional invalidation and current relationship quality. Participants completed online measures of hostile intent attributions, perceptions of childhood emotional invalidation, and current relationship quality with a significant other. They read emotionally provocative interpersonal scenarios and then reported likely emotionally invalidating reactions from their significant other to measure current perceptions of emotional invalidation. Results supported our hypotheses that perceptions of current emotional invalidation in a close, personal relationship would mediate the relationship between perceptions of childhood maternal emotional invalidation and both current relationship support and relationship conflict. Furthermore, the strength of this mediational pathway outweighed the influence of a more general hostile attribution bias. These findings have implications for prevention and intervention strategies designed to enhance interpersonal functioning.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-13T06:52:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241259670
       
  • Motor Strategies: The Role of Active Behavior in Spatial Hearing Research

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      Authors: Chiara Valzolgher
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      When completing a task, the ability to implement behavioral strategies to solve it in an effective and cognitively less-demanding way is extremely adaptive for humans. This behavior makes it possible to accumulate evidence and test one’s own predictions about the external world. In this work, starting from examples in the field of spatial hearing research, I analyze the importance of considering motor strategies in perceptual tasks, and I stress the urgent need to create ecological experimental settings, which are essential in allowing the implementation of such behaviors and in measuring them. In particular, I will consider head movements as an example of strategic behavior implemented to solve acoustic space-perception tasks.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-10T09:09:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241260246
       
  • Free to be Healthy' Free Will Beliefs are Positively Associated With
           Health Behavior

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      Authors: Tom St Quinton, A. William Crescioni
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has demonstrated that a stronger belief in free will contributes to a variety of socially desirable behaviors. We assessed the correlation between free will beliefs and health behaviors. Four studies (N = 1172) provide evidence that belief in free will is positively associated with health protective behaviors (e.g., physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, low fat diet) and negatively associated with health risk behaviors (e.g., alcohol consumption, smoking, unhealthy snacking). In relation to the respective health protective and health risk behaviors, we found free will beliefs were more strongly correlated with physical activity and alcohol consumption, respectively. We also found free will beliefs were associated with key social cognition determinants (e.g., attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control, and intention). Overall, our results suggest that belief in free will can have important consequences for health behavior. This contributes to current theorizing about the implications of believing in free will.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-08T09:50:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241260264
       
  • Patterns of Health-Risk Behaviours and Their Associations With Anxiety and
           Depression Among Chinese Young Adults by Gender: A Latent Class Analysis

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      Authors: Chaoqun Dong, Hua Chen, Yi Li, Yumei Sun, Yinzhu Pan, Qiongying Xu, Hongyu Sun
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated gender differences in health-risk behaviour patterns among young adults and assessed the associations of anxiety and depression with these patterns. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with 1740 young Chinese adults aged 18–24 years. Latent class analysis (LCA) and multinomial logistic regression were conducted to identify the clusters of health-risk behaviours and their associations with anxiety and depression. Three common patterns were found for both genders: physical inactivity, substance use, and insufficient fruit intake (5.7% for males [M] and 11.6% for females [F]); a sedentary lifestyle only (48.4% for M and 48.9% for F); and a sedentary lifestyle, substance use, and an unhealthy diet (7.6% for M and 20.0% for F). Additionally, two additional unique patterns were found: physical inactivity and unhealthy diet in males (38.3%) and physical inactivity and insufficient fruit intake in females (19.6%). Sociodemographic variables exert different effects on health-risk behaviour patterns as a function of gender. Lower anxiety levels (odds ratio [OR]: 0.892; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.823–0.966) and greater depression levels (OR: 1.074; 95% CI: 1.008–1.143) were associated with a sedentary lifestyle, substance use, and unhealthy diet class only in female young adults compared with a sedentary-only class. These findings underscore the need for the implementation of targeted interventions based on gender differences.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-06T10:39:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241258922
       
  • Exploration of the Mediating Role of Self-Compassion and Mindfulness on
           Orthorexia Nervosa and Perfectionism

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      Authors: Eliza Kalika, Misba Hussain, Helen Egan, Michail Mantzios
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Orthorexia Nervosa (ON) is characterized by an excessive preoccupation with healthy eating, accompanied by increasingly restrictive dietary practices over time. In light of the increased attention to ON, it is noteworthy that the existing body of research, specifically with regard to mindfulness and self-compassion remains constrained in scope and depth. A total of 151 participants over the age of 18 completed scales measuring Orthorexia, Self-Compassion, Mindfulness, and Perfectionism. The findings revealed that individuals exhibiting high levels of ON tended to have low levels of self-compassion and mindfulness, along with high levels of perfectionism. Furthermore, the results indicated that self-compassion and mindfulness acted as mediators in the relationship between perfectionism and orthorexia nervosa. These findings deepen our comprehension of orthorexia and underscore the role of self-compassion and mindfulness, or their absence, as mediating factors in this context. The implications of these results and potential future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-05T04:16:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241256886
       
  • Physiology of Risk-Taking and Risk Management in Realistic Decision-Making
           Scenarios

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      Authors: Davide Crivelli, Roberta A. Allegretta, Michela Balconi
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Decisions under risk are a particular case of decisional skills taking place in complex and mostly unpredictable situations, where affective connotation of deciding is highly relevant. We aimed at investigating decisional processes under risk by outlining individual risk-taking (RT) and risk management (RM) attitudes via realistic decision-making and, in keeping with the risk-as-feeling hypothesis, at exploring implicit physiological correlates of such processes. 35 participants were presented with realistic situations where they had to make decisions by choosing between alternatives connoted by different levels of riskiness. Concurrently, autonomic physiological activation (cardiovascular and electrodermal activity) was recorded. Data analysis highlighted that: (i) participants showed higher propensity towards risk management than risk-taking; (ii) the propensity towards both risk taking and risk management was significantly determined by physiological markers of autonomic activity; and (iii) risk taking and risk management indices showed associations with different autonomic measures, respectively heart rate and skin conductance metrics.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-04T11:19:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241258919
       
  • How Does Empowering Leadership Relate to Work Engagement' The Roles of
           Organisational Identification and Workplace Well-Being

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      Authors: Saifang Liu, Xiaoxi Han, Lei Du, Honghai Zhu, Runze Shi, Jijun Lan
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars tend to believe that effective leadership contributes to facilitating employee work engagement. Based on social identity theory and self-determination theory, this study explored how empowering leadership affects employee work engagement through the mediating roles of organisational identification and workplace well-being. A sample of 3645 front-line employees in China participated in this study. A structural equation model analysis was performed to examine the hypothetical model. Sex, age, degree of education, wage income per month (RMB), and subjective social class were covariables. The results indicated that (a) empowering leadership was positively related to work engagement, (b) organisational identification and workplace well-being played a partial mediating role in the relationship, and (c) organisational identification and workplace well-being had a chain mediating effect on empowering leadership and work engagement. These findings advance the understanding of the effect of empowering leadership on employees’ working attitudes and behaviours. They also contribute to potential interventions that boost employee work engagement.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-04T06:15:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241259370
       
  • The Dark Side of Safety: A Call for a More Thorough Consideration of
           Racism and Collective Power Motivations in the Social Psychology of
           Firearms

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      Authors: Gerald D. Higginbotham
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This paper situates current social psychological research on the symbolic use of firearms (e.g., as a source of personal safety) in broader historical context to motivate a more thorough consideration of collective power motives. Historically, firearms have been used to dominate racial outgroup members (e.g., White Americans use of firearms and firearm laws to dispossess indigenous people of land or control free and enslaved Black people) or, at times, attempt to resist group-based oppression (e.g., Black Americans use of firearms to struggle against White Jim Crow terrorism). Given most gun owners report self-protection as their primary reason for firearm ownership and yet anti-Black attitudes are still a consistently important predictor of firearm ownership among dominant group members (e.g., White Americans), this paper examines how guns may function as a perceived source of personal safety and collective power. I center the persistent role of White supremacy and anti-Blackness in original U.S. firearm psychology and policy to illuminate the interrelatedness of personal safety and collective power perceptions, and how perceived threats to in-group power may motivate the use of guns and policies that selectively regulate gun access to mitigate associated safety concerns. Seeking to nudge social psychology to more thoroughly examine firearms’ potential function as a symbolic source of collective power, I end by discussing how considering collective power can help us better understand how historically dominant and historically marginalized groups view firearms today while also illuminating some barriers to the pursuit of gun safety for all.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-04T01:39:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241252773
       
  • Effects of Stereotype Threat on Women’s Leadership Aspirations and
           Affective Responses: The Role of Stigma Consciousness

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      Authors: Ferhat Ayyildiz, Ilknur Özalp Türetgen, Mahmut Bayazit
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This paper aims to investigate the role of stereotype threat and the moderating role of gender stigma consciousness on women’s leadership aspiration, leadership career goal, social self-esteem, and negative affect across two experimental studies in Türkiye. We expected the detrimental effects of streotype threat to be experienced by those with high gender stigma consciousness. The first study, involving 130 female undergraduates (Mage = 20.7, SD = 4.4), presented implicit stereotype threat and showed that the threat increased the interest of team membership and women low in stigma consciousness reported higher leadership career goals than those high in stigma consciousness. The second study, conducted with 90 female undergraduates (Mage = 20.6, SD = 1.6), presented explicit stereotype threat and showed that the explicit threat had negative effect on leadership aspiration, and women high in stigma consciousness felt more negative affect and less social self-esteem due to threat than those who were low. The present research contributes to the women’s leadership literature by identifying for the first time the role of stigma consciousness in the motivational and affective consequences of stereotype threat.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-01T07:43:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241257434
       
  • Self-Regulated Parenting: A Systematic Review of the Relations Between
           Effortful Control, the Big-Five, and Parenting Practices

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      Authors: Maor Yeshua, Andrea Berger
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      It is well established that parents’ own self-regulation is related to adaptive parenting practices (such as warmth and sensitivity) as well as to maladaptive ones (such as laxness and over-reactivity). However, parenting practices are not solely determined by parents’ self-regulation. We discuss how broad personality dimensions (drawn from the Big-Five model) relate to temperamental self-regulation (effortful control) and to parenting practices. Considering the limited empirical literature linking these three constructs, we present extant evidence for each of the dyadic connections between these three constructs. We then propose a comprehensive model that includes the plausible moderation/mediation role of different personality dimensions (such as conscientiousness and agreeableness) on the connection between self-regulation and parenting practices. This systematic review summarizes the extant empirical findings from 74 studies, linking effortful control, character and parenting practices. It is the first to systematically review and organize the accumulating knowledge regarding their relations. Based on the reviewed literature, a conceptual framework is proposed for predicting parenting practices, which are, in turn, a crucial concept predicting children’s behavioral and cognitive outcomes. In doing so, it provides a theoretical basis for the importance of parental character traits, specifically conscientiousness and agreeableness, as mediators between the parent’s effortful control and their actual parenting practices.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-06-01T02:39:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241256623
       
  • Toward Tailored and Targeted Communication for the Promotion of Firearm
           Safety: A Qualitative Study With Firearm Retailers

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      Authors: Mike Henson-Garcia, Lauren Q. Malthaner, Katelyn K. Jetelina, Michael Mackert, Marlyn Allicock, Sandra McKay
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Firearm injury is a major yet understudied public health issue in the U.S. This qualitative study explored firearm retailers’ perspectives to inform messaging and communication approaches to promote firearm safety among the gun owning population. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 retailers at a single gun shop in Texas. Thematic analysis identified key themes related to (1) audience segmentation, (2) appropriate use of language, and (3) trusted messengers and modalities for the communication of firearm safety information. This formative work provides practical insights to optimize public health messaging in this arena and ultimately reduce firearm injuries. Overall, this study provides valuable insights to guide the development and implementation of evidence-based, social marketing efforts aiming to promote firearm safety across various gun-owning audiences.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-31T04:11:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241256880
       
  • The Influence of Gun Victimization on Support for Gun Control Legislation

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      Authors: Deborah J. Hartley, Mario A. Davila
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The primary objective of the current study was to add to the literature and broaden our understanding of gun violence victims by examining attitudes towards gun legislation held by victims of gun violence. To our knowledge, there are only two quantitative studies that have examined the impact of gun victimization on attitudes towards gun control legislation. A secondary objective was to examine the link between impressions of the National Rifle Association (NRA) and gun policy preferences, which remains an understudied area in the gun legislation literature. The current study additionally examined other factors that may impact support for gun control measures. Utilizing data from a national sample of 880 adults and controlling for demographic predictors, logistic regression was employed to examine the impact of gun victimization on attitudes towards gun control legislation. Although prior gun victimization did not yield any significant findings, concordant with prior research, regression results indicated that gun ownership was a strong predictor of opposition to gun control among respondents. Interestingly, holding a favorable attitude towards the NRA was an even stronger predictor of opposition to firearms legislation than gun ownership. Findings point to the need for additional empirical research on the impact of gun victimization and the influence that organizations like the NRA have on public opinion and subsequent gun safety legislative efforts.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-30T05:55:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241240732
       
  • Honor Endorsement and Increased Firearm Purchasing Behavior and Intentions
           During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Jarrod E. Bock, Samantha E. Daruwala, Raymond P. Tucker, Stephen D. Foster, Shelby L. Bandel, John F. Gunn, Michael D. Anestis
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The surge in firearm sales from the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic have been linked to increases in firearm violence, which is of public concern given that having firearms in one’s home is associated with increased risk for domestic violence and suicide. Consistent with pre-pandemic trends, individuals tended to purchase firearms for self-protection during COVID-19. Prior work indicates that protective firearm ownership is motivated not only by perceptions that the world (and one’s local environment) is dangerous, but also by one’s endorsement of masculinity norms found in U.S. cultures of honor (primarily southern and western states). Honor-based masculinity norms emphasis reputation defense, toughness, and an absolute intolerance of disrespect. The present research examined the relative motivating influences of various threat perceptions and masculine honor endorsement in predicting reasons for non-COVID-19 firearm ownership, firearm purchasing during COVID-19, and purchase intentions. Three separate samples (total N = 2483) of mostly White U.S. men completed online surveys during different months of the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants completed measures of their endorsement of masculine honor norms, factors associated with firearm purchasing (e.g., dangerous world beliefs, intolerance of uncertainty), and firearm purchasing behaviors. Results indicated that masculine honor endorsement was higher among (1) protective firearm owners compared to non-owners and non-protective owners, (2) firearm owners who purchased a firearm during COVID-19 compared to non-owners and non-purchasing owners, and (3) firearm owners with intentions to purchase firearms in the next year compared to those without intentions and undecided owners. Relative to other predictors (e.g., COVID-19 concerns, dangerous world beliefs), masculine honor endorsement was consistently the strongest predictor of these outcomes. Findings add to the literature by highlighting the strength of masculine honor endorsement in motivating (protective) firearm ownership. Implications for interpersonal violence and suicide are discussed.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T02:20:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241255323
       
  • Using the Socio-Ecological Model to Understand Increased Risk of Gun
           Violence in the African American Community

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      Authors: Tameka L. Gillum, Clarice J. Hampton, Chanté Coppedge
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Gun violence is a major public health issue of growing concern in the United States (U.S.) with 48,830 lives lost to gun related violence in 2021, documenting the highest number of gun related homicides and suicides ever recorded. The African American community is disproportionately impacted by gun violence and members of this community are almost 14x more likely to die by gun homicide than their white counterparts. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has identified a socio-ecological framework as a lens through which to better understand violence and inform potential prevention strategies to address it. This model identifies four levels (individual, relationship, community, societal) which help to enhance our understanding of the complex interplay between individuals and their environments. Here, we use this model to understand why the African American community experiences elevated risk of gun violence in the U.S. and propose strategies for prevention. Understanding the issue of gun violence beyond individual level risk, this analysis highlights the interplay between multiple levels including the ways in which societal level factors influence violence. While this paper provides a lens through which to understand the multi-leveled factors that contribute to gun violence in the African American community, it also serves as a call to action for policymakers, scholars, and agencies to develop culturally informed policy and programming efforts specific to those who are most impacted.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T01:56:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241256635
       
  • Behavioral and Psychosocial Mediators of the Effects of Increased
           Self-Regulation on Short- and Long-Term Weight Loss in Women Within
           Community-Based Obesity Treatments

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      Authors: James J. Annesi, Francine A. Stewart
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to evaluate behavioral mediators of relationships between increased self-regulation of eating and weight loss so that findings on psychosocial correlates of treatment-associated weight change could be extended. Participants were women enrolled in 6-month community-based obesity treatments using primarily self-regulatory (SR-treatment, n = 52) or education-focused (Didactic training, n = 54) methods. Changes from baseline in self-regulation of eating, self-efficacy for controlled eating, emotional eating propensity, exercise, and the diet were first calculated. There were significant overall improvements in each psychosocial and behavioral measure, and weight. Except for emotional eating change from baseline–Month 12, improvements were each significantly greater in the SR-treatment group. Mediation of the relationships of change in self-regulation with 6-, 12-, and 24-month weight changes, by changes in self-efficacy and emotional eating, were significant, R2s = .19–.26, ps < .001. Only changes in emotional eating over 6 and 12 months were significant mediators. Mediations of the same self-regulation-weight change relationships by changes in exercise and the diet were also significant, R2s = .19–.28, ps < .001, and only changes in exercise over 12 and 24 months were significant mediators. Although group membership did not moderate effects on weight, substitution of sweets for the (composite) diet demonstrated it to be a significant mediator over 6 and 12 months. In women with obesity, self-regulation improvement was associated with short- and longer-term weight loss through changes in emotional eating, exercise, and sweets consumption. Thus, behavioral treatments will benefit from targeting those variables.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-27T09:36:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241255037
       
  • Is Seeing Believing' Hallmark Movie Viewership and Relationship
           Beliefs

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      Authors: Jasmine W. Rios, C. Veronica Smith, Taylor N. Locke
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The Hallmark Channel, a highly watched cable network, is known for its consistently idealistic portrayals of romantic relationships. Despite its popularity, no research has examined whether increased viewership of Hallmark movies covaries with endorsement of relationship beliefs. According to cultivation theory, what we watch impacts our beliefs and perceptions of reality. Additionally, the Differential Susceptibility to Media Effects Model (DSMM) proposes that certain variables, such as developmental (i.e., age, relationship length) and dispositional factors (e.g., attachment style, gender), may make certain viewers more or less susceptible to the effects of media viewership. Based on this grounding, the main purpose of this study was to determine if watching more Hallmark movies is associated with endorsing certain beliefs about romantic relationships and opposite-sex friendships when controlling for several susceptibility factors. A nationwide sample of heterosexual, married participants (N = 279) completed measures of Romantic Beliefs, Implicit Theories of Relationships, and beliefs about opposite-sex friendships and reported on their media consumption. More frequent Hallmark movie viewership was associated with increased endorsement of several relationship beliefs, above and beyond susceptibility factors (e.g., attachment, relationship length) and daily television consumption. Specifically, greater Hallmark movie viewership was positively associated with greater endorsement of multiple unrealistic relationship beliefs, destiny beliefs, and believing that opposite-sex friendships are problematic. The findings of the current study provide further support for cultivation theory and DSMM.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-27T01:26:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241256630
       
  • Disentangling the coping process in White rural men who carry guns

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      Authors: Sara Beachy, Christopher TH Liang, Philip Fizur, Qiong Fu, Nicole L Johnson
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Affluent White rural men have the highest rates of gun ownership in the United States. However, few studies have specifically examined reasons and motivations for gun ownership and gun behaviors in this population. Therefore, this study sought to examine the relationship between stress variables, namely masculine gender role stress, adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), and income level, and subsequent pro-gun beliefs and amount of time an individual carried a gun within this population. Results indicated that only two measures of pro-gun beliefs (i.e., believing guns keep one safe, believing guns are present in one’s social sphere) were correlated with percentage of time an individual carried. Additionally, ACEs were positively correlated with believing guns influence how others perceive oneself, levels of masculine gender role stress, and income. These results suggest that White rural gun owners who have increased ACEs have decreased income and tend to believe that owning guns impacts their social status with peers. However, increased ACEs do not influence belief about guns keeping one safe, believing guns are present in one’s social sphere, or gun carriage. Instead, White rural gun owners without childhood adversity may be more susceptible to believing their safety depends on guns and belongingness within their social sphere. Future research should assess reasons why affluent White rural men find it important to maintain their safety in the context of gun ownership.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T11:20:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241252771
       
  • Exclusion, Violence and the Body: The Case of a Young Man with Disability
           due to Gunshot Wound

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      Authors: Jacqueline de Oliveira Moreira, Luciana Alves Drumond Almeida, Bianca Ferreira Rodrigues, Lívia de Oliveira Mariano, Karinne Vieira de Jesus
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The present text presents partial results of the research “Young people with disability due to gunshot wounds: an exploratory study from the Memorialistic Narratives”, which aimed to problematize the effects of violence and criminality in the juvenile sphere by investigating, beyond the increase in mortality and incarceration rates, the transformation of these young people into people with disabilities, specifically, people in wheelchairs. To achieve this goal, we used as a method the Memorialistic Narratives and worked on the categories of exclusion, violence and a body marked by trauma. We will reflect on the case of Guilherme, a poor, marginalized young man with a disability and a wheelchair user due to a gunshot wound. The choice for his case relates to the different forms that violence can assume, influencing lives and leaving marks, besides, we believe that his life story can contribute to qualifying psychology’s look at young people in contexts of violence.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T11:12:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241253797
       
  • Parenting Style and Subjective Well-Being in Children and Youth: A
           Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Liangrong Huang, Wenfeng Wu, Fang Yang
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Parenting styles influence child development. Some theories and numerous studies have shown a close relationship between parenting style and youths’ subjective well-being; however, the results of different studies were inconsistent. Hence, our meta-analysis aimed to determine the overall relationship between positive and negative parenting styles on subjective well-being (including life satisfaction, positive and negative affect) and any moderating effects between them. After searching and screening the literature, 155 studies were included in the analysis, comprising 79,979 participants and 417 effect sizes. The results showed that positive parenting style was significantly positively associated with subjective well-being (r = .318, 95% CI = .287 to .348), life satisfaction (r = .358, 95% CI = .326 to .389), and positive affect (r = .355, 95% CI = .303 to .406), but significantly negatively associated with negative affect (r = −.153, 95% CI = −.207 to −.098). Negative parenting style was significantly negatively related to subjective well-being (r = −.173, 95% CI = −.205 to −.152), life satisfaction (r = −.144, 95% CI = −.175 to −.112), and positive affect (r = −.078, 95% CI = −.129 to −.027), but significantly positively related to negative affect (r = .204, 95% CI = .149 to .257). Moderating effect results showed that the relationship between parenting style and subjective well-being is moderated by age, gender, and cultural background. Findings highlight the benefits of positive parenting styles in promoting healthy child development and well-being.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T09:08:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241256883
       
  • Rumination and Forgiveness in Emerging Adults: Mediating Role of
           Mindfulness and Humility

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      Authors: Kıvanç Uzun, Gökmen Arslan
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this study was to examine whether mindfulness and humility mediate the influence of rumination on forgiveness among emerging adults. The sample consisted of 392 individuals in the emerging adulthood stage, residing in Türkiye, with 69.10% females and 30.90% males, aged between 18 and 25 years (M = 20.19, SD = 1.77). Data were collected through a demographic information form and four self-report scales. In addition to descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation coefficient and bootstrap analysis were employed for data analysis. According to the study’s findings, it can be inferred that ruminative thoughts among emerging adults hinder their ability to forgive. Furthermore, the study revealed that mindfulness and humility serve as mediators in the relationship between ruminative thoughts and forgiveness in emerging adults. In this context, it can be concluded that leveraging the positive effects of mindfulness and humility can mitigate the adverse impact of rumination on forgiveness among emerging adults, thus enhancing their inclination towards forgiveness.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-20T08:09:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241256641
       
  • Depression, Anxiety and Poor Sleep Quality are Associated with Chronotype
           and Financial Wellness in University Students

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      Authors: Christele Lahoud, Georges Merhi, Georges-Junior Kahwaji, Rachele Lahoud, Souheil Hallit, Feten Fekih-Romdhane, Hanna Mattar
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Evidence suggests the importance of a person’s chronotype in predicting various aspects of an individual’s physical and mental health. While the effect of depression on sleep is well established, the impact of a person’s specific sleep timing and chronotype on the prevalence of both depression and anxiety has yet to be fully understood, especially among university students, vulnerable to mental health problems. In addition, other factors also seem to influence the occurrence of depression and anxiety among students as well as their quality of sleep, one of which being the students’ financial wellness. The objective was to evaluate the association between chronotype and the severity and prevalence of depression among Lebanese university students, while also taking into account the possible connection between chronotype and financial wellness and both anxiety and sleep quality. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between December 2021 and February 2022; 330 Lebanese university students was included (mean age 21.75 ± 2.43; 67.3% females). Results: The majority of the Lebanese university students in our sample were found to have an intermediate typology (63.0%), followed by the evening typology, which appeared to constitute 28.2% of the sample, while only 8.8% possessed a morning typology. In this study, having an intermediate or evening typology compared to a morning one was significantly associated with higher depression and worse sleep quality. In addition, having an evening chronotype compared to a morningness propensity was significantly associated with more anxiety. Conclusion: This study found a positive association between an evening typology (chronotype) and higher depression and anxiety and poorer quality of sleep. Although preliminary and based on cross-sectional data, this research could help provide a better understanding of the different chronotypes among university students, and of the possible increased susceptibility of some of these typologies (i.e., evening-type) to mental health problems.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-17T02:06:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241251457
       
  • Stimulus Selection Based on Gender Ratios: Gender Ratios are Indicative of
           Both Stereotypical and Conceptual Gender

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      Authors: Jonathan D. Kim, Ute Gabriel, Pascal Gygax, Anna Siyanova- Chanturia
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores how the use of gender ratios to inform stimulus selection affects the activation of gendered social information. It investigates if stimuli selected this way can activate gender stereotype knowledge and/or conceptual gender knowledge. This was tested through attribute naming (Study 1) and rating (Study 2) tasks, with component and regression analysis allowing for examination of the nature of gender ratios at both attribute and component levels. The results provide rich information about the nature of gender ratio information as a means of stimulus selection, and in doing so support both conceptualisations as long as researchers acknowledge their overlap. The results also indicate that these roles elicited both positive/prescriptive (i.e., the role is appropriate for a given gender) and negative/proscriptive beliefs (i.e., the role is not appropriate for a given gender). These findings hold important implications for future research using gender ratios.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-14T05:43:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241253582
       
  • Recommendations for the Clinician Role in Reducing Gun Violence

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      Authors: Samantha J Ballas, Alina Mufti, Kenneth Adames Ramos, Abdiel Cabral-Hernandez, Timothy Rudolph-Math, Isabelle Thenor-Louis, Zachariah Wentlent, Shahram Izadyar, Kim Wallenstein, Kathryn Hagen, Roseanna Guzman-Curtis, Trina Northhardt, Jay Brenner
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      There is a growing need for clear and definitive guidelines to prevent firearm violence in communities across the United States. Recommendations explore the utility and feasibility of universal screenings and recommend utilizing universal screening due to a lack of a clear risk to it. Providers should also work to create risk reduction plans with patients as well. Furthermore, recommendations for mental health care, counseling, and bystander training are made for institutions and their providers.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-14T04:00:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241253592
       
  • Examining the Relation Between Early Violence Exposure and Firearm-Related
           Experiences in Emerging Adulthood: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

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      Authors: Melissa C. Osborne, Dennis E. Reidy, Jeff R. Temple, Annalyn DeMello, Yu Lu
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Firearms are a leading cause of death among adolescents and young adults in the United States. Early exposure to violence, as a victim or witness, is associated with increased risk of firearm-related experiences, including carrying and threatening others with a gun. These experiences, in turn, increase the risk of both fatal and non-fatal firearm injuries. Using an ethnically diverse sample of emerging adults, we build on prior research by examining the link between early violence exposure at multiple contexts of the social-ecological model and multiple firearm-related experiences (i.e., firearm-threatening victimization, firearm-threatening perpetration, and firearm carriage). We analyzed data from a 10-year longitudinal study of 1042 youth in the Southern United States. Experiencing childhood physical abuse was associated with both firearm-threatening victimization and perpetration in emerging adulthood. Additionally, exposure to neighborhood and interparental violence were linked to threatening others with firearms and carrying firearms, respectively. Counter to expectations, bullying victimization did not emerge as a predictor of any firearm-related experiences. Findings highlight the importance of cross-cutting violence prevention efforts to prevent high-risk firearm-related behaviors among emerging adults. Programs for children and adolescents that address these types of violence exposure should highlight coping skills and sources of positive social support to bolster protective factors against firearm-related outcomes.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-13T12:56:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241254313
       
  • Multicultural Efficacy Beliefs in Higher Education: Examining University
           Instructors’ Burnout and Mental Well-Being

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      Authors: Saghar Chahar Mahali, Phillip R. Sevigny, Shadi Beshai
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Canadian universities are experiencing a dramatic increase in enrollment of students from diverse backgrounds. Evidence suggests many educators are not prepared to teach in multicultural contexts. Educators’ lack of preparedness to teach in such contexts may lead them to develop burnout, which can negatively impact their mental and professional well-being. However, self-efficacy beliefs may buffer against job burnout and promote mental well-being. Hence, multicultural efficacy is an important factor for teaching in multicultural settings. In this study, we examined the relationships of multicultural efficacy with university instructors’ burnout and mental well-being. A total of 158 faculty and sessional instructors were recruited from four prominent higher education institutions in Canada. The results revealed that multicultural efficacy was significantly related to the Personal Accomplishment facet of burnout and mental well-being, even after controlling variance accounted for by demographics, job-related characteristics, teaching self-efficacy, and colour-blind racial attitudes. These findings indicate that domain specific multicultural efficacy and general teaching self-efficacy are distinct constructs. Further, findings may inform the development of training opportunities and diversity-related workshops to enhance university instructors’ awareness of diversity, social justice issues, and multicultural efficacy to better equip them for instruction in multicultural classrooms.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-13T08:39:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241253599
       
  • Gender Differences in Procrastination and Subjective Well-Being: A
           Cross-Sectional Study Among Students and Non-Students

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      Authors: Murat Balkis, Erdinç Duru
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to examine gender differences in the relationship between procrastination and subjective well-being in a sample of 1052 individuals. Including both students and non-students. The participants, 56.7% were women (Mean = 24.83, Standard Deviation = 6.01, range = 18–56) and 43.3% were men (Mean = 25.01, Standard Deviation = 6.91, range = 18–59), completed assessments covering procrastination, positive affect, negative affect, and life satisfaction. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and structural equation modeling. The current findings suggest that men, compared with women, reported higher levels of procrastination, positive affect, and subjective well-being and lower levels of negative affect. The results suggest that procrastination has a greater impact on the subjective well-being of men, especially among non-student males. These findings contribute to the understanding of gender differences in the relationship between procrastination and subjective well-being, emphasizing the need for further research.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-13T07:16:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241253588
       
  • Perceived Social Support and Connectedness in Non-Suicidal Self-Injury
           Engagement

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      Authors: Amanda Simundic, Amanda Argento, Jessica Mettler, Nancy L. Heath
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Perceived social support has been posited as an important factor in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) cessation. Although, previous research suggests that social connectedness is the mechanism through which perceived social support influences psychological wellbeing. Thus, the present study investigated whether social connectedness is the mechanism through which perceived social support functions to influence NSSI engagement. Fifty-six women with (Mage = 20.18, SD = 2.07) and 84 without (Mage = 20.24, SD = 1.98) a history of NSSI completed online measures of perceived social support and social connectedness. A mediation model was conducted with social connectedness in the relation between perceived social support from family, friends, and significant others and NSSI engagement. Findings revealed that social connectedness fully explained the relation between perceived social support from all sources and NSSI engagement. The results suggest that the relation between perceived social support and NSSI engagement is fully explained by the degree to which individuals report feeling connected to others. Implications for future research and practice will be discussed.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T12:29:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241254323
       
  • Adapting to the Evolving Digital Landscape: Development and Validation of
           the VirtHuLab Self Efficacy Scale

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      Authors: Mirko Duradoni, Martina La Gamma, Elena Serritella, Franca Paola Severino, Alba Prifti, Andrea Guazzini
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Measuring people’s self-efficacy in navigating the digital world has become essential in an age where the Internet permeates every aspect of life. This paper describes the creation and validation of the VISES (Virthulab Internet Self-Efficacy Scale), an instrument designed for the modern Internet environment. The way we work, communicate, and access information is changing as a result of the digital revolution, and VISES encapsulates the abilities and self-assurance needed to succeed in this Web 4.0 era. The study investigated the connections between VISES scores, Internet usage habits, net frustration, self-disparagement, and Internet addiction using a rigorous methodology. The study included a sample of 773 participants who could speak Italian (66.5% women). Participants were 31.38 years old on average (standard deviation = 11.19). The 3-factor structure of VISES, which demonstrated strong reliability for each subscale, was discovered by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). According to the study, there is a substantial positive link between the VISES Internet self-efficacy ratings and both the frequency and duration of online use. Additionally, VISES scores exhibited positive associations with expected outcomes of Internet use, including social outcomes, personal entertainment, and personal information. The negative link between VISES scores and net frustration and self-disparagement emphasized the importance of self-efficacy in reducing negative emotional and cognitive states while using the Internet. Surprisingly, the association between VISES scores and Internet addiction was found for just one of the dimensions of VISES.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T11:59:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241253601
       
  • A Combined Kundalini Yoga and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Program for
           Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Pilot Study

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      Authors: Julie K. Staples, Daniel Mintie, Sat Bir Singh Khalsa
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is one of the standard conventional treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, recent studies have reported the benefits of yoga for reducing PTSD symptoms including a Kundalini Yoga (KY) intervention. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of a novel combined 8-week CBT and KY program for treating PTSD symptoms and improving sleep quality in a single group trial of 26 adults with PTSD. PTSD symptoms (PTSD checklist-5) and sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) were assessed at baseline, post intervention, and at 2-month follow-up. Both CBT and yoga homework compliance were also measured. Total PTSD symptom scores as well as the cluster symptoms (intrusion, avoidance, arousal/reactivity, and negative alterations in cognitions and mood) were significantly improved following the program, all p < .01. The improvements in total PTSD scores, intrusion, avoidance, arousal/reactivity were maintained at follow-up, with all values still less (p < .01) than baseline. The negative alterations in cognitions and mood symptom cluster continued to improve further at follow-up compared to post-intervention values (p < .05). Total sleep score (p < .05) and the subscales of sleep disturbance (p < .01), daytime dysfunction (p < .05), and sleep quality (p < .01) were significantly improved after the program and these improvements were maintained at follow-up compared to baseline. Sleep medication use was decreased (p < .05) and sleep latency was improved (p < .01) at follow-up only compared to baseline. There was a significant positive correlation (p < .05) between the completion of the yoga home practice and post change in total sleep scores. These results show that a combined KY and CBT intervention resulted in decreased PTSD symptoms and improved sleep quality and suggest this program may constitute an additional treatment option for PTSD.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T08:46:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241253595
       
  • Pandemic Stress and Cyberbullying Among Adolescents During China’s
           Outbreak of Omicron: Examining the Roles of Perceived Safety and Family
           Cohesion

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      Authors: Shan Jiang, Ruoyu Du, Yinglin Chen, Chaoxin Jiang
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic posed risks to the psychosocial development of children and adolescents in the digital age. Under such a background, this study aims to examine the effects of pandemic stress on cyberbullying perpetration and victimization among Chinese adolescents, and to explore the mediator of perceived safety and the moderator of family cohesion underlying this association, during China’s outbreak of Omicron. A sample of 822 adolescents was obtained from Taizhou in Zhejiang Province, China, based on a multistage cluster random sampling method. The results showed that pandemic stress was positively associated with cyberbullying perpetration and victimization. Moreover, pandemic stress negatively predicted perceived safety, which in turn, increased the probability of cyberbullying perpetration and victimization. Furthermore, family cohesion moderated the effects of pandemic stress on cyberbullying perpetration and victimization. This study contributes to practical implications for policy making and social work practices regarding how to protect adolescents from cyberbullying during the pandemic.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-08T09:22:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241252778
       
  • Exploring the Theory of Employee Planned Behavior: Job Satisfaction as a
           Key to Organizational Performance

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      Authors: David Hemsworth, Jonathan Muterera, Alireza Khorakian, Blanca Rosa Garcia-Rivera
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This article introduces a significant advancement with the “Theory of Employee Planned Behavior” (TEPB), a novel extension of the well-established Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). The TEPB uniquely positions job satisfaction as a central determinant in driving organizational performance. Using data from county-level government institutions in the United States, this research offers a nuanced exploration into how employee satisfaction influences organizational commitment and citizenship behaviors, which, in turn, substantially impact organizational performance. Our approach utilizes a significant dataset involving 372 dyads across hierarchical levels in government institutions. Through the application of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM), we rigorously validate the TEPB model. The results highlight a significant relationship where enhanced job satisfaction leads to stronger organizational commitment. This heightened commitment further fosters organizational citizenship behaviors, crucial in achieving superior organizational performance. This work notably extends the TPB model by integrating organizational performance as a consequential outcome. It also provides empirical evidence of the direct relationship between job satisfaction and organizational performance, specifically in the context of government institutions. Such findings are invaluable for organizational executives and policymakers in recognizing the paramount importance of employee satisfaction for organizational success. Overall, the TEPB model presented in this study offers a holistic and practical framework for organizations seeking to understand and effectively manage employee behavior. By focusing on job satisfaction, organizations can foster a more committed and proactive workforce, significantly improving performance and efficiency.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-05-07T06:59:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241252784
       
  • Status Consumption as Coping With Fear of Death: The Mediating Role of
           Death Avoidance and the Moderating Role of Materialism

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      Authors: Hakan Cengiz, Joanne Cacciatore
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Individuals employ various coping mechanisms to deal with the fear of death. While materialism and status consumption are commonly recognized in the literature as such strategies, no study has yet empirically tested this premise. Accordingly, this study examined the mediating role of death avoidance in the link between the fear of death and death-related status consumption (DRSC). Data obtained from 346 participants were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The results showed that fear of death significantly and positively influences DRSC and that death avoidance partially and positively mediates this relationship. Results also revealed that materialism strengthens the relationship between fear of death and DRSC, while it does not significantly moderate the relationship between death avoidance and DRSC. These results support the conclusion that death-related status consumption may play a critical role as an avoidance mechanism in coping with the fear of death. This study, being among the few that investigate death-related consumer behaviors, enriches both terror management theory and the literature on consumer behavior in crises.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-30T01:42:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241251458
       
  • A Common Ground Gun Violence Prevention Policy Package

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      Authors: Kathleen Grene, Amani Dharani, Michael Siegel
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      In 2022 we conducted a literature review, surveyed 1078 gun owners, and conducted post-survey focus groups and interviews of gun owners and non-gun owners, to determine a common ground gun violence prevention (GVP) policy package. This allowed us to see policies that would save lives and be widely accepted: (1) violent misdemeanor laws, (2) state permit laws, combined with universal background checks; (3) red flag laws. Based on our review of relevant research, we conservatively estimate that in states without any of the policy package components, implementing this package would result in a 27.9% reduction in firearm deaths. We believe that polarization between firearm owners and non-firearm owners, which has thwarted a widely supported response to the problem of gun violence, is largely a harmful myth that can be overcome by including gun owners in the process of fashioning an effective policy approach.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T09:45:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241248602
       
  • Alcohol Use Amongst Rural Adolescents and Young Adults: A Brief Review of
           the Literature

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      Authors: Jessica Saalfield, Bethany Haag
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The sociodevelopmental periods of adolescence and young adulthood are rife with alcohol use. However, much of the literature demonstrating this comes from ‘traditional’ settings and college campuses (i.e., large suburban/urban campuses, or those containing their own infrastructure). Alcohol culture in rural areas has largely been understudied, which may be problematic given the unique stressors they face (e.g., economic hardship, lack of social activities, healthcare inequality). There has also been difficulty both within and across fields classifying rural versus urban geographical locations; no distinct system used broadly, making ittrea difficult to generalize and accurately collect data. The geographic categorizations are often viewed as homogenous identifiers; however, diversity occurs both within and outside of these classification systems. It appears that rurality may be a risk factor for increased drinking both earlier and later in life, but the research has failed to extend to the formative college years. This short review has two main focuses: attempting to disentangle the definition of rurality and reviewing the literature regarding alcohol use in rural areas, with a specific focus on adolescents and young adults. Identifying the mechanisms responsible for substance use in rural areas is a crucial component of prevention and treatment programs.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-27T12:24:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241251460
       
  • Five Years of Extreme Risk Protection Orders in Oregon: A Descriptive
           Analysis

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      Authors: Shauna Rakshe, Rebecca Valek, Rebecca Teichman, Kathryn Freeman, Susan DeFrancesco, Kathleen F. Carlson
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Extreme Risk Protection Order (ERPO) laws have received increasing attention as a tool to prevent firearm suicide and homicide, including mass shootings. However, important gaps remain in our understanding of ERPO usage and implementation. Using the Oregon Judicial Case Information Network database, we abstracted data from all ERPO petitions filed in Oregon from 2018 to 2022, the first five years after the law took effect (N = 649). ERPO petitions were filed in 29 of 36 counties (81%, range 0–105 per county, median 11), against respondents 17–96 years of age (median: 42). Of ERPOs filed, 78% were initially granted. While only 22% of respondents in initially-granted ERPOs requested a hearing, when a hearing was held, nearly half (44%) of ERPOs were dismissed. The majority of ERPO petitions were motivated by threats of harm to respondents and others (n = 327, 50%), followed by threats of harm to others-only (n = 220, 34%) or respondents-only (n = 81, 12%). During the 5-year period, 72 (11%) ERPO petitions cited threats of mass violence as a motivating factor, including 24 (4%) petitions citing threats to schools or college campuses. The majority of ERPOs were filed by law enforcement officers (60%), and these petitions were significantly more often granted than those filed by family/household members (96% vs. 67%, p < .0001). We also found evidence of important gaps in documentation, including of respondent race (unavailable for 191 respondents, 29%) and of weapon removal or disposition after the ERPO was granted (unavailable in 350 cases, 69%). This study of long-term patterns of ERPO petitions highlights trends in usage and suggests areas where improvement may be possible, with implications for other states that have adopted or are considering similar ERPO laws.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-27T06:12:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241248599
       
  • Job Loss Due to COVID-19: A Longitudinal Study of Mental Health,
           Protective and Risk Factors

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      Authors: Andrew F. Arena, Daniel Collins, Andrew Mackinnon, Sophia Mobbs, Isobel Lavender, Samuel B. Harvey, Mark Deady
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic had a devastating impact on unemployment, which—compounded by the additional stressors associated with the pandemic—had considerable mental health impact. The current study examined the trajectory of mental health amongst those experiencing pandemic-related job loss, alongside the impact of risk and protective factors. Data were obtained from 374 Australian participants who were allocated to a waitlist control arm of a randomised control trial. The outcome variables assessed at baseline and six-month follow-up consisted of depression, anxiety, and suicidality. The assessed risk and protective factors were age, gender, relationship status, education, exercise frequency, COVID-related stress, dispositional resilience, and coping self-efficacy. Re-employment by follow-up was used as a covariate. Overall, there were decreases in depression and anxiety symptoms, and partial evidence of decreased suicidality, demonstrating an apparent capacity for individuals to better cope with their circumstances over time. Demographics and exercise had no effect on changes in mental health. Those with high COVID-related stress, low resilience, and low coping self-efficacy had worse mental health at baseline, although exhibited significantly greater improvements in mental health over time. Obtaining re-employment by follow-up did not predict changes in mental health. The present results offer an optimistic picture of recovery for those experiencing pandemic-related job loss, even for those with the most substantial risk and severity. The likely protective role played by Australian social welfare policies over the course of the study is explored. Stress around one’s broader sociocultural or economic circumstances, perceived resilience, and coping self-efficacy are valuable targets for intervention.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-27T01:54:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241248601
       
  • Cultivating Self-Transcendence Through Meditation Practice: A Test of the
           Role of Meta-Awareness, (Dis)identification and Non-Reactivity

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      Authors: Pierre De Oliveira, Catherine Juneau, Céline Stinus, Maya Corman, Noemi Michelli, Nicolas Pellerin, Rebecca Shankland, Michael Dambrun
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, we present a study comprising two distinct stages to examine the extent to which metacognitive processes of decentering facilitate the emergence of self-transcendence experiences in everyday life (i.e., the frequency of self-transcendent emotions, flow proneness, and adopting an interconnected identity). In the course of conducting this research, the first stage (N = 374) focused on assessing the structure and validity of the French version of the Metacognitive Processes of Decentering Scale (MPoD-t). Building on this, the second stage (N = 294) examined the potential relationship between meditative practices and psychological decentering processes (i.e., meta-awareness, (dis)identification with internal experiences, and (non)reactivity to thought content) and explored whether these mechanisms explain the association between meditative practices and the experience of self-transcendent states. Overall, the results demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties of the French version of the MPoD and provided enhanced insights into the distinct mediating roles played by various decentering components in the manifestation of self-transcendence experiences in daily life. Indeed, the findings revealed that the relationship between practice and the occurrence of self-transcendent emotions or flow was mediated by the meta-awareness component, while the association between practice and the development of an interconnected identity was explained by the (dis)identification with internal experiences component. The implications of these findings are discussed.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-26T06:05:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241246469
       
  • VIEW: An Assessment of Problem-Solving Style - 20 Years of Progress

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      Authors: Scott G. Isaksen, Christian Hoßbach
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      While the ability to solve complex problems creatively is among the most important skills for contemporary jobs, understanding individual differences how people prefer to engage in individual or collaborative problem-solving becomes increasingly important. VIEW an assessment of problem-solving style has been specifically designed to measure these preferences at the intersection of creativity and problem-solving. This article summarizes the progress that has been made in the past twenty years of research since the instrument was launched. The available evidence shows that the instrument meets contemporary standards of reliability and validity justifying its application in research and practice. Looking ahead, we conclude with promising areas for further developing the assessment and future research on problem-solving styles that addresses emerging phenomena such as collaborating across hybrid work environments or using artificial intelligence tools.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-26T05:35:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241249954
       
  • Examining the Connectorship Scale: Factor Structure and Correlations With
           Self-Efficacy and Extraversion

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      Authors: Hardi Vadher, Kristi Baerg MacDonald, Sarah Ross, Julie Aitken Schermer
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The Connectorship Scale was designed to assess how leaders connect with their followers and is described to measure eight dimensions: social interactivity, dependability, positive communication, presenting oneself, storytelling ability, belief in networking, tangible introduction, and belief in the importance of online networking. This study explores the scale properties and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) of the Connectorship Scale and examines how the scale scores correlate with self-efficacy and extraversion based on responses from 454 (52% women) adult business students. The internal consistency estimates suggested that one of the subscales, positive communication, was unreliable; we therefore excluded that subscale from further analyses. A CFA of the seven-factor model suggested good fit once two pairs of error terms were allowed to correlate. Self-efficacy and all facets of extraversion positively correlated with six of the seven connectorship subscales, the exception being the tangible introduction scale. The results raise concern about the positive communication subscale from the Connectorship Scale but do support the use of the other seven subscales for research about engaged and effective leadership.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T08:57:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241248597
       
  • Support Groups Versus Primary Mental Healthcare on Disability and
           Continuity of Care: Community Trial [Support Groups for Recovery]

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      Authors: Felipe Agudelo-Hernández, Ana Giraldo Alvarez, Rodrigo Rojas-Andrade
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Based on the need to implement strategies to reduce recovery gaps in mental health with the community as axes of recovery, the objective of the present study was to assess the impact on psychosocial disability and care continuity in individuals with suicidal behavior, of the clinical and community components of the Mental Health Gap Action Program (mhGAP), versus exclusive psychiatric care. For this, a controlled community trial carried out in 2023 was conducted, comprising intervention groups: Support Group (SG), mhGAP Group (mhGAPG) and a Control Group (CG). Self-report measurements were collected pretest and posttest, utilizing the Psychosocial Disability Scale and the Alberta Continuity of Care Scale. The study involved the participation of 94 individuals with a history of suicidal behavior, with 30 individuals in the SG, 34 in the mhGAP group, and 30 in the CG. Categorical variables were summarized using frequency distribution tables. Descriptive statistics were used to examine participants’ characteristics at the study outcome and estimate treatment compliance. The Mann–Whitney U Test examined differences in sociodemographic variable frequencies. The Jarque-Bera test confirmed a normal distribution for psychological variables, warranting the use of parametric tests. Differences in mean values across groups, each with two measurements per individual, were assessed using a type II repeated measures ANOVA. There were significant differences based on the intervention, with the effect being greater in the SG across all domains. Significant improvement was observed in all domains of the disability and continuity of care scale within the intervention groups. Both groups showed improvement, with better results for the SG. In conclusion, a methodology is proposed for implementing support groups based on core components, which effectively enhances psychosocial disability and the continuity of mental health care, especially in suicidal behavior.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-22T07:15:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241248595
       
  • Perceived Stress Mediates Associations Between Grit and Health-Related
           Quality of Life

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      Authors: Katherine M. Knauft, Cole A. Holt, Vrinda Kalia
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Grit, characterized by passion and perseverance in the pursuit of long-term goals, may be associated with enhanced quality of life and reduced levels of perceived chronic stress. We hypothesized that reduced levels of perceived stress may mediate the association between facets of grit (i.e., Perseverance and Consistency) and healthy functioning. We conducted two studies, one with college students and one with community adults, to test this hypothesis (cumulative N = 600). In both studies, facets of grit were assessed using the Short Grit Scale, levels of perceived chronic stress were assessed via the Perceived Stress Scale, and health-related quality of life was measured using selected questions from the Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36. Consistent with our hypothesis, perceived stress levels significantly mediated the relation between Grit-Perseverance and health-related quality of life in both college students and community adults. Our data suggest that individuals with high Grit-Perseverance experience lower perceived stress, which may result in improved health-related quality of life. Additionally, perceived stress partially mediated the relation between Grit-Consistency and health-related quality of life, but only in community adults. These novel findings suggest that the association between Grit-Perseverance and perceived chronic stress may differ for college students and community adults. Overall, our work indicates that perceived stress may be a key mediator through which facets of grit are related to healthy functioning in college students and community adults.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-19T12:45:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241248607
       
  • Project GRIP: An Illustration of Participatory Action Research with
           Communities of People Who Own and Use Firearms

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      Authors: Phillip N. Smith, Christopher Cordell, Laura Taylor Stevens, Katie West, Savannah T. Morgan, Jordan Vallas, Krista R. Mehari
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Firearm-related injury and mortality prevention strategies are often incompatible with and potentially ineffective for the very populations at risk. Such incompatibility is reflective of a cultural disconnect between investigators and prevention specialists and those who own and use firearms. The current paper describes Project GRIP, a research study that was guided by the principles of Participatory Action Research (PAR). We present the project as a case-example and demonstration of how PAR principles can inform an approach to partner with firearm owners in injury prevention research. Though PAR is a general approach and not a set of techniques, we describe the strategies we used in the hopes that they may be useful for investigators using PAR with firearm owners. We discuss the project and our approach across different stages of the process, including entering into PAR with firearm owners, building partnerships, developing a shared vision, mutual understanding, and co-learning, building and maintaining positive relationships, and executing the project tasks. The PAR approach and the intentional emphasis on partnership is, in our opinion, vital to ensuring that the perspectives of firearm owners are incorporated into the research literature so that more ecologically valid and potentially effective injury and mortality prevention strategies can be developed and disseminated.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-17T09:54:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241246467
       
  • Introversion, Alexithymia, and Hostility: A Path Analysis From Personality
           to Suicidal Ideation Among University Students

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      Authors: Sara Guidotti, Alice Fiduccia, Carlo Pruneti
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The aim of the current study was to investigate the relationship between state (i.e., hostility) and trait (i.e., social detachment, alexithymia) psychological constructs associated with suicidal ideation among university students. Methods: A group of 190 university students was consecutively recruited in the period between September 2022 and March 2023. After a clinical interview, a series of psychological tests were administered: the Cattell’s 16-Personality Factors Questionnaire (16PF), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R), and the anamnestic form of the Cognitive Behavioral Assessment (CBA2.0), which contains a specific question regarding the suicidal ideation. Results: The analyses demonstrated that alexithymia fully mediated the relationship between a particular aspect of introversion (social detachment or low warmth) and hostility which, in turn, seemed to be a significant predictor of suicidal ideation. Conclusions: The path analysis conducted seemed to highlight the importance of personality traits, such as social detachment and the ability to recognize and express one’s internal states, on the mental health of university students in terms of hostility and suicidal ideation. Considering that the reduction of suicide mortality has been prioritized as a global target in the 15-19 age group, identifying the psychological factors associated with it is fundamental.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-16T10:25:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241247526
       
  • Social Comparison Processes of Hispanic Students at Hispanic Majority
           Institutions

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      Authors: Ho Phi Huynh, Anastacia Wicks, Alena Raya, Isabella Castellanos, Dawn R. Weatherford, Malin K. Lilley
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This paper describes the types of social comparison used by Hispanic students at a Hispanic Majority Institution through two studies (N = 406). We found that students engaged in upward identification more often than downward identification, downward contrast, and upward contrast. However, when comparing themselves on an academic measure, downward identification and upward contrast became relatively more frequent. Additionally, downward identification tended to predict higher self-reported confidence about academic abilities than other types of social comparison.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-10T11:14:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241241641
       
  • Rumination and Gender in the Relation Between Perceived Threat and State
           Anxiety During COVID-19

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      Authors: Katherine M. Knauft, Niki Hayatbini, Seth M. Wilensky, Vrinda Kalia
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesPerception of and subsequent responses to counter threats by disease, such as COVID-19, are essential for engagement in self-protective behaviors. But, associated increases in anxiety that accompany the threat of disease may negatively impact well-being. Therefore, identifying variables that may modulate the association between perceived threat from COVID-19 and anxiety is important. We conducted a study to examine the moderating roles of two subtypes of rumination (brooding and reflection) in the association between perceived threat from COVID-19 and state anxiety. Additionally, as both COVID-19 outcomes and the tendency to ruminate differ across genders, we explored gender as a second moderator.MethodsParticipants (N = 300; Men = 144) were recruited online in April 2020 and completed measures of state anxiety, brooding and reflective rumination, and perceived threat from COVID-19.ResultsModeration regression analyses revealed that perceived threat and brooding were independently associated with increased state anxiety. Reflective rumination and gender, however, significantly moderated the relation between perceived threat and state anxiety. For men, reflective rumination strengthened the association between threat and anxiety. For women, reflective rumination weakened this association; women with the highest scores in reflective rumination also reported high state anxiety at low, medium, and high perceived threat levels.ConclusionsThese findings illuminate gender differences in the relations between perceived threat, rumination, and experienced state anxiety during the pandemic.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-10T08:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241246491
       
  • Depictions of Firearms and Other Projectile Weapons in Top-Selling
           Japanese Manga

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      Authors: Yen-Han Lee, William DeJong
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Firearm violence is a pressing public health issue in the United States and becoming increasingly so worldwide. This concern has prompted researchers to examine the prevalence of such violence in media entertainment. Japanese manga have a large youth readership in the U.S., yet research on their depictions of firearms is presently lacking. We randomly selected 50 chapters from each of ten top-selling manga series worldwide (N = 500) to identify dialogue, action, and other illustrations involving handguns, rifles, machine guns, other projectile weapons, and bombs. Of the 500 chapters, 129 (25.8%) had at least one depiction of a firearm or other projectile weapon, with 684 instances of characters handling (e.g., carrying, holding, firing, reloading) such a weapon. Of the 384 unique characters so depicted, the vast majority were males (88.3%), adults (92.2%), and “good” characters (73.4%). Manga readers, especially male adolescents and preteens, are frequently exposed to storylines in which one or more characters are using a firearm or other projectile weapon. Working collaboratively, manga publishers and distributors should act to develop and implement a comprehensive rating system to flag content that may be harmful to youth so that parents can more easily monitor what their children are reading.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T09:41:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241246204
       
  • When Inequity Leads to Boredom: An Experimental Study With University
           Students

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      Authors: Heleen E. Raes, Emily R. Weiss, McWelling Todman, Ezras Tellalian
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      While theoretical connections between social inequity and boredom have been established, empirical evidence is lacking. Inequity aversion is important in this relationship. If individuals believe that the amount of work invested in pursuing an outcome has been unfairly devalued in relation to the investment of others, they may feel that their investment is greater than the outcome’s worth. This experimental study explores whether devaluation of one’s investment in a task, in relation to another individual’s investment required to obtain equal rewards, is experienced as boredom. Undergraduate and graduate students (N = 31) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions and performed a monotonous task in the presence of a confederate, for equal reward. Exposure time to the confederate varied. It was expected that participants who spent more time on the task than the confederate would report more boredom and a negatively distorted time experience. Significant between-group effects were found for Tedium (F(2, 28) = 3.55, p = .04) and Temporal Estimation (F(2, 28) = 5.37, p = .01). Participants who spent more time on the task felt more bored (Mdiff = −1.05, p = .05) and rated time as progressing slower (Mdiff = −1.26, p = .03). There were no significant differences between the other conditions. A parsimonious interpretation is that the perceived inequity in resource investment costs associated with different lengths of social exposure during the boredom-inducing task increased the salience of investment loss, which was experienced as boredom and resulted in a distorted time experience.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T02:21:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241242405
       
  • Examining the Longitudinal Bi-Directional Associations of Friend
           Engagement, Social Functioning, and Depression

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      Authors: Austen R. Anderson, Mallory Lastrapes
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Various components of social functioning predict depression and these associations can vary by gender. Bi-directional associations may be important to consider as social factors may influence depressive symptoms while depressive symptoms may impact social factors. Most previous longitudinal research examining bi-directional effects has traditionally used the cross-lagged panel model (CLPM), which has some inherent weaknesses. This study sought to apply a more comprehensive analysis to examine bi-directional associations between friend engagement, social functioning, and depressive symptoms. Random intercept cross-lagged panel models (RI-CLPM) were tested on three waves from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study (N = 5890). Average levels of social functioning were positively associated with friend engagement and negatively associated with depression. Fluctuations in social functioning and friend engagement were negatively associated with same-wave depressive symptoms. Lastly, depression was predicted by previous fluctuations in social functioning, although the findings varied by gender. This study showed that the relationships between social factors and depression are apparent within and across large time intervals, even while controlling for between-person associations. These findings add further support to the need to attend to social life as a predictor of depression in older adults. Future research could improve upon this research by examining the characteristics of the friendship interactions and including more diverse samples.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-03-28T03:21:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241241632
       
  • Death Anxiety in the COVID-19 Pandemic: Testing REBT Models of
           Psychopathology and Psychological Health of Death Anxiety

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      Authors: Elisa P. Dumitru, Cardoș A. I. Roxana, Horea-Radu Oltean, Mirela I Bîlc, Daniel O. David
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: This paper aimed to examine the validity of the death anxiety psychopathological and psychological health models of Rational-Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT). We investigated whether irrational and rational beliefs were associated with death anxiety and if there are possible significant positive correlations between death anxiety and depression, anxiety, and stress. Method: A sample of 200 individuals completed online self-report measures and Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was chosen to assess the validity of the REBT psychopathological model and the REBT psychological health model. Pearson’s correlation analysis was utilized to confirm the relationships between death anxiety and depression, anxiety, and stress. Results: REBT’s model of psychopathology provide acceptable fit of the data. Results suggest that LFT beliefs mediate the relationship between DEM and death anxiety, while no mediation effect was found for the psychological health model. Additionally, high correlations were obtained between death anxiety and depression, anxiety, and stress. Conclusions: Results provided empirical support for the REBT models of death anxiety and underline the critical importance of cognitive constructs in the prediction of death anxiety. Results are discussed within the framework of REBT theory, which can serve as a foundation for new research directions regarding death anxiety, both theoretical and clinical.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-03-27T06:09:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241242396
       
  • Assessing Measurement Consistency: A Study of the BPFSC Invariance Across
           Age and Sex in Romanian Adolescents

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      Authors: Samuel Bud, Aurora Szentágotai-Tătar
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The Borderline Personality Feature Scale for Children (BPFSC) is a widely used instrument and currently the only dimensional measure to investigate Borderline Personality features in children and adolescents. The present study aimed to investigate the factor structure and measurement invariance across age and sex in a community sample of 634 adolescents (mean age = 16.72, standard deviation = 1.31). To test for measurement invariance, we conducted multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MG-CFA). Analysis showed residual invariance across age and sex. Based on the results, we conclude that BPFSC is a valid and reliable instrument to assess Borderline Personality features in adolescents. Implications for evidence-based assessment of Borderline Personality features in adolescence are discussed.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-03-20T11:32:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241239592
       
  • How and when Proactive Vitality Management Promotes Undergraduates’
           Creativity' A Conservation of Resources Perspective

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      Authors: Weijun Hua, Jianwei Zhang, Xingyu Xuan, Mengmeng Fu, Jie Zhou
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Despite widely highlighting that creative individuals need to be full of vitality to function optimally, previous research neglects the very real possibility that human beings may also need to proactively manage their vitality to ignite creativity. Drawing on the conservation of resources theory, this study explores the impact of proactive vitality management on undergraduates’ creativity through harmonious academic passion, as well as the moderating roles of university creative climate and prevention focus. Evidence from a scenario-based experiment (Study 1) and a multi-wave field survey (Study 2) demonstrated that proactive vitality management positively promoted individual creativity. This relationship was partially mediated by harmonious academic passion. In addition, proactive vitality management enhanced undergraduate students’ creativity via harmonious academic passion in a high university creative climate, whereas the indirect effect was weak when prevention focus was high. Theoretical and practical implications are also discussed, along with study limitations and future research directions.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-03-19T01:28:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241240729
       
  • The Relationship Between Dispositional Affectivity, Perceived Income
           Adequacy, and Financial Strain: An Analysis of Financial Stress
           Perceptions

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      Authors: Baylor A. Graham, Robert R. Sinclair, Alec Munc
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Despite financial concerns representing of the most substantial sources of stress, the intersection between individual differences and financial stress has received sparce attention. Emphasizing the cognitive-appraisal process, our study reveals financial stress perceptions partly reflect a dispositional tendency to interpret financial information either more positively or negatively. Across two studies (N = 441; N = 348), we found that positive and negative affect predict subjective financial perceptions of income adequacy. Further, using Relative Weights Analysis, we demonstrate that in predicting financial stress perceptions, dispositional affect is as important as, or more important than, objective measures of financial stress (i.e., household income and debt). Lastly, using moderated mediation, we found that both current and future perceived income adequacy mediate the relationship between one’s income and their experience of affective financial strain, and dispositional affect moderates this relationship. Our work informs current research and interventions seeking to understand individual differences in financial stress perceptions.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-03-15T02:52:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241239267
       
  • Contamination-Focussed Vignettes as an Analogue of Infectious Pandemics:
           An Experimental Validation using the State Disgust and Anxiety Responses
           in OCD

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      Authors: Ben Harkin, Lucy E. Davies, Alan Yates
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Despite infectious pandemics proving particularly detrimental to those with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), the investigation of analogous experimental paradigms is lacking. To address this gap, we conducted two studies employing vignettes that depicted contamination-related situations commonly experienced during a pandemic (e.g., Coughing into hands and failing to use hand sanitizer). We manipulated the salience of these vignettes across three levels: high contamination, low contamination, and a neutral control condition. Our examination of state anxiety and disgust responses in all participants revealed the successful manipulation of the vignettes’ impact. Specifically, individuals with more severe OCD symptoms reported significantly higher levels of state disgust and anxiety for both high and low contamination vignettes, in contrast to the group with lower symptom severity. No significant differences were observed in the neutral vignette condition between the high- and low-scoring groups. Interestingly, for those with higher OCD symptoms, high salience contamination-focused vignettes resulted in similarly elevated state disgust and anxiety, regardless of whether the vignettes were situated in public (Study 1) or domestic (Study 2) settings. This suggests that the heightened sensitivity to contamination-related scenarios observed in individuals with OCD symptoms in the present study is not confined to a specific context. These findings support the use of contamination-focused vignettes as analogues for studying infectious pandemics and provide valuable insights into OCD models, interventions, and future research.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-03-11T07:35:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241238208
       
  • Mediating Effects of Guilt and Shame on the Helping Behavior of People who
           Have Witnessed Ostracism

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      Authors: Kenta Tsumura
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Social connections are fundamental to human well-being, yet ostracism can lead to mental and physical maladjustment. Ostracized individuals often attempt to reconnect, but their efforts can be hindered by feelings of helplessness and depression. This study examines factors that facilitate helping behavior toward ostracized individuals by third parties who witness the ostracism, that is, the mediating effects of guilt and shame on the effects of witnessing ostracism on subsequent helping behavior. Participants (n = 161) read scenarios depicting ostracism or inclusion situations and reported their likelihood to engage in helping behaviors and their feelings of guilt and shame after witnessing the events. Results indicated that guilt mediated a positive relationship between witnessing ostracism and subsequent helping behavior, whereas shame mediated a negative relationship. These findings are consistent with existing research on the prosocial motivation of guilt and the avoidance tendencies of shame. The results highlight the complex interplay of emotions in shaping bystander responses to ostracism and shed light on potential interventions to promote inclusive behaviors. By influencing the emotions of bystanders, prosocial actions based on guilt can be encouraged and avoidance based on shame can be discouraged, ultimately promoting a more inclusive society.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-03-09T12:16:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241239009
       
  • Should We Really Be Afraid of “Weakness”' Applying the Insights of
           Attribution Theory

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      Authors: Adam Abdulla
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      It is widely assumed that the term “weakness” has negative psychological effects and should be replaced by “area for improvement.” The present study is the first to examine the matter experimentally. It was hypothesised that effects of “weakness” (vs. “area for improvement”) are most pronounced in those with low perceived self-efficacy in the relevant domain. Two experiments were conducted in the domain of self-regulation. In those with low perceived self-efficacy for self-regulation (PSESR), “weakness” apparently had a negative indirect effect on improvement expectancy by increasing the perceived stability (Experiment 1) or lowering the perceived controllability (Experiment 2) of the problem. Moreover, at low levels of PSESR in Experiment 2, estimated indirect effects of “weakness” on perceived value of improvement were both positive and negative. However, gender apparently moderated those effects. “Weakness” apparently lowered perceived controllability in both males and females but in women the negative effect was more pronounced when PSESR was low. In addition, “weakness” apparently increased perceived internality in males with low PSESR. Compared to “area for improvement,” “weakness” may indeed have some (negative) psychological effects in people with low perceived self-efficacy in the relevant domain. Given the ubiquity of these terms in evaluative contexts and the widespread fears of the term “weakness,” more experimental research needs to be conducted.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-02-27T11:14:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241231210
       
  • Coworkers Behaving Badly: How the Dark Triad Influences Responses to
           Witnessing Workplace Misconduct

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      Authors: Braden T. Hall, Joshua T. Lambert, Danielle Wahlers, William Hart
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The “bad-begets-bad” phenomenon describes how witnessed or perceived misconduct in an organization promotes mental states and behavior that encourage further misconduct. Based in two perspectives on how the Dark Triad (DT) constructs (narcissism, Machiavellianism, psychopathy) differentiate, we proposed their roles in contributing to the bad-begets-bad phenomenon. A convenience sample of college students (N = 454) completed an online study in which they read vignettes depicting workplace misconduct wherein a reporting incentive was (incentive condition) or was not (no-incentive condition) offered. Subsequently, they reported their likelihood of possessing mental states (e.g., goals) and engaging in behavior broadly reflective of the bad-begets-bad phenomenon. Lastly, they completed the Short Dark Triad (SD3) questionnaire to assess narcissism, Machiavellianism, and psychopathy. We used a series of step-wise regression models to analyze the data. Consistent with the “malicious two” perspective on the DT, only Machiavellianism and psychopathy consistently predicted mental states and behavior reflective of the bad-begets-bad phenomenon. Also, consistent with the “cautious and adaptable Machiavellian perspective,” only Machiavellianism interacted with the incentive condition to influence people’s willingness to report misconduct (i.e., not further promote misconduct). Broadly, the data contribute to understanding the role of the DT in organizational settings and support two perspectives on how the DT should operate in the context of witnessing workplace misconduct.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-02-19T03:27:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241234594
       
  • Fertility Fails to Predict Voter Preference for the 2020 Election: A
           Pre-Registered Replication of Navarrete et al. (2010)

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      Authors: Jessica L. Engelbrecht, Matthew Duell, John E. Edlund
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      As part of the Systematizing Confidence in Open Research and Evidence (SCORE) program, the present study reassesses the claim made in Navarrete et al. (2010) Study 1, that women’s voter preference for male candidates who demonstrate cues of strong genetic fitness increases across the reproductive cycle as a function of conception risk. We report an attempt to conceptually replicate these findings, modifying the outcome variables for voter preference to reflect the 2020 election rather than the 2008 election, while maintaining fidelity to the original study by including Barack Obama as a candidate. Contrary to the original findings, conception risk did not predict greater voter support for Obama as a younger, more attractive alternative to Donald J. Trump, nor was conception risk a significant factor in other matchups we presented to participants. Candidate intelligence and participant psychopathy scores on the Dark Triad were found to be factors in preference for Obama/Biden or Trump, respectively. We discuss these results in the context of evolutionary and political psychology, suggesting the need for further research that takes political factors into account.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T04:45:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241233209
       
  • Antecedents of Workaholism and Work Engagement: A Motivational Perspective
           in Research on Heavy Work Involvement

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      Authors: Diana Kusik, Aleksandra Tokarz, Joanna Kłosowska
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      In this perspective article, we propose encompassing the motivational perspective to enrich future studies on two forms of heavy work involvement (HWI): workaholism and work engagement. Based on the holistic definition of motivation, we build a theoretical instrumentation that includes four motivational categories that are presented and characterized by relevant key terms: I. Activation and energy of action; II. Action orientation and action realization; III. Competencies and cognitive processes; IV. Work environment and the context of action. We use these categories in an analysis of the latest contemporary research which has investigated the motivational determinants of both workaholism and work engagement. Our analysis shows that studies in this perspective are in the initial stages; we propose examples of theories and models as well as important precise questions embedded in each I-IV motivation category that can stimulate future research directions. The concluding comments include three main recommendations for future research on HWI.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-02-10T06:23:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241231718
       
  • University Students’ Mindset and Effort Regulation Across the
           Domains of Nursing and English

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      Authors: Donald Glen Patterson, Mariya A. Yukhymenko-Lescroart
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we examined and compared the beliefs of undergraduate nursing students at a healthcare-focused university in central Japan regarding their abilities to learn English and nursing and sustain effort in their studies. Specifically, the purposes of this research were to learn how Japanese nursing students’ mindsets and effort regulation differed across the domains of English and nursing and to determine the extent to which mindsets can predict students’ effort regulation in these domains. Data were collected through an online questionnaire (N = 132). We found that students’ mindsets and effort regulation differed across the domains of English and nursing with no significant differences by year of study. Growth mindsets and effort regulation were significantly higher and fixed mindsets were significantly lower in nursing than in English. Mindsets in nursing were found to predict effort regulation in both nursing and English, but mindsets in English were found only to predict effort regulation in English. The findings offer valuable insights into the learning beliefs of Japanese nursing students and may provide ideas about how to better motivate nursing students in their studies. Furthermore, the study contributes to the understanding of how mindsets vary across domains and cultural contexts.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-02-10T06:15:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241232895
       
  • Influence of Mindfulness on Game Addiction-Mediating Role of Emotional
           Control

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      Authors: Anurekha K. Tharumiya, Riniprabha P, Karthika Sakthivel, Janani K, Manikandan M. K. Manicka
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      In the past few decades, online games have become immensely popular among the younger generation thus leading to online game addiction. Previous researches acknowledge that mindfulness or present-focused awareness may reduce addiction. Moreover, addiction is found to have an impact on the propensity to respond to the situations in the environment in a way that is acceptable to all the people (emotional control). The present study attempts to study the influence of mindfulness and emotional control on game addiction. For this, 187 college students were selected through the Simple Random Sampling method. Personal Profile Sheet, The Online Game Addiction Scale, Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS) and The Emotional Control Questionnaire, with four dimensions of Rehearsal, Emotional Inhibition, Aggression Control and Benign control were used to collect the data. The study found a significant gender difference in the level of game addiction where boys being more addicted to online games than girls. Mindfulness shows a significant negative influence over Game Addiction. Among the four dimensions of emotional control, the two dimensions viz., rehearsal and benign control show mediation effect between mindfulness and game addiction. However, the mediating role of emotional inhibition and aggression control was not significantly demonstrative.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-02-10T03:09:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241232940
       
  • How Multicultural Experiences Influence Malevolent Creativity

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      Authors: Bo Yang, Heng Li
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      A wealth of studies have revealed that foreign experiences affect various cognitive abilities. One well-established finding is that living abroad can increase creative thinking skills. However, there has been little research on the dark side of creativity. Here, we hypothesized that exposure to foreign experiences can also foster malevolent creativity, which refers to the deliberate application of original ideas to turn a profit at someone else’s expense. Consistent with our hypotheses, Studies 1 and 2 found that student participants with foreign experiences showed greater malevolent creativity than those without such experiences. Relying on non-student adults, Study 3 replicated the findings of Study 1 using a different behavioral outcome of malevolent creativity. Study 4 found that participants who had decided to move overseas but had not yet done so demonstrated reduced levels of malevolent creativity compared to participants who had lived abroad, which minimized the possibility of reverse causality. Study 5 utilized an experimental design methodology and provided causal evidence for the effect of foreign experiences on malevolent creativity. These findings contribute to understanding about the range of effects that foreign experiences can have on different types of creativity.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T01:39:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241233208
       
  • Pandemic Grief and Suicidal Ideation in Latin American Countries: A
           Network Analysis

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      Authors: Tomás Caycho-Rodríguez, Jonatan Baños-Chaparro, José Ventura-León, Sherman A. Lee, Lindsey W. Vilca, Carlos Carbajal-León, Daniel E. Yupanqui-Lorenzo, Pablo D. Valencia, Mario Reyes-Bossio, Nicol Oré-Kovacs, Claudio Rojas-Jara, Miguel Gallegos, Roberto Polanco-Carrasco, Mauricio Cervigni, Pablo Martino, Marlon Elías Lobos-Rivera, Rodrigo Moreta-Herrera, Diego Alejandro Palacios Segura, Antonio Samaniego-Pinho, Andrés Buschiazzo Figares, Diana Ximena Puerta-Cortés, Andrés Camargo, Julio Torales, José Arkangel Monge Blanco, Pedronel González, Vanessa Smith-Castro, Olimpia Petzold-Rodriguez, Raymundo Calderón, Wendy Yamilet Matute Rivera, Daniela Ferrufino-Borja, Agueda Muñoz-del-Carpio-Toia, Jorge Palacios, Carmen Burgos-Videla, Ana María Eduviges Florez León, Ibeth Vergara, Diego Vega, Marion K. Schulmeyer, Hassell Tatiana Urrutia Rios, Arelly Esther Lira Lira, Nicol A. Barria-Asenjo, Jesús Ayala-Colqui, Luis Hualparuca-Olivera
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to characterize the network structure of pandemic grief symptoms and suicidal ideation in 2174 people from eight Latin American countries. Pandemic grief and suicidal ideation were measured using the Pandemic Grief Scale and a single item, respectively. Network analysis provides an in-depth characterization of symptom-symptom interactions within mental disorders. The results indicated that, “desire to die,” “apathy” and “absence of sense of life” are the most central symptoms in a pandemic grief symptom network; therefore, these symptoms could be focal elements for preventive and treatment efforts. Suicidal ideation, the wish to die, and the absence of meaning in life had the strongest relationship. In general, the network structure did not differ among the participating countries. It identifies specific symptoms within the network that may increase the likelihood of their co-occurrence and is useful at the therapeutic level.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T02:23:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241231209
       
  • Exploring the Moderating Roles of Emotions, Attitudes, Environment, and
           Teachers in the Impact of Motivation on Learning Behaviours in Students’
           English Learning

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      Authors: Xu Wang, Honggang Liu
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      For several decades, extensive research has been conducted on motivation in language learning. However, how motivation impacts learning behaviours with the moderation of factors related to emotions, attitude, environment, and teachers has not been reported. This study aims to examine the moderating effects of these four motivational factors to explain the inconsistent effects of motivation on English learning behaviours across studies. Drawing on self-determination theory, the study investigated 182 high school English learners and explored how the four motivational factors moderate the relationship between students' motivation and their English learning behaviours. We first examined how the four motivational factors predicted intrinsic/extrinsic motivation and how intrinsic/extrinsic motivation predicted English learning behaviours. The results reveal that the four motivational factors all positively predicted intrinsic motivation, while language attitude positively predicted extrinsic motivation. Both intrinsic and extrinsic motivations positively predicted English learning behaviours, with intrinsic motivation exerting a stronger influence. Language attitude did not moderate the relationship between motivation and English learning behaviours. However, the other three factors enhanced the positive relationship between motivation and learning behaviours. Notably, at the low level of teacher-related factors, the impact of extrinsic motivation on English learning behaviours was insignificant. Related implications are discussed.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-02-02T09:54:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241231714
       
  • Meta-Analysis of Social Presence Effects on Stroop Task Performance

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      Authors: Teresa Garcia-Marques, Alexandre C. Fernandes
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, we conducted a meta-analytic review to examine the impact of social presence on individuals’ performance on the Stroop task, shedding light on the cognitive processes underlying social facilitation. We followed PRISMA guidelines to identify and include 33 relevant studies in a multivariate random-effects meta-analysis. Our results show that social presence reliably modulates Stroop interference (a measure of cognitive control); specifically, participants exhibit lower Stroop interference when performing the task in the presence of others compared to performing it in isolation. We also found that the strength of the effect varies depending on the type of social presence: it is stronger with an attentive audience compared to an inattentive one, and null with an evaluative audience. Additionally, different features of the Stroop task itself moderate the effect; the effect is stronger for the classic version of the task compared to the semantic version, and for experiments that use mixed within-block trials compared to those with homogenous blocks. We also observed a negative relationship between the number of trials and the magnitude of the effect. Overall, these findings provide insights into the mechanisms by which the presence of others affects performance on the Stroop task, and how they align with social facilitation theories.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T05:16:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241227150
       
  • The Only way is up' How Different Facets of Employee and Supervisor
           Perfectionism Help or Hinder Career Development

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      Authors: Kathleen Otto, Martin Baluku, Amelie Schaible, Cemre Oflu, Emily Kleszewski
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Although the double-edged nature of perfectionism is widely acknowledged, little is known about how it shapes employee career development. By combining two field studies, we provide a multiperspective insight into the relevance of both employee and supervisor perfectionism for employee career development. While we expected self-oriented perfectionism (SOP) to have an ambivalent role for career development, we proposed that socially prescribed perfectionism (SPP) in particular, but also other-oriented perfectionism (OOP), would show maladaptive relationships with career-related indicators. In Study 1 (N = 116), we focused on the employee perspective and how multidimensional perfectionism relates to career aspirations (operationalized via work motivation) and subjective career success. Employees high in SOP reported higher, whereas those high in SPP reported lower perceived career success. OOP was negatively related to intrinsic motivation, but positively explained extrinsic (social) motivation and amotivation. In Study 2 (N = 146), we examined the role of supervisor perfectionism in supporting or hindering employees’ career development by providing or draining resources. Our results show that supervisors high in SOP - and partly in OOP are reluctant to delegate highly responsible tasks; SPP even increased the likelihood of assigning illegitimate tasks to subordinates. Our findings suggest that both employee and supervisor perfectionism may boost or thwart employee career development and success. We discuss that supervisor perfectionism may limit employees’ opportunities for experiential learning.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T06:01:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241229204
       
  • The Impact of Illegitimate Tasks on Volunteer Participation: The
           Perspective of Psychological Capital

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      Authors: Qing Miao, Yuhang He, Xingkui Zhu
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      How do illegitimate tasks in volunteering affect volunteer participation' Previous research has focused only on the unidimensional effects of illegitimate tasks on volunteer participation. This study used the Job Demands-Resources model to investigate the multidimensional effects of illegitimate tasks on volunteer participation and the potential mechanisms of the effects. Based on three waves of survey data from 1768 Chinese volunteers, we found that illegitimate tasks negatively affect volunteer attitudes and volunteer outcomes by reducing volunteers’ psychological capital. This study develops a mediated model about the effects of illegitimate tasks on volunteer attitudes and outcomes. This study also makes related recommendations, such as asking volunteer organizations to offer stress-coping courses and encouraging volunteers to share their personal volunteering experiences.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T04:27:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241230614
       
  • Confirming Eight-Factor Structure of the Substance Use Motives Measure in
           a Sample of US College Students

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      Authors: Stephanie J. Strong, Nora E. Charles, Margaret R. Bullerjahn, Cassidy Tennity, Chloe O’Dell, Emily Cordova
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The 2020 National Survey on Drug Use indicates nearly three quarters of individuals ages 18-25 have used substances in the past year. Research suggests individuals who use substances to cope with negative mood states are typically more substance-involved, report more psychological distress, and have a more extensive treatment history. Additionally, the high rate of polysubstance use among substance using adults in the U.S. highlights the need for broadband measures that can adequately capture use, consequences, and motivations for use of multiple substances. However, most measures assessing motives for use are typically substance specific. Recently, Biolcati and Passini (2019) developed a brief, but comprehensive model of broad substance use motives (i.e., Substance Use Motives Measure, SUMM) based on well-established motives questionnaires (e.g., DMQ-R, MMQ). They found support for their proposed eight-factor model in an online sample of Italian citizens (ages 18–60). No studies to date have examined the psychometric properties of the SUMM with an English-speaking or US college student sample. The current study evaluates the factor structure of the SUMM in a sample of 143 college students (74.8% female, 77.6% White, and 94.4% non-Hispanic/Latinx) at a large, southeastern university in the United States. Results of a confirmatory factor analysis showed support for the previously identified eight-factor structure for the SUMM, with acceptable model fit and internal consistency of each factor found. Findings support using the SUMM as a broad measure of substance use motives, but more research is needed to assess measurement invariance across different groups and to evaluate external, concurrent, and convergent validity using other well-established measures of substance use motives, severity, and psychiatric symptomatology.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T04:16:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226901
       
  • Relationships of Transformational and Paternalistic Leadership Styles With
           Follower Needs, Multidimensional Work Motivations and Organizational
           Commitment: A Mediated Model

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      Authors: Selinay Çivit, Aslı Göncü-Köse
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Paternalistic Leadership (PL) style is suggested to be an emic manifestation of Transformational Leadership (TL) in cultural contexts characterized by high power distance and collectivism. The present study investigated the effects of TL and PL behaviors on employees’ multidimensional work motivation and organizational commitment and the mediating effects of satisfaction of psychological needs (needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness) in these relationships. Data were collected from 423 white-collar employees and analyzed by Structural Equation Modeling. The findings revealed that TL was significantly related to employees’ autonomous and controlled work motivations as well as amotivation via its association with the satisfaction of employees’ needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. PL was associated with employees’ autonomous work motivations and amotivation via satisfaction of employees’ need for relatedness. Autonomous motivations were positively associated with affective commitment; whereas controlled motivations were positively related to normative commitment. Amotivation was negatively associated with all types of commitment. The findings are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical implications as well as suggestions for future research.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T06:56:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226905
       
  • Self-Compassion, Anxiety and Depression Symptoms; the Mediation of Shame
           and Guilt

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      Authors: Paria Etemadi Shamsababdi, Gholam Reza Dehshiri
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Self-compassion is related to psychological well-being and can improve mental health problems. The present study aimed to examine the relationship of self-compassion with anxiety and depression symptoms considering the mediating effects of shame and guilt. Two hundred forty-three participants in Iran completed the measures of Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS), self-compassion Scale-Short Form (SCS-SF), and personal feelings questionnaire-2 (PFQ-2 Brief). The result showed that there was a significant negative correlation between self-compassion and shame, guilt, depression, and anxiety. The correlation between shame and guilt with depression and anxiety was also positive and significant. Mediation analysis was used to examine whether self-compassion predicted decreased symptoms of depression and anxiety through decreased shame and guilt. The results showed that self-compassion has a negative direct effect on depression symptoms. The direct effect of self-compassion on anxiety symptoms was not significant. Moreover, we found that shame and guilt mediate the relationship between self-compassion and depressive symptoms. However, the indirect effect of guilt on anxiety symptoms was not significant. The findings of the current study demonstrate that Self-compassion is linked to more psychological strengths and efficient emotional regulations, leading to less self-conscious emotions (shame and guilt) and decreased depression and anxiety symptoms.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-22T01:55:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241227525
       
  • The Effectiveness of Adolescent-Focused Therapy and Family-Based Therapy
           for Anorexia Nervosa

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      Authors: Marni P. Stewart, Oliver Baumann
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Anorexia Nervosa is the most deadly mental illness due to the high mortality and relapse rates after reaching remission. The systematic review investigated the effectiveness of two empirically validated interventions (Family-Based Therapy [FBT] and Adolescent-Focused Therapy [AFT]) for an adolescent or young adult living with Anorexia Nervosa to reach partial or full remission and expected weight ratios. Twelve studies published between 1994 and 2015 were evaluated and indicated that FBT resulted in significant weight gain and higher partial and full remission rates than AFT, demonstrating its superiority in treating AN in adolescents and young adult samples, in one instance, at least up to 4 years. Despite FBT and AFT delivery, a significant proportion of participants did not achieve their target weight or full remission, indicating that both treatments may not be effective in all circumstances.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T06:25:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226687
       
  • Introducing a Neuroscience-Based Assessment Instrument: Development and
           Psychometric Study of the Neural Networks Symptomatology Inventory

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      Authors: Bruno Faustino, Isabel Fonseca
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Neuroscience research methods contribute to the understanding of the underlying neural impairments associated with psychopathology. Previous research suggested that impairments in Default Mode Network, Fronto-Parietal Executive Network, Amygdaloid-Hippocampal Memory Network, and Attentional Salience Network are present in different psychopathological symptoms. However, a self-report measure based on this evidence is lacking. Aims: Therefore, the present study describes the development and preliminary psychometric study of the Neural Network Symptomatology Inventory (NNSI). Method: Two different samples were recruited (sample 1: N = 214, Mage = 21.0, SD = 7.10; sample 2: N = 194, Mage = 21.5, SD = 8.41) and responded to self-report instruments in a cross-sectional design. Standard methodologies to scale development and psychometric study were applied: Item development, Exploratory (EFA), Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), and Pearson correlations. Results: EFA and CFA suggested a 4-factor model with adequate goodness-of-fit indices (χ2(449) = 808,9841, TLI = .89, CFI = .92, RMSEA = .048 (.042–.053). All NNSI subscales correlated positively with psychopathological domains and correlated negatively with psychological well-being. Conclusions: This preliminary study suggests that NNSI may be a valid instrument to assess symptomatology associated with complex neural network impairments. Nevertheless, further research is required to deepen and improve NNSI psychometric characteristics.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T10:03:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226685
       
  • Fun in a Box' Loneliness and Adolescents’ Problematic Smartphone Use: A
           Moderated Mediation Analysis of the Underlying Mechanisms

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      Authors: Alexandra Maftei, Ioan-Alex Merlici, Cristian Opariuc-Dan
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Addictive smartphone use is one of the most concerning behaviors among adolescents. The present study investigated the indirect effects of self-esteem and boredom proneness and the moderating role of the need to belong on the link between loneliness and addictive smartphone use (ASU). Our sample included 357 adolescents aged 12 to 19 (Mage = 15.56, SD = 1.01, 57.42% males) from ten public schools in Romania. We used a moderated mediation approach, with moderation of the both second mediation paths and the direct effect path. Results suggested that the influence of loneliness on ASU was statistically significant and partially mediated both by self-esteem and boredom proneness. Adolescents’ need to belong significantly moderated the positive association between boredom proneness and ASU, and the direct negative association between loneliness and ASU; however, it did not moderate the negative association between self-esteem and ASU. Thus, high levels of the need to belong also increased the influence of boredom proneness on AUS and had a marginally significant effect on the relation between loneliness and ASU. These results suggested that adolescents’ need to belong, self-esteem, and boredom proneness might contribute to developing ASU. Interventions centered around countering the adverse effects of excessive technology use ought to consider group activities that facilitate social bonding to satisfy the participants’ need to belong, reduce their levels of boredom, and, thus, reduce the risk of developing ASU symptoms.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T12:15:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226681
       
  • Gun Owners Views on Gun Control in the United States: A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Ted Peterson
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Guns and gun violence have become a widely discussed and hotly debated concern across the United States. With gun violence on the rise and mass shootings provoking powerful emotional outrage, the question often rests with what can or should be done to rectify these societal issues. This paper examines the attitudes of guns expressed through two qualitative interviews of gun owners in the United States. The paper observes many of the same outrage amongst these gun owners of Americans with seemingly little to show in the way of public policy progress for protecting citizens. Still, differences persist in what should be or can be done. The paper recommends more expansive study on this critical group of citizens involved in future United States gun safety and policy debate.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T02:02:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241227522
       
  • The Effect of Alexithymia, Attention, and Pain Characteristics on
           Mentalizing Abilities Among Adults With Chronic Pain

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      Authors: Laura Šalčiūnaitė-Nikonovė, Linas Leonas, Laura Sapranavičiūtė-Zabazlajeva
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: Impaired mentalizing abilities are found among persons with chronic pain, yet it is still unknown why. The current study focuses on mentalizing abilities and how these could be affected by different pain factors, alexithymia traits, and other aspects of psychological functioning (depression, anxiety, attention) in persons experiencing chronic pain.Methods: 71 participants (80.3% female; mean age 56.1 (SD = 13.1)) with subjectively reported chronic pain conditions participated in the study. Mentalizing abilities were assessed using an objective assessment of the Frith-Happé animations test. Alexithymia was measured using Toronto Alexithymia Scale. Subjectively reported data on various pain characteristics and other related psychological factors (depression, anxiety, attention) were collected. Bivariate linear regression analyses were used to identify variables that had statistically significant relationships with Frith-Happé test scores as dependent variables, which were then used to build multivariate models.Results: Mentalization task scores had no significant associations with alexithymia. However, in bivariate models, greater Frith-Happé animations categorisation score was associated with higher attention task scores (βs = .332, p = .005), higher education (βs = .317, p = .007), and lower level of depressiveness (βs = −.234, p = .049). Greater animations feelings scores were associated with less severe pain intensity (βs = −.322, p = .006), younger age (βs = −.399, p = .001), and better attention (βs = .383, p = .001). In multivariate analysis models predicting both animations categorisation and feelings scores, attention was found to be the only statistically significant factor (respectively, βs = .257, p = .029 and βs = .264, p = .035).Conclusions: No significant correlations were found between mentalizing abilities and alexithymic features in persons with chronic pain. Disruptions of attention was the most significant factor leading to lower mentalizing abilities in persons with chronic pain.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T10:44:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226895
       
  • Relationship Between Self-Compassion and Compassion for Others: The
           Mediated Effect of Perceived Social Support and Psychological Resilience

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      Authors: Jialan Ma, Qianguo Xiao
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Studies from individualistic cultural contexts have shown there were no or negative significant correlation between self-compassion and compassion (for others). However, there may be a closer association between them in a collectivism and Buddhism culture. This study randomly selected 441 college students in China and used measures of self-compassion, trait compassion (compassion for others), psychological resilience, and perceiving social support to investigate this relationship. The results showed a moderately positive correlation between self-compassion and compassion. Further chain-mediation analyses revealed that self-compassion not only directly predicted compassion for others but also indirectly influenced it through the mediating effects of perceiving social support and psychological resilience. The results of this study suggest that the quality of compassion may be significantly influenced by culture.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T09:51:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226906
       
  • The Influence of Group Favoritism on Moral Judgment -- Evidence From
           Event-Related Potential

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      Authors: Yang Bo, Zhang Lihua
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      When judging the morality of an action, individuals may exhibit a bias stemming from group favoritism. It leads to the expression of different moral evaluations of the same behaviors performed by different social groups. The current study used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the influence of in-group favoritism (in-group vs. homogeneous out-group) and out-group favoritism (in-group vs. high-quality out-group) on moral judgments. Two experiments were conducted, showing a higher moral score of the in-group compared to the homogeneous out-group by participants. ERP data indicated that in-group stimulation triggered larger P2 amplitudes than homogeneous out-group. Additionally, a larger N400-like amplitude, localized to the right hemisphere, was observed during the evaluation of the homogeneous out-group. Significantly, when comparing the in-group to the high-quality out-group, there was no discernible difference in moral scores or ERP amplitudes. Overall, the results indicate that in-group favoritism can affect moral judgments, especially when assessing homogeneous out-groups, but it can be reduced by the characteristics of groups.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T05:52:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241227397
       
  • State Resident Handedness, Ideology, and Political Party Preference: U.S.
           Presidential Election Outcomes Over the Past 60 Years

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      Authors: Stewart J. H. McCann
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Pearson correlation, partial correlation, and multiple regression strategies determined the degree to which estimates of the level of left-handedness in each of the 48 contiguous American states related to citizen political ideology and to Democratic-Republican presidential popular vote over the past 60 years. Higher state levels of left-handedness were associated significantly with liberal ideology in each of the presidential election years from 1964 to 2016. Comparable ideology data were not available for 2020. Higher state levels of left-handedness also were associated with a greater degree of Democratic candidate popular vote support in each of the presidential election years from 1964 to 2020 except for 1976. The mean size of these 28 significant Pearson correlations involving the two political criteria was .62 (SD = .12) with a range of .38–.80, indicating handedness alone could account for a mean of 40.1% (SD = 14.9) of the variance in the two political preference variables. Corresponding multiple regressions showed that when state-level Big Five personality, White population percent, urbanization, and income variables were given the opportunity to enter the equations, handedness still emerged with a significant regression coefficient in 26 of the 28 equations. The two exceptions occurred for 1968 with either political preference criterion. It is speculated that such relations are grounded in hypothesized but poorly understood genetic links between handedness, personality, and political beliefs and attitudes, and, that a foundational genetic predisposition to left-handedness in a population may have much greater impact on correlates than overt levels of left-handedness.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T02:23:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241227521
       
  • The Intergenerational Transmission of Gender Roles: Evidence From Parents
           and Children in Single-Parent

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      Authors: Liling Wang, I-Jun Chen, Mengping Yang, Ying Shi, Yunping Song
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Given the current increases in the divorce rate and the number of single-parent families, the development of gender roles among children from single-parent families has received more and more attention. This study investigated how single parents influenced the formation of their children’s gender roles and family-related factors that benefited the development of gender roles in single-parent children. Through in-depth interviews with 24 pairs of parents and children from single-parent families, we investigated single parents’ and their children’s cognition on gender roles, parents’ parenting attitudes and behaviors during their children’s gender role development, and communication and interaction between parents and children. Results showed intergenerational consistency in the gender role concepts of parents and their children in single-parent families. However, the children’s gender role concepts were not completely and directly inherited from their parents, and could be affected by their subjective initiative. Additionally, single parenting did not necessarily negatively impact children’s gender role development, which depends on their parent’s parenting style. The study’s limitations are discussed, and future directions for in-depth research are suggested.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-11T10:34:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241227161
       
  • Sex Stereotypes and Child Physical Abuse: Mediating Effects of Attitudes
           on Beliefs about Consequences for Abusive Parents

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      Authors: Christopher Leone, LouAnne Hawkins, Mary Geary, Valentina Bolanos
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      We hypothesized that (a) sex stereotypes would influence individuals’ attitudes toward and beliefs about physically abusive parents and (b) these attitudes would mediate the connection between sex stereotypes and beliefs. Participants read one of four scenarios in which (a) sex of parents and sex of children were systematically varied while (b) holding constant the actions of parents and children as well as surrounding circumstances. Participants then expressed their attitudes about those parents and their beliefs about appropriate consequences for these parents. As expected, participants held more unfavorable attitudes about fathers than mothers and believed lenient consequences were more appropriate for mothers than fathers. Moreover, the linkage between parents’ sex and participants’ beliefs was mediated by participants’ attitudes such that the effects of sex stereotypes on beliefs were all indirect rather than direct. Limitations (e.g., cross-sectional design, sample representativeness) and future directions (e.g., alternative parental and child behaviors, individual differences as moderators) are discussed.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-11T05:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941231225394
       
  • Metacognition as a Mediator for Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Following
           Childhood Stressful Life Events: An Examination of the Construct Validity
           of the Metacognitions Questionnaire-Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

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      Authors: Benjamin C. Darnell, Sarah R. Lee, Andrea M. Despotes, Dominoe A. Jones, David P. Valentiner
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Both cognitive and metacognitive theories implicate posttraumatic metacognition as an important factor in the maintenance of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) following stressful life events (SLEs). The Metacognitions Questionnaire-posttraumatic stress disorder (MCQ-PTSD; Wells, 2009) was previously developed to assess for metacognitions specific to SLEs and resulting PTSS. This study aimed to examine the construct validity of this measure in the context of childhood SLEs specifically. First, we confirmed the factor structure underlying the MCQ-PTSD in our sample. We then assessed whether the MCQ-PTSD would function as expected based on a theoretical model in which, controlling for posttraumatic cognitions, posttraumatic metacognitions were expected to mediate the relationship between childhood SLEs and PTSS. Using data from a racially diverse sample of undergraduate psychology students (N = 402; Agemean = 19.38 ± 1.81) at a large Midwestern university, the two-factor structure of the MCQ-PTSD was confirmed. Among participants who endorsed clinically significant experience of childhood SLEs (n = 203; Agemean = 19.49 ± 1.94), negative metacognitions mediated the relationships of emotional and sexual abuse with PTSS, when controlling for other posttraumatic cognitions. These relationships were not observed for positive metacognitions. These results are consistent with a metacognitive model for PTSD and suggest that the MCQ-PTSD may be a valid measure of posttraumatic metacognitions following childhood SLEs.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T09:36:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941231217467
       
  • The Mediating Role of Self-Esteem in the Relationship Between Perceived
           Ethnic Discrimination and Continuance Commitment of Migrant Workers

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      Authors: İlhami Yücel, Daniel Roque Gomes, Neuza Ribeiro, Kasım Kağan Özlok
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to examine the relationship between perceived ethnic discrimination by migrant workers (applicants for international protection) and continuance commitment, and to analyze whether this relationship is mediated by self-esteem. In addition, it aims to contribute to the literature on the organizational outcomes of perceived ethnic discrimination. This research was conducted through a questionnaire survey of 411 migrants who applied for international protection in Turkey. As a result of the study, perceived ethnic discrimination was found to be a predictor of continuance commitment and self-esteem. In addition, it was observed that self-esteem has a mediating role in the relationship between perceived ethnic discrimination and continuance commitment. The results offer important implications for organizations and organization managers on how migrant workers should be managed and which issues require specific attention. The application of the study on migrant workers and the examination of these variables provide important contributions and practical implications to the literature. In addition, this is a rare study that examines the mediator model with the variables specified in the model using social identity theory, which has not yet been widely covered in existing literature.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T08:02:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226686
       
  • Attachment Anxiety and Nomophobia: A Moderated Parallel Mediation Model

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      Authors: Yuan Liang
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Nomophobia is the state of being anxious or disturbed when feeling disconnected from the digital world and can have a significant impact on individuals’ health and well-being. Drawing upon attachment theory and the previous literature on nomophobia, this study aims to understand how attachment anxiety influences nomophobia and whether this relationship differs between males and females. In the Human Penguin Project (HPP) (N = 1221; 12 countries; participants aged ≥20 years), the Experiences in Close Relationships Questionnaire-Revised (ECR-R), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), and the Nomophobia Questionnaire (NMP-Q) were used to assess attachment anxiety, alexithymia, perceived stress, and nomophobia, respectively. The results demonstrated that (1) there were significant positive correlations between attachment anxiety, nomophobia, alexithymia, and perceived stress. Additionally, (2) there was a direct and significant effect of attachment anxiety on nomophobia, and alexithymia and perceived stress partially mediated this relationship. Finally, (3) gender significantly moderated the relationship between attachment anxiety and nomophobia. Specifically, the predicted effect was significant in both males and females, but the direct effect of attachment anxiety and nomophobia was stronger in males.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T11:13:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226907
       
  • Role of Pubertal Timing and Perceived Parental Attachment in Internalizing
           Problem Behaviours Among Adolescents

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      Authors: Palak Kanwar
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescents need supportive social institutions to help them deal effectively with the demands of pubertal changes accompanied by new social roles, reducing their susceptibility to problem behaviors. Considering this, it will be investigated how internalizing problem behaviors in teenagers is affected by the interaction between pubertal timing and perceived parental attachment. For this, cross-sectional data from 772 adolescents with ages ranging from 11 to 15 years old was used. Regression analyses showed early maturing adolescents with insecure perceived parental attachments had higher levels of depression and anxiety than their early, on-time, and late maturing counterparts with secure perceived parental attachments. This finding supports the contextual amplification model, as the detrimental consequences of early maturation are impacted by difficult parent-adolescent relationships.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T07:28:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226684
       
  • Experiential Avoidance, Post-Traumatic Stress Symptoms, and Academic
           Impairment

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      Authors: Benjamin Laman-Maharg, David P. Valentiner, Sebastian Szöllös, Nina S. Mounts
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      The ways in which Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms lead to impairments in functioning, including academic performance, are not well understood. The present study sought to examine the role of a common maladaptive coping strategy, experiential avoidance, as a moderator of the relationship between posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and academic achievement. Participants (N = 326) were undergraduate students enrolled in introductory psychology courses at a large university in the Midwestern United States who reported at least one event potentially meeting Criterion A for PTSD. The prospective association of PTSS with current and subsequent semester GPAs, and with experiential avoidance as the moderator, were examined. The interaction between PTSS and experiential avoidance significantly predicted both current semester GPA and subsequent semester GPA, with stronger associations between PTSS and GPA being observed at higher levels of experiential avoidance. These results were not fully explained by control variables of high school performance, standardized test scores, and general negative affect. This study found that experiential avoidance significantly moderates the relationship between PTSS and academic performance. These results suggest that interventions that target PTSS and/or experiential avoidance may increase GPA. Limitations and future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T04:10:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226682
       
  • Dominance Analysis of Bright and Dark Dispositional Predictors of Socially
           Desirable Responding

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      Authors: Brian K. Miller, Eric G. Kirby, Kaitlynn Brianna Stevens
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Although the role of so-called dark traits in the prediction of maladaptive behavior has seen a large increase in interest by researchers, the Big Five still maintain their ubiquity in the prediction of most behaviors. This study uses measures of the Dark Tetrad and the Big Five personality traits to predict a very specific form of maladaptive behavior: the impression management form of socially desirable responding. In regression-based dominance analysis, results suggest that not all of the Big Five nor the Dark Tetrad provide statistically significant incremental validity but as a block, the Big Five dominate the Dark Tetrad in the prediction of the purposeful misrepresentation of one’s self to others on self-report inventories. More specifically, four of the Big Five as well as the traits of Machiavellianism and sadism from the Dark Tetrad are significant predictors of impression management.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-08T05:39:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941241226908
       
  • Mental Illness, Gun Access and Carrying: A Test of Competing Hypotheses

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      Authors: Miranda L. Baumann
      Abstract: Psychological Reports, Ahead of Print.
      Access to firearms among individuals with mental health problems has been a source of protracted debate among policymakers, the media, and the public, writ large. At the center of this controversy are questions about the nature and consequences of gun access in the context of mental illness. The lack of substantial empirical evidence, due in part to limited access to quality data, plays a significant role in perpetuating ongoing debate. To address this problem, this study uses data from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication to evaluate the relative importance of several clinical, cultural, and criminological factors in explaining gun access and carrying among adults with and without mental illnesses. Multivariate analyses reveal that, whereas past year disorder (of any type or severity) and other clinical characteristics were unrelated to firearm access, several cultural factors such as childhood rurality (e.g., ORrural vs. urban: 3.59; 95% CI: 2.52, 5.12) and the criminological experience of early intimate partner violence (e.g., ORvictim only vs. noexp: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.50, 2.26) were. None were predictive of carrying. Further, none of the relationships observed were conditioned on any of the clinical characteristics. These results indicate that people with mental illnesses likely own and carry guns for the same reasons and in the same contexts as others. Additional updated and quality data is needed to further explore these issues; however, these finding suggest that suicide and violence prevention efforts targeting people with mental illnesses need to be sensitive to the cultural and personal significance of guns.
      Citation: Psychological Reports
      PubDate: 2024-01-08T04:26:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00332941231225169
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lamella     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Evolution, Mind and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediation Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Family Trauma, Child Custody & Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Creativity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Psychosocial Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Play in Adulthood     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychology and Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Performance and Mindfulness     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School & Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jungian Journal for Scholarly Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
KULA : knowldge creation, dissemination, and preservation studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Service Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
JCPP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Know and Share Psychology     Open Access  
Methods in Psychology     Open Access  
Gadjah Mada Journal of Professional Psychology     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Katharsis     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
Human Arenas : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Psychology, Culture, and Meaning     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cognitive Enhancement     Hybrid Journal  
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Dhammathas Academic Journal     Open Access  
INSAN Jurnal Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Heroism Science     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Psychology     Open Access  
Gogoa     Open Access  
Journal of Global Engagement and Transformation     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Journal of Cognitive Systems     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi Terapan     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Jurnal Educatio : Jurnal Pendidikan Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal  
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Musiktherapeutische Umschau : Forschung und Praxis der Musiktherapie     Hybrid Journal  

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