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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
New School Psychology Bulletin     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
O Que Nos Faz Pensar : Cadernos do Departamento de Filosofia da PUC-Rio     Open Access  
OA Autism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Online Readings in Psychology and Culture     Open Access  
Open Journal of Medical Psychology     Open Access  
Open Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Organisational and Social Dynamics: An International Journal of Psychoanalytic, Systemic and Group Relations Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Organizational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Orientación y Sociedad : Revista Internacional e Interdisciplinaria de Orientación Vocacional Ocupacional     Open Access  
Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto)     Open Access  
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Papeles del Psicólogo     Open Access  
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Peace and Conflict : Journal of Peace Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Pensamiento Psicologico     Open Access  
Pensando Familias     Open Access  
Pensando Psicología     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Perceptual and Motor Skills     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Persona     Open Access  
Persona : Jurnal Psikologi Indonesia     Open Access  
Persona Studies     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 166)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access  
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal  
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Phenomenology & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Phenomenology and Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
physiopraxis     Hybrid Journal  
PiD - Psychotherapie im Dialog     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Poiésis     Open Access  
Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Porn Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
PPmP - Psychotherapie Psychosomatik Medizinische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Practice Innovations     Full-text available via subscription  
Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Problems of Psychology in the 21st Century     Open Access  
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Progress in Brain Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psic : Revista de Psicologia da Vetor Editora     Open Access  
Psico     Open Access  
Psicoanalisi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicobiettivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Psicogente     Open Access  
Psicol?gica Journal     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Prática     Open Access  
Psicologia da Educação     Open Access  
Psicologia della salute     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicología desde el Caribe     Open Access  
Psicologia di Comunità. Gruppi, ricerca-azione, modelli formativi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicologia e Saber Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Psicologia em Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia em Revista     Open Access  
Psicologia Ensino & Formação     Open Access  
Psicologia Hospitalar     Open Access  
Psicologia Iberoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia para América Latina     Open Access  
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicología, Conocimiento y Sociedad     Open Access  
Psicologia, Saúde e Doenças     Open Access  
Psicooncología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicoperspectivas     Open Access  
Psicoterapia e Scienze Umane     Full-text available via subscription  
Psikis : Jurnal Psikologi Islami     Open Access  
Psikohumaniora : Jurnal Penelitian Psikologi     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PsyCh Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
PSYCH up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psych. Pflege Heute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychê     Open Access  
Psyche: A Journal of Entomology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychiatrie et violence     Open Access  
Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychiatrische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 359)
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis, Self and Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychoanalytic Dialogues: The International Journal of Relational Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychoanalytic Inquiry: A Topical Journal for Mental Health Professionals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychodynamic Practice: Individuals, Groups and Organisations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Psychodynamic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologia : Advances de la Disciplina     Open Access  
Psychologica     Open Access  
Psychologica Belgica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 226)
Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Psychological Perspectives: A Semiannual Journal of Jungian Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychological Research on Urban Society     Open Access  
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 201)
Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 267)
Psychological Science and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science and Education psyedu.ru     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science In the Public Interest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Psychological Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychological Thought     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie in Erziehung und Unterricht     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology     Open Access  
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology and Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal  
Psychology and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Psychology in Russia: State of the Art     Free   (Followers: 2)
Psychology in Society     Open Access  
Psychology Learning & Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychology of Language and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Psychology of Leaders and Leadership     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Psychology of Men and Masculinity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Well-Being : Theory, Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychology Research and Behavior Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology, Community & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Psychology, Health & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychomusicology : Music, Mind, and Brain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Psychopathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
psychopraxis. neuropraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychosomatic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychosomatic Medicine and General Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Psychotherapy in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
PsychTech & Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Psyecology - Bilingual Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psyke & Logos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psykhe (Santiago)     Open Access  
Quaderni di Gestalt     Full-text available via subscription  
Quaderns de Psicologia     Open Access  
Qualitative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Qualitative Research in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quantitative Methods for Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Rehabilitation Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Religion, Brain & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Clinical Psychological Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.281
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2167-7026 - ISSN (Online) 2167-7034
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Mental-Health Trajectories of U.S. Parents With Young Children During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic: A Universal Introduction of Risk

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Maureen Zalewski, Sihong Liu, Megan Gunnar, Liliana J. Lengua, Philip A Fisher
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Parents of young children were a subgroup of the population identified early in the pandemic as experiencing significant mental-health symptoms. Using a longitudinal sample of 3,085 parents from across the United States who had a child or children age 0 to 5, in the present study, we identified parental mental-health trajectories from April to November 2020 predicted by pre–COVID-19 cumulative risk and COVID-19-specific risk factors. Both growth-mixture modeling and latent-growth-curve modeling were used to test the relationship between risk factors and parent mental health. Pre–COVID-19 cumulative risk and COVID-19-specific risks of financial strain, decreased employment, and increased family conflict were salient risk factors predicting poor mental-health trajectories across both modeling approaches. These finding have public-health implications because prolonged exposure to mental-health symptoms in parents constitutes a risk factor for child development.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T10:33:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221083275
       
  • Role of Triarchic Traits in Relations of Early Resting Heart Rate With
           Antisocial Behavior and Broad Psychopathology Dimensions in Later Life

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bridget M. Bertoldi, Catherine Tuvblad, Keanan J. Joyner, Colleen Ganley, Adrian Raine, Laura Baker, Antti Latvala, Sofi Oskarsson, Christopher J. Patrick
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Low resting heart rate (HR) is a known risk indicator for the development of antisocial behavior (ASB) and other clinical problems. Stimulation seeking and fearlessness have been explored as factors underlying the HR/ASB relationship, but these have often been conflated, which has complicated interpretation. We examined HR’s associations with ASB and other outcomes in terms of biobehavioral traits described by the triarchic model of psychopathy using data (N = 710) from a longitudinal study of ASB risk. Low resting HR in childhood was related to adult ASB, and covariance between ASB and traits of disinhibition and boldness largely accounted for this association. In addition, low childhood HR was related to greater externalizing problems and fewer internalizing problems in adulthood; disinhibition accounted for the former association, and boldness accounted for the latter. Findings indicate a role for both disinhibition and boldness in associations between early HR and later clinical outcomes and have implications for theory and practice.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T10:30:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221081880
       
  • Resting-State Functional Connectivity Differences Following Experimental
           Manipulation of the Orbitofrontal Cortex in Two Directions via Theta-Burst
           Stimulation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rebecca B. Price, Fabio Ferrarelli, Colleen Hanlon, Claire M. Gillan, Tae Kim, Greg J. Siegle, Meredith L. Wallace, Marlee Renard, Rachel Kaskie, Michelle Degutis, Anna Wears, Vanessa Brown, Manivel Rengasamy, Susanne E. Ahmari
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Compulsive behaviors (CBs) have been linked to orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) function in animal and human studies. However, brain regions function not in isolation but as components of widely distributed brain networks—such as those indexed via resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC). Sixty-nine individuals with CB disorders were randomized to receive a single session of neuromodulation targeting the left OFC—intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) or continuous TBS (cTBS)—followed immediately by computer-based behavioral “habit override” training. OFC seeds were used to quantify RSFC following iTBS and following cTBS. Relative to cTBS, iTBS showed increased RSFC between right OFC (Brodmann’s area 47) and other areas, including dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC), occipital cortex, and a priori dorsal and ventral striatal regions. RSFC connectivity effects were correlated with OFC/frontopolar target engagement and with subjective difficulty during habit-override training. Findings help reveal neural network-level impacts of neuromodulation paired with a specific behavioral context, informing mechanistic intervention development.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T06:06:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221103136
       
  • Adults’ Memory for a Maltreatment-Related Childhood Experience:
           Interview Protocols

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Deborah Goldfarb, Gail S. Goodman, Yan Wang, Ronald P. Fisher, Daisy Vidales, Lauren C. Gonzalves, Yuerui Wu, Dana Hartman, Jianjian Qin, Mitchell L. Eisen
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Adults’ claims of decades-old child maltreatment raise questions about how to obtain accurate memories about childhood events. In this study, adults who experienced a documented child maltreatment medical examination when they were 3 to 16 years old (Time 1) were interviewed 2 decades later (Time 2). The adults (N = 115) were randomly assigned to one of three interview-protocol conditions: a standard forensic interview, the cognitive interview (CI) with mental reinstatement, or the CI with mental- and physical-context reinstatement. The CI increased accuracy by dampening reports of potentially schematic but nonexperienced information. Younger age at Time 1 was associated with memories that were less complete but not more inaccurate. A greater number of Time 2 posttraumatic-stress-disorder symptoms predicted both correct and incorrect (omissions and commissions, respectively) answers to specific questions and incorrect answers to misleading questions; commission errors were associated with Time 1 physical-abuse status. Theoretical implications and clinical and legal applications are discussed.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T06:51:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221081877
       
  • The Development and Internal Evaluation of a Predictive Model to Identify
           for Whom Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Offers Superior Relapse
           Prevention for Recurrent Depression Versus Maintenance Antidepressant
           Medication

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zachary D. Cohen, Robert J. DeRubeis, Rachel Hayes, Edward R. Watkins, Glyn Lewis, Richard Byng, Sarah Byford, Catherine Crane, Willem Kuyken, Tim Dalgleish, Susanne Schweizer
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Depression is highly recurrent, even following successful pharmacological and/or psychological intervention. We aimed to develop clinical prediction models to inform adults with recurrent depression choosing between antidepressant medication (ADM) maintenance or switching to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). Using previously published data (N = 424), we constructed prognostic models using elastic-net regression that combined demographic, clinical, and psychological factors to predict relapse at 24 months under ADM or MBCT. Only the ADM model (discrimination performance: area under the curve [AUC] = .68) predicted relapse better than baseline depression severity (AUC = .54; one-tailed DeLong’s test: z = 2.8, p = .003). Individuals with the poorest ADM prognoses who switched to MBCT had better outcomes compared with individuals who maintained ADM (48% vs. 70% relapse, respectively; superior survival times, z = −2.7, p = .008). For individuals with moderate to good ADM prognoses, both treatments resulted in similar likelihood of relapse. If replicated, the results suggest that predictive modeling can inform clinical decision-making around relapse prevention in recurrent depression.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T06:50:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221076832
       
  • Effects of Alcohol Intoxication on Sexual Decision-Making Among Men Who
           Have Sex With Men: Alcohol’s Influences on Self-Control Processes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephen A. Maisto, Jeffrey S. Simons, Tibor P. Palfai, Dezarie Moskal, Alan Z. Sheinfil, Kelli D. Tahaney
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      This experiment tested mechanisms linking alcohol intoxication and analogue determinants of condomless anal intercourse (CAI) in a sample of 257 men who have sex with men (MSM). The two mechanisms tested were implicit approach biases toward CAI stimuli and executive working memory. Participants were randomly assigned to three conditions (water control, placebo, or alcohol) and, following beverage administration, completed a working memory task, an approach-avoidance task of sexual versus condom stimuli, and two video role-play vignettes of high-risk sexual scenarios. Sexual arousal and CAI intentions were assessed by self-report, and behavioral skills and risk exposure were derived from participants’ role-play behavior. Estimation of four path models showed that the hypothesized mechanisms were supported for the CAI intention outcome, but the findings for the skills and risk-exposure outcome were mixed. Implications for development and enhancement of HIV prevention interventions are discussed.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T07:32:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221079780
       
  • Maturing Out: Between- and Within-Persons Changes in Social-Network
           Drinking, Drinking Identity, and Hazardous Drinking Following College
           Graduation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kristen P. Lindgren, Scott A. Baldwin, Kirsten P. Peterson, Jason J. Ramirez, Bethany A. Teachman, Ethan Kross, Reinout W. Wiers, Clayton Neighbors
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Many college students reduce hazardous drinking (HD) following graduation without treatment. Identifying cognitive mechanisms facilitating this “natural” reduction in HD during this transition is crucial. We evaluated drinking identity as a potential mechanism and tested whether within-persons changes in one’s social network’s drinking were linked to within-persons changes in drinking identity and subsequent within-persons changes in HD. A sample of 422 undergraduates reporting HD was followed from 6 months before graduation until 2 years after graduation. Their drinking, drinking identity, and social networks were assessed online. Within-persons changes in drinking identity did not mediate the relationship between within-persons changes in social-network drinking and personal HD, although significant positive between-persons associations among all constructs were found. Instead, there was some evidence that within-persons changes in drinking identity followed changes in HD, which suggests that drinking identity may function as a marker versus mechanism of “natural” HD reduction during transition out of college.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T07:07:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221082957
       
  • Connectivity Patterns Evoked by Fearful Faces Demonstrate Reduced
           Flexibility Across a Shared Dimension of Adolescent Anxiety and Depression
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicholas A. Hubbard, Randy P. Auerbach, Viviana Siless, Nicole Lo, Isabelle R. Frosch, Danielle E. Clark, Robert Jones, Rebecca Kremens, Megan Pinaire, Flavia Vaz-DeSouza, Satrajit S. Ghosh, Aude Henin, Stefan G. Hofmann, Diego A. Pizzagalli, Isabelle M. Rosso, Anastasia Yendiki, Susan Whitfield-Gabrieli, John D. E. Gabrieli
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescents experiencing anxiety or depression exhibit cognitive biases favoring the processing of negative emotional information. It remains unknown whether common neurobiological processes underlie these biases across anxiety and depression. Here, brain imaging was acquired from typical, anxious, and depressed adolescents during an emotional-interference task. Functional connectivity patterns were assessed while adolescents were cued to attend to or ignore faces. Results revealed a shared dimension of anxious and depressive symptoms was associated with reduced changes in connectivity patterns between conditions in which adolescents needed to ignore or attend to fearful faces. These findings were exclusive to fearful faces and observed only for functional connections with a primary face-representation area (fusiform gyrus). Results suggested a failure to flexibly adapt communication patterns with sensory-representation areas in the presence of negative emotional information, which may reflect a common neurobiological mechanism explaining biases favoring such information shared among adolescent anxiety and depression.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-07T06:54:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221079628
       
  • Does Objectively Measured Social-Media or Smartphone Use Predict
           Depression, Anxiety, or Social Isolation Among Young Adults'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Craig J. R. Sewall, Tina R. Goldstein, Aidan G. C. Wright, Daniel Rosen
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Despite a plethora of research, the link between digital-technology use and psychological distress among young adults remains inconclusive. Findings in this area are typically undermined by methodological limitations related to measurement, study design, and statistical analysis. Addressing these limitations, we examined the prospective, within-persons associations between three aspects of objectively measured digital-technology use (duration and frequency of smartphone use, duration of social-media use) and three aspects of psychological distress (depression, anxiety, and social isolation) among a sample of young adults (N = 384). Across 81 different model specifications, we found that most within-persons prospective effects between digital-technology use and psychological distress were statistically nonsignificant, and all were very small—even the largest effects were unlikely to register a meaningful impact on a person’s psychological distress. In post hoc subgroup analyses, we found scant evidence for the claim that digital-technology use is more harmful for women and/or younger people.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T05:33:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221078309
       
  • Systemic Challenges in Internship Training for Health-Service-Psychology:
           A Call to Action From Trainee Stakeholders

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: R. Palitsky, D. M. Kaplan, M. A. Brodt, M. R. Anderson, A. Athey, J. A. Coffino, A. Egbert, E. S. Hallowell, G. T. Han, M.-A. Hartmann, C. Herbitter, M. Herrera Legon, C. D. Hughes, N. C. Jao, M. T. Kassel, T.-A. P. Le, H. F. Levin-Aspenson, G. López, M. R. Maroney, M. Medrano, S. J. Reznik, M. L. Rogers, B. Stevenson
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The challenges observed in health-service-psychology (HSP) training during COVID-19 revealed systemic and philosophical issues that preexisted the pandemic but became more visible during the global health crisis. In a position article written by 23 trainees across different sites and training specializations, we use lessons learned from COVID-19 as a touchstone for a call to action in HSP training. Historically, trainee voices have been conspicuously absent from literature about clinical training. We describe long-standing dilemmas in HSP training that were exacerbated by the pandemic and will continue to require resolution after the pandemic has subsided. We make recommendations for systems-level changes that would advance equity and sustainability in HSP training. This article advances the conversation about HSP training by including the perspective of trainees as essential stakeholders.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T05:28:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211072232
       
  • Optimal Well-Being After Psychopathology: Prevalence and Correlates

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrew R. Devendorf, Ruba Rum, Todd B. Kashdan, Jonathan Rottenberg
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Optimal functioning after psychopathology is understudied. We report the prevalence of optimal well-being (OWB) following recovery after depression, suicidal ideation, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, and substance use disorders. Using a national Canadian sample (N = 23,491), we operationalized OWB as absence of 12-month psychopathology, coupled with scoring above the 25th national percentile on psychological well-being and below the 25th percentile on disability measures. Compared with 24.1% of participants without a history of psychopathology, 9.8% of participants with a lifetime history of psychopathology met OWB. Adults with a history of substance use disorders (10.2%) and depression (7.1%) were the most likely to report OWB. Persons with anxiety (5.7%), suicidal ideation (5.0%), bipolar I (3.3%), and bipolar II (3.2%) were less likely to report OWB. Having a lifetime history of just one disorder increased the odds of OWB by a factor of 4.2 relative to having a lifetime history of multiple disorders. Although psychopathology substantially reduces the probability of OWB, many individuals with psychopathology attain OWB.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T10:11:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221078872
       
  • Covariate Selection for Estimating Individual Treatment Effects in
           Psychotherapy Research: A Simulation Study and Empirical Example

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      Authors: Robin Anno Wester, Julian Rubel, Axel Mayer
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Estimating individual treatment effects (ITEs) is crucial to personalized psychotherapy. It depends on identifying all covariates that interact with treatment, a challenging task considering the many patient characteristics hypothesized to influence treatment outcome. The goal of this study was to compare different covariate-selection strategies and their consequences on estimating ITEs. A Monte Carlo simulation was conducted to compare stepwise regression with and without cross-validation and shrinkage methods. The study was designed to mimic the setting of psychotherapy studies. No single covariate-selection strategy dominated all others across all factor-level combinations and on all performance measures. The least absolute shrinkage and selection operator showed the most accurate out-of-sample predictions, identified the highest number of true treatment-covariate interactions, and estimated ITEs with the highest precision across the most conditions. Domain backward stepwise regression and backward stepwise regression using Bayesian information criterion were least biased in estimating variance of ITEs across the most conditions.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T06:41:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211071043
       
  • Gray-Matter Morphometry of Internalizing-Symptom Dimensions During
           Adolescence

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      Authors: Harry R. Smolker, Hannah R. Snyder, Benjamin L. Hankin, Marie T. Banich
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding the neuroanatomical correlates of internalizing psychopathology during adolescence may shed light on neurodevelopmental processes that make this a critical period for the trajectory of mental illness. However, few studies have simultaneously examined co-occurring and dissociable features of internalizing psychopathology during this formative developmental stage. In the current study, we identify the neuroanatomical correlates of four dimensions of internalizing psychopathology symptoms in adolescents: a common internalizing dimension capturing covariance in symptoms across internalizing disorders, as well as low-positive-affect-specific, anxious-arousal-specific, and anxious-apprehension-specific residuals. Our results suggest that these dimensions are associated with neuroanatomy across much of the brain, including prefrontal and limbic regions implicated in case-control studies and regions supporting visual processing. It is noteworthy that results differed between males and females in regions that are sexually dimorphic in adulthood, and the direction of the effects was largely opposite what has been observed in adults and children.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T06:41:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211071091
       
  • Affect-Dynamic Signatures of Psychosis Risk Across Multiple Time Scales
           and Contexts

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      Authors: Lilian Y. Li, Jason Schiffman, Elizabeth A. Martin
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      There is a critical need for identifying time-sensitive and cost-effective markers of psychosis risk early in the illness course. One solution may lie in affect dynamics, or the fluctuations of affect across time, which have been demonstrated to predict transitions in psychopathology. Across three studies, the current research is the first to comprehensively investigate affect dynamics in relation to subthreshold positive symptoms (perceptual aberration and magical ideation) and negative symptoms (social anhedonia) of the psychosis spectrum. Across multiple time scales and contexts, we modeled affect dynamics from inexpensive laboratory paradigms and social-media text. Findings provided strong evidence for positive symptoms linked to heightened magnitude and frequency of affective fluctuations in response to emotional materials. Alternatively, negative symptoms showed modest association with heightened persistence of baseline states. These affect-dynamic signatures of psychosis risk provide insight on the distinct developmental pathways to psychosis and could facilitate current risk-detection approaches.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T06:41:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211070794
       
  • Changes in Maternal Depression and Children’s Behavior Problems:
           Investigating the Role of COVID-19-Related Stressors, Hair Cortisol, and
           Dehydroepiandrosterone

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      Authors: Stacey N. Doan, Madeleine Ding, Anna Beth Burniston, Patricia A. Smiley, Chong Man Chow, Cindy H. Liu
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Few studies have used longitudinal approaches to consider the cumulative impact of COVID-19-related stressors (CRSs) on the psychological adjustment of mothers and children. In the current study, we tracked changes in maternal depressive symptoms and children’s behavioral problems from approximately 2 years before the pandemic (T1) to May through August 2020 (T2). Second, we explored maternal hair cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone as predictors of change in maternal depressive symptoms. Mothers (N = 120) reported on maternal and child psychological adjustment at both time points. Hair hormone data were collected in the lab at T1. Results suggest increases in children’s internalizing symptoms from T1 to T2 and that higher levels of CRSs were associated with increased maternal depressive symptoms. Maternal and child adjustment were correlated. Maternal hair cortisol, but not dehydroepiandrosterone, was associated with significant increases in depressive symptoms. Findings underscore the importance of considering the family system and cumulative risk exposure on maternal and child mental health.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T05:30:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221076845
       
  • A Comparison of Mental-Health Outcomes in the United States and Italy at
           Different Levels of Cumulative COVID-19 Prevalence

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      Authors: Anthony D. Mancini, Gabriele Prati
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      How does the prevalence of COVID-19 affect people’s mental health' In a preregistered study (N = 857), we sought to answer this question by comparing demographically matched samples in four regions in the United States and Italy with different levels of cumulative COVID-19 prevalence. No main effect of prevalence emerged. Rather, prevalence region had opposite effects, depending on the country. New York City participants (high prevalence) reported more general distress, posttraumatic-stress-disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and COVID-19 worry than San Francisco (low prevalence). Conversely, Campania participants (low prevalence) reported more general distress, PTSD symptoms, and COVID-19 worry than Lombardy (high prevalence). Consistent with these patterns, we found that COVID-19 worry was more strongly linked with general distress and PTSD symptoms in New York City than San Francisco, whereas COVID-19 worry was more strongly linked with PTSD in Campania than Lombardy. In exploratory analyses, media exposure predicted and mapped on to geographic variation in mental-health outcomes.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-03-07T10:33:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221074678
       
  • Alcohol’s Effects During Uncertain and Uncontrollable Stressors in
           the Laboratory

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      Authors: Daniel E. Bradford, Jack M. Shireman, Sarah J. Sant’Ana, Gaylen E. Fronk, Susan E. Schneck, John J. Curtin
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Alcohol’s effects on reactivity to stressors depend on the nature of the stressor and the reactivity being assessed. Research that identifies characteristics of stressors that modulate reactivity and clarifies the neurobehavioral, cognitive, and affective components of this reactivity may help prevent, reduce, or treat the negative impacts of acute and chronic alcohol use and have implications for other psychopathology involving maladaptive reactivity to stressors. We used a novel, multimeasure, cued, electric-shock-stressor paradigm in a greater-university community sample of adult recreational drinkers to test the effects of alcohol (n = 64), compared with no alcohol (n = 64), on reactivity to stressors that vary in both their perceived certainty and controllability. Preregistered analyses suggested alcohol significantly dampened subjective anxiety (self-report) and defensive reactivity (startle potentiation) more during uncertain stressors than during certain stressors regardless of controllability, which suggests that stressor uncertainty—but not uncontrollability—may be sufficient to enhance alcohol’s dampening of stress reactivity and thus negative reinforcement potential.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-20T06:56:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211061355
       
  • The Effect of COVID-19 Lockdowns on Maternal Mental Health and Parenting
           Practices Moderated by Urban Green Space

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      Authors: Marigen Narea, Kenzo Asahi, Alejandra Abufhele, Amanda Telias, Damián Gildemeister, Samanta Alarcón
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Stress generates difficulties in parenting, which affects child development. We aimed to understand the impact of COVID-19 lockdowns on maternal mental health and parenting practices. We also explored to what extent green space is a protective factor in the aforementioned relationship. We explored heterogeneous lockdown effects using longitudinal georeferenced data for 985 families (mothers and 24- to 30-month-olds) and exploiting localized lockdowns in Chile. Controlling for observed and unobserved fixed characteristics, on average, we did not find an association between lockdown duration and maternal mental health or parenting practices. However, the previous nonsignificant association is heterogeneous across access to green space. Although lockdown duration increased dysfunctional interactions with children for mothers with little access to green space, we did not see the previous effect on mothers who live close to green space. Mothers who do not comply with the lockdown mandate are the ones who drive this heterogeneous effect.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T02:34:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211068871
       
  • Which Anxious Adolescents Were Most Affected by the COVID-19 Pandemic'

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      Authors: Santiago Morales, Selin Zeytinoglu, Nicole E. Lorenzo, Andrea Chronis-Tuscano, Kathryn A. Degnan, Alisa N. Almas, Daniel S. Pine, Nathan A. Fox
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Although the COVID-19 pandemic caused significant stress and anxiety among many people, individuals’ experiences varied. We examined whether specific forms of anxiety predicted distinct trajectories of anxiety, perceived stress, and COVID-related worries during 3 early months of the pandemic. In a longitudinal study (N = 291), adolescents’ (n = 194) social anxiety and generalized anxiety levels were assessed via parent reports and self-reports and clinical diagnostic interviews. Later, when these adolescents were young adults (n = 164), anxiety, stress, and COVID-related worries were assessed thrice during the pandemic. Prepandemic generalized anxiety predicted higher initial levels and maintenance of anxiety, stress, and COVID-related worries during the pandemic. In contrast, prepandemic social anxiety predicted lower initial levels of anxiety, stress, and COVID-related worries, but this initial effect on anxiety and stress was offset over time by social anxiety’s positive effect on the slope. Our results highlight the importance of understanding how prepandemic factors influence individuals’ experiences during the pandemic.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T02:33:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211059524
       
  • Parental Mentalizing During a Pandemic: Use of Mental-State Language on
           Parenting Social Media Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Tal Yatziv, Almog Simchon, Nicholas Manco, Michael Gilead, Helena J. V. Rutherford
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has been a demanding caregiving context for parents, particularly during lockdowns. In this study, we examined parental mentalization, parents’ proclivity to consider their own and their child’s mental states, during the pandemic, as manifested in mental-state language (MSL) on parenting social media. Parenting-related posts on Reddit from two time periods in the pandemic in 2020, March to April (lockdown) and July to August (postlockdown), were compared with time-matched control periods in 2019. MSL and self–other references were measured using text-analysis methods. Parental mentalization content decreased during the pandemic: Posts referred less to mental activities and to other people during the COVID-19 pandemic and showed decreased affective MSL, cognitive MSL, and self-references specifically during lockdown. Father-specific subreddits exhibited strongest declines in mentalization content, whereas mother-specific subreddits exhibited smaller changes. Implications on understanding associations between caregiving contexts and parental mentalization, gender differences, and the value of using social-media data to study parenting and mentalizing are discussed.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T07:52:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211062612
       
  • An Epidemiologic, Longitudinal, and Discordant-Twin Study of the
           Association Between Gambling Disorder and Suicidal Behaviors

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      Authors: Wendy S. Slutske, Christal N. Davis, Michael T. Lynskey, Andrew C. Heath, Nicholas G. Martin
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Gambling disorder is associated with suicidal behaviors, but it is not clear whether the association is due to common etiologic factors or to gambling disorder being causally related to suicidality. This question was examined from the perspective of epidemiologic, longitudinal, and discordant-twin studies. The results suggested that the causes of the association with disordered gambling differed for suicidal ideation, plan, and attempt and differed for men and women. The association of suicidal thoughts with disordered gambling was noncausally explained by common genetic influences among women but not men. Conversely, there was evidence consistent with a potentially causal influence of disordered gambling on suicide attempt among men but not women, which might have been related to gambling-related financial problems. The use of monetary data to identify individuals experiencing financial harms associated with their gambling may represent a more practicable target for screening, intervention, and prevention and may reduce gambling-related financial crises, thereby warding off a potential gambling-related suicide attempt.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T06:10:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211062599
       
  • Moral Injury, Traumatic Stress, and Threats to Core Human Needs in
           Health-Care Workers: The COVID-19 Pandemic as a Dehumanizing Experience

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      Authors: Sarah L. Hagerty, Leanne M. Williams
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The pandemic has threatened core human needs. The pandemic provides a context to study psychological injury as it relates to unmet basic human needs and traumatic stressors, including moral incongruence. We surveyed 1,122 health-care workers from across the United States between May 2020 and August 2020. Using a mixed-methods design, we examined moral injury and unmet basic human needs in relation to traumatic stress and suicidality. Nearly one third of respondents reported elevated symptoms of psychological trauma, and the prevalence of suicidal ideation among health-care workers in our sample was roughly 3 times higher than in the general population. Moral injury and loneliness predict greater symptoms of traumatic stress and suicidality. We conclude that dehumanization is a driving force behind the psychological injury resulting from moral incongruence in the context of the pandemic. The pandemic most frequently threatened basic human motivations at the foundational level of safety and security relative to other higher order needs.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-10T06:08:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211057554
       
  • Negative Affectivity and Disinhibition as Moderators of an Interpersonal
           Pathway to Suicidal Behavior in Borderline Personality Disorder

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      Authors: Timothy A. Allen, Michael N. Hallquist, Aidan G. C. Wright, Alexandre Y. Dombrovski
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In this longitudinal study, we examined whether personality traits moderate the link between interpersonal dysfunction and suicidal behavior in a high-risk sample of 458 individuals diagnosed with borderline personality disorder. Participants were assessed annually for up to 30 years (mean number of follow-ups = 7.82). Using multilevel structural equation modeling, we examined (a) longitudinal, within-persons relationships among interpersonal dysfunction, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts and (b) moderation of these relationships by negative affectivity and disinhibition. Negative affectivity predicted a stronger within-persons coupling between interpersonal dysfunction and suicidal ideation. Disinhibition predicted a stronger coupling between ideation and suicide attempts. Assessing negative affectivity and disinhibition in a treatment setting may guide clinician vigilance toward people at highest risk for interpersonally triggered suicidal behaviors.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-03T07:40:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211056686
       
  • Continuities and Discontinuities in the Cognitive Mechanisms Associated
           With Clinical and Nonclinical Auditory Verbal Hallucinations

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      Authors: Peter Moseley, Ben Alderson-Day, Stephanie Common, Guy Dodgson, Rebecca Lee, Kaja Mitrenga, Jamie Moffatt, Charles Fernyhough
      First page: 752
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVHs) are typically associated with schizophrenia but also occur in individuals without any need for care (nonclinical voice hearers [NCVHs]). Cognitive models of AVHs posit potential biases in source monitoring, top-down processes, or a failure to inhibit intrusive memories. However, research across clinical/nonclinical groups is limited, and the extent to which there may be continuity in cognitive mechanism across groups, as predicted by the psychosis-continuum hypothesis, is unclear. We report two studies in which voice hearers with psychosis (n = 31) and NCVH participants reporting regular spiritual voices (n = 26) completed a battery of cognitive tasks. Compared with non-voice-hearing groups (ns = 33 and 28), voice hearers with psychosis showed atypical performance on signal detection, dichotic listening, and memory-inhibition tasks but intact performance on the source-monitoring task. NCVH participants, however, showed only atypical signal detection, which suggests differences between clinical and nonclinical voice hearers potentially related to attentional control and inhibition. These findings suggest that at the level of cognition, continuum models of hallucinations may need to take into account continuity but also discontinuity between clinical and nonclinical groups.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-01-18T01:02:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026211059802
       
 
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