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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lamella     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Evolution, Mind and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediation Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Family Trauma, Child Custody & Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Creativity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Psychosocial Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Play in Adulthood     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychology and Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Performance and Mindfulness     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School & Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jungian Journal for Scholarly Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
KULA : knowldge creation, dissemination, and preservation studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Service Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
JCPP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Know and Share Psychology     Open Access  
Methods in Psychology     Open Access  
Gadjah Mada Journal of Professional Psychology     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Katharsis     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
Human Arenas : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Psychology, Culture, and Meaning     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cognitive Enhancement     Hybrid Journal  
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Dhammathas Academic Journal     Open Access  
INSAN Jurnal Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Heroism Science     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Psychology     Open Access  
Gogoa     Open Access  
Journal of Global Engagement and Transformation     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Journal of Cognitive Systems     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi Terapan     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Jurnal Educatio : Jurnal Pendidikan Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal  
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Musiktherapeutische Umschau : Forschung und Praxis der Musiktherapie     Hybrid Journal  

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Journal Cover
Perceptual and Motor Skills
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.349
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0031-5125 - ISSN (Online) 1558-688X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Eye-Tracking Analyses of a Coach’s Pointing Gestures Timed With Speech:
           Implications for Players' Recall of Basketball Tactical Instructions

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      Authors: Houssem Ben Chikha, Hajer Mguidich, Bachir Zoudji, Aïmen Khacharem
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Coaches often use pointing gestures alongside their speech to reinforce their message and emphasize important concepts during instructional communications, but the impact of simultaneous pointing gestures and speech on learners’ recall remains unclear. We used eye-tracking and recalled performance to investigate the impact of a coach’s variously timed pointing gestures and speech on two groups of learners’ (novices and experts) visual attention and recall of tactical instructions. Participants were 96 basketball players (48 novice and 48 expert) who attempted to recall instructions about the evolution of a basketball game system under two teaching conditions: speech accompanied by gestures and speech followed by gestures. Overall, the results showed that novice players benefited more from instructional speech accompanied by gestures than from speech followed by gestures alone. This was evidenced by their greater visual attention to the diagrams, demonstrated through a higher fixation count and decreased saccadic shifts between the coach and the diagrams. Additionally, they exhibited improved recall and experienced reduced mental effort, despite having the same fixation time on the diagrams and equivalent recall time. Conversely, experts benefited more from instructional speech followed by gestures, indicating an expertise reversal effect. These results suggest that coaches and educators may improve their tactical instructions by timing the pairing of their hand gestures and speech in relation to the learner’s level of expertise.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T06:58:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241266645
       
  • Effects of Specific Dual Task Training on Change of Direction Ability,
           Cognitive Flexibility, and Inhibition in Young Soccer Players

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      Authors: Rym Baccouch, Rihab Borji, Hafedh Ayed, Sonia Sahli, Yosra Zammit, Haithem Rebai
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In the current study we aimed to investigate the effect of specific dual task training (SDTT) compared to conventional soccer training (CST) on motor and cognitive performances in U13 elite soccer players. Twenty-four young soccer players (all males) participated in this study. We measured their change of direction ability (CODA) and cognitive performances (cognitive flexibility and inhibition) before and after four weeks in either the SDTT group or the CST group. We administered the Trail-Making Test (TMT) to evaluate cognitive flexibility and the Stroop test to evaluate cognitive inhibition. We assessed CODA using the t test (TT). After training, CODA (p < .001), cognitive flexibility (p < .001), and inhibition (p < .001) were improved only in the SDTT group. These results suggest that SDTT seems more suitable than CST to optimally improve both CODA and cognitive performances in U13 elite soccer players.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-07-21T06:52:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241266901
       
  • The Use of a Just Noticeable Difference Approach to Improve Perceptual
           Acuity Ability in Male Runners

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      Authors: Maressa Priscila Krause, Luke Haile, Dayanne Sampaio Antonio, Andre L. Peres, Robert J. Robertson
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      We were interested in micro-variations in an athlete’s psychophysical state that separate peak exertion from physiological collapse. Thus, we measured perceptual acuity in runners using a classic psychophysical approach, the just noticeable difference (JND) on two standard stimuli runs at treadmill speed corresponding to 70%VO2max and 80%VO2max. Thirty-four male runners (M age = 35.26, SD = 7.33 years) first performed a maximal treadmill test to determine the speed of a standard exercise bout for the JND trials. The JND trials consisted of four 5-minute running bouts on a treadmill with 5-minute rests between bouts. For bouts 1 and 3, participants ran at the standard stimuli pace, but for bouts 2 and 4, they adjusted their speeds to achieve a level of exertion at a JND above/below the SS. They achieved differences in the final 30 seconds of the VO2 between each JND bout and the previous standard stimuli at just above (JND-A) and just below (JND-B) the JND perceived exertions. We used a Generalized Linear Model analysis to compare the JND-A and JND-B within and between ventilatory threshold groups (lower/higher) in absolute and relative VO2 and in terms of the total JND magnitude. The magnitude of JND-A was greater than that of JND-B at 70%VO2max and 80%VO2max in absolute units (70%VO2 Δ = 2.62; SE = 0.37; p < .001; 80%VO2 Δ = 1.67; SE = 0.44; p = .002) and in relative units (70%VO2max Δ = 4.70; SE = 0.66; p < .001; 80%VO2max Δ = 2.96; SE = 0.80; p = .002). The total magnitude was greater in the 70%VO2max trial than 80%VO2max in absolute units (70%VO2 M = 3.78, SE = 0.31 mL·kg−1·min−1; 80%VO2 M = 2.62, SE = 0.37 mL·kg−1·min−1; p = .020) and in relative units (70%VO2max M = 6.57, SE = 0.53%VO2max; 80%VO2max M = 4.71, SE = 0.64%VO2max; p = .030). The JND range narrowed when physiologic demand increased, for both physical (speed) and psychological (RPE) variables.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-06-19T12:16:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241252852
       
  • Home-Court Advantage is Greater for Teams Competing at Higher Playing
           Levels: An Exploratory Analysis of Spanish Male Basketball Leagues

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      Authors: Enrique Alonso Pérez-Chao, Raúl Nieto-Acevedo, Aaron T. Scanlan, Adrián Martin-Castellanos, Alberto Lorenzo, Miguel Ángel Gómez
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to (i) compare the extent of home-court advantage (HA) and home win percentage (HW) between Spanish basketball leagues across different playing levels (i.e., leagues) and (ii) analyze the influence of team ability on HA and HW within each playing level. We gathered data for game locations and results from open online sources for all games in the First Division (ACB), Second Division (LEB Gold), and Third Division (LEB Silver) Spanish male basketball leagues between 2010–2023. The dataset included 12 seasons, 635 teams (215 First Division, 203, Second Division, and 217 Third Division), and 19,539 games (7075 First Division, 6344 Second Division, and 5520 Third Division). We calculated HA [(total home wins/total wins) * 100] and HW [(total home wins/total home games) * 100] for each team across each season. We performed Kruskal Wallis tests, calculated partial eta squared (ηp2), and performed Mann-Whitney U tests with rank biserial correlation (rb) effect sizes and Dwass-Steel-Critchlow-Fligner pairwise comparisons to compare HA and HW between leagues and between team abilities (low, medium, and/or high) within each league. There was a significant effect for HA between leagues (p = .01) with post hoc comparisons revealing a higher HA for the First Division than for the Third Division (p = .01), but HW was not significantly different between leagues. In turn, variations in HA and HW between team abilities were consistent across playing levels, with HW significantly increasing in a progressive manner with higher team abilities (p < .001) and with HA significantly lower among high-level teams compared to lower-ability team clusters (p < .01). These findings emphasize the importance of considering playing level and team ability and interpreting HA and HW together to contextualize an apparent home advantage in Spanish basketball.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-06-19T10:24:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241262124
       
  • The Difference Between Expert Dancers’ and Non-Dancers Tapping Timing
           With and Without an Auditory Stimulus at a Slow Tempo

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      Authors: Soo Mi Nam, Ji-Won Park, Ji-Hyun Ko, Min Joo Kim
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our primary purpose in this study was to determine whether trained dancers differed from untrained non-dancers in their ability to accurately control motor timing during finger and heel tapping tasks, both with and without slow isochronous auditory stimuli. Dancers and non-dancers were instructed to synchronize their taps with isochronous auditory stimuli under three conditions: 30, 40, and 50 BPM. After the synchronization phase, participants were asked to continue tapping without the auditory sequences. On the synchronization task, the tapping onset of both groups lagged behind the stimulus onset in all tempo conditions. In all conditions, dancers showed more accurate and stable beat synchronization and continuation than non-dancers. As the tempo condition slowed down (from 50 to 30 BPM), synchronization accuracy decreased while synchronization and continuation variability increased. Unlike for novices, dancers showed no difference between the finger and heel tapping synchronization tasks. During the continuous tasks, their timing accuracy was higher for heel than for finger tapping. Collectively, these findings suggest that dance training, which involves synchronizing bodily movements based on rhythm, may lead to an accumulation of experience that enhances specific sensorimotor skills related to synchronizing movements with external stimuli or continuing rhythmic movements temporally.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-06-14T10:28:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241262547
       
  • Effects of a Psychological Intervention Program on Competitive Anxiety and
           Psychological Profile in Young Soccer Players

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      Authors: José Antonio Domínguez González, Rafael Enrique Reigal Garrido, Verónica Morales Sánchez, Antonio Hernández Mendo
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our aim in the present study was to test the efficacy of a 13-week, 19-session psychological intervention program on young soccer players’ competitive anxiety and their sport psychological profiles. Participants were 37 players in the under-15 age category, of which 18 players formed the experimental group (M age = 14.67 years, SD = .48) and 19 players formed the control group (Mage = 14.23 years, SD = .42); this was a quasi-experimental design without random assignment to groups. We had all participants complete the Psychological Inventory of Sport Performance (IPED), the Questionnaire of Psychological Characteristics of Sport Performance (CPRD), and the Competition State Anxiety Inventory-2 (CSAI-2) before and after the intervention. Results indicated positive effects for the intervention group (but not the control group) on stress control and motivation dimensions of the CPRD, cognitive anxiety and self-confidence on the CSAI-2, and self-confidence and attentional control on the IPED. These results suggest that psychological training for athletes contributes to their improved psychological skills, providing them tools to better adapt to the competitive environment.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-30T04:19:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241256410
       
  • Effects of an Auditory Versus Visual Stimulus on Reaction and Response
           Time During Countermovement Jumps

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      Authors: Russell Lowell, David Saucier, Harish Chander, Reuben Burch, Zachary Gillen
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Reacting and responding to an external stimulus is an important component of human performance, and they inform us about a participant’s neurophysiological capabilities. Our purpose in this study was to determine whether reaction times (REACT), response times (RT), and countermovement jump (CMJ) performance differ when responding to an auditory (AUD) versus visual (VIS) stimulus. Participants were 17 college-aged volunteers (6 females and 11 males; M age = 23.0, SD = 3.4 years; M height = 174.57, SD = 10.37 cm; M body mass = 73.37, SD = 13.48 kg). Participants performed CMJs on force plates immediately upon receiving an AUD or a VIS stimulus. The AUD stimulus was a beep noise, while the VIS stimulus was a light on a screen in front of the participants. We determined REACT for the tibialis anterior (TA), medial gastrocnemius (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) muscles to be the amount of time between stimulus onset and the initiation of the muscle’s electromyographic (EMG) signal. We determined RT to be the amount of time between stimulus onset and the beginning of the participant’s force production. We assessed CMJ performance via ground reaction forces during the unweighting, braking, and propulsive phases of the jump. We quantified EMG amplitude and frequency during each CMJ phase. We found RT to be faster to the AUD versus the VIS stimulus (p = .007). VL and BF muscles had faster REACT than TA and GM muscles (p ≤ .007). The AUD stimulus was associated with faster CMJ unweighting phase metrics (p ≤ .005). Thus, individuals may react and respond faster to an AUD versus VIS stimulus, with limited improvements in their subsequent physical performance.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T05:09:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241256688
       
  • Impaired Perception of Body-Weight Distribution Marks Functional Mobility
           Problems in Patients Undergoing Total Hip Arthroplasty

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      Authors: Davide De Leo, Federico Temporiti, Carlotta Bleggi, Moreno La Guardia, Paola Adamo, Roberto Gatti
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Hip osteoarthritis and total hip arthroplasty imply damaged articular and periarticular structures responsible for proprioception, and this damage may impair the accurate perception of body-weight distribution. In this study, we investigated proprioceptive abilities and accuracy perceiving body-weight distribution in patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty, and we assessed the associations between these abilities and body perception accuracy with functional mobility testing in 20 patients scheduled for total hip arthroplasty and 20 age-matched healthy participants. We assessed (a) absolute error in hip joint position sense (AE-JPS), (b) absolute error in body-weight distribution (AE-BWD) during standing and sit-to-stand tasks with open and closed eyes, and (c) functional mobility with the Timed Up and Go Test (TUG). We assessed patients undergoing hip arthroplasty before (T0) and five days after their surgery (T1), while control participants underwent a single evaluation. Relative to controls, participants undergoing surgery showed higher AE-JPS at 15° of hip flexion at T0 (p = .003) and at T1 (p = .007), greater AE-BWD during sit-to-stand with open eyes at T1 (p = .014) and with closed eyes at both T0 (p = .014) and at T1 (p < .001), and worse TUG at both T0 (p = .009) and T1 (p < .001). AE-BWD during sit-to-stand with closed eyes positively correlated with TUG at T0 (r = 0.55, p = .011) and at T1 (r = 0.51, p = .027). These findings suggested that impairments in body-weight distribution perception were evident both before and immediately after total hip arthroplasty, suggesting that these impairments may regularly mark these patients’ functional mobility problems.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T04:36:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241256405
       
  • Dual-Tasks in Soccer: Effects of Players’ Experience and Task Condition
           on Physical Performance

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      Authors: Gibson Moreira Praça, Pedro Henrique de Almeida Oliveira, Vitor Hugo Santos Resende
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we examined whether experience level and various dual motor and cognitive or single tasks influenced young soccer players’ physical performance during small-sided games. Participants were 72 players from U-13 (n = 36) and U-17 (n = 36) groups who participated in 3-to-a-side small-sided games under four experimental conditions: control, a secondary motor task, an additional related secondary cognitive task, and an additional secondary non-specific task. We used GPS devices to measure physical performance in terms of distances covered and accelerations at different thresholds. We found no significant interaction effect between player experience and task condition (p = .540), meaning that dual tasks had comparable effects on players of different experience levels. There were significant main effects of both experience level (p < .001) and condition (p < .001) on most physically related variables. Older players outperformed younger ones, particularly in high-intensity actions. While secondary motor tasks decreased physical performance, secondary cognitive tasks, irrespective of specificity, did not impair players’ performances. In conclusion, experience level did not influence the players’ physical response to dual tasks, and a secondary motor task was more disruptive to physical performance than either of two types of secondary cognitive tasks. Cognitive tasks can be incorporated into soccer training without compromising physical performance.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T02:16:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241257398
       
  • Initial Validation of the Coach-Athlete Relationship Questionnaire in a
           Sample of Portuguese Athletes

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      Authors: Ana Pinho, Diogo Monteiro, Miguel Jacinto, Rui Matos, Filipe Rodrigues, Nuno Amaro, Pedro Teques, Teresa Fonseca, Raúl Antunes
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our primary objectives in this study were to translate and provide psychometric support for the Coach Athlete Relationship Questionnaire (CART-Q) Portuguese version, assess its invariance across sex, and explore its nomological validity in relation to enjoyment. Our sample participants were 470 athletes (226 females, 244 males) aged between 16 to 39 years from various individual and team sports. We found that the translated Portuguese version of the CART-Q exhibited satisfactory test-retest reliability and can serve as a reliable tool for evaluating the core constructs of the coach-athlete relationship – closeness, commitment, and complementarity. Moreover, this instrument showed evidence of nomological validity through significant positive correlations between its underlying factors and athletes' enjoyment with their sport. The proposed model for explaining item variance was also found to be invariant between male and female respondents. We recommend further use of this instrument in research and practical applications.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-17T02:01:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241254437
       
  • The Effects of Motionless Interventions Based on Visual-Auditory
           Instructions With Sonification on Learning a Rhythmic Motor Skill

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      Authors: Shiva Ghambari, Saeed Arsham, Hesam Ramezanzade
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our aim in this study was to investigate the effects of motionless interventions, based on visual-auditory integration with a sonification technique, on the learning a complex rhythmic motor skill. We recruited 22 male participants with high physical fitness and provided them four acquisition sessions in which to practice hurdle running, based on a visual-auditory instructional pattern. Next, we divided participants into three groups: visual-auditory, auditory, and control. In six sessions of motionless interventions, with no physical practice, participants in the visual-auditory group received a visual-auditory pattern similar to their experience during the acquisition period. The auditory group only listened to the sound of sonified movements of an expert hurdler, and the control group received no instructional interventions. Finally, participants in all three groups underwent post-intervention and transfer tests to determine their errors in the spatial and relative timing of their leading leg’s knee angular displacement. Both visual-auditory and auditory groups had significantly less spatial error than the control group. However, there were no significant group differences in relative timing in any test phase. These results indicate that the use of the sonification technique in the form of visual-auditory instruction adapted to the athletes’ needs benefitted perception-sensory capacities to improve motor skill learning.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-17T01:36:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241252855
       
  • A Comparison of the Functioning and Disability Levels of Children With
           Hemiplegic and Diplegic Cerebral Palsy Based on ICF-CY Components

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      Authors: Hasan Bingöl, Dilan Demirtaş Karaoba
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      We compared children with hemiplegic and diplegic cerebral palsy (CP) using the conceptual framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health: Child and Youth version (ICF-CY). We enrolled 42 children with CP aged 5 – 13 years old (M age = 9.57, SD = 2.8 years). We assessed their trunk control and dynamic balance with the Trunk Control Measurement Scale (TCMS) and the Timed Up and Go test (TUG), and we used ABILHAND-Kids and Assessment of Life Habits (Life-H) to assess their manual ability and participation with activities of daily living. We administered the European Child Environment Questionnaire (ECEQ) to identify relevant environmental factors. We employed structural equation modeling (SEM) to identify specific factors contributing to potential differences between these CP groups. Children with hemiplegic CP demonstrated significantly better outcomes in terms of trunk control, dynamic balance, and environmental factors compared to those with diplegic CP (p < .05). In contrast, children with diplegic CP demonstrated superior outcomes regarding manual ability, compared to those with hemiplegic CP (p < .001). In our structural equation models, trunk control strongly predicted both dynamic balance (0.75) and environmental factors (0.74). Moreover, the relationships between trunk control and participation in daily and social activities were 0.54 and 0.47, respectively. Impaired trunk control and dynamic balance were significant contributors to increased activity restrictions and environmental barriers in children with diplegic CP. This suggests that improving disability and functioning in children with diplegic CP requires a focus on trunk control training and dynamic balance exercises.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-13T04:28:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241254130
       
  • Evaluating the Stroop Test With Older Adults: Construct Validity, Short
           Term Test-Retest Reliability, and Sensitivity to Mental Fatigue

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      Authors: Larissa Oliveira Faria, Thais Frois, Leonardo de Sousa Fortes, Laiss Bertola, Maicon Rodrigues Albuquerque
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      We conducted two studies to evaluate the construct validity, short term test-retest reliability, and sensitivity to mental fatigue of the Stroop task when used with older adults. In Study 1, 40 participants visited our lab on two separate days. On the first visit, they took five screening scales, and we measured their height and body mass. On the second visit, they completed the Stroop task twice with a 30-minute interval between assessments. In Study 2, 15 different participants took a 30-minute Flanker/Reverse Flanker task during the interval between the two administrations of the Stroop tasks and they gave subjective ratings of their mental fatigue on the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) prior to taking either of the Stroop tasks. In Study 1, participants showed a ceiling effect on the Stroop accuracy measure, there was strong concurrent validity for the Stroop with significant score differences between the Stroop’s congruent and incongruent conditions (p < .001), and there was excellent response time reliability (ICC = 0.926) on day two when participants took the Stroop twice within a 30-minute inter-test interval. However, there were significant test-retest performance differences with respect to cognitive inhibition (p < .001). In Study 2, mental fatigue from the Flanker/Reverse Flanker test resulted in a significantly worse second Stroop performance (p = .045). We concluded that the Stroop task demonstrated strong concurrent validity and response time reliability among older adults, but it showed sensitivity to mental fatigue, and repeated administrations within the short 30-minute test-retest interval revealed that the most important Stroop measure (cognitive inhibition) was unreliable. We discuss the implications of these findings.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-13T02:10:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241253425
       
  • Does Viewing Mirror-Reflected Body Image Affect Static and Dynamic
           Standing Balance'

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      Authors: Naoki Hamada, Ryo Tsujinaka, Hitoshi Oda, Shiho Fukuda, Masakazu Matsuoka, Hiroshi Kunimura, Koichi Hiraoka
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In the present study, we examined the immediate effect of allowing healthy participants to view their mirror-reflected body image on static and dynamic balance. We placed a mirror to allow participants to frontally view their own body image while maintaining a quiet stance or while engaged in a dynamic postural standing task. On measures of body sway during quiet stance, there were no effects of this visual feedback, supporting the view that human beings have no central mechanism for viewing the mirror-reflected body image to control body sway during quiet stance. However, the body deviated forward during quiet stance while viewing the mirror-reflected body image, indicating that viewing the mirror-reflected body image contributed to the anterior-posterior positioning of the body, as mediated by an ankle control strategy. For the dynamic standing task, viewing the body image induced unstable peaks of rhythmic lateral shifting of the body weight over the feet. This indicates that viewing the body image caused unstable motor commands for rhythmic lateral weight shifting. When participants made a transition from a bipedal to a unipedal stance in response to a cue, viewing the body image shortened the onset latency of the body sway. Accordingly, viewing the body image seemed to accelerate the motor execution involved in lateral weight shifting, possibly due to predictive activation of the motor system before movement onset. Considered collectively, we found static and dynamic stance balance to be influenced by viewing one’s mirror-reflected body image. Viewing the mirror-reflected body image may be a means of changing static and dynamic balance in patients with impaired postural control.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T02:01:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241253634
       
  • Bibliometric Mapping of Psychological Flexibility Research: Trends and
           Future Directions

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      Authors: Walton Wider, Nicholas Tze Ping Pang, Jiaming Lin, Muhammad Ashraf Fauzi, Leilei Jiang, Jem Cloyd M. Tanucan
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we offer an exhaustive analysis of academic work on psychological flexibility using bibliometric techniques. We identify emerging trends in a dataset of 3535 scholarly articles from the Web of Science database. We highlight key publications, map out the field’s intellectual framework, and anticipate future research avenues through co-citation and co-word analytics. The co-citation assessment revealed five distinct clusters, while the co-word analysis showed three. Although research regarding psychological flexibility has gained recent popularity, there remains a need for more scholarly initiatives to achieve a nuanced understanding of this subject.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T01:44:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241253946
       
  • The Mental Game of Golf: Understanding Relationships Between
           Self-Efficacy, Fear of Failure, Competitive State Anxiety, and Flow

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      Authors: Doheung Lee, Sangwook Kang
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our purpose in this study was to investigate the relationship between self-efficacy, fear of failure, competitive state anxiety, and flow among elite golfers. We surveyed 375 elite golfers (N = 375; male = 187, female = 188) who were registered with the Korean Sports and Olympic Committee, and we analyzed their survey responses using descriptive statistics, confirmatory factor analysis, correlation analysis, and structural equation modelling. As expected, we found golf self-efficacy (GSE) to be significantly related to fear of failure (FOF). We also found FOF and competitive state anxiety (CSA) significantly related to flow. Finally, we verified a suspected hierarchical or mediating effect in these relationships such that we verified predictive relationships of flow as follows: GSE→FOF→CSA→Flow. These golfers’ self-efficacy had a buffering effect of lowering their FOF and CSA in the pathway toward flow. A suggested implication of these findings is that to enhance a golfer’s performance by minimizing interfering psychological factors, it is essential to boost their self-efficacy.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-05-02T06:24:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241250166
       
  • The Effect of a Table Tennis Exercise Program With a Task-Oriented
           Approach on Visual Perception and Motor Performance of Adolescents With
           Developmental Coordination Disorder

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      Authors: Dongmin Kim, Woongrae Roh, Yongho Lee, Sanghun Yim
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this study we investigated the effects of an 8-week table tennis exercise program with a task-oriented approach on visual perception and motor performance of 31 adolescents with developmental coordination disorder (DCD). The participants were identified by their teachers as having greater difficulty than their peers (450 students from three Korean middle schools) in physical education (PE) classes. On the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-2, these adolescents scored below the 15th percentile and showed difficulties in performing daily life activities due to motor performance problems; they did not have physical defects, intellectual or neurological impairments, or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Of 98 prospective adolescents with PE difficulties, we obtained personal assent and parents’ informed consent from 54, and 31 of these met screening criteria for DCD through the Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire-Korean. This final group was divided in non-random fashion (based on the proximal geographic grouping of the children’s schools) between an experimental group (n = 16) and a control group (n = 15). The experimental group participated in the 8-week task-oriented table tennis training program with three 90-minute sessions per week, while the control group only participated in regular PE classes twice per week. We measured participants’ visual perception and motor performance in the same environment before and after the intervention program. Participants’ visual perception was significantly more improved in the experimental group than the control group, with specific improved skills in visual-motor search, visual-motor speed, figure-ground, and visual closure; copying and perceptual constancy skills did not improve significantly. In addition, total motor performance and motor sub-skills, including fine manual control, manual coordination, body coordination, strength, and agility were significantly more improved in the experimental group than in the control group. Thus, our task-oriented table tennis exercise program was of greater assistance than general PE classes for improving visual perception and motor performance in adolescents at risk of DCD.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T10:20:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241250080
       
  • Paralympic Versus Olympic Canoe Sprint: Comprehension of the Development
           Trajectory of the Kayak 200 Meters

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      Authors: Frederico Ribeiro Neto, Luiz Gustavo Teixeira Fabrício dos Santos, Luis Felipe Castelli Correia de Campos, Ciro Winckler, Rodrigo Rodrigues Gomes Costa
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Improvements in race times for male and female Para canoe athletes across different sports classes have led to a reduction in relative differences between classes over time. However, there is a lack of research examining the comparative developmental trajectories between high-performance Paralympic (PCS) and Olympic (OCS) canoe sprint. In this study, we compared the developmental trajectories of 200-meter kayak performances among PCS and OCS athletes. In total, we analyzed 628 race results obtained from public online databases, for nine competitions between 2015 and 2023. Race times were reduced over the years except in specific sports classes (KL3-M, K1-M, and K1-F; KL: Kayak Level, M: male, F: female), with a poor positive correlation (r = 0.17 to 0.33) between time and the years. For the remaining sports classes, these correlations ranged from poor to fair (r = −0.58 to −0.13). OCS K1 athletes outperformed their Paralympic counterparts. Among Paralympic classes, KL1 had slower times than KL2 and KL3 (p ≤ .05), with KL2 times significantly lower than KL3 in the female category. OCS athletes exhibited less variability in race times compared to PCS athletes. In the male category, there were no significant differences in the coefficients of variation (CV) and amplitude of race times between sport classes, except for KL1-M, which had a larger CV than K1 (p ≤ .05). In the female category, the CV and amplitude of race times were significantly higher in KL1-F compared to KL3-F and K1-F. OCS times remained stable from 2015, with KL3-M following a similar trend. PCS displayed greater race time variability, particularly in higher impairment classes, notably KL1. This underscores the existence of distinct developmental stages within the canoe sprint modality, particularly emphasizing the early developmental phase of KL1. It also provides valuable insights for coaches and sports selection, especially concerning athletes with more severe impairments, including those in Rehabilitation Centers and during athlete recruitment.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-26T06:21:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241247859
       
  • Either Autonomy Support or Enhanced Expectancies Delivered Via
           Virtual-Reality Benefits Frontal-Plane Single-Leg Squatting Kinematics

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      Authors: Jennifer A. Hogg, Gary B. Wilkerson, Shellie N. Acocello, Bryan R. Schlink, Yu Liang, Dalei Wu, Gregory D. Myer, Jed A. Diekfuss
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our purpose in this study was to determine the effects of a virtual reality intervention delivering specific motivational motor learning manipulations of either autonomy support (AS) or enhanced expectancies (EE) on frontal plane single-leg squatting kinematics. We allocated 45 participants (21 male, 24 female) demonstrating knee, hip, and trunk frontal plane mechanics associated with elevated anterior cruciate ligament injury risk to one of three groups (control, AS, or EE). Participants mimicked an avatar performing five sets of eight repetitions of exemplary single-leg squats. AS participants were given the added option of choosing the color of their avatar. EE participants received real-time biofeedback in the form of green highlights on the avatar that remained on as long as the participant maintained pre-determined ‘safe’ frontal plane mechanics. We measured peak frontal plane knee, hip, and trunk angles before (baseline) and immediately following (post) the intervention. The control group demonstrated greater increases in knee abduction angle (Δ = +2.3°) than did the AS (Δ = +0.1°) and EE groups (Δ = −0.4°) (p = .003; η2p = .28). All groups demonstrated increased peak hip adduction (p = .01, ηp2 = .18) (control Δ = +1.5°; AS Δ = +3.2°; EE Δ = +0.7°). Hip adduction worsened in all groups. AS and EE motivation strategies appeared to mitigate maladaptive frontal plane knee mechanics.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T08:08:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241246361
       
  • An Evaluation of the Reliability of the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Water
           Competence and Its Relationship With Actual Water Competence

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      Authors: Boris Jidovtseff, Liliane De Sousa Morgado, Arja Sääkslahti, Kristy Howells, Lisa M. Barnett, Eva D’Hondt, Aldo M. Costa, Kristine De Martelaer
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In its recent development, the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Water Competence (PSPWC) showed good face and construct validity. However, additional reliability and validity research is needed, including test-retest reliability and a demonstration of the relationship between PSPWEC test scores and actual water competence. Toward that aim, we administered the PSPWC to 124 children, aged 5–8 years. We repeated this test administration after one week for a subset of 55 children to determine its test-retest reliability, and the remaining 69 children also performed the fully aligned Actual Aquatic Skills Test (AAST) in an indoor swimming pool to provide data for our investigation of the relationship between PSPWC scores and actual water competence. We found good test-retest reliability, both at the global level (ICC = 0.81, n = 55) and at the level of individual skills (Weighted kappa coefficients from 0.58 to 0.90), with no significant differences between these two test scores. We also found a moderate positive relationship between PSPWC and AAST total scores (r = .64, n = 69), with no significant difference between total scores of actual and perceived water competencies. Children overestimated their competence in three specific skills: the back star, swimming on the front, and diving in deep water. While these results underline specific situations in which children’s higher self-perceptions of their water competence are a risk factor for their water safety, these data confirm that the PSPWC is reliable for measuring children’s perceived competencies in aquatic education and drowning prevention, and there is further support for its validity through a moderate correlation with actual water competencies.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T02:50:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241248552
       
  • Visual Attention to Semantic and Orthographic Associations in Fluent
           Aphasia: Evidence from Eye-Tracking

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      Authors: Susan M. DeMetropolis, Andrea Pittarello
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Background and PurposeWe examined the allocation of visual attention in an association task by both neurotypical participants (n = 11) and adults with fluent aphasia (n = 12).Research DesignParticipants were presented with a picture (e.g., a basket) followed by a semantically related association (i.e., “strawberry”) and an orthographically related association (i.e., “b,” the first letter of “basket”).AnalysisAn eye tracker recorded their eye movements for three areas of interest (AOI): the picture, the semantic associate, and the orthographic associate, over 1396 observations.ResultsResults showed that both neurotypical participants and participants with aphasia looked longer at the semantic associate than at the picture, and this difference was more pronounced for neurotypicals than for people with aphasia (PWA). Neurotypicals also looked longer than the PWA group at the orthographic associate than at the prior picture. Regarding eye fixation counts, both participant groups looked more frequently at the semantic associate than at either the picture or the orthographic associate. Notably, this pattern was more pronounced among neurotypical participants than PWA.ConclusionsOur findings emphasize the importance of semantic associations in fluent aphasia and suggest a potential rehabilitative approach in speech and language therapy.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T01:24:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241248309
       
  • Understanding the Role of Teacher-Student Relationships in Students’
           Online Learning Engagement: Mediating Role of Academic Motivation

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      Authors: Huma Akram, Shengji Li
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Strengthening online learning outcomes requires the establishment of strong student-teacher relationships to engage students actively in learning activities. Teacher-student relationships are also pivotal factors for enhancing academic motivation for online learning engagement. Generally, however, research on online teaching remains underdeveloped. We aimed, in this study, to investigate the complex interplay in higher education in Pakistan between teacher-student relationships, academic motivation, and online learning engagement. We used Self-Determination Theory to frame an exploration of the impact of positive teacher-student relationships as mediated by intrinsic or extrinsic academic motivation on students’ engagement in online learning activities. We administered a student self-report questionnaire to 437 participants from diverse universities in Sindh province. Using Structural Equation Modeling, we confirmed a model fit in which there were positive correlations between teacher-student relationships and students’ online learning engagement; and between students’ intrinsic and extrinsic academic motivations and their on line learning engagement. Our findings emphasized the need for communication, personalized support, and a sense of belonging in virtual education. Moreover, our findings revealed the mediating role of students’ intrinsic and extrinsic academic motivation in teacher-student relationships, highlighting the nuanced dynamics of academic motivation in the virtual learning environment, with intrinsic motivation having the greatest mediating impact in the relationship between teacher-student relationships and on line learning engagement. Our study’s practical implications include a need for professional educators to foster positive teacher-student relationships and integrate student motivational elements into online course design.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-22T01:40:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241248709
       
  • Fatigue and Performance Rates as Decision-Making Critera in Pacing Control
           During CrossFit®

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      Authors: Guilherme Ribeiro, Rafael Alves De Aguiar, Artur Ferreira Tramontin, Eduardo Crozeta Martins, Fabrizio Caputo
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated fatigue and performance rates as decision-making criteria in pacing control during CrossFit®. Thirteen male regional-level competitors completed conditions of all-out (maximum physical work from beginning to end) and controlled-split (controlled physical work in the first two rounds but maximum work in the third round) pacing throughout the Fight Gone Bad workout separated by one week. We assessed benchmarks, countermovement jumps and ratings of fatigue after each round. Benchmarks were lower in round 1 (99 vs. 114, p < .001) but higher in rounds 2 (98 vs. 80, p < .001) and 3 (97 vs. 80, p < .001) for controlled-split compared with all-out pacing. Reductions in countermovement jumps were higher after rounds 1 (−12.6% vs. 1.6%, p < .001) and 2 (−12.7% vs. −4.0%, p = .014) but similar after round 3 (−13.2% vs. −11.3%, p = .571) for all-out compared with controlled-split pacing. Ratings of fatigue were higher after rounds 1 (7 vs. 5 a.u., p < .001) and 2 (8 vs. 7 a.u, p = .023) but similar after round 3 (9 vs. 9 a.u., p = .737) for all-out compared with controlled-split pacing. During all-out pacing, countermovement jump reductions after round 2 correlated with benchmark drops across rounds 1 and 2 (r = .78, p = .002) and rounds 1 and 3 (r = −.77, p = .002) and with benchmark workout changes between pacing strategies (r = −.58, p = .036), suggesting that the larger the countermovement jump reductions the higher the benchmark drops across rounds and workouts. Therefore, benchmarks, countermovement jumps and ratings of fatigue may assess exercise-induced fatigue as decision-making criteria to improve pacing strategy during workouts performed for as many repetitions as possible.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-18T05:39:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241247858
       
  • Assessing Lower-Extremity Visuo-Motor Reaction Time in Young Male Soccer
           Players: Test-Retest Reliability and Minimum Detectable Change of the
           Brain Pro System

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      Authors: Erhan Secer, Derya Ozer Kaya
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      A reliable, versatile means of assessing visuo-motor reaction time (V-MRT) is important to football (soccer) players for many reasons, including the fact that faster V-MRT is a critical sport skill that may even play a role in reducing common sports injuries to the lower muscle extremities that can be associated with lost time on the field. We aimed to determine the test-retest reliability and minimum detectable change (MDC) of the Brain Pro System for assessing lower-extremity V-MRT in young male football players. We had 68 participants (M age = 16.35, SD = 1.71 years) perform two assessment sessions one-week apart. For test-retest reliability, we calculated a one-way intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) at the 95% confidence interval and provided the standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimum detectable change (MDC) (MDC = SEM × 1.96 × √2) for V-MRTs. We obtained excellent V-MRT test-retest reliability for dominant lower-extremity, non-dominant lower-extremity, and dominant and non-dominant lower-extremities (ICC2,1 = .93, 95%CI = .89–.96; ICC2,1 = .94, 95%CI = .91–.96; ICC2,1 = .96, 95%CI = .94–.97; respectively). The calculated MDC for the dominant lower-extremity V-MRT, the non-dominant lower-extremity V-MRT, and dominant and non-dominant lower-extremities (random) V-MRT were 1.21 seconds, 1.13 seconds, and 1.21 seconds, respectively. Brain Pro System had excellent reliability for assessing lower-extremity V-MRT in young male football players. The MDC values at the 95% confidence level (MDC95) we obtained were reliable for assessing clinically meaningful V-MRT changes.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-17T12:24:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241248306
       
  • Psychometric Support and Measurement Invariance of a Turkish Version of
           the Transformational Parenting Questionnaire

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      Authors: Sinan Yıldırım, Serap Sarıkaya
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our primary objective in this study was to psychometrically evaluate the Transformational Parenting Questionnaire (TPQ) within the Turkish context. Secondarily, we aimed to determine whether the questionnaire demonstrated measurement invariance across children’s genders and grade levels. We included 950 participants, aged 11–18 years (446 girls, 498 boys, 6 unspecified gender identity; Mage = 14.73, SD = 1.85 years). Confirmatory factor analysis provided support for the original 4-factor structure of the TPQ, and there was satisfactory criterion-related correlational validity between this instrument and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. The TPQ exhibited robust internal item reliability coefficients, and respondent’s test-retest correlations over a 15-day interval suggested adequate item response consistency. Importantly, we confirmed measurement invariance of the scale across participants gender and educational grade levels. In summary, we found that the TPQ was a valid and reliable tool for assessing Turkish children’s perceptions of transformative parenting behaviors.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-17T10:57:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241247860
       
  • Psychometric Properties of the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Movement Skill
           Competence for Young Norwegian Children

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      Authors: Håvard Lorås, Ellen Beate Hansen Sandseter, Lise Storli, Rasmus Kleppe, Lisa Barnett, Ole Johan Sando
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the Pictorial Scale of Perceived Movement Skill Competence (PMSC) for young Norwegian children, a scale that is aligned with skills assessed in the Test of Gross Motor Development- Third Edition. We used convenience sampling to recruit 396 Norwegian-speaking children (7–10-year-olds) who completed the PMSC. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) confirmed factorial validity for the proposed three-factor model of the PMSC, encompassing measures of self-perceived ball, locomotor, and active play competence. Internal item consistency coefficients of these sub-scales were acceptable, and subsequent measurement invariant analysis found a gender difference such that boys rated their competence higher than girls in running, jumping forward, hitting a ball (racket), kicking, throwing a ball and rope climbing, while girls rated themselves higher, compared to boys, in galloping and skating/blading. Furthermore, there was a slightly better model fit for boys than for girls. Several items were significantly related to children’s age, and the three-factor model exhibited differential age related factor mean differences across older and younger children. Overall, we found the PMSC to have acceptable psychometric properties for confident use in assessing perceived motor competence among 7–10-year-old Norwegian children, though we observed age and gender differences in children’s responses that warrant careful interpretation of results and further research investigation.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-16T07:40:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241245175
       
  • Acute Knee Crutch Use Provokes Changes to Postural Strategy

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      Authors: Christian Maron, Aron Jendre, Daniel Goble, Charles Marks, Joshua Haworth
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Single-leg knee crutches are a relatively new, hands-free mobility assistive device with benefits over standard axillary crutches. Our main goal in this study was to evaluate balance ability in a healthy population upon first exposure to the knee crutch device. We had 20 healthy individuals (M age = 21.1; SD = 1.5 years) complete baseline static and dynamic balance tests on a force plate, followed by knee crutch fitting, a self-selected duration of ambulation practice, and another round of balance testing while wearing the knee crutch. We used the BTrackS Balance Test (BBT) to measure static balance, and the BTrackS Limits of Stability (BLOS) test to measure dynamic balance, and we created a custom lateral bias score from the BLOS results. On average, participants self-selected 3.1 minutes of ambulation practice. Wearing the knee crutch caused a near doubling of static balance path length and a large reduction in percentile ranking on the BBT. Dynamic balance area was more than halved (p < .001), with lateral bias scores during the BLOS, indicating that participants heavily favored their non-crutched leg (p < .001). Our results indicate that static and dynamic balance were significantly altered when wearing the knee crutch, and participants seemed to switch to a single leg stance strategy. Despite these balance changes, participants were quickly ready and willing to complete independent ambulation and balance testing procedures using the single-leg knee crutch.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-13T01:46:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241246390
       
  • An Examination of the Sport Commitment Model for Athletes With Physical
           Disabilities

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      Authors: Andy Wei-Ru Yao, Deborah R. Shapiro
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Sport commitment describes a psychological attachment to a sport that influences one’s desire or resolve to continue involvement in it. Studying antecedents believed to influence long term commitment to sport among athletes with a disability will help ensure that participants gain those psychosocial and health outcomes from sport participation that benefit quality of life. Our purposes in this study were: (i) to examine the Sport Commitment Model (SCM) in terms of the magnitude of the contribution of antecedent factors (i.e., enjoyment, personal investment, involvement opportunities, social constraints, involvement alternatives) to sport commitment of athletes with disabilities; and (ii) to examine the model structure (i.e., original SCM, mediation, and direct/indirect model) that best reflects an understanding of the sport commitment antecedents for these athletes. A total of 157 adult athletes (M age = 34.87, SD = 11.78) with physical disabilities from both team and individual sports across the United States, Europe, and Asia completed the Sport Commitment Questionnaire. Data analyses indicated that sport involvement opportunities, followed by personal investment, were the strongest predictors of these athletes’ sport commitments (R2 = .66). Based on the principle of parsimony, the original structural equation model (χ2 (215) = 384.95; RMSEA = .07; CFI = .95; SRMR = .06) was deemed better for understanding the mechanism of sport commitment than the mediation or direct/indirect models. We address implications of applying the SCM to athletes with disabilities, and we offer suggestions for future research.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T10:37:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241244471
       
  • The Development and Evaluation of the Kinesthetic Motor Imagery of Pelvic
           Floor Muscle Contraction Questionnaire (KMI-PFQ) in Spanish Women

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      Authors: Ferran Cuenca-Martínez, Roy La Touche, Gemma Barber-Llorens, Mario Romero-Palau, Laura Fuentes-Aparicio, Núria Sempere-Rubio
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Practitioners have begun using motor imagery (MI) for preventing and treating some pelvic floor disorders. Due to requirements for imagining before performing a MI intervention and because there are few instruments available for assessing this specific ability in the pelvic floor musculature, we sought to develop and test a new MI questionnaire, the Kinesthetic Motor Imagery of Pelvic Floor Muscle Contraction Questionnaire (KMI-PFQ). We focused in this study on the development and analysis of the instrument’s factorial structure and internal reliability in a participant sample of 162 healthy Spanish women (M age = 20.1, SD = 2.2 years). We developed and evaluated the KMI-PFQ’s psychometric properties, finding it to have good internal consistency, with Cronbach’s α = .838, ω coefficient = .839, and an intraclass correlation coefficient = .809, with two factors (“ability” and “mental effort”) explaining 58.36% of response variance. The standard error of measurement was 3.58, and the minimal detectable change was 9.92. No floor or ceiling effects were identified. There was also good convergent validity as seen by statistically significant positive correlations between KMI-PFQ scores and the revised-Movement Image Questionnaire and Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire. There were no statistically significant correlations between KMI-PFQ scores and the Orientation to Life Questionnaire. The KMI-PFQ is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring kinesthetic ability to feel/imagine pelvic floor muscle contractions in healthy Spanish women.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T04:29:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241246817
       
  • Time Limited Benefits of Physical and Proprioceptive Training on Physical
           Fitness Components in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

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      Authors: Malek Belaiba, Rabeb Laatar, Rihab Borji, Amani Ben Salem, Sonia Sahli, Haithem Rebai
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we explored the immediate and three-month follow-up effects of physical training on physical fitness in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We randomly assigned 20 children with ASD (age 8–11 years) into an experimental group (EG; n = 10) and a control group (CG; n = 10). The EG participated in an 8-week training program involving both strength and proprioceptive exercises (three 60-minute sessions/week), while the CG simply maintained their daily activities. We assessed physical fitness components for each participant at baseline, post-training, and at a 3-month follow-up. The physical training intervention significantly improved physical fitness of these children with ASD in terms of their flexibility (p < .001; 32.46%), lower limbs strength (p = .003; 36.98%), lower body power (p < .001; 41.78%) and functional mobility (p < .001; 25.56%). However, these addition training-induced gains were lost at follow-up for lower limbs strength (p < .001), flexibility (p < .001), and functional mobility (p = .034)). Physical training was effective for improving physical fitness in children with ASD, but the loss of these gains at three months follow-up underscored the need for continuous physical exercise.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-03T12:16:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241244484
       
  • Examining the Role of Fan Support on Home Advantage and Home Win
           Percentage in Professional Women’s Basketball

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      Authors: Enrique Alonso-Pérez-Chao, Adrián Martín-Castellanos, Raúl Nieto-Acevedo, Adrián Lopez-García, Rubén Portes, Miguel Ángel Gómez
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Our main aim in this study was to analyze any differences in Win Percentages at Home (HW) that might represent a Home-Court Advantage (HA) in women’s professional basketball. A secondary objective was to analyze how team ability might modify the HA effect by comparing any interaction effect between HW and team ability in games played with and without fans. We collected data from first Spanish female basketball divisions, using a linear mixed model (LMM) for repeated measures to identify differences between time periods (games with fans vs. games without fans) for HA and HW. When comparing games with and without fans, we found no significant HA and HW differences (p = .283 and p = .872, respectively). In fact, interestingly, we observed higher win values when fans were absent. Additionally, during the COVID-19 shut down stage, HA increased; but it returned to pre-pandemic levels afterward, with no significant differences between these periods (p = .482). Similarly, while HW seemed to increase during the COVID-19 shut down period and continued improving in the post-pandemic phase, there were actually no statistically significant differences (p = .772). Higher HA and HW were evident without fans during the pandemic compared to the pre-pandemic period when fans were present in women’s professional basketball. During the post-pandemic period, HA decreased upon fans’ return, while HW continued increasing. We discuss possible bases for these unexpected findings.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-02T12:23:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241244985
       
  • Feasibility and Usefulness of Repetitions-In-Reserve Scales for Selecting
           Exercise Intensity: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Vasco Bastos, Sérgio Machado, Diogo S. Teixeira
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      The intensity of resistance training (RT) exercise is an important consideration for determining relevant health and performance-related outcomes. Yet, current objective exercise intensity measures present concerns in terms of viability or cost. In response to these concerns, repetition-in-reserve (RIR) scales may represent an adequate method of measuring and regulating intensity. However, no recent review has focused on how RIR scales have been used for this purpose in prior research. We prepared the present scoping review to analyze the feasibility and usefulness of RIR scales in selecting RT intensity. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases (last search date April 2023) for experimental and non-experimental studies that utilized an RIR scale to measure proximity to failure in RT activities with apparently healthy individuals of any age. We qualitatively analyzed 31 studies (N = 855 mostly male adult participants) published between 2012-2023. RIR scales appeared to be contextually feasible and useful in prescribing and adjusting RT intensity. The most common trend in this research was to prescribe a target RIR and adjust the exercise load for a desired proximity to muscle failure. Additionally, when measuring proximity to failure as an outcome of interest, the literature suggests that the RIR prediction should be made close to task failure to increase its accuracy. Future research should further explore the impact of sex, RT experience, exercise selection, and muscle conditioning on the overall RIR approach.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-04-02T02:13:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241241785
       
  • Motivational Orientation, Boredom and Fun in Physical Education: The
           Mediation Role of Self-Esteem and Motor Self-Efficacy

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      Authors: Rafael E. Reigal, Jacobo Hernández-Martos, Diogo Monteiro, Rocío Pérez-López, Antonio Hernández-Mendo, Verónica Morales-Sánchez
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescents who enjoy physical education (PE) classes are more likely to be active during out-of-school hours. Similarly, achievement goal theory suggests that task-oriented motivation is associated with higher levels of reported fun during PE classes. In contrast, ego-oriented motivation has been related to boredom in class, but some self-perceptions (e.g., self-esteem or motoric self-efficacy) may modify this relationship and are important for physical activity. Our aim in this paper was to analyze the relationships between motivational orientation and fun and boredom in PE classes by assessing the mediating effects of self-esteem and self-efficacy. We surveyed 478 teenagers between 13 and 18 years of age (M = 14.57; SD = 1.15) with the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire (TEOSQ), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE), the Motor Self-Efficacy Scale (MSES), and the Intrinsic Satisfaction in Sport Scale (SSI-EF). We used a structural equation model to evaluate relationships between these variables of interest. We found a positive relationship between ego orientation and boredom and between task orientation and fun; and we found a negative relationship between task orientation and boredom in PE classes. Importantly, we observed indirect effects from self-esteem and motoric self-efficacy in the relationships between motivational orientation and boredom and fun in PE. These results highlight the importance of students’ motivational orientations in PE classes and illustrate that self-perception of self-esteem and motoric self-efficacy can mediate these relationships.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-03-28T05:04:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241242147
       
  • Toward Development of a Novel Proprioceptive Trail-Making Test: Comparing
           Healthy Dancers and Non-Dancers

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      Authors: Madison R. Card, Anthony J. Ryals
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      There is a pressing need for ecologically valid versions of traditional neuropsychological tests indexing executive function (EF), such as the Trail-Making Task (TMT), that incorporate movement and bodily awareness in healthy participants with varying abilities. We designed a proprioceptive version of the TMT (pTMT) that involved coordinated gross motor movement and proprioceptive awareness to investigate whether this measure of visual attention, task switching, and working memory positively correlated with a computerized version of the TMT (the dTMT). We aimed to establish the initial validity of our proprioceptive TMT (pTMT) by comparing performances on the dTMT and pTMT among a cohort of 36 healthy participants (18 dancers, 18 non-dancers; M age = 22, SD = 5.27; 64% female) anticipating that dancers would express higher intrinsic bodily awareness than non-dancers. Results revealed a mild to moderate but statistically significant positive correlation between dTMT and pTMT completion times [part A: r (36) = .33, p = .04; part B: r (36) = .37, p = .03] and numbers of errors [part B: r (36) = .41, p = .01] across both participant groups. These data suggest partial measurement convergence between these two TMT versions. Relative to non-dancers, dancers exhibited a higher level of performance (likely due to their better proprioceptive ability) through their faster completion times on dTMT-B [t (34) = 3.81, p = .006, d = 1.27] and pTMT-B [t (34) = 2.97, p = .005, d = .99], and their fewer errors on dTMT-B [t (34) = 2.93, p = .006, d = 1.0]. By identifying cognitive differences between these different groups of healthy individuals, our data contribute to both a theoretical understanding and the initial development of gross motor movement-based cognitive assessments, providing a path toward the further refinement of an ecologically valid full-body TMT.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-03-27T08:32:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241240891
       
  • Cognitive Reserve and Frontotemporal Disorders: Exploring the Relationship
           Between Education, Physical Activity, and Cognitive Dysfunction in Older
           Adults

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      Authors: Josue G. Amian, Cristina Fernandez-Portero, Rocío de la Bella, María José Arenilla-Villalba, Guillermo López-Lluch, David Alarcon
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this study we investigated the relationship between cognitive reserve (CR) proxies, such as education, physical activity (PA), and cognitive dysfunction (CD) in the presence or absence of frontotemporal disorders (FTD). Previous research has suggested that education and PA may delay the onset of CD and reduce the risk of developing dementia. However, it remains unclear whether these CR proxies can protect against CD when FTD is present. We aimed to explore this relationship and determine whether sustained CR may be evident regardless of FTD. We recruited 149 older adults (aged 65–99 years) from community centers where they were voluntarily participating in leisure activities. We used bioelectrical impedance to measure their body composition, and we administered the International PA Questionnaire and the Mini-Mental State Examination to measure their PA and cognitive function, respectively. We used the Frontal Assessment Battery to screen for frontotemporal dementia. Our results showed that people with FTD were older, had lower education, and engaged in less PA, relative to other participants. Regression models revealed that age, education, and PA were significant predictors of FTD. More specifically, FTD was negatively associated with cognitive functioning, and there were significant interaction effects between FTD and education and PA. PA and education were significant predictors of cognitive functioning, and, when values for PA and education were high, they offset the effects of FTD on cognitive function. These findings support impressions that PA and years of education provide an insulating or compensatory effect on cognitive functioning in older adults with executive dysfunction or frontotemporal dementia, highlighting the importance of encouraging both pursuits.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-03-25T07:41:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241241358
       
  • Profiling Bilateral Skills in High-Performance Male and Female Gaelic
           Footballers

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      Authors: Karol Dillon, Ian Sherwin, Philip E. Kearney
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Bilateral skill symmetry in sport refers to an individual’s ability to successfully perform sporting actions with both sides of the body. Two scarcely researched areas in relation to bilateral skills are the effects of opposition proximity on skill execution and bilateral skill in high-performance female athletes. In this study, we used Nacsport to code all skill executions (hand pass, kick pass, hop, solo and shot) during 121 games by both male and female participants (76 male, 45 female), classified as Tier 1 (n = 181, 134) and Tier 2 (n = 238, 115) high performance, adult Gaelic Football players. Irrespective of the participants’ tier group or gender, these players relied upon their dominant side for most skill executions (Kick Pass Dominant Foot Mdn: MT1 = 90%, MT2 = 98.6%, FT1 = 100%, FT2 = 100%; Solo Dominant Foot: Mdn MT1 = 95%, MT2 = 97.3%, FT1: 100%, FT2: 100%; Hand Pass Dominant Hand Mdn: MT1: 83.7%, MT2: 99%, FT1: 95.5%, FT2: 95.5%; Hop Dominant Hand Mdn: MT1: 91.9%, MT2: 94.7%, FT1: 98.1%, FT2: 98.1%; Play Dominant Foot Mdn: MT1: 74.5%, MT2: 94.5%, FT1: 94.7%, FT2: 88.2%). There were no consistent differences between tier groups or genders in relation to dominant side use, but top tier male players were generally less reliant on the dominant limb than were female players from both tiers. In general, top tier male players performed more successfully than either second tier male players or female players in both tiers. Most skills were executed under conditions of low opponent proximity, limiting the requirement for participants to use their non-dominant limbs. These findings illustrate the demands of Gaelic football in relation to bilateral skills, and we identified new research questions for future investigators.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-03-23T12:30:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241238307
       
  • Telic-Paratelic Dominance and Heart Rate Variability in Athletes Engaged
           in Power and Endurance Training

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      Authors: Afek Chihaoui Mamlouk, Ibrahim Ouergui, Fatma Ben Waer, Fayçal Zarrouk, Nabil Gmada, Mohamed Younes, Ezdine Bouhlel
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: The current study aimed to evaluate the telic-paratelic tendency and heart rate variability in athlete participants from different sports activities.Methods: We assigned 117 healthy participants (M age = 20, SD = 3 years) into three groups according to their training activity: power-trained (PT; n=43), endurance-trained (ET; n=36), and healthy untrained individuals (n=38). We assessed their telic-paratelic tendencies with the validated Telic Dominance Scale and their autonomic nervous system activity with heart rate variability (HRV) analyses.Results: Our findings revealed no significant differences in the telic-paratelic tendencies between ET and PT groups. However, significant differences were observed between athletes and untrained individuals (p = 0.001). Indeed, compared to untrained participants, ET and PT athletes had a greater telic tendency (both p = 0.001), were more focused on planning orientation (ET: p = 0.003; PT: p=0.001), and less often avoided arousal or activation (For ET 31% and for PT 26% of participants). The paratelic tendency was more important in untrained individuals, with most of these participants lacking in seriousmindedness and planning. In addition, we found higher HRV in paratelic ET athletes (SDNN p = 0.050, LF p = 0.022, and LF/HF p = 0.031) compared to their telic peers.Conclusion: our results suggest that sport activity did not influence the telic-paratelic tendency. Nevertheless, this tendency differentiates trained from untrained participants. HRV was higher among paratelic ET athletes, potentially reflecting less stress and more training adaptability in these athletes.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-03-23T07:53:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241237045
       
  • Errorless Training Benefits Motor Learning and Kinematic Outcomes in
           Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

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      Authors: Saeed Arsham, Rahil Razeghi, Ahmadreza Movahedi
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Most children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have some form of motor deficits. Additionally, based on executive dysfunction, working memory is often atypical in these children. Errorless learning reduces demands on working memory. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of errorless training on these children’s ability to learn golf putting. Participants (N = 20), aged 9–13 years (M = 10.15, SD = 1.4), were randomly assigned to either: (a) an errorless (ER) training group (n = 10) or (b) an explicit instruction (EI) group (n = 10). The ER group practiced putting from different distances without any instruction, while the EI group practiced putting at a particular distance with instruction. We measured motor performance (e.g., putting accuracy) and kinematic variables (e.g., putter face angle). One-way analyses of variance showed that motor performance significantly improved in both groups, but that the ER group showed significantly better accuracy retention (p < .028) and transfer learning (p < .047) than the instructional group. Kinematic variables were also significantly different between the two groups on the transfer test. These findings supported the benefits of errorless training compared to explicit instruction to teach motor skills to children with ASD.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-03-18T11:39:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241238308
       
  • Mapping Risk Judgment and Risk Taking in Mountain Hiking: An Information
           Integration Approach

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      Authors: Eric Fruchart, Patricia Rulence-Pâques
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Risk analysis is essential for promoting hiking-based tourism. Our objective in the present study was to map 395 mountain hikers’ positions on risk judgment and risk taking, according to how they integrated three antecedent factors of confidence (environment, team, and self). For integrating information, people can develop an additive rule whereby they apply the same weight to all information or use interaction rules (i.e., conjunctive or disjunctive), to give different weights to information. In the questionnaire our participants completed, there were eight scenarios that combined the three confidence antecedent factors as information cues. We applied cluster analysis, repeated-measures analyses of variance, chi-square tests, and bivariate correlation analyses to the questionnaire results to identify three participant risk positions. In the first risk position (cluster 1), participants used a disjunctive integration rule for both risk judgment and risk taking. In the second risk position (Clusters 2 and 4), they used an additive integration rule for risk judgment while they used a disjunctive integration rule for risk taking. In the third risk position (cluster 3), they used an additive integration rule for both risk judgment and risk taking. In each risk position, confidence in the three antecedent factors (environment, team, and self) negatively affected risk judgment and positively affected risk taking. We found the compositions of the clusters to be related to the participants’ sex, and we discuss various advantages of applying information integration for mountain hiking practitioners and promoters.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-03-15T03:15:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241239119
       
  • Effect of a Ten-week Sensorimotor Exercise Program on the Side-to-Side LAM
           Asymmetry of Adolescent Football Players: A Randomized Control Trial

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      Authors: Damian Sikora, Paweł Linek
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      In this study we, evaluated the effects of a 10-week sensorimotor exercise program on the thickness and side-to-side asymmetry of the lateral abdominal muscles in adolescent soccer players. From among 120 initially recruited participants, we included 90 athletes (aged 10–17 years old) in our final analysis. Healthy athletes who met our inclusion criteria were randomly divided into comparative experimental and control groups. Sensorimotor exercises were conducted twice weekly for 10-weeks in the experimental group, and the control group received no intervention. We took ultrasound measurements when participants were in supine and standing rest positions. In the supine position, the experimental group (a) reduced the asymmetry of the internal oblique (IO) muscle by 0.4 mm (MD: 0.7; 95% CI 0.6–1.1); (b) increased the thickness of the external oblique (EO) muscle on the right by 0.7 mm (MD: 0.2; 95% CI 0.1–0.6) and on the left by 0.9 mm (MD: 0.2, 95% CI 0.2–0.7); and (c) increased the muscle on the IO right by 0.8 mm (MD: 0.3; 95% CI 0.2–0.9) and on the, left by 1.2 mm (MD: 0.4 95% CI 0.3–1.1). In a standing position the experimental group increased the thickness of the EO on the right by 1.5 mm (MD: 0.6; 95% CI 0.03–1.2) and on the left by 2.1 mm (MD: 0.6; 95% CI 0.1–1.3) and increased the IO on the right by 1.2 mm (MD: 0.7; 95% CI 0.2–1.7) and on the left by 1.1 mm (MD: 0.9; 95%CI 0.1–2.0). Thus, this 10-week program of additional sensorimotor exercises reduced the (side-to-side) asymmetry of the internal oblique muscle and increased the thickness of the EO and IO muscles in young football players.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-03-07T09:21:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241238317
       
  • Gaze Behavior and Cognitive Performance on Tasks of Multiple Object
           Tracking and Multiple Identity Tracking by Handball Players and
           Non-Athletes

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      Authors: Piotr Styrkowiec, Stanisław H. Czyż, Jukka Hyönä, Jie Li, Lauri Oksama, Maciej Raś
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Multiple object tracking (MOT) and multiple identity tracking (MIT) each measure the ability to track moving objects visually. While prior investigators have mainly compared athletes and non-athletes on MOT, MIT more closely resembles dynamic real-life environments. Here we compared the performance and gaze behavior of handball players with non-athletes on both MOT and MIT. Since previous researchers have shown that MOT and MIT engage different eye movement strategies, we had participants track 3–5 targets among 10 moving objects. In MOT, the objects were identical, while in MIT they differed in shape and color. Although we observed no group differences for tracking accuracy, the eye movements of athletes were more target-oriented than those of non-athletes. We concluded that tasks and stimuli intended by researchers to demonstrate that athletes’ show better object tracking than non-athletes should be specific to the athletes’ type of sport and should use more perception-action coupled measures. An implication of this conclusion is that the differences in object tracking skills between athletes and non-athletes is highly specific to the skills demanded by the athletes’ sport.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-03-05T12:01:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241235529
       
  • The Effects of Combined Virtual Reality Exercises and Robot Assisted Gait
           Training on Cognitive Functions, Daily Living Activities, and Quality of
           Life in High Functioning Individuals With Subacute Stroke

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      Authors: Murat Akinci, Mustafa Burak, Fatma Zehra Kasal, Ezgi Aydın Özaslan, Meral Huri, Zeynep Aydan Kurtaran
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Stroke is a global health concern causing significant mortality. Survivors face physical, cognitive, and emotional challenges, affecting their life satisfaction and social participation. Robot-assisted gait training with virtual reality, like Lokomat, is a promising rehabilitation tool. We investigated its impact on cognitive status, activities of daily living, and quality of life in individuals with stroke. Between September 2022 and August 2023, we exposed 34 first stroke patients (8 women, 26 men; M age = 59.15, SD = 11.09; M height = 170.47, SD = 8.13 cm; M weight = 75.97; SD = 10.87 kg; M days since stroke = 70.44, SD = 33.65) in the subacute stage (3–6 months post-stroke) to Lokomat exercise. Participant exclusion criteria were Lokamat exercise inability, disabilities incompatible with intended measurements, and any cognitive limitations. The Control Group (CG) received conventional physiotherapy, while the Lokomat Group (LG) received both conventional physiotherapy and robot-assisted gait training with virtual reality, administered by an occupational therapist. Evaluations were conducted by a physiotherapist who was unaware of the participants’ group assignments and included assessments with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Lawton Brody Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale, and Stroke Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS-QoL). Both groups demonstrated an improved quality of life, but the LG outperformed the CG with regard to SS-QoL (p = .01) on measures of Energy (p = .002) and Mobility (p = .005). Both groups showed improvements in cognitive functioning (p < .001) with no between-group difference, and in activities of daily living (p < .05) for which the LG was superior to the CG (p = .023). Thus, adding robot-assisted gait training with Lokomat and virtual reality improved self-reported quality of life and daily activities at levels beyond conventional physiotherapy for patients in the subacute stroke phase. An incremental impact on cognitive functions was not evident, possibly due to rapid cognitive recovery or this was undetected by limited cognitive testing.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T04:10:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241235420
       
  • Analysis of Off-The-Wall Smash Shots in Men’s and Women’s
           Professional Padel

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      Authors: Iván Martín-Miguel, Diego Muñoz, Adrián Escudero-Tena, Bernardino J. Sánchez-Alcaraz
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: our aim was to analyze the characteristics of the off-the-wall smash in men´s and women´s padel, and to compare gender differences in the set-dependent frequency of these shots. Study sample: through systematic observation, we analyzed 441 off-the-wall smashes from the Final Master of the 2022 season of the World Padel Tour. Results: showed that the women performed twice as many off-the-wall smashes as the men. This shot was executed most frequently (90%) from the center and right side of the court and from the dominant side, usually providing volley continuity (73%) and sometimes resulting in point winners (21.5%). Furthermore, there were gender differences, depending on the defense zone from which the wall smashes were defended (p = .014) and on the final match result (p = .018). In men’s padel, the losing pair performed more off-the-wall smashes, while in women’s padel, the winning pair performed more of these smashes. Finally, between both genders, most off-the-wall smashes occurred in the first set and decreased in number in the third set, with the second set containing the fewest off-the wall smashes.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-02-24T11:03:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241236123
       
  • Construction and Assessment of the Physical Activity and Physical
           Education Importance for Parents Scale

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      Authors: Pablo Saiz-González, Jose Coto-Lousas, Damián Iglesias, Javier Fernandez-Rio
      Abstract: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Ahead of Print.
      A recent systematic review reported positive associations between parents and children’s physical activity participation. Moreover, parents’ perceptions of the importance and value of physical activity can influence their children’s participation in it. Our aim in this study was to develop and validate an instrument to assess parents’ perceptions of the importance of physical activity and physical education. After first creating the instrument, we conducted content and exploratory factorial validation and reliability analyses of it with 93 parents (M age = 44.76, SD = 6.05, range = 31–66 years; 73 females, 20 males). The result was a 9-item instrument, with items assessed on a 5-point Likert scale and grouped into three factors: (a) importance of physical education; (b) importance of engaging in physical activity or sport; and (c) importance of joining your children in physical activity or sport. In a second confirmatory factor analysis with 224 parents (M age = 44.53, SD = 6.07; 174 or 77.7% females and 50 or 22.3% males) we confirmed the factor validity and reliability previously analyzed (χ2 = 42.77, df = 24, p = .011, GFI = 0.96, NFI = 0.98, NNFI = 0.99, CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = 0.06 (90% CI: 0,04, 0.08), SRMR = 0.04, ECVI = 0.04, CR = 0.70–0.87). Thus, the new Physical Activity and Physical Education Importance for Parents Scale (PAPEIPS) is a valid and reliable instrument for measuring parents’ perceived importance of physical activity and physical education.
      Citation: Perceptual and Motor Skills
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T05:02:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00315125241235416
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lamella     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Evolution, Mind and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediation Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Family Trauma, Child Custody & Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Creativity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Psychosocial Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Play in Adulthood     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychology and Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Performance and Mindfulness     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School & Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jungian Journal for Scholarly Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
KULA : knowldge creation, dissemination, and preservation studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Service Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
JCPP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Know and Share Psychology     Open Access  
Methods in Psychology     Open Access  
Gadjah Mada Journal of Professional Psychology     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Katharsis     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
Human Arenas : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Psychology, Culture, and Meaning     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cognitive Enhancement     Hybrid Journal  
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Dhammathas Academic Journal     Open Access  
INSAN Jurnal Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Heroism Science     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Psychology     Open Access  
Gogoa     Open Access  
Journal of Global Engagement and Transformation     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Journal of Cognitive Systems     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi Terapan     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Jurnal Educatio : Jurnal Pendidikan Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal  
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Musiktherapeutische Umschau : Forschung und Praxis der Musiktherapie     Hybrid Journal  

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