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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 1007 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 360)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 181)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 83)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 256)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 147)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 120)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 149)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 74)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 86)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access  
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access  
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Culture and Brain
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2193-8652 - ISSN (Online) 2193-8660
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Non-genetic linkage of personality traits and the divergence of Eastern
           and Western cultures: association with Hofstede’s cultural dimensions

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      Abstract: Abstract The divergence of Eastern and Western cultures signifies the two opposite, major branches that developed during human cultural evolution. While socioeconomic, historical, and geographical factors are thought to be responsible for this divergence, genetic factors may also contribute to the separation of Eastern and Western cultures. In an attempt to describe a potential biological basis for the differences between “Easterners” and “Westerners”, SNPs that were associated with personality/behavioral traits, were interrogated in different populations worldwide. For some but not all SNPs examined, a high correlation in their allelic frequencies in different racial groups was detected. Those that exhibited the highest difference in allelic frequencies between East Asians and European ancestry populations, were all highly correlated in pairwise comparisons and corresponded to traits that are aligned with typical characteristics that are thought to underscore Western and Eastern cultures. Genetic loci associated with these SNPs included CTNNA2 (rs7600563), OXTR (rs53576) LINC00461 (rs3814424) MTMR9 (rs2164273) and WSCD2 (rs1426371) that have been linked to excitement seeking, empathy, the perception of loneliness, conscientiousness, and extraversion. Among them, variations especially in LINC00461 in different populations correlated significantly with Hofstede’s cultural dimensions indices of the different countries. These findings highlight the potential role of genetic factors in cultural evolution and suggest that genetic differences may contribute to the divergence of Eastern and Western cultures.
      PubDate: 2022-02-25
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-022-00107-2
       
  • Culture points the moral compass: Shared basis of culture and morality

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      Abstract: Abstract The present work reviews moral judgment from the perspective of culture. Culture is a dynamic system of human beings interacting with their environment, and morality is both a product of this system and a means of maintaining it. When members of a culture engage in moral judgment, they communicate their “social morality” and gain a reputation as a productive member who contributes to the culture’s prosperity. People in different cultures emphasize different moral domains, which is often understood through the individualism-collectivism distinction that is widely utilized in cultural psychology. However, traditional morality research lacks the interactive perspective of culture, where people communicate with shared beliefs about what is good or bad. As a consequence, past work has had numerous limitations and even potential confounds created by methodologies that are grounded in the perspective of WEIRD (i.e., Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich and Democratic) cultures. Great attention should be paid to the possibly misleading assumption that researchers and participants share the same understanding of the stimuli. We must address this bias in sampling and in the minds of researchers and better clarify the concept of culture in intercultural morality research. The theoretical and practical findings from research on culture can then contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms of moral judgment.
      PubDate: 2022-01-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-022-00106-3
       
  • The relationship between five cultural values and neuropsychological test
           performances in an ethnically diverse group in the UK

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      Abstract: Abstract Cultural perspectives of neuropsychology proposes that test instruments reflect cultural values held by different societies. However, there is a lack of studies that tests such assumptions, making this relationship unclear. This is a first study to examine whether different cultural values would uniquely predict the performances of neuropsychological tests. Cultural values were defined using Hofstede’s framework of cultural values, and we included neuropsychological measures commonly found in clinical practice. Two hundred and four healthy participants of diverse ethnic backgrounds were included in the study. Five neuropsychological measures were used covering working memory, attention, verbal fluency, verbal memory, and processing speeds. The Cultural Values Scale measured five dimensions of Hofstede’s cultural values. Hierarchical regressions revealed that higher long-term-orientation predicted the better performance on Digit Span Backwards and phonetic fluency. This suggests that values of perseverance or future planning may manifests on tests of working memory and executive functions. Whereas higher uncertainty avoidance predicted lower performance on Digit Span Backwards. Lower tolerance toward ambiguity during testing procedures could have resulted in anxiety, thus affect working memory processes. These results suggest that long-term-orientation and uncertainty avoidance could be associated with processes within executive functions, especially if these are subjected to verbal assessments. Future studies should confirm these findings with other neuropsychological measures and recruit a wider range of clinical and non-clinical populations. Limitations of the study are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-01-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-021-00105-w
       
  • Bilingual digit and number word processing in a parity judgment flanker
           task

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      Abstract: Abstract Numbers are particularly interesting as they can be presented in different notations, for example, they can be represented as numerical digits or words. Moreover, many cultures around the world have different writing systems for representing number. Thai uses a more traditional Thai number system in conjunction with Arabic numbers. In the current study, we investigated the processing of numerical digits and words in unbalanced Thai-English bilinguals using a numerical parity judgment task. The flankers occurring on either side of the target were either congruent or incongruent with the target digit or word. In Experiment 1, we investigated the effects of Arabic digit and Thai digit flankers on English and Thai target number words and in Experiment 2, the effects of English and Thai number word flankers on Arabic and Thai digit targets. In Experiment 1, we found an interference effect from Thai digit flankers on Thai numerical words and in Experiment 2, an interference effect for Arabic digits from Thai word flankers. These results suggest that the first language is playing a greater contributing role than the second language and that numerical notation format contributes to the effect. Proficiency in the second language is likely to moderate this effect.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-020-00097-z
       
  • Culture and extrinsic moral motives: comparisons of Japan residents and
           Japanese sojourners in individualistic and loose countries

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      Abstract: Abstract Dominant theories assume that moral judgments reflect the individual’s personal beliefs, but cross-cultural findings on morality suggest that people in collectivistic and tight cultures may rely on social expectations to evaluate morally relevant actions. Moreover, moral attitudes are flexible, and people may adapt moral values in line with what the members of the host culture value. In the current research, self-construal, tightness-looseness, and extrinsic moral motives (perceptions that moral acceptability of a given action is something that people are expected to go along with others) were investigated. Japan residents who had never been abroad (n = 73) and Japanese sojourners in individualistic and loose cultures (the United States, Canada, France, Germany, and Italy; n = 50) participated. Results showed that compared with Japan residents, Japanese sojourners reported lower extrinsic moral motives on morally relevant actions concerning communal values. Cultural tightness, but not self-construal, mediated the relationship between culture and extrinsic moral motives ratings. Among sojourners, assimilation and cultural tightness predicted higher extrinsic moral motives ratings, whereas length of residence negatively predicted the motives. These results show that people in tight cultures may make moral judgments based on what is perceived as socially appropriate, but not on what is personally important. Also, the research highlights the importance of considering the role of extrinsic moral motives in shaping moral judgments.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-020-00095-1
       
  • 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and impulsivity under punishment: a
           gene × culture interaction

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      Abstract: Abstract A previous Japanese study has shown that the short (s) allele of the serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), implicated in higher sensitivity to aversive stimuli, may promote motor inhibitory control in conditions where impulsivity is punished. The present study conducted in Australia replicates this Japanese study to examine if culture modulates the observed gene–behaviour link. Japan has a tight culture, where norm adherence and low impulsivity are emphasised. In contrast, Australia is a loose culture, where deviation from norms is tolerated to a greater extent. We therefore expected that the s-allele carriers’ strong motor inhibitory control in aversive conditions might be weaker in Australia than in Japan. Ninety-eight second-generation Australians of East Asian heritage, including 53s/s-allele carriers, 32s/l-allele carriers and 11l/l-allele carriers, participated in the reward/punishment-go/nogo task. As expected, s/s carriers in Australia, compared with their peers in Japan, showed higher impulsivity when inappropriate responding was punished (i.e. punishment-nogo conditions) but lower impulsivity when appropriate non-responding was rewarded (i.e. reward-nogo conditions). In contrast, the behaviours of the Australian s/l-allele carriers were similar to those of their Japanese counterparts. The results suggest that the larger context of culture that provides behavioural norms should be considered when examining gene × environment interaction.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-020-00098-y
       
  • Gender effects in personality: a cross-cultural affective neuroscience
           perspective

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite enormous progress in understanding the neuroscientific elements that underpin the basic emotions, far less attention has been paid to individual differences. The Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (ANPS) aim to measure these universally-shared subcortical affective systems on which personality is built: CARE, PLAY, SEEK, SADNESS, FEAR and ANGER. Gender differences have been reported in several previous ANPS studies, but no systematic review of these findings has yet been conducted. The present study reviewed ANPS gender effects in 15 countries: (from West to East) Canada, U.S.A., Portugal, Spain, France, Italy, Germany, Norway, Poland, Serbia, Turkey, Russia, China, Hong Kong, and Japan. The total sample size was N = 6500, composed of 38% males and 62% females. The mean age for the total sample was 26 years. The results showed that gender differences on the ANPS were variable, for different classes of basic emotions. These categories included emotions on which females scored universally higher (CARE and SADNESS); emotions that showed variability based on geography (FEAR and PLAY); and emotions that showed virtually no gender effect (SEEKING and ANGER). These findings can be interpreted in the light of biological universals, geographical variation caused by genetics, and cultural variation in emotion expression and regulation. The results were broadly consistent with gender effects reported in the Big Five personality literature, including a trend of gender differences increasing when moving from 'East' to 'West'. The paper reviews a range of suggestions for future research, including cultural data, genomic data and/or culture-gene interactions.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-021-00099-5
       
  • The default mode network in self- and other-referential processing: effect
           of cultural values

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      Abstract: Abstract Growing evidence shows culture-related differences in brain activity during self- and other-referential tasks. However, the effect of individual endorsement of cultural values on connectivity of the default mode network (DMN), the primary network associated with self-referential processing, during self- and other-referential tasks is virtually unexplored. We used self-report questionnaires to measure independent and interdependent self-construal and investigated the effect of cultural values on DMN functional connectivity during self and other trait adjective judgment task. The observed associations show that the endorsement of individualist values predisposes to a greater DMN involvement during self-processing and to its lesser involvement during close-other-processing, whereas the endorsement of collectivist values predisposes to a less active DMN engagement in self-processing and to its greater engagement in other-processing. This is in line with the notion that DMN is not specialized for self-processing, but rather is involved in more general cognitive processing related to social cognition and the degree of its involvement in self- versus other-processing is moderated by cultural value system.
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-020-00094-2
       
  • Neural underpinnings of the role of dialecticism in processing positive
           emotions

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      Abstract: Abstract Previous findings suggest that dialecticism leads to the emphasis of negative aspects of positive emotions and the down-regulation of positive emotions in cultures having a background strong in dialecticism. However, there is little neurological evidence linking dialecticism and positive emotion processing. In the present study, we examined the relationship between dialecticism and positive emotion processing with event-related brain potentials. The results showed that (1) P2, P300, LPP 600–1000 and LPP 1000–1500 were larger for positive emotion in social context stimuli as compared to positive emotion stimuli. (2) P300 and LPP 300–600 in all conditions were found to be negatively correlated with the scores of dialecticism. People with higher dialecticism scores had smaller P300 and LPP 300–600 amplitudes during processing of different positive emotional stimuli. The results provide neurological evidence that dialecticism influences the experience of positive emotions and affects how positive emotions are processed. Further implications are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-09-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-021-00104-x
       
  • Inter-brain EEG connectivity in hyperscanning for Italian and French
           gestures: the culture-related nonverbal language

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      Abstract: Abstract In each culture, non-verbal communication is characterized by the use of conventional gestures. The present study aimed to investigate the neural correlates underlying a non-verbal interaction between encoder and decoder characterized by the use of different gestures in Italian and French cultures. Specifically, interagents’ cortical activity was recorded with the use of electroencephalography (EEG) in hyperscanning. From results, different cortical modulation and inter-brain connectivity emerged regarding the types and valence of gestures, the interagents’ role and the culture of belonging. The present research has shown cultural differences concerning gestures’ type and valence, highlighting brain synchronization in same culture’s individuals.
      PubDate: 2021-07-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-021-00103-y
       
  • Neural representations of visual aesthetic experience (VAE): a
           meta-analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study intended to investigate the generic nature of visual aesthetic experience. Researchers have not agreed upon what constitutes visual aesthetic experience, and the present study proposed that visual aesthetic experience is comprised of at least two components: enhanced visual processing and positive emotional and reward experience. We applied a general activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis to 42 functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments described in 37 published studies. The general activation likelihood estimation revealed activation in the left orbitofrontal cortices and bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, which was thought to be related to emotional and reward processes, and activation in the right fusiform gyrus. In addition, a conjunction analysis of passive viewing tasks and tasks with explicit instructions showed activation in the anterior cingulate cortex/orbitofrontal cortex, and contrast analysis revealed stronger activation in the anterior cingulate cortex/orbitofrontal cortex during the passive viewing task without explicit instructions to make aesthetic evaluations, suggesting that stronger emotional experiences occur under such conditions. A conjunction analysis of groups with different cultural backgrounds showed activation in the ventral anterior cingulate cortex/orbitofrontal cortex, suggesting that there are universal cultural components of visual aesthetic experience. Together, our findings complement the existing literature by including all kinds of visual stimuli that could induce an aesthetic experience in the viewer and contributes to our understanding of aesthetics by showing that it involves enhanced visual sensation and positive emotional and reward experience.
      PubDate: 2021-07-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-021-00102-z
       
  • 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and cross-cultural adaptation: the role of
           relational openness as a mediator

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      Abstract: Abstract Prior evidence suggests increased social interaction anxiety among carriers of the short (s) allele of the serotonin transporter gene polymorphism (5-HTTLPR), relative to the long (l) allele carriers. According to gene-culture coevolution hypothesis, the collectivistic norm of lower levels of relational openness (i.e., lesser inclinations to meet new people) and 5-HTTLPR s allele co-evolved under the environmental pressure of high pathogen prevalence. We examined if the 5-HTTLPR s allele and low relational openness are associated at the levels of the society and the individual. In Study 1, we found across 21 countries, those with a higher prevalence of the l allele of 5-HTTLPR (L%) tend to be higher in relational mobility. In Study 2, 303 international students were genotyped, and questionnaires examined their personal tendencies during their cross-cultural adaptation process. The s allele carriers (s/s homozygotes & s/l heterozygotes) were found to have higher relational openness than the non-carriers (l/l homozygotes). Moreover, 5-HTTLPR was found to have an indirect effect on cross-cultural adaptation and cultural diversity in friendship networks, mediated by relational openness. Those lower in relational openness encountered more challenge in adapting to the new country and developed friendship networks that were culturally less diverse. Together, the findings imply the gravity of relational openness as a confluence of gene-culture coevolution, with key importance for social networks and the newcomers’ cross-cultural adaptation in the multicultural environment.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-020-00092-4
       
  • Culture and priming in the perception of facial emotion,
           self-representation and thought: Brazil and United States

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      Abstract: Abstract Cultural approaches focused on the influences of individualist and collectivist norms describe the relationship between an individual and his or her social surroundings. The current study had a twofold purpose. The primary goal was to investigate whether Brazilians, like other collective peoples, displayed more group self-representations, categorized items more relationally and paid more attention to context than Americans. A secondary concern was to investigate if counter-cultural primes played a role in activating either collective or individual selves. Both American (n = 100) and Brazilian (n = 101) participants were assigned either to a no-prime condition or a counter-cultural prime condition and then were asked to rate emotion cartoons, categorize items, complete the Twenty Statement Test, and choose a representative object. As expected, unprimed Brazilian participants displayed more collectivist patterns on emotional and cognitive tasks than Americans. However, Brazilians offered more individualist self-representations than American participants. Priming only had a marginal effect on item categorization. These findings, along with the strengths and limitations of this study and suggestions for future research, are discussed.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-020-00090-6
       
  • Where to draw the line: honor mindset increases retaliation in response to
           unfair behavior

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      Abstract: Abstract Past research has linked honor to a higher tendency for retaliation. A common method is to compare groups that are either low or high in honor. While effective, this does not account for within-group variation, nor isolate honor as a distinct construct from alternative differences between groups that might affect the outcome. In the current study we investigated honor as a cultural mindset, using priming methodology in both Dutch participants (who are typically low in honor endorsement) and Dutch-Turkish and Dutch-Moroccan participants (who are typically high in honor endorsement), while controlling for trait endorsement of honor values. To quantify retaliation, we used two social dilemmas: presenting an unequal offer in the Ultimatum Game, and chips being taken in the Justice Game. The results showed that priming honor resulted in an increased willingness to pay for punishment in the Justice Game, but not higher rejection in the Ultimatum Game. This suggests that unfairness by itself is not sufficient to trigger retaliation; rather, a pronounced transgression is required—in this case something being taken what is considered rightfully yours. Furthermore, decision-making in both social dilemmas was not associated with cultural background or honor endorsement. This indicates that an honor mindset needs to be salient to affect decision-making, and can affect behavior over and above the endorsement of honor values.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-020-00093-3
       
  • Horizontal and vertical perceptual asymmetries for the grayscale task in
           healthy Japanese young adults

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      Abstract: Abstract The grayscale task requires participants to make forced-choice luminance judgments of two mirror-reversed luminance gradients. Neurologically healthy left-to-right readers in Western countries, show strong leftward and upward attentional biases in the horizontal and vertical conditions, respectively. In this study, we examined the grayscale task performance of young adults whose native language was Japanese, a language with complex writing rules including changes in the directionality of reading. Additionally, we examined the effects of sex, handedness, and hand used. Half (64 men and 64 women) of the participants included in this study were left-handed. Participants were administered a paper version of the grayscale task in horizontal and vertical conditions. As with left-to-right readers, respective leftward and upward biases were observed in the two conditions. The main effects of sex, handedness, and hand used and the possible interactions among the three variables were non-significant for either condition. The results of this study can be used as basic data for the application of this task to clinical and analog research in neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders in Japan.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-020-00096-0
       
  • Do culture and oxytocin receptor polymorphisms interact to influence
           emotional expressivity'

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      Abstract: Abstract Drawing on recent evidence suggesting that individuals having the G allele of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) polymorphism are especially susceptible to socio-cultural environmental influences, including cultural norms, the present study investigated the interplay of culture and two OXTR polymorphisms (rs53576 and rs2254298) in the domain of emotional expressivity, which is culturally encouraged in Western cultures. Testing Japanese and European Canadian undergraduates, we found cultural differences in negative emotional expressivity and positive emotional expressivity. As expected, the European Canadians were greater in positive emotional expressivity than the Japanese. In contrast, the pattern was reversed in negative emotional expressivity. A series of multiple regression analyses entering gender and personality traits as control variables showed that neither culture nor the two OXTR polymorphisms interact to negative emotional expressivity and positive emotional expressivity. The present null findings suggest that continued examination with larger samples would better elucidate results on the interactions among culture, OXTR, and socioemotional behaviors.
      PubDate: 2021-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-020-00091-5
       
  • Neural responses to facial and vocal displays of emotion in Japanese
           people

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      Abstract: Abstract To obtain further evidence to support spontaneous attention to vocal tones in Japanese, in this study, we developed a new set of stimuli, including positive and negative emotions, and investigated responses to facial and vocal displays of emotion by using behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) measurements. Japanese participants either judged face as pleasant or unpleasant while ignoring the attendant voice or judged vocal tone as pleasant or unpleasant as while ignoring the attendant face. As predicted, an interference effect by to-be-ignored information, which was computed by subtracting accuracy for incongruous face-voice stimuli from accuracy for congruous ones, was greater in face judgments than in voice judgments, suggesting an attentional bias for vocal tone. Moreover, corresponding to this pattern in accuracy, a positive ERP occurring at approximately 200 ms after the onset of the stimulus (called P2) was more likely to be elicited by incongruous stimuli than by congruous ones, and the difference in P2 amplitude was greater in face judgments than in voice judgments. A negative ERP occurring relatively late in the processing (called N400) was also more likely to be elicited by incongruous stimuli than by congruous stimuli; however, the size was not significantly different between these judgments. Our findings are the first to provide evidence that Japanese pay spontaneous attention to emotional vocal tones over emotional faces at behavioral and neural levels.
      PubDate: 2021-05-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-021-00101-0
       
  • Distressed but happy: health workers and volunteers during the COVID-19
           pandemic

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      Abstract: Abstract During the COVID-19 outbreak, many people rose to the occasion by engaging in volunteerism and health work. We conducted two nationwide surveys in the United States (n = 2931) and China (n = 2793) assessing volunteers’ and health workers’ levels of mental distress and happiness. In spite of data being collected at different phases of the COVID-19 outbreak and across two different cultures, the results converged. Volunteers and health workers reported higher mental distress (e.g., depression, anxiety, somatization) than the comparison group. However, volunteers and health workers also reported more happiness than the comparison group. More importantly, in a follow-up in China (n = 1914) one month later, health workers still reported heightened happiness but were no longer more distressed than the comparison group. The changes in distress were partially mediated by happiness at the first time point, pointing to the potential role of happiness in coping with distress. In sum, the emotional landscape of volunteers and health workers was complicated—they experienced higher distress but also higher happiness than comparison groups. Future research would do well to include longer follow-up periods to examine how experiencing happiness during highly stressful situations predicts mental health over time.
      PubDate: 2021-05-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-021-00100-1
       
  • Emotional reactions to self-inconsistency and self-conflict in Japan and
           the U.S.

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      Abstract: Abstract This research compared Japanese and American individuals’ reactions to experiencing inconsistency or conflict between two roles (i.e., identities, relationships, self-aspects). Past research has established that trait-level well-being and role inconsistency are negatively related in the U.S. but unrelated in Japan. We extended on past work by (1) experimentally manipulating an experience of inconsistency in both countries to establish causality, and (2) identifying if the previously-observed cultural differences in role inconsistency are distinct from cultural differences in role conflict. Participants from universities in Japan and the U.S. were randomly assigned to write about how their behavior differs in two roles or relationships (inconsistency condition), interference between two roles or relationships (conflict condition), or descriptions of two roles or relationships (control condition). Inconsistency decreased moral self-regard in the U.S. but not in Japan, whereas conflict decreased moral self-regard in both cultures. Americans had a more globally negative reaction to role conflict, but only inconsistency reduced their feelings of authenticity. In other words, the negative relationship between inconsistent roles and well-being observed in the U.S. appears both causal in nature and distinct from the effect of conflict within the self-concept. In addition, although inconsistency does not elicit negative reactions in Japan, role conflict does reduce positive feelings about the self.
      PubDate: 2020-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-019-00087-w
       
  • The role of culture and language in moral decision-making

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study aimed to investigate the effect of cultural and language factors in moral decision-making in Hindi–English bilinguals in comparison with English monolinguals living in Australia. The study included 166 Hindi–English bilingual participants who completed the survey in either their first or second language, and a comparison group of 127 English monolingual participants. Participants were presented with six hypothetical moral dilemmas (original trolley/footbridge), Waterpark (impersonal/personal), Family Game Show (impersonal/personal) requiring them to either save the lives or winnings of five people by sacrificing the lives or winnings of one person or not and to make moral judgments about these decisions. A cultural effect was found in moral decision-making as individuals from a Western background were more likely to engage in utilitarian decision-making, and rate it as more appropriate, than those from an Indian background to the monetary-loss Waterpark and Family Game Show dilemmas. In addition, similarities were found in decision-making choices to the trolley and footbridge dilemmas in the two cultural groups. Overall, no significant foreign language effect was found in the Hindi–English bilinguals. The foreign language effect may not extend to more proficient second language learners or acculturated bilingual speakers.
      PubDate: 2020-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s40167-019-00085-y
       
 
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