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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 99)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 348)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 66)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 264)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 346)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 208)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 200)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 198)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Clinical Psychological Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.281
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2167-7026 - ISSN (Online) 2167-7034
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Paranoia: From Passive Social-Threat Perception to Misattunement in Social
           Interaction

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michal Hajdúk, Noah J. Sasson, Sohee Park, Amy E. Pinkham
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Paranoia, defined as the unfounded belief that others intend to cause harm, negatively affects individuals across the continuum from healthy to pathological. Despite a definition that is explicitly social, paranoia is often studied as an isolated characteristic of the person who is experiencing it. In the current review, we propose that the study of paranoia could be advanced by adopting a perspective focused on its interactional nature. Specifically, we hypothesize that aberrant dynamic interaction and/or misattunement between social partners may be a critical component in the formation and maintenance of paranoia. We also speculate that the relationship between paranoia and social functioning is bidirectional in which poor interpersonal functioning is both a result of and a contributor to paranoia. This approach may identify novel mechanisms and potential treatment targets.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T05:46:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231218639
       
  • Family Genetic-Risk Profiles Associated With Divorce

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jessica E. Salvatore, Henrik Ohlsson, Jan Sundquist, Kristina Sundquist, Kenneth S. Kendler
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      We used Swedish national-register data (N = 2,828,777) to examine divorce and its associated patterns of family genetic-risk scores (FGRSs; personalized measures of genetic risk inferred from diagnoses in relatives) across 10 psychiatric disorders: major depression, anxiety disorders, obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, anorexia nervosa, alcohol use disorder, drug use disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder, and autism spectrum disorder. Individuals who divorced had elevated FGRSs across all disorders compared with individuals who were stably married or never married. FGRSs for all disorders were higher among divorced females compared with divorced males and among individuals who did not go on to have a stable second marriage compared with individuals who had a stable second marriage and increased as the cumulative number of divorces increased. In summary, genetic predispositions for psychiatric disorders are associated with the propensity to divorce and with several differences as a function of sex, remarriage, and the cumulative number of divorce transitions.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T04:43:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231214204
       
  • Reinforcement-Learning-Informed Queries Guide Behavioral Change

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      Authors: Vanessa M. Brown, Jacob Lee, John Wang, Brooks Casas, Pearl H. Chiu
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Algorithmically defined aspects of reinforcement learning correlate with psychopathology symptoms and change with symptom improvement following cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Separate work in nonclinical samples has shown that varying the structure and statistics of task environments can change learning. Here, we combine these literatures, drawing on CBT-based guided restructuring of thought processes and computationally defined mechanistic targets identified by reinforcement-learning models in depression, to test whether and how verbal queries affect learning processes. Using a parallel-arm design, we tested 1,299 online participants completing a probabilistic reward-learning task while receiving repeated queries about the task environment (11 learning-query arms and one active control arm). Querying participants about reinforcement-learning-related task components altered computational-model-defined learning parameters in directions specific to the target of the query. These effects on learning parameters were consistent across depression-symptom severity, suggesting new learning-based strategies and therapeutic targets for evoking symptom change in mood psychopathology.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-25T05:08:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231213368
       
  • Seeing the Invisible: A Photovoice Exploration of Living With and Managing
           the Invisible Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis

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      Authors: Le-Sharn Parker, Gogem Topcu, Danielle De Boos, Clare Bale, Roshan das Nair
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In this photovoice study, we explored how people with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience living with and managing invisible symptoms in daily life. Twelve people with MS produced digital images over a 2-week period to capture their experiences of invisible symptoms. Participants then discussed their images in semistructured interviews. We thematically analyzed the interviews and developed three main themes that encompass the difficulties around conceptualizing invisible symptoms and the conflicts of legitimacy this presents for people with MS, in which the reality of their invisible symptoms is invalidated by others and sometimes for themselves. Participants navigated these issues in dynamic ways, choosing to fit their symptoms to their lives or make space for their symptoms depending on the context, often influenced by a desire to “stay invisible” or to “be seen.” We highlight clinical implications for supporting people with MS around the legitimacy conflicts they experience and how they negotiate living with invisible symptoms.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T10:44:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231220846
       
  • State Perceived Stress Is Concurrently, but Not Prospectively, Associated
           With State Impulsivity in Youths

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      Authors: Katherine Seldin, Natalie F. Upton, Madison C. Feil, Michele R. Smith, Morgan A. Bryson, Liliana J. Lengua, Kevin M. King
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Stress is considered a transdiagnostic mechanism underlying psychopathology. Research has suggested that when people experience more stress, they also act more impulsively. Most prior work has focused on between-persons associations or tested broad conceptualizations of impulsivity. We tested associations of momentary reports of perceived stress and appraisal of coping difficulty with three dimensions of impulsivity (urgency, planning, and persistence). High school and college students (N = 146) self-reported momentary perceived stress, coping appraisals, affect, urgency, planning, and persistence three times per day for 10 days. Higher perceived stress was concurrently associated with higher urgency and lower persistence, even after controlling for negative affect. Higher coping appraisals were concurrently associated with higher planning and persistence. No prospective effects were observed. Perceived stress may relate to a time-limited decreased ability to regulate responses to negative affect and persist, whereas coping appraisals may be associated with changes in multiple types of self-regulation.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T04:57:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231221794
       
  • The Continuity of Adversity: Negative Emotionality Links Early Life
           Adversity With Adult Stressful Life Events

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Grace M. Brennan, Terrie E. Moffitt, Kyle J. Bourassa, HonaLee Harrington, Sean Hogan, Renate M. Houts, Richie Poulton, Sandhya Ramrakha, Avshalom Caspi
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Adversity that exhibits continuity across the life course has long-term detrimental effects on physical and mental health. Using 920 participants from the Dunedin Study, we tested the following hypotheses: (a) Children (ages 3–15) who experienced adversity would also tend to experience adversity in adulthood (ages 32–45), and (2) interim personality traits in young adulthood (ages 18–26) would help account for this longitudinal association. Children who experienced more adversity tended to also experience more stressful life events as adults, β = 0.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.04, 0.18], p = .002. Negative emotionality—particularly its subfacet alienation, characterized by mistrust of others—helped explain this childhood-to-midlife association (indirect effect: β = 0.06, 95% CI = [0.04, 0.09], p < .001). Results were robust to adjustment for sex, socioeconomic origins, childhood IQ, preschool temperament, and other young-adult personality traits. Prevention of early life adversity and treatment of young-adult negative emotionality may reduce vulnerability to later life stress and thereby promote the health of aging adults.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T04:56:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231220337
       
  • Corrigendum: Whose Signals Are Being Amplified' Toward a More Equitable
           Clinical Psychophysiology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T01:12:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231225462
       
  • Criminalizing Psychopathology in Black Americans: Racial and Gender
           Differences in the Relationship Between Psychopathology and Arrests

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Briana N. Brownlow, Kassidie S. Harmon, Jolynn Pek, Jennifer S. Cheavens, James L. Moore, Emil F. Coccaro
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Black Americans are arrested at disproportionate levels compared with White Americans. We sought to understand whether the association between psychopathology and arrest record is equally strong for Black Americans and White Americans, hypothesizing that the association would be stronger for Black Americans. In a sample of adults (age: M = 34.81 years), we found that at the same level of psychopathology severity, emotion dysregulation, and impulsivity, Black Americans (n = 585) exhibited higher rates of being arrested in adulthood than White Americans (n = 977). These findings held even when controlling for environmental (e.g., socioeconomic status) and individual (e.g., substance-use history) factors associated with arrests. This suggests that the risk conferred by more severe psychopathology on arrests is stronger for Black Americans than White Americans. Our results highlight how structural racism affects both psychopathology and the carceral system to contribute to the overrepresentation of Black Americans within the criminal justice system.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-06T04:51:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231217312
       
  • Predicting Transdiagnostic Symptom Change Across Diverse Demographic
           Groups in Single-Session Interventions for Adolescent Depression

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Riley McDanal, Jenny Shen, Kathryn R. Fox, Nicholas R. Eaton, Jessica L. Schleider
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Youths with marginalized identities experience minority stress, a construct linked to more severe transdiagnostic psychopathology. Financial, geographical, and temporal barriers limit access to psychological care for these individuals. Single-session interventions (SSIs), which mitigate many such barriers, are likely more accessible than traditional therapies. However, accessibility does not guarantee effectiveness across identity groups. In a preregistered study (N = 2,452), we assessed whether demographic identities moderated the relationship between SSI condition and transdiagnostic internalizing (emotional distress) change from before SSI to after SSI in a national U.S. sample of adolescents with elevated depressive symptoms. SSI-driven internalizing-symptom reductions were equivalent between youths with myriad marginalized identities (e.g., Black, asexual, gender minority) and their counterparts (e.g., non-Hispanic White, heterosexual, cisgender) and across age and subjective school social status. We discuss implications of the results for SSI dissemination.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T05:55:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231199437
       
  • Interpersonal Linkage in Positive and Negative Emotional Behaviors,
           Emotional Well-Being, and Physical Functioning in Dementia Caregivers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kuan-Hua Chen, Jennifer Merrilees, Casey L. Brown, Claire Yee, Anna Sapozhnikova, Jenna L. Wells, Emilio Ferrer, Peter S. Pressman, Barbara L. Fredrickson, Robert W. Levenson
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Caring for a person with dementia (PWD) can produce declines in caregivers’ emotional well-being and physical functioning, which could result from disruptions in the emotional linkage between PWDs and caregivers. We examined the effects of interpersonal linkage in emotional behaviors on emotional well-being and physical functioning in caregivers and control partners. Forty-five PWD–caregiver dyads and 12 control dyads had a 10-min unrehearsed conflict conversation in the laboratory. We quantified positive and negative emotional linkage as the covariation between objectively coded positive and negative emotional behaviors during the conversation. Caregivers and one partner in the control dyads completed questionnaires concerning their emotional well-being and physical functioning. We found that lower positive emotional linkage was associated with lower emotional well-being in caregivers and control partners. We did not find similar effects with negative emotional linkage or for physical functioning. We offer possible explanations for these findings and implications for assessing caregiver risk.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-01-03T05:41:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231214530
       
  • Perceptual Thresholds for Threat Are Lowered in Anxiety: Evidence From
           Perceptual Psychophysics

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      Authors: Shannon Glasgow, Gabriella Imbriano, Sekine Ozturk, Jingwen Jin, Aprajita Mohanty
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Anxiety is believed to be characterized by heightened sensitivity to threat. The behavioral-inhibition system (BIS), a risk factor for anxiety, is hypothesized to index this threat sensitivity. In the present study, we address a critical gap in the literature: Neither anxiety nor BIS have been clearly linked with behavioral measures of threat sensitivity indexed by lowered threat-related perceptual thresholds. We used psychophysical methods to precisely measure absolute perceptual thresholds for detection of threatening and neutral faces. We examined their relationships with self-reported BIS and anxious apprehension in individuals diagnosed with anxiety disorders and individuals not diagnosed with anxiety disorders. Irrespective of anxiety disorder diagnosis, higher self-reported BIS and anxious apprehension were associated with reduced perceptual thresholds for threatening versus neutral stimuli, but only BIS showed a specific association after controlling for anxious apprehension. Using adaptive psychometrics, in this study, we offer key empirical evidence linking specific temperamental dimensions with perceptual indices of threat sensitivity transdiagnostically across anxiety disorders.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T06:36:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231211211
       
  • A Study of Parent-Reported Internalizing Symptoms in Transgender Youths
           Before and After Childhood Social Transitions

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      Authors: Lily Durwood, Natalie M. Gallagher, Robin Sifre, Kristina R. Olson
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Some children socially transition genders by changing their pronouns (and often names, hairstyles, and clothing) from those associated with their assigned sex at birth to those associated with their gender identity. We refer to children who have socially transitioned as transgender children. Using a prospective sample of children who socially transitioned during childhood (at or before the age of 12; age of transition: M = 6.82 years), we tested whether the parent-reported internalizing symptoms of transgender children were different before versus after they socially transitioned. The children were predominantly White (70.6% White) and girls (76.5% transgender girls, 23.5% transgender boys). Their parents tended to have high levels of education (74.5% bachelor’s degree or above) and lived in families with high household incomes (62.7% with household incomes of $75,000 or above). On average, youths showed lower levels of internalizing symptoms after socially transitioning versus before, suggesting a possible mental-health benefit of these transitions.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-12-01T06:55:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231208086
       
  • Boundaries on Parent Involvement in Their Child’s Anxiety
           Cognitive-Behavioral-Treatment Outcome: Parent Reinforcement and
           Relationship Behaviors Moderate Outcome

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      Authors: Wendy K. Silverman, Yasmin Rey, Carla E. Marin, Panagiotis Boutris, James Jaccard, Jeremy W. Pettit
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Extending a recent parent-mediation efficacy trial, we identified parent reinforcement and relationship behaviors as setting boundary conditions, or moderators, of youths’ anxiety outcome in 254 youths and their parents, who were randomized to (a) cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) with parent reinforcement-behavior training (CBT + Reinf), (b) CBT with parent relationship-behavior training (CBT + Relat), or (c) individual-youth CBT—a comparator control arm. Findings revealed that parents with high baseline negative-reinforcement levels and acceptance levels (i.e., above the mean) report their children as having lower anxiety at outcome when assigned to CBT + Reinf and CBT + Relat, respectively, versus CBT. No moderation effects were found for either parent positive reinforcement or parent psychological control. Implications for treating anxiety disorders and moving toward precision-treatment approaches in youths and the importance of research replication and extension are discussed.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T09:39:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231209331
       
  • Global Well-Being and Mental Health in the Internet Age

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      Authors: Matti Vuorre, Andrew K. Przybylski
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In the last 2 decades, the widespread adoption of Internet technologies has inspired concern that they have negatively affected mental health and psychological well-being. However, research on the topic is contested and hampered by methodological shortcomings, leaving the broader consequences of Internet adoption unknown. We show that the past 2 decades have seen only small and inconsistent changes in global well-being and mental health that are not suggestive of the idea that the adoption of Internet and mobile broadband is consistently linked to negative psychological outcomes. Further investigation of this topic requires transparent study of online behaviors where they occur (i.e., on online platforms). We call for increased collaborative efforts between independent scientists and the Internet-technology sector.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T12:01:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231207791
       
  • Depressive Symptoms and Their Mechanisms: An Investigation of Long-Term
           Patterns of Interaction Through a Panel-Network Approach

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      Authors: Asle Hoffart, Nora Skjerdingstad, René Freichel, Alessandra C. Mansueto, Sverre Urnes Johnson, Sacha Epskamp, Omid V. Ebrahimi
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The dynamic interaction between depressive symptoms, mechanisms proposed in the metacognitive-therapy model, and loneliness across a 9-month period was investigated. Four data waves 2 months apart were delivered by a representative population sample of 4,361 participants during the COVID-19 pandemic in Norway. Networks were estimated using the newly developed panel graphical vector-autoregression method. In the temporal network, use of substance to cope with negative feelings or thoughts positively predicted threat monitoring and depressed mood. In turn, threat monitoring positively predicted suicidal ideation. Metacognitive beliefs that thoughts and feelings are dangerous positively predicted anhedonia. Suicidal ideation positively predicted sleep problems and worthlessness. Loneliness was positively predicted by depressed mood. In turn, more loneliness predicted more control of emotions. The findings point at the theory-derived variables, threat monitoring, beliefs that thoughts and feelings are dangerous, and use of substance to cope, as potential targets for intervention to alleviate long-term depressive symptoms.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-11-16T04:36:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231208172
       
  • Hooking the Self Onto the Past: How Positive Autobiographical Memory
           Retrieval Benefits People With Social Anxiety

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      Authors: David A. Moscovitch, Kendra White, Taylor Hudd
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Do people with social anxiety (SA) benefit from positive memory retrieval that heightens self-relevant meaning' In this preregistered study, an analog sample of 255 participants with self-reported clinically significant symptoms of SA were randomly assigned to retrieve and process a positive social-autobiographical memory by focusing on either its self-relevant meaning (deep processing) or its perceptual features (superficial processing). Participants were then socially excluded and instructed to reimagine their positive memory. Analyses revealed that participants assigned to the deep processing condition experienced significantly greater improvements than participants in the superficial processing condition in positive affect, social safeness, and positive beliefs about others during initial memory retrieval and in negative and positive beliefs about the self following memory reactivation during recovery from exclusion. These novel findings highlight the potential utility of memory-based interventions for SA that work by “hooking” self-meaning onto recollections of positive interpersonal experiences that elicit feelings of social acceptance.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-11-15T09:09:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231195792
       
  • Executive Function and Impulsivity Predict Distinct Genetic Variance in
           Internalizing Problems, Externalizing Problems, Thought Disorders, and
           Compulsive Disorders: A Genomic Structural Equation Modeling Study

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      Authors: Daniel E. Gustavson, Claire L. Morrison, Travis T. Mallard, Mariela V. Jennings, Pierre Fontanillas, Sarah L. Elson, Abraham A. Palmer, Naomi P. Friedman, Sandra Sanchez-Roige
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Individual differences in self-control predict many health and life outcomes. Building on twin literature, we used genomic structural equation modeling to test the hypothesis that genetic influences on executive function and impulsivity predict independent variance in mental health and other outcomes. The impulsivity factor (comprising urgency, lack of premeditation, and other facets) was only modestly genetically correlated with low executive function (r = .13). Controlling for impulsivity, we found that low executive function was genetically associated with increased internalizing (β = 0.15), externalizing (β = 0.13), thought disorders (β = 0.38), compulsive disorders (β = 0.22), and chronotype (β = .011). Controlling for executive function, we found that impulsivity was positively genetically associated with internalizing (β = 0.36), externalizing (β = 0.55), body mass index (β = 0.26), and insomnia (β = 0.35) and negatively genetically associated with compulsive disorders (β = −0.17). Executive function and impulsivity were both genetically correlated with general cognitive ability and educational attainment. This work suggests that executive function and impulsivity are genetically separable and show independent associations with mental health.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T09:46:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231207845
       
  • Does Major Depression Differentially Affect Daily Affect in Adults From
           Six Middle-Income Countries: China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russian
           Federation, and South Africa'

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      Authors: Vanessa Panaite, Nathan Cohen
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Much of the research on how depression affects daily emotional functioning comes from Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic (WEIRD) countries. In the current study, we investigated daily positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA) and PA and NA variability in a cross-cultural sample of adults with a depression diagnosis (N = 2,487) and without a depression diagnosis (N = 31,764) from six middle-income non-WEIRD countries: China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russian Federation, and South Africa. Across countries, adults with depression relative to adults without depression reported higher average NA and NA variability and lower average PA but higher PA variability. Findings varied between countries. Observations are discussed within the context of new theories and evidence. Implications for current knowledge and for future efforts to grow cross-cultural and non-WEIRD affective science are discussed.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-11-06T11:15:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231194601
       
  • The Association Between the Selection and Effectiveness of
           Emotion-Regulation Strategies and Psychopathological Features: A Daily
           Life Study

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      Authors: Marlies Houben, Elise K. Kalokerinos, Peter Koval, Yasemin Erbas, Jardine Mitchell, Madeline Pe, Peter Kuppens
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Emotion dysregulation is central to psychopathological conditions, including borderline personality disorder (BPD) and depression. However, the nature of emotion-regulation (ER) difficulties in the daily life of people with BPD or depressive features is still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to disentangle two different ER subprocesses in daily life, (a) selection of ER strategies and (b) the effectiveness of implementing strategies, in terms of their associations with subsequent emotional experience. We analyzed data from a three-wave, longitudinal, experience-sampling study of young adults with varying levels of psychopathological features (N = 202). BPD features were uniquely linked to the use but not altered effectiveness of several putatively adaptive and maladaptive ER strategies. Depressive features were uniquely associated with the use of putatively maladaptive strategies. These findings suggest that ER deficits in people with more BPD or depressive features may be primarily located in strategy selection rather than the implementation of those strategies.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-10-27T10:21:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231203662
       
  • Neuroticism Is Prospectively Associated With 30-Month Changes in Broadband
           Internalizing Symptoms, but Not Narrowband Positive Affect or Anxious
           Arousal, in Emerging Adulthood

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      Authors: Christopher C. Conway, Shannon E. Grogans, Allegra S. Anderson, Samiha Islam, Logan E. Craig, Jazmine Wedlock, Juyoen Hur, Kathryn A. DeYoung, Alexander J. Shackman
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Elevated levels of Neuroticism/Negative Emotionality (N/NE) and, less consistently, lower levels of Extraversion/Positive Emotionality (E/PE) confer risk for pathological depression and anxiety. To date, most prospective-longitudinal research has narrowly focused on traditional diagnostic categories, creating uncertainty about the precise nature of these prospective associations. Adopting an explicitly hierarchical-dimensional approach, we examined the association between baseline variation in personality and longitudinal changes in broad and narrow internalizing-symptom dimensions in 234 emerging adults followed for 2.5 years, during the transition from older adolescence to early adulthood. N/NE was uniquely associated with increases in broadband internalizing—the core cognitive and affective symptoms that cut across the emotional disorders—and unrelated to the narrower dimensions of positive affect and anxious arousal that differentiate specific internalizing presentations. Variation in E/PE and several other Big Five traits was cross-sectionally but not prospectively related to longitudinal changes in specific internalizing symptoms. Exploratory personality-facet-level analyses provided preliminary evidence of more granular associations between personality and longitudinal changes in internalizing symptoms. These observations enhance the precision of models linking personality to internalizing illness, highlight the centrality of N/NE to increases in transdiagnostic internalizing symptoms during a key developmental chapter, and set the stage for developing more effective prevention and treatment strategies.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T11:37:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231205270
       
  • Investigating a Common Structure of Personality Pathology and Attachment

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      Authors: Madison Shea Smith, Susan C. South
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Critical theoretical intersections between adult insecure attachment and personality disorders (PDs) suggest that they may overlap, but a lack of empirical analysis to date has limited further interpretation. The current study used a large sample (N = 812) of undergraduates (N = 355) and adults receiving psychological treatment (N = 457) to test whether a joint hierarchical factor structure of personality pathology and insecure attachment is tenable. Results suggested that attachment and PD indicators load together on latent domains of emotional lability, detachment, and vulnerability, but antagonistic, impulsigenic, and psychosis-spectrum factors do not subsume attachment indicators. This solution was relatively consistent across treatment status but varied across gender, potentially suggesting divergent socialization of interpersonal problems. Although further tests are needed, if attachment and PDs prove to be unitary, combining them has exciting potential for providing an etiologic-developmental substrate to the classification of interpersonal dysfunction.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-10-14T06:00:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231200018
       
  • Association Between Depression Symptoms and Emotional-Communication
           Dynamics

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      Authors: Amy J. P. Gregory, Melanie A. Dirks, Jonas P. Nitschke, Jessica M. Wong, Lauren J. Human, Jennifer A. Bartz
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Communicating emotional experiences effectively is critical for adaptive functioning and personal and interpersonal well-being. Here, we investigated whether variability in depression symptoms undermines people’s ability to express their emotions to others (“emotional expressive accuracy”) and how those communication dynamics influence other’s impressions. In Phase 1, 49 “targets” were videotaped describing significant autobiographical events; they then watched their videos and continuously rated how positive/negative they were feeling throughout the narrative. In Phase 2, 171 “perceivers” watched subsets of videos from targets and similarly rated each target’s affect. Results from 1,645 unique target–perceiver observations indicate a link between target’s depressive symptoms and impaired emotional expressive accuracy for positive events, B = −0.002, t(1,501) = −3.152, p = .002. Likewise, more depressive targets were rated less favorably by perceivers, again when sharing positive events, B = −0.012, t(1,511) = −10.145, p < .001. Given the beneficial effects of “capitalization”—sharing positive experiences with others—these findings may illustrate one link between depressive symptoms and impoverished relationships.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T10:13:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231194963
       
  • Facing Emotions: Between- and Within-Sessions Changes in Facial Expression
           During Psychological Treatment for Depression

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      Authors: Hadar Fisher, Philip T. Reiss, Dovrat Atias, Michal Malka, Ben Shahar, Simon Shamay-Tsoory, Sigal Zilcha Mano
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The main diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD) are consistent experiences of high levels of negative emotions and low levels of positive emotions. Therefore, modification of these emotions is essential in the treatment of MDD. In the current study, we harnessed a computational approach to explore whether experiencing negative emotions during psychological treatment is related to subsequent changes in these emotions. Facial expressions were automatically extracted from 175 sessions of 58 patients with MDD. Within sessions, a U-shaped trajectory of change in valence was observed in which patients expressed an increase in negative emotions in the middle of the session. Between sessions, a consistent increase in valence was observed. A trajectory of within-sessions decrease followed by an increase in valence was positively associated with greater perceived positive emotions and subsequent decreases in depressive symptoms. These findings highlight the importance of targeting negative emotions during treatment to achieve more favorable outcomes.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T06:22:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231195793
       
  • The Longitudinal (Co)Development of Personality Traits and the Level of
           Personality Functioning After Negative Life Events

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      Authors: Peter Haehner, Chelsea E. Sleep, Joshua D. Miller, Donald R. Lynam, Christopher J. Hopwood
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Based on the evidence from cross-sectional studies, there is an ongoing debate whether personality traits and personality functioning are redundant (e.g., because these constructs are strongly correlated). However, some questions regarding their overlap can only be addressed using longitudinal data. In this Registered Report, we examined the (co)development of the Big Five personality traits and personality functioning using longitudinal data from individuals who had recently experienced a negative life event (N = 1,151). Personality functioning was less rank-order stable than conscientiousness and less mean-level stable than all Big Five traits except neuroticism. Furthermore, the developmental trajectory of the level of personality functioning was particularly similar to the developmental trajectory of neuroticism. Our results show that personality functioning and most Big Five personality traits differ in their longitudinal development in the context of negative life events and suggest the need for a clearer distinction between personality functioning and neuroticism.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-09-25T06:50:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231197607
       
  • Heterogeneity in Temporal Dynamics of Pain and Affect Among Individuals
           With Chronic Back Pain and Associations With Risk for Future
           Opioid-Related Problems

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      Authors: Madelyn R. Frumkin, Ryan W. Carpenter, Thomas L. Rodebaugh
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Chronic low back pain (CLBP) is a biopsychosocial phenomenon involving complex relationships between pain and psychosocial factors. In preregistered analyses, we examined dynamic relationships between pain and negative affect among individuals with CLBP (N = 87). We found that increased negative affect was concurrently and prospectively associated with increased pain for individuals on average. However, there was significant and meaningful between-persons variability in these effects such that risk for future opioid-related problems was positively associated with the within-persons correlation between pain and negative affect (β = 0.290, 95% credible interval [CI] = [0.071, 0.485]), the degree to which pain predicted increased negative affect (β = 0.439, 95% CI = [0.044, 0.717]), and the autoregressive effect of negative affect over 4-hr lags (β = 0.255, 95% CI = [0.007, 0.478]). These results suggest that variability in within-persons symptom dynamics may help identify chronic pain patients who are at greater risk of opioid-related problems.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-09-25T06:43:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231196121
       
  • Stereotypes and OCD-Symptom Presentations: A Mixed-Methods Evaluation
           Using Male-Character Vignettes

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      Authors: Gabriella T. Ponzini, Miranda Signorelli, Elizabeth A. Claydon, Christa Lilly, Shari A. Steinman
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Stereotypes toward symptom presentations of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) are poorly understood. A mixed-methods, multistudy analysis of OCD stigma was conducted. In Study 1 (N = 60), participants read one of five vignettes (symmetry/just right, contamination, sexual, harm/aggression, scrupulous OCD) before responding to open-ended questions. Inductive content analyses revealed anxiety-relevant stereotypes (e.g., trivialization) for symmetry/just right and contamination and serious mental-illness stereotypes (e.g., dangerous) for harm/aggression and sexual vignettes. In Study 2 (N = 698), participants read one of seven vignettes (OCD-symptom presentations, generalized anxiety disorder, schizophrenia) before responding to stigma measures. The sexual, harm/aggression, and schizophrenia vignettes were strongly associated with serious mental-illness stigma. The scrupulous vignette was associated with the most anxiety-relevant stigma. Together, these studies detail stereotype endorsement across OCD-symptom presentations. Stigma-reduction interventions should include psychoeducation and address macro-level stereotypes (i.e., stereotypes that exist across symptom presentations) while enhancing opportunities for contact to mitigate stigma.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-09-25T06:27:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231192893
       
  • Personality Pathology and Momentary Stress Processes

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      Authors: Colin E. Vize, Aleksandra Kaurin, Aidan G. C. Wright
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The expression of personality pathology differs between people and within a person in day-to-day life. Personality pathology may reflect, in part, dysregulation in basic behavioral processes. Thus, a useful approach for studying maladaptive trait expression comes from literature on stress and daily hassles, which provides dynamic accounts for the relations between individual differences and maladaptive dysregulation. In this study, we sought to integrate maladaptive traits and dynamic stress processes to further dynamic models of personality pathology. In a combined clinical/community sample (N = 297) oversampled for interpersonal problems, we used ecological momentary assessment (observation N = 19,968) to investigate how maladaptive traits moderated the processes of stress generation, stress reactivity, and affective spillover/inertia. Tests of our preregistered hypotheses provided a mix of supportive and null findings for stress processes identified in past research and mixed support for the moderating role of personality. The results provide insights into the relations between everyday stressors and personality pathology.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-09-25T06:19:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231192483
       
  • Threat Appraisal and Pediatric Anxiety: Proof of Concept of a Latent
           Variable Approach

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      Authors: Rachel A. Bernstein, Ashley R. Smith, Elizabeth R. Kitt, Elise M. Cardinale, Anita Harrewijn, Rany Abend, Kalina J. Michalska, Daniel S. Pine, Katharina Kircanski
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Elevated threat appraisal is a postulated neurodevelopmental mechanism of anxiety disorders. However, laboratory-assessed threat appraisals are task-specific and subject to measurement error. We used latent-variable analysis to integrate youths’ self-reported threat appraisals across different experimental tasks; we next examined associations with pediatric anxiety and behavioral- and psychophysiological-task indices. Ninety-two youths ages 8 to 17 (M = 13.07 years, 65% female), including 51 with a primary anxiety disorder and 41 with no Axis I diagnosis, completed up to eight threat-exposure tasks. Anxiety symptoms were assessed using questionnaires and ecological momentary assessment. Appraisals both before and following threat exposures evidenced shared variance across tasks. Derived factor scores for threat appraisal were associated significantly with anxiety symptoms and variably with task indices; findings were comparable with task-specific measures and had several advantages. Results support an overarching construct of threat appraisal linked with pediatric anxiety, providing groundwork for more robust laboratory-based measurement.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-09-23T06:00:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231190349
       
  • Trajectories and Personality Predictors of Eating-Pathology Development in
           Girls From Preadolescence to Adulthood

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      Authors: Emilie Lacroix, Sylia Wilson, Matt McGue, William G. Iacono, Kristin M. von Ranson
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding eating-pathology development may enable meaningful prescriptions for its prevention. Here, we identified common trajectories of eating-pathology development and the personality factors associated with these trajectories. Participants were 760 female twins from the Minnesota Twin Family Study who reported on eating pathology at approximate ages 11, 14, 18, 20, 24, and 29. Parents reported on twins’ personality characteristics at age 11, and twins completed self-report personality questionnaires at ages 14 and 18. Latent class growth analysis identified two distinct trajectories for total eating pathology, binge eating, and weight preoccupation and three distinct trajectories for body dissatisfaction. Girls with more pathological trajectories already showed elevated eating pathology at age 11. These subgroups of high-risk girls self-reported greater proneness to anxiety, stress, and alienation, and less sociable personality styles. Prevention efforts may be enhanced by using self-reported personality traits to identify girls at high risk for eating pathology.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-09-12T06:36:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231192271
       
  • Self-Referential Processing and Depression: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Amanda C. Collins, E. Samuel Winer
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Reward devaluation theory posits that depressed individuals avoid and devalue positivity, suggesting that they may hold fewer positive self-schemas. Previous meta-analytic reviews have supported this theoretical framework regarding positivity but have not assessed for self-referential stimuli. Self-referential encoding and recall tasks assess for self-schemas and thus provide further insight into how depressed individuals process self-referential positivity. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to examine the extent to which depressed individuals differ in processing self-referential positivity and negativity and whether this processing differs when depressed individuals think of others (i.e., other-referential). Results indicate that depressed individuals recall and endorse fewer self-referential positive words than negative words and fewer self-referential positive words than other-referential positive words than nondepressed individuals. These findings support reward devaluation theory and suggest that conceptualizing self-referential processing in depression as merely based on negativity biases can overlook crucial information about how depressed individuals devalue self-referential positive information.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T12:44:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231190390
       
  • Integrating “Lumpers” Versus “Splitters” Perspectives: Toward a
           Hierarchical Dimensional Taxonomy of Eating Disorders From Clinician
           Ratings

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      Authors: Kelsie T. Forbush, Yiyang Chen, Po-Yi Chen, Brittany K. Bohrer, Kelsey E. Hagan, Danielle A. N. Chapa, Kara A. Christensen Pacella, Victoria Perko, Brianne N. Richson, Sarah N. Johnson Munguia, Marianna L. Thomeczek, Sarah V. Nelson, Kylie Christian, Trevor J. Swanson, Jennifer E. Wildes
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we describe a hierarchical dimensional model of eating-disorder (ED) classification based on the Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology. Participants were community-recruited adults with an ED (N = 252; 81.9% female). We used a modified version of Goldberg’s method, which involved sequentially extracting latent factors using exploratory structural equation modeling, resulting in a 10-factor hierarchical-dimensional model. Dimensions predicted 92.4% and 58.7% of the variance in recovery outcomes at 6 months and 1 year, respectively. Compared with other illness indicators (e.g., Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders [DSM] diagnoses, dimensional ED impairment scores, weight/shape overvaluation, and DSM ED-severity specifiers), hierarchical dimensions predicted 0.88 to 334 times more variance in ED behaviors at baseline and 1.95 to 80.8 times more variance in psychiatric impairment at 1-year follow-up. Results suggest that reducing within-disorder heterogeneity for EDs within the broader context of internalizing symptoms provides a powerful framework from which to predict outcomes and understand symptoms experienced by people with EDs.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T05:55:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231186803
       
  • Pressure From Within: Gay-Community Stress and Body Dissatisfaction Among
           Sexual-Minority Men

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      Authors: Zachary A. Soulliard, Micah R. Lattanner, John E. Pachankis
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Although intraminority gay-community stress has been theorized to affect sexual-minority men’s body dissatisfaction, this association has not been evaluated quantitatively. Using two samples of sexual-minority men—one sample recruited from a population-based study of U.S. adults (N = 424; age: M = 54.29 years) and the other a sample meeting diagnostic criteria for depressive, anxiety, or trauma-/stressor-related disorders (N = 251; age: M = 26.52 years)—in this study, we investigated associations between gay-community stress and body dissatisfaction. In both samples, gay-community stress was significantly associated with sexual-minority men’s greater body dissatisfaction in models that controlled for demographic and minority-stress variables. In terms of specific domains of gay-community stress, perceptions of the gay community’s focus on sex, social status, and social competition were significant correlates of greater body dissatisfaction. Future research can determine the impact of routinely addressing gay-community stress in body image and eating-disorder treatments for this population.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-08-30T05:10:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231186789
       
  • A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Trigger Warnings, Content Warnings, and
           Content Notes

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      Authors: Victoria M. E. Bridgland, Payton J. Jones, Benjamin W. Bellet
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Trigger warnings, content warnings, or content notes are alerts about upcoming content that may contain themes related to past negative experiences. Advocates claim that warnings help people to emotionally prepare for or completely avoid distressing material. Critics argue that warnings both contribute to a culture of avoidance at odds with evidence-based treatment practices and instill fear about upcoming content. A body of psychological research has recently begun to empirically investigate these claims. We present the results of a meta-analysis of all empirical studies on the effects of these warnings. Overall, we found that warnings had no effect on affective responses to negative material or on educational outcomes. However, warnings reliably increased anticipatory affect. Findings on avoidance were mixed, suggesting either that warnings have no effect on engagement with material or that they increased engagement with negative material under specific circumstances. Limitations and implications for policy and therapeutic practice are discussed.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-08-18T08:55:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231186625
       
  • Resilience Among Older Individuals in the Face of Adversity: How
           Demographic and Trait Factors Affect Mental-Health Constructs and Their
           Temporal Dynamics

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      Authors: Lotte P. Brinkhof, Monique Chambon, K. Richard Ridderinkhof, Frenk van Harreveld, Jaap M. J. Murre, Harm J. Krugers, Sanne de Wit
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Resilience can be conceptualized as a network of interacting mental-health constructs characterized by weak autoconnections and/or interconnections. We investigated whether positive appraisal style (PAS), the ability to bounce back or recover from stress (BRS), age, education level, and urbanization grade can confer such desirable network properties within a network comprising depression, anxiety, loneliness, and mental well-being. Longitudinal data (five time points during the COVID-19 pandemic) were derived from a sample of older adults (N = 1,270, 55+). Individuals who were 67 or older, highly educated, or scored high on PAS and BRS exhibited more resilient network dynamics and generally better overall mental-health outcomes. Findings pertaining to urbanization grade and the (subgroup-dependent) dynamics among the mental-health constructs are also discussed. These findings may inform theorizing and interventions aimed at resilience during a challenging life phase.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-08-11T11:30:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231190294
       
  • Profiles of Risk, Allostatic Load, and Mental Health in Low-Income
           Children

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      Authors: Fanita A. Tyrell, Fred A. Rogosch, Dante Cicchetti
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Most health disparities originate in childhood and extend across the life span. However, studies on health disparities have predominantly focused on adults. This study evaluated the biological and psychosocial consequences of exposure to chronic adversity among 491 low-income children aged 8 to 12 years (Mage = 9.73, SD = 1.0; 52.1% male; 68.2% Black and 21.2% Latinx; 267 maltreated and 224 nonmaltreated). Latent profile analyses revealed six distinct profiles of cumulative socioeconomic risk, allostatic load, and mental health functioning. Childhood maltreatment, emotion regulation, affect, and personality characteristics were differentially associated with these latent profiles. Findings indicate differential effects of chronic adversity on adaptation, consistent with resilience theory. These findings also offer evidence that signs of physiological dysregulation emerge at earlier ages in development and suggest there may be a window of opportunity in childhood for interventions to reduce the detrimental effects of chronic adversity on health outcomes in children.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-08-11T10:44:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231183012
       
  • Associations of DNA-Methylation Measures of Biological Aging With Social
           Disparities in Child and Adolescent Mental Health

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      Authors: Laurel Raffington, Peter T. Tanksley, Liza Vinnik, Aditi Sabhlok, Megan W. Patterson, Travis Mallard, Margherita Malanchini, Ziada Ayorech, Elliot M. Tucker-Drob, Kathryn Paige Harden
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Children who experience environmental adversities are at increased risk of both internalizing and externalizing disorders. Epigenetic mechanisms may regulate the influence of environmental adversities on mental health. We examined the hypothesis that salivary DNA-methylation patterns of pace of biological aging (Dunedin pace of biological aging [DunedinPoAm]) and inflammation (DNA-methylation C-reactive protein [DNAm-CRP]) are socially stratified and associated with mental health in 1,183 children (609 female; age: M = 13.6 years) from the Texas Twin Project. Analyses were preregistered. Participants’ DNA-methylation algorithms and psychiatric symptoms differed by socioeconomic contexts and race/ethnicity. Children with more parent-reported internalizing symptoms had higher DunedinPoAm and DNAm-CRP scores, and children with more aggression problems had higher DNAm-CRP. DunedinPoAm partially mediated advantage of White racial identity on internalizing. Likewise, DNAm-CRP partially mediated advantage of higher family socioeconomic contexts and, in a separate model, White racial identity on reduced internalizing symptoms. Children’s epigenetic measures of pace of biological aging and inflammation are associated with social inequalities and mental health.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T02:56:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231186802
       
  • The Next Generation of Clinical-Psychological Science: Moving Toward
           Anti-Racism

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      Authors: Craig Rodriguez-Seijas, Juliette McClendon, Dennis C. Wendt, Derek M. Novacek, Tracie Ebalu, Lauren S. Hallion, Nima Y. Hassan, Kelsey Huson, Glen I. Spielmans, Johanna B. Folk, Lauren R. Khazem, Enrique W. Neblett, Tony J. Cunningham, Joya Hampton-Anderson, Shari A. Steinman, Jessica L. Hamilton, Yara Mekawi
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The field of clinical-psychological science exists in a broader field of psychology that is increasingly acknowledged as embedded in racist and white-supremacist history. In the production of clinical-psychological science, the clinical science model predominates as one of the most influential scientific voices that emphasizes the value of rigorous scientific theory, training, and praxis. We highlight some of the ways in which the clinical science model has neglected anti-racism. By examining the idiosyncratic development of the clinical science model in clinical-psychological science, we outline how its failure to contend with systemic racism in the field propagates a racist subdiscipline. Our hope is that by enacting difficult self-reflection, we invite other stakeholders in our field to think more critically about how systemic racism and white supremacy pervade our structures and institutions and to begin making more concrete changes that move the clinical-psychological-science field toward explicit anti-racism.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-07-25T06:39:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231156545
       
  • Evidence for Bidirectional, Cross-Lagged Associations Between Alliance and
           Psychological Distress in an Unguided Mobile-Health Intervention

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      Authors: Simon B. Goldberg, Zishan Jiwani, Daniel M. Bolt, Kevin M. Riordan, Richard J. Davidson, Matthew J. Hirshberg
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Bidirectional associations between changes in symptoms and alliance are established for in-person psychotherapy. Alliance may play an important role in promoting engagement and effectiveness within unguided mobile-health (mHealth) interventions. Using models disaggregating alliance and psychological distress into within- and between-persons components (random intercept cross-lagged panel model), we report bidirectional associations between alliance and distress over the course of a 4-week smartphone-based meditation intervention (n = 302, 80.0% elevated depression/anxiety). Associations were stable across time, and effect sizes were similar to those observed for psychotherapy (distress to alliance: βs = −0.13 to −0.14; alliance to distress: βs = −0.09 to −0.10). Alliance may be worth measuring to improve the acceptability and effectiveness of mHealth tools. Further empirical and theoretical work characterizing the role and meaning of alliance in unguided mHealth is warranted.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-07-21T05:49:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231184890
       
  • Does Perceived Posttraumatic Growth Predict Observed Changes in
           Current-Standing and State Posttraumatic Growth'

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      Authors: Meghan J. Gangel, Rowan Kemmerly, Lindsey Wilson, Sydney Glickson, Patricia A. Frazier, Howard Tennen, Eranda Jayawickreme
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Research on posttraumatic growth has been marred by the ubiquity of retrospective perceived growth assessments that lack construct validity. However, one justification for assessing perceived growth is that such perceptions may be a catalyst for subsequent change. We examined this question using a measurement-burst design in a representative midlife sample who had experienced a major negative life event in the past year (Wave 1: N = 804). Participants completed three waves of retrospective measures of perceived growth (Posttraumatic Growth Inventory), current-standing measures of posttraumatic growth domains, and experience-sampling assessments of state manifestations of growth-relevant domains twice a day for 3 weeks (Nassessments = 32,099) over 6 months. In random-intercept cross-lagged panel models, perceived growth did not predict subsequent observed change in current standing or aggregated state assessments of growth. Overall, perceived growth does not appear to serve as a catalyst for positive change in the short term.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-07-21T05:33:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231182329
       
  • The Role of Shame in the Sexual-Orientation Disparity in Mental Health: A
           Prospective Population-Based Study of Multimodal Emotional Reactions to
           Stigma

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      Authors: John E. Pachankis, Mark L. Hatzenbuehler, Daniel N. Klein, Richard Bränström
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the prominence of shame in stigma theories, its role in explaining population-level mental-health disparities between the stigmatized and nonstigmatized has not been investigated. We assessed shame explicitly (via self-report) and implicitly (via a behavioral task) in a prospective, representative cohort of sexual-minority and heterosexual young adults in Sweden (baseline n = 2,222). Compared with heterosexuals, sexual minorities evidenced higher explicit and implicit shame, which explained sexual-orientation disparities in depression, social anxiety, and suicidal thoughts. Among sexual minorities, there was an indirect effect of shame in the association between interpersonal stigma (i.e., past-year family rejection and childhood bullying) and later experiences of adverse mental health; an indirect effect did not exist for the related construct, internalized stigma. Results suggest extending existing stigma theories to consider emotions such as shame as characteristic reactions to stigma and guide the search for treatment targets focused on reducing the mental-health sequelae of stigma.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-07-14T06:55:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231177714
       
  • A Mixed-Methods Study of Race-Based Stress and Trauma Affecting Asian
           Americans During COVID

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      Authors: Joyce P. Yang, Quyen A. Do, Emily R. Nhan, Jessica A. Chen
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 propelled anti-Asian racism around the world; although empirical research has yet to examine the phenomenology of racial trauma affecting Asian communities. In our mixed-methods study of 215 Asian participants of 15 ethnicities, we examined experiences of racism during COVID and resulting psychological sequelae. Through qualitative content analysis, themes emerged of emotional, cognitive, and behavioral changes resulting from these racialized perpetrations, including internalizing emotions of fear, sadness, and shame; negative alterations in cognitions, such as reduced trust and self-worth; and behavioral isolation, avoidance, and hypervigilance, in addition to positive coping actions of commitment to racial equity initiatives. We engaged in data triangulation with quantitative Mann-Whitney U tests and found that individuals who experienced COVID discrimination had significantly higher racial trauma and posttraumatic stress disorder scores compared with individuals who did not. Our convergent findings provide clinicians with novel ways to assess the ongoing impact of racial trauma and implement appropriate interventions for clients.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-07-12T06:48:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231180810
       
  • Do Symptom Severity, Individual Socioeconomic Status, and Neighborhood
           Socioeconomic Status Explain Differences in Daily Functioning in
           Non-Latinx Black, Non-Latinx White, and Latinx People With Serious Mental
           Illnesses'

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      Authors: Arundati Nagendra, Chih-Wei Joshua Liu, Kim T. Mueser, Philip D. Harvey, Colin A. Depp, Raeanne C. Moore, Beshaun Davis, Amy E. Pinkham
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we examined ethno-racial differences in daily functioning in 66 non-Latinx White participants, 83 non-Latinx Black participants, and 60 Latinx participants (N = 209) diagnosed with serious mental illnesses, and the extent to which individual socioeconomic status (SES), neighborhood SES, and symptom severity accounted for observed differences. Participants completed ecological momentary assessments of what they were doing, who they were with, and where they were three times daily for 30 days. Black participants more frequently reported being alone or engaged in passive leisure (e.g., watching TV) than White participants and Latinx participants, less frequently reported vocational activity than Latinx participants, and less frequently reported home-based active leisure than White participants. Although some findings were accounted for by neighborhood SES, individual SES, or symptoms, there is also a need to explore sociocultural and racism-related explanatory factors. Clinical implications (e.g., providing vocational services to Black clients) and future research directions are discussed.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-06-06T09:38:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231169659
       
  • Machine-Learning-Based Prediction of Client Distress From Session
           Recordings

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      Authors: Patty B. Kuo, Michael J. Tanana, Simon B. Goldberg, Derek D. Caperton, Shrikanth Narayanan, David C. Atkins, Zac E. Imel
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Natural language processing (NLP) is a subfield of machine learning that may facilitate the evaluation of therapist–client interactions and provide feedback to therapists on client outcomes on a large scale. However, there have been limited studies applying NLP models to client-outcome prediction that have (a) used transcripts of therapist–client interactions as direct predictors of client-symptom improvement, (b) accounted for contextual linguistic complexities, and (c) used best practices in classical training and test splits in model development. Using 2,630 session recordings from 795 clients and 56 therapists, we developed NLP models that directly predicted client symptoms of a given session based on session recordings of the previous session (Spearman’s ρ = .32, p < .001). Our results highlight the potential for NLP models to be implemented in outcome-monitoring systems to improve quality of care. We discuss implications for future research and applications.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T05:55:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231172694
       
  • Multiple Adaptive Attention-Bias-Modification Programs to Alter Normative
           Increase in the Error-Related Negativity in Adolescents

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      Authors: Nader Amir, Amanda Holbrook, Alex Kallen, Nicholas Santopetro, Julia Klawohn, Shaan McGhie, Alec Bruchnak, Magen Lowe, William Taboas, C. J. Brush, Greg Hajcak
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In the current article, we examined the impact of two home-delivered attentional-bias-modification (ABM) programs on a biomarker of anxiety (i.e., the error-related negativity [ERN]). The ERN is sensitivity to ABM-related changes; however, it is unclear whether ABM exerts its influence on the ERN and anxiety by increasing general attentional control or by disengaging spatial allocation of attention. In this study, we measured the ERN, anxiety, attention bias, and attention control before and after two versions of ABM training and a waitlist control group in 546 adolescents. An ABM designed to increase attention control modulated the ERN but had no impact on anxiety. An ABM designed to reduce attentional bias changed bias and self-reported anxiety in youths but had no impact on the ERN or parent-reported anxiety. These results suggest that the ERN and normative anxiety may be modified using attention training.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T05:47:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231170563
       
  • Parent and Child Depressive Symptoms and Authoritarian Parenting:
           Reciprocal Relations From Early Childhood Through Adolescence

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      Authors: Emma Chad-Friedman, Leslie S. Jordan, Simone Chad-Friedman, Edward Lemay, Thomas Olino, Daniel N. Klein, Lea R. Dougherty
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      We conducted cross-lagged panel models to examine reciprocal relations between parent and child depressive symptoms and authoritarian-parenting behaviors across development in a community sample of 599 youths (89.1% White, 7.7% Black/African American, 2.3% Asian, 0.7% multiracial/other; 65.3% had at least one parent with a 4-year college degree). Mothers and fathers completed self-report measures about their own depressive symptoms and authoritarian-parenting behaviors during the years their children were 3 to 15 years old. Child depressive symptoms were assessed with a developmentally appropriate semistructured clinical interview at all time points. Results demonstrated reciprocal pathways between maternal and child depressive symptoms from ages 3 to 15 years serial mediators. Moreover, although child depressive symptoms at age 3 years led to greater maternal and paternal negative authoritarian parenting from ages 3 to 15 years, these effects were not reciprocal. Pathways between paternal and child depressive symptoms were not observed. Our findings highlight the importance of examining reciprocal pathways to identify mechanisms in the development of depression within families.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-26T12:30:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231170871
       
  • Stress Accumulation, Depressive Symptoms, and Sleep Problems Among Black
           Americans in the Rural South

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      Authors: Olutosin Adesogan, Justin A. Lavner, Sierra E. Carter, Steven R. H. Beach
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Centuries of systemic racism in the United States have led to Black Americans facing a disproportionate amount of life stressors. These stressors can have negative effects on mental and physical health, contributing to inequities throughout the life span. In the current study, we used longitudinal data from 692 Black adults in the rural South to examine the ways in which neighborhood stress, financial strain, and interpersonal experiences of racial discrimination operate independently and in tandem to affect depressive symptoms and sleep problems over time. Findings provided strong support for univariate and additive stress effects and modest support for multiplicative stress effects. Results underscore how multiple stressors stemming from systemic racism can undermine health among Black Americans and highlight the need for further research on factors that promote well-being in the face of these stressors.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-26T12:27:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231170839
       
  • Common Cause Versus Dynamic Mutualism: An Empirical Comparison of Two
           Theories of Psychopathology in Two Large Longitudinal Cohorts

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      Authors: Michael E. Aristodemou, Rogier A. Kievit, Aja L. Murray, Manuel Eisner, Denis Ribeaud, Eiko I. Fried
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Mental disorders are among the leading causes of global disease burden. To respond effectively, a strong understanding of the structure of psychopathology is critical. We empirically compared two competing frameworks, dynamic-mutualism theory and common-cause theory, that vie to explain the development of psychopathology. We formalized these theories in statistical models and applied them to explain change in the general factor of psychopathology (p factor) from early to late adolescence (N = 1,482) and major depression in middle adulthood and old age (N = 6,443). Change in the p factor was better explained by mutualism according to model-fit indices. However, a core prediction of mutualism was not supported (i.e., predominantly positive causal interactions among distinct domains). The evidence for change in depression was more ambiguous. Our results support a multicausal approach to understanding psychopathology and showcase the value of translating theories into testable statistical models for understanding developmental processes in clinical sciences.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T01:04:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231162814
       
  • What Is the Power of Identity' Examining the Moderating Role of
           Racial-Identity Latent Profiles on the Relationship Between Race-Related
           Stress and Trauma Symptoms Among Black American Women

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      Authors: Ifrah S. Sheikh, Daniel Lanni, Yara Mekawi, Abigail Powers, Vasiliki Michopoulos, Sierra Carter
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In the current study, we investigated the emergence of racial-identity latent profiles and the potential for racial-identity profiles to moderate the relationship between race-related stress and trauma symptoms in nontreatment-seeking, trauma-exposed, Black American women (N = 222). Racial-identity profiles emerged from latent profile analyses and supported a three-class solution: undifferentiated, detached, and nationalist. Analysis of variance revealed that the nationalist profile group experienced significantly higher race-related stress compared with the detached and undifferentiated profiles. Moderation analyses revealed racial-identity profile type predicted both total posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and each PTSD symptom cluster; specifically, the nationalist profile type buffered the effects of race-related stress on PTSD symptoms. This study illustrates how stress from racial discrimination influences PTSD symptoms and the ways racial identity may mitigate this relationship, which has the capacity to inform the adaptation of PTSD treatments for minoritized groups.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-20T06:29:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231161064
       
  • Cognitive Inhibition in Trauma Recovery Among Asylum Seekers: Test in a
           Randomized Trial of Mindfulness-Based Trauma Recovery for Refugees

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      Authors: Iftach Amir, Anna Aizik-Reebs, Kim Yuval, Yuval Hadash, Amit Bernstein
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Emerging evidence suggests that mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) may be one promising intervention approach within the global mental-health crisis of forced displacement. Little is known about the mechanisms of action of MBIs for trauma recovery or among diverse forcibly displaced people (FDP). Within a single-site randomized waitlist-control trial among 143 traumatized East African asylum seekers living in a high-risk urban postdisplacement setting, cognitive inhibition (CI) of trauma- and threat-related information was measured (modified Sternberg task) before and after Mindfulness-Based Trauma Recovery for Refugees (MBTR-R) or a parallel waitlist-control period. At preintervention, a deficit in the CI of trauma- and threat-related but not positively valenced emotionally evocative information was associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity. Although MBTR-R led to improved CI of trauma- and threat-related information, this change process did not mediate the therapeutic effect of MBTR-R on PTSD. Findings inform theory implicating CI in PTSD, MBI mechanisms of action, and FDP mental health.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-16T11:41:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231164958
       
  • “One Metric to Rule Them All”: A Common Metric for Symptoms of
           Depression and Generalized Anxiety in Adolescent Samples

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      Authors: Matthew Sunderland, Nicholas Olsen, Rachel Visontay, Cath Chapman, Louise Mewton, Lexine Stapinski, Nicola Newton, Maree Teesson, Tim Slade
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      There is a significant degree of heterogeneity in scales that purport to measure depression and generalized anxiety in adolescent samples, which makes it difficult to directly compare scores across studies. The aim of the current study is to develop a common metric that facilitates the comparison of scores from different but related scales of depression and generalized anxiety using a large adolescent sample. A nonequivalent-anchor-test design in conjunction with simultaneous calibration was used to equate and develop a common metric for six different scales. The common metric provided scores with acceptable levels of precision across the −1 to 3 range on θ, which represents the more severe and often clinical end of the spectrum. Thus, in the current study, we identified a coherent common metric that is closely aligned with the “distress” subfactor of the Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology model. Additional validation testing in independent samples is now required.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-15T01:09:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231168564
       
  • Identifying Treatment Responders to Varenicline for Alcohol Use Disorder
           Using Two Machine-Learning Approaches

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      Authors: Erica N. Grodin, Amanda K. Montoya, Alondra Cruz, Suzanna Donato, Wave-Ananda Baskerville, Lara A. Ray
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Varenicline has shown promise for treating alcohol use disorder (AUD); however, not everyone will respond to varenicline. Machine-learning methods are well suited to identify treatment responders. In the present study, we examined data from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Clinical Intervention Group multisite clinical trial of varenicline using two machine-learning methods. Baseline characteristics taken from a randomized clinical trial of varenicline were examined as potential moderators of treatment response using qualitative interaction trees (N = 199) and group least absolute shrinkage and selection operator interaction nets (N = 200). Results align with prior research, highlighting smoking status, AUD severity, medication adherence, and drinking goal as predictors of treatment response. Novel findings included the interaction between age and cardiovascular health in predicting clinical response and stronger medication effects among individuals with lower craving. With increased integration of machine-learning methods, studies that effectively integrate methods and medication development have high potential to inform clinical practice.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-15T01:06:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231169922
       
  • Daily Emotion Regulation in Major Depression and Borderline Personality
           Disorder

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      Authors: Ulrike Zetsche, Paul-Christian Bürkner, Julian Bohländer, Babette Renneberg, Stefan Roepke, Lars Schulze
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Emotional disturbances are an inherent aspect of most mental disorders and possibly driven by impaired emotion regulation. In the present study, we examined how exactly affected individuals differ from healthy individuals in regulating their emotions and whether individuals suffering from different mental disorders face similar or distinct difficulty in emotion regulation. We overcome earlier methodological constraints by using a 7-day experience sampling assessing the employment and effectiveness of six regulation strategies real time in 55 individuals with current major depressive disorder, 52 individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD), and 55 healthy individuals. All participants were female. Both clinical groups employed rumination and suppression more often and acceptance less often than healthy individuals. Depressed individuals ruminated even more often than individuals with BPD. Expressive suppression and rumination showed negative effects on subsequent emotions in all groups. Remarkably, both clinical groups were able to benefit from adaptive regulation strategies if they did select them.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-13T05:24:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231160709
       
  • Adolescents’ Sexual Orientation and Behavioral and Neural Reactivity to
           Peer Acceptance and Rejection: The Moderating Role of Family Support

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      Authors: Kirsty A. Clark, John E. Pachankis, Lea R. Dougherty, Benjamin A. Katz, Kaylin E. Hill, Daniel N. Klein, Autumn Kujawa
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual-minority adolescents frequently endure peer rejection, yet scant research has investigated sexual-orientation differences in behavioral and neural reactions to peer rejection and acceptance. In a community sample of adolescents approximately 15 years old (47.2% female; same-sex attracted: n = 36, exclusively other-sex attracted: n = 310), we examined associations among sexual orientation and behavioral and neural reactivity to peer feedback and the moderating role of family support. Participants completed a social-interaction task while electroencephalogram data were recorded in which they voted to accept/reject peers and, in turn, received peer acceptance/rejection feedback. Compared with heterosexual adolescents, sexual-minority adolescents engaged in more behavioral efforts to ingratiate after peer rejection and demonstrated more blunted neural reactivity to peer acceptance at low, but not medium or high, levels of family support. By using a simulated real-world social-interaction task, these results demonstrate that sexual-minority adolescents display distinct behavioral and neural reactions to peer acceptance and rejection.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-13T04:40:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231158574
       
  • A Commentary on “Systemic Challenges in Health Service Psychology
           Internship Training: A Call to Action From Trainee Stakeholders”

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      Authors: Chardée A. Galán, Cassandra L. Boness, Irene Tung, Sarah L. Pedersen, Neil P. Jones
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-11T09:02:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231156597
       
  • Look What Appeared From Under the Rug: A Commentary on Palitsky et al.
           (2022)

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      Authors: Marc S. Atkins, Tara G. Mehta
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-11T09:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221129799
       
  • Inclusion of Trainee Stakeholders Is Necessary for Effective Change in
           Health-Service-Psychology Internship Training

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      Authors: R. Palitsky, S. J. Reznik, D. M. Kaplan, M. R. Anderson, A. Athey, M. A. Brodt, J. A. Coffino, A. Egbert, E. S. Hallowell, J. T. Fox-Fuller, G. T. Han, M.-A. Hartmann, C. Herbitter, M. Herrera Legon, C. Hughes, C. R. Hosking, N. C. Jao, M. T. Kassel, T.-A. P. Le, H. F. Levin-Aspenson, G. López, M. R. Maroney, M. Medrano, M. L. Rogers, B. Stevenson
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In a recent call to action, we described pressing issues in the health-service-psychology (HSP) internship from the perspective of interns. In our article, we sought to initiate a dialogue that would include trainees and bring about concrete changes. The commentaries on our article are a testament to the readiness of the field to engage in such a dialogue, and we applaud the actionable recommendations that they make. In our response to these commentaries, we seek to move the conversation further forward. We observe two themes that cut across these responses: the impetus to gather novel data on training (the “need to know”) and the importance of taking action (the “need to act”). We emphasize that in new efforts to gather data and take policy-level action, the inclusion of trainee stakeholders (as well as others involved in and affected by HSP training) is a crucial ingredient for sustainable and equitable change.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-11T09:01:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231156598
       
  • Toward a Postdoctoral-Residency Training Model

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      Authors: Kelly A. Knowles, Rebecca C. Cox, Bunmi O. Olatunji
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-11T09:01:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231156594
       
  • Reforming Clinical Psychological Science Training: The Importance of
           Collaborative Decision-Making With Trainees

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      Authors: Dylan G. Gee, Alexander J. Shackman
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      To effectively address the staggering burden of mental illness, clinical psychological science will need to face some uncomfortable truths about current training practices. In a commentary authored by 23 current or recent trainees, Palitsky and colleagues (2022) highlighted a number of urgent challenges facing today’s clinical interns. They provid a thoughtful framework for reform with specific recommendations and guiding questions for a broad spectrum of stakeholders. Key suggestions are applicable to the entire sequence of clinical training, including doctoral studies that occur prior to internship. Although there is cause for cautious optimism, overcoming these systemic barriers will require a coordinated, all-hands approach and a more collaborative approach to policymaking.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-11T09:01:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221129820
       
  • ParTy ’n’ Play: Associations Between Sex-Related Substance Use and the
           Disinhibited Externalizing Spectrum Among Gay and Bisexual Men

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      Authors: Craig Rodriguez-Seijas, Brooke G. Rogers, Audrey Harkness, Steve A. Safren, John E. Pachankis
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Research suggests sex-related substance use can be conceptualized within the disinhibited externalizing spectrum of psychopathology. However, this research has generally excluded sexual-minority samples. In the current study, we examined the associations between the disinhibited externalizing spectrum and several sex-related substance use domains (i.e., heavy drinking and poppers [alkyl nitrite], cannabis, cocaine, and methamphetamine use) in a clinical sample (N = 254) of sexual-minority men. Disinhibited externalizing was significantly associated with reporting sex-related cannabis and methamphetamine use versus not and with frequency of sex-related alcohol and cocaine use. These results suggest few and generally weak associations—except for methamphetamine use—between the disinhibited externalizing spectrum and sex-related substance use. Implications for the applicability of dimensional models of psychopathology for sexual-minority populations, future directions for research on sexual behavior and substance use grounded in the specific sociocultural context in which sexual-minority men exist, and transdiagnostic interventions for sex-related substance use are discussed.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-06T01:39:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231158062
       
  • Changes in Daily Behaviors and Cognitions During the COVID-19 Pandemic:
           Associations With Suicide Crisis Syndrome and Suicidal Ideation

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      Authors: Megan L. Rogers, Erjia Cao, Jenelle A. Richards, Alexis Mitelman, Shira Barzilay, Yarden Blum, Ksenia Chistopolskaya, Elif Çinka, Manuela Dudeck, M. Ishrat Husain, Fatma Kantas Yilmaz, Oskar Kuśmirek, Jhoanne M. Luiz, Vikas Menon, Evgeni L. Nikolaev, Barbara Pilecka, Larissa Titze, Samira S. Valvassori, Sungeun You, Igor Galynker
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in drastic disruptions to lives and possible pernicious impacts on mental health, including suicidality. Understanding these relations, as well as impacts on at-risk populations, is essential. The present study examined changes in daily behaviors and cognitions after the implementation of physical/social distancing mandates in individuals with symptoms of suicide crisis syndrome (SCS) and/or suicidal ideation. Adults (N = 5,528) across 10 countries completed online self-report measures. There were significant main effects of time and various configurations of interactions between time, SCS, and suicidal ideation in predicting behaviors (outdoor and social engagements) and cognitions (thoughts about health, finances, and living situation). Cross-culturally, individuals with more severe SCS symptoms generally had the largest changes in behaviors and cognitions, though this effect was not replicated across all countries. Overall, these findings highlight the implications of the potentially mutually exacerbating influences of routine disruptions and suicide risk and the importance of examining associations cross-culturally.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-06T01:38:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221148732
       
  • The General Factor of Psychopathology (p): Choosing Among Competing Models
           and Interpreting p

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Avshalom Caspi, Renate M. Houts, Helen L. Fisher, Andrea Danese, Terrie E. Moffitt
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past 10 years, the general factor of psychopathology, p, has attracted interest and scrutiny. We review the history of the idea that all mental disorders share something in common, p; how we arrived at this idea; and how it became conflated with a statistical representation, the bifactor model. We then leverage data from the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study to examine the properties and nomological network of different statistical representations of p. We found that p performed similarly regardless of how it was modeled, suggesting that if the sample and content are the same, the resulting p factor will be similar. We suggest that the meaning of p is not to be found by dueling over statistical models but by conducting well-specified criterion-validation studies and developing new measurement approaches. We outline new directions to refresh research efforts to uncover what all mental disorders have in common.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-05-03T11:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221147872
       
  • The Longitudinal Association Between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder,
           Emotion Dysregulation, and Postmigration Stressors Among Refugees

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Philippa Specker, Belinda J. Liddell, Meaghan O’Donnell, Richard A. Bryant, Vicki Mau, Tadgh McMahon, Yulisha Byrow, Angela Nickerson
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Although emotion dysregulation has been robustly associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), there is relatively little understanding of this process in refugees. Specifically, longitudinal methodology has not been used to examine the relationship between emotion dysregulation and PTSD among refugees. In this study, we investigated the temporal relationship between emotion dysregulation, postmigration stressors, and PTSD clusters (reexperiencing, avoidance, negative alterations in mood and cognition [NAMC], and hyperarousal) from the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders among a community sample of refugees (N = 1,081) over a 2-year period. Random intercept cross-lagged panel analysis found that emotion dysregulation was antecedent to within-persons increases in reexperiencing and NAMC symptoms over time and bidirectionally associated with hyperarousal and postmigration stressors. In addition, postmigration stressors were antecedent to within-persons increases in reexperiencing, avoidance, and NAMC and bidirectionally associated with hyperarousal symptoms. Findings provide novel evidence in support of postmigration stressors and emotion dysregulation as mechanisms maintaining PTSD and highlight the potential utility of tailoring interventions to address these factors.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-04-21T07:00:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231164393
       
  • Do I Like Me Now' An Analysis of Everyday Sudden Gains and Sudden Losses
           in Self-Esteem and Nervousness

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      Authors: Theresa Eckes, Steffen Nestler
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Although rapid changes in symptom severity, or sudden gains and losses, are well known in psychotherapeutic research, much about the underlying processes that lead to them is still unclear. The revised theory of sudden gains and the complexity theory of psychopathology offer explanations of why sudden gains and sudden losses occur and how they can be predicted. To test the implications of these two theories, we investigated sudden gains and losses in a daily diary study focusing on their frequency, stability, and association with certain statistical indicators. To this end, we examined the daily self-esteem and nervousness ratings of 98 young adults over 82 consecutive days. Generally supporting the theoretical frameworks above, our findings suggest that everyday sudden gains and losses seem to be a common but unstable phenomenon associated with increased within-person variance.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-04-21T06:53:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231165677
       
  • Mapping Psychosis Risk States Onto the Hierarchical Taxonomy of
           Psychopathology Using Hierarchical Symptom Dimensions

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      Authors: Henry R. Cowan, Trevor F. Williams, Jason Schiffman, Lauren M. Ellman, Vijay A. Mittal
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Clinical high risk for psychosis (CHR) is a transdiagnostic risk state. However, it is unclear how risk states such as CHR fit within broad transdiagnostic models such as the Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology (HiTOP). In this study, a hierarchical dimensional symptom structure was defined by unfolding factor analysis of self-report data from 3,460 young adults (mean age = 20.3 years). A subsample (n = 436) completed clinical interviews, 85 of whom met CHR criteria. Regression models examined relationships between symptom dimensions, CHR status, and clinician-rated symptoms. CHR status was best explained by a reality-distortion dimension, with contributions from internalizing dimensions. Positive and negative attenuated psychotic symptoms were best explained by multiple psychotic and nonpsychotic symptom dimensions, including reality distortion, distress, fear, detachment, and mania. Attenuated psychotic symptoms are a complex presenting problem warranting comprehensive assessment. HiTOP can provide both diagnostic precision and broad transdiagnostic coverage, making it a valuable resource for use with at-risk individuals.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-03-29T11:58:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221146178
       
  • Contextualizing Bicultural Competence Across Youths’ Adaptation From
           High School to College: Prospective Associations With Mental Health and
           Substance Use

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      Authors: Michaela S. Gusman, M. Dalal Safa, Kevin J. Grimm, Leah D. Doane
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Bicultural competence, the ability to navigate bicultural demands, is a salient developmental competency for youths of color linked with positive adjustment. In this study, we investigated how discrimination experiences informed developmental trajectories of behavioral and affective bicultural competence across youths’ adaptation from high school to college and how these biculturalism trajectories predicted later adjustment (i.e., internalizing symptoms and binge drinking). Data were collected between 2016 and 2020 and included 206 U.S. Latino youths (mean age = 17.59 years, 64% female, 85% Mexican origin, 11% first-generation immigrants, and 62% second-generation immigrants). Linear latent growth analyses revealed that youths who experienced greater time-varying discrimination demonstrated lower concurrent behavioral and affective bicultural competence. Higher behavioral bicultural competence intercepts were associated with fewer internalizing symptoms in the third college year. No other significant associations emerged for internalizing symptoms or binge drinking. These findings have implications for mental-health equity among Latino youths during a critical period of psychopathology onset.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-03-23T12:01:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026231159667
       
  • Race-Based Rejection Sensitivity and the Integrated Motivational
           Volitional Model of Suicide in a Sample of Black Women

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Déjà N. Clement, Shadin A. Awad, Vanessa N. Oliphant, LaRicka R. Wingate
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Black women’s rates of suicide ideation have risen steadily, and this increase may be due to socioecological factors such as race-related stress. Experiences of race-related stress may be associated with feelings of defeat and entrapment, significant predictors of suicide ideation, as studies have identified that race-based rejection may be humiliating and cause feelings of defeat. Black women may experience race-based rejection sensitivity (RRS) because of historical inequities and discrimination. The current study examined relationships among defeat, entrapment, RRS, and suicide ideation in Black women. Mediation analysis indicated direct associations between defeat and suicide ideation and indirect associations by way of entrapment in Black women. Results indicated that RRS did not significantly moderate the relationship between defeat and entrapment, defeat and suicide ideation, or entrapment and suicide ideation. The current study advances research on mental health equity and suicide by adding to the scant work conducted on risk factors for suicide in Black women.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-03-21T06:54:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221147265
       
  • Culturally Anchored Mental-Health Attitudes: The Impact of Language

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      Authors: Uriel C. Heller, Leigh H. Grant, Miwa Yasui, Boaz Keysar
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Culture plays a key role in the long-standing underutilization of professional mental-health services among immigrants and ethnic minorities, especially among Asian communities. Furthermore, language nativeness can modulate the salience of cultural norms. Through a series of four experimental studies (N = 1,120), we evaluated whether bilingual speakers’ attitudes toward mental-health treatment are affected by whether they are using their native Chinese or foreign English. Overall, participants more strongly endorsed mental-health treatment when information was presented in English. The same outcome was found for participants residing in the United States and mainland China. Consistent with a language-priming-culture hypothesis, participants using Chinese endorsed mental-health treatment less when their affiliation with traditional Asian values was higher, whereas in English their recommendations remained independent of affiliation with traditional Asian values. In sum, these studies reveal the significance of language in culturally anchored mental-health attitudes.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-03-04T12:17:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221148110
       
  • Development and Feasibility Pilot Study of Indigenous Recovery Planning: A
           Community-Engaged Approach to Addressing Substance Use in a Native
           Community

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Monica C. Skewes, Vivian M. Gonzalez, Julie A. Gameon, Adriann Ricker, Shannon Martell, Martel Reum, Shannon Holder
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Although Native (American Indian [AI] and Alaska Native [AN]) populations have high rates of abstinence from alcohol, health problems associated with substance use remain a pressing concern in many AI/AN communities. As part of a longstanding community-based participatory research project involving 5 years of relationship building and three preliminary studies, our team of academic and community coresearchers developed a culturally grounded intervention to facilitate recovery from substance use disorders among tribal members from a rural AI reservation. Our Indigenous Recovery Planning (IRP) intervention consists of six weekly sessions and is designed to provide inroads to existing resources in the community, affirm and enhance Native identity, address culturally relevant risk factors, and build on strengths. Results from a feasibility pilot study (N = 15) suggest that IRP is feasible to implement and acceptable to the community. Although there was insufficient statistical power to conduct hypothesis testing, there were changes between pretest and posttest scores in the expected directions. Future directions and limitations of this research are discussed.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-02-08T05:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221141662
       
  • Global Is Local: Leveraging Global Mental-Health Methods to Promote Equity
           and Address Disparities in the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ali Giusto, Helen E. Jack, Jessica F. Magidson, David Ayuku, Savannah L. Johnson, Kathryn L. Lovero, Sidney H. Hankerson, Annika C. Sweetland, Bronwyn Myers, Palmira Fortunato dos Santos, Eve S. Puffer, Milton L. Wainberg
      Abstract: Clinical Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Structural barriers perpetuate mental-health disparities for minoritized U.S. populations; global mental health (GMH) takes an interdisciplinary approach to increasing mental-health-care access and relevance. Mutual capacity-building partnerships between low- and middle-income countries and high-income countries are beginning to use GMH strategies to address disparities across contexts. We highlight these partnerships and share GMH strategies through a case series of said partnerships between Kenya and North Carolina, South Africa and Maryland, and Mozambique and New York. We analyzed case materials and narrative descriptions using document review. Shared strategies across cases included qualitative formative work and partnership building; selecting and adapting evidence-based interventions; prioritizing accessible, feasible delivery; task sharing; tailoring training and supervision; and mixed-method, hybrid designs. Bidirectional learning between partners improved the use of strategies in both settings. Integrating GMH strategies into clinical science—and facilitating learning across settings—can improve efforts to expand care in ways that consider culture, context, and systems in low-resource settings.
      Citation: Clinical Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2023-01-10T09:17:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21677026221125715
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 99)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 348)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 66)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 264)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 346)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 208)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 200)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 198)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

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