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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 1007 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 358)
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 354)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 275)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 255)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 180)
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 173)
Journal of Applied Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 168)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 148)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 146)
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 144)
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 139)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 121)
Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 94)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : General     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 90)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 86)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 83)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 74)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Educational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Human Perception and Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55)
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Abnormal Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Emotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Clinical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Educational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Neuropsychologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Applied     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Counseling Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Applied Sport Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Motivation and Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Developmental Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal for the Psychology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Personality Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Neuropsychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
European Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Research in Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Anxiety Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Trauma & Dissociation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Psychological Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Legal and Criminological Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Dreaming     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Development and Psychopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Psychosomatic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
International Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Methodology: European Journal of Research Methods for the Behavioral and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Personality Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Ethics & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Humanistic Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Developmental Psychobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Family Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
History of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Multivariate Behavioral Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Mathematical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Neuropsychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychotherapy Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Psychological Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pediatric Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Imagination, Cognition and Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Peace and Conflict : Journal of Peace Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Group Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Forum of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
New Ideas in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nonverbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Constructivist Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Phenomenological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Diagnostica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trauma Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Analytical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Black Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Human Psychopharmacology Clinical and Experimental     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Japanese Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Comparative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forum Psychotherapeutische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Neuropsychobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Russian & East European Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forum der Psychoanalyse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Measurement Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Psicología     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dialectica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia : Teoria e Pesquisa     Open Access  
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Mentálhigiéné es Pszichoszomatika     Full-text available via subscription  
Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle     Full-text available via subscription  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Mindfulness
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.132
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1868-8527 - ISSN (Online) 1868-8535
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • The Role of Likeability in Discriminating Between Kindness and Compassion

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      Abstract: Objectives Kindness and compassion are prosocial constructs aimed at benefiting others, with the former focused on happiness and the latter on suffering. Despite these distinctly different motivations, kindness and compassion are often used interchangeably. If compassion and kindness are different processes, they should respond differently to the same facilitators and inhibitors, with a key moderator being likeability. Methods We used a cross-sectional survey design to examine whether a target that differed in terms of likeability (liked versus disliked) influenced willingness to engage in kind acts compared to compassionate acts, and the emotional patterns experienced. We recruited 150 participants (83 men, 66 women, 1 other; Mage = 27.85, SD = 10.21) using an online survey platform. Results Participants reported less willingness to engage in acts of kindness compared to acts of compassion regardless of target likeability. However, this reduction in willingness was markedly greater for disliked targets. Compassionate acts towards liked targets were associated with significantly higher levels of negative emotions (e.g., irritation, sadness, anger, anxiety, and disgust) when compared to kind acts. Conversely, compassionate acts towards disliked targets elicited less feelings of irritation and anger compared to kind acts. Conclusions These findings indicate that kindness and compassion result from separable motivational systems, differing in both the emotions elicited and the willingness to act. Reluctance in helping disliked others is reduced when the action is aimed at reducing suffering.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
       
  • Embracing the Complexity of our Inner Worlds: Understanding the Dynamics
           of Self-Compassion and Self-Criticism

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      Abstract: Objectives Although research in self-compassion has been rapidly growing, there is still substantial controversy about its meaning and measurement. The controversy centers on Neff’s popular Self- Compassion Scale (SCS) and the argument that compassionate self-responding (CSR) and uncompassionate self-responding (UCS) are a single dimension versus the argument that they are two semi-independent, unipolar dimensions, with UCS not reflective of “true” self-compassion. Methods We review the evidence for both positions and conclude that the data cannot yet resolve the debate. Results Neither position is proven to be right or wrong. We recommend the way forward is to let go of traditional factor analytic approaches and examine self-compassionate behavior as a dynamic network of interacting processes that are influenced by context. This leads us to three classes of testable hypotheses. The link between CS and UCS will depend on the timeframe of measurement, current circumstances, and individual differences. Conclusions We propose a middle ground to the SCS debate; rather than supporting the single total score, 2-factor score (CSR and UCS) or the 6-factor score (the six subscales of the SCS), we argue these constructs interact dynamically, and the decision of which scoring method to use should depend on the three testable contextual hypotheses.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
       
  • Contemplating Critique: Mindfulness Attenuates Self-Esteem and
           Self-Regulatory Impacts of Negative Feedback

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      Abstract: Objectives Receiving feedback is vital to learning and job performance, but this can provoke undesirable psychological responses, including loss of self-esteem and self-regulatory depletion. While mindfulness can attenuate responses to self-threats, it is unknown if this occurs following self-esteem threats, including negative feedback. This experimental study investigates a proposed moderated mediation model of how brief mindfulness meditation may attenuate these psychological responses to negative feedback. Methods The proposed model was tested through a randomized 2 × 2 factor experiment with a sample of undergraduate students (N = 163). Participants completed a performance task (the Remote Associates Test), followed by an audio guided mindfulness induction (mindfulness meditation v. mind-wandering active control). After receiving randomized performance feedback, either negative or positive feedback, participants reported their state self-esteem and self-regulatory depletion. We modeled feedback as predicting self-regulatory depletion through self-esteem, and brief mindfulness meditation moderating the relationship between feedback and self-esteem, and through this influencing the indirect relationship of feedback and self-regulatory depletion. Results Findings provided support for the proposed moderated mediation model. Inducing mindfulness via brief meditation weakened the relationship between negative feedback and decreased self-esteem, thus contributing to lower self-regulatory depletion. Conclusions The results provide evidence that inducing mindfulness through meditation attenuates psychological responses to negative feedback, including loss of state self-esteem and self-regulatory depletion. This adds to understanding of the intersection of mindfulness practice, the self, and practice in educational and workplace domains.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
       
  • Impact of Social Anxiety and Type of Stressor on Levels of Self-compassion

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      Abstract: Self-compassion involves showing kindness and understanding to the self during times of stress. Individuals with social anxiety have been shown to exhibit lower levels of self-compassion than the general population. Objectives The present pair of studies examined levels of self-compassion for different types of stress. Across both studies, individuals with elevated social anxiety were hypothesised to display the lowest levels of self-compassion in times of social judgement. Methods In Study 1 (N = 160), self-compassionate responding was assessed after randomly assigning participants to recall a time in their lives when they were socially judged, physically ill, or experiencing symptoms of burnout. Study 2 (N = 230) was a replication of Study1, but potential mediation models for differences in self-compassionate responding were also explored. Results For Study 1, there was a significant interaction such that individuals high in social anxiety had lower levels of self-compassion in times of social judgement, whereas those low in social anxiety displayed the lowest levels of self-compassion in times of burnout. For Study 2, individuals in the physical illness condition displayed the greatest self-compassion, and those in the burnout condition displayed the least self-compassion, regardless of social anxiety level. Self-blame was found to mediate the relationship between condition and self-compassion, such that those in the physical illness condition reported less self-blame, which was associated with greater self-compassion. Conclusions This research provides initial support for the possibility that self-compassion can depend on the domain of stress an individual encounters. Self-blame may be one reason for differences in self-compassion across different domains of stress.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
       
  • Deconstructing Self-Compassion: How the Continued Use of the Total Score
           of the Self-Compassion Scale Hinders Studying a Protective Construct
           Within the Context of Psychopathology and Stress

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      Abstract: Abstract In a new commentary in Mindfulness, Neff once again tried to defend the use of the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS) total score by arguing that compassionate and uncompassionate self-responding (CS and UCS) are part of a bipolar continuum. In this brief reaction, we refute this notion and also clarify how the continued use of the SCS total score muddies the water of research on self-compassion as a protective variable. We also illustrate how the SCS—by separating CS and UCS—can provide more valid and valuable information on protection and vulnerability within the context of psychopathology and stress than just relying on the total score of the SCS.
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
       
  • One Compassion, Many Means: A Big Two Analysis of Compassionate Behavior

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      Abstract: Objectives Compassion science has been informed and guided by Buddhist perspectives, but has yet to fully account for certain key Buddhist ideas about compassion. Skillful means and fierce compassion represent two such ideas, both of which pertain to compassionate actions that may not always appear compassionate to recipients or observers. Methods To better account for the variety of compassionate behavior evident in the Buddhist traditions, including but not limited to skillful means and fierce compassion, this paper reviews relevant theory and findings from compassion science through the lens of the Big Two Framework. The Big Two Framework distinguishes between two core dimensions of social cognition, namely communion (i.e., warmth, morality, and expressiveness) and agency (i.e., dominance, competence, and instrumentality). Results The Big Two Framework’s fundamental distinction between communion and agency appears useful for delineating forms of compassionate behavior. Additionally, the framework is helpful for considering behavior from actor versus recipient/observer perspectives, making it well-suited to account for compassionate actions that may not appear compassionate. Conclusions Reflecting on compassion in relation to the Big Two maps a richer understanding of the social cognition underlying diverse forms of compassionate behavior and offers an empirically tractable framework and terminology for advancing research on understudied expressions of compassion.
      PubDate: 2022-05-10
       
  • Tracing the Path Toward Mindfulness Back to Its Origins: Linking Tenets of
           Buddhism to Mindfulness Within the Buddhism-Informed Unified Flexibility
           and Mindfulness (BI-UFM) Model

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      Abstract: Objectives The Unified Flexibility and Mindfulness (UFM) model is a process-oriented multistage mechanistic model operationalizing the interplay between forms of mechanistic mindfulness and informed mindfulness, thereby representing holistic mindfulness as a set of interrelated processes and clarifying their links to well-being. Recent cross-sectional, correlational findings from a US sample supported the UFM model. The current study used data across 4 countries to link everyday aspects of Buddhism to components within the UFM model, thereby (1) extending work on the UFM model cross-culturally, (2) empirically tracing various aspects of mindfulness back to their origins, and (3) extending Buddhist psychology to embrace a broad operationalization of mindfulness within the Buddhism-Informed UFM (BI-UFM) model. Methods A sample of 2091 online respondents (68% female, M = 32yo) drawn from 5 cultural groups (668 white Americans, 319 Asian Americans, 332 Chinese, 400 Japanese, 362 Taiwanese) completed the Three Teachings of East Asia (TTEA) inventory, the Multidimensional Psychological Flexibility Inventory (MPFI; a UFM measure), and measures of distress and well-being. Results Confirmatory SEM analyses suggested that across random sample halves, culture groups, and Buddhists vs. non-Buddhists, key aspects of Buddhism (e.g., impermanence, meditation practice) were stably and consistently linked to greater mindful present moment awareness and decentering, which were in turn linked to value-driven behavior and well-being. Aspects of punishing karmic view were linked to higher distraction/inattention and defensively reacting to difficult experiences, which were in turn linked to aimless haphazard behavior and distress. Exploratory network analyses yielded comparable findings, highlighting the central nature of meditation practice and informed, value-driven behavior. The results more broadly supported the BI-UFM process model in which forms of mechanistic mindfulness were linked to greater informed mindfulness (e.g., decentering and value-driven behavior), highlighting possible paths toward cultivating holistic mindfulness, thereby promoting well-being. Conclusions The current results support the BI-UFM model as a conceptual framework for understanding how Buddhist thought might shape the lives of individuals across the globe.
      PubDate: 2022-05-04
       
  • Transition Needs Compassion: a Thematic Analysis of an Online
           Compassion-Focused Therapy Group in a Gender Service

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      Abstract: Objectives Transgender and gender non-conforming people may face elevated rates of shame and self-criticism in light of minority stress. Compassion-focused therapy has a growing evidence base in addressing trans-diagnostic processes in mental health difficulties, including shame and self-criticism. The objective of the present study was to explore the experience of an initial pilot compassion-focused therapy group delivered online in a Gender Service during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods Six transgender people completed a semi-structured interview after attending an 8-week compassion-focused therapy group in a national Gender Service. Inductive thematic analysis was used to identify themes in the data. Results Four themes were identified from the data: Transition Needs Compassion; Acceptability of the Compassion-Focused Approach; Being in a group with other transgender people; and Online delivery works despite its challenges. Participants reported that the compassion-focused framework was an appropriate and helpful way of understanding their experiences of stigma and that both the content and process of the group had benefitted them. Being with other transgender people raised some anxieties, such as comparisons or fear of offending, but also enabled seeing the self in more positive and accepting ways. While online delivery had some challenges, participants largely felt it was an effective mode of delivery, aided by the experiential nature of the group. Conclusions Compassion-focused therapy seems to be a feasible and acceptable approach for transgender and gender non-conforming people. Group processes may be helpful in increasing self-acceptance. Further quantitative exploration of therapy process and outcomes is warranted.
      PubDate: 2022-05-04
       
  • Self-transcendence Predicts Better Pre- and Postoperative Outcomes in Two
           Randomized Clinical Trials of Brief Mindfulness-Based Interventions

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      Abstract: Objectives Self-transcendent experiences have been infrequently examined by modern psychological science, despite their purported healing potential. The two studies reported here were designed to test whether surgical patients could achieve self-transcendent states and whether those states predicted better clinical outcomes. Methods Two, single-site, parallel-group randomized clinical trials (RCTs) involving knee and hip replacement patients were conducted. In Study 1 (N = 196), patients were randomized to a preoperative, 15-min mindfulness of breath or cognitive-behavioral pain psychoeducation intervention. In Study 2 (N = 118), patients were randomized to a preoperative, 20-min mindfulness of breath, mindfulness of pain, or cognitive-behavioral pain psychoeducation intervention. Self-transcendent state and acute clinical symptomology were assessed immediately before and after the preoperative interventions. Postoperative outcomes were also assessed. Results A brief MBI induced self-transcendent states in a general sample of knee and hip replacement patients (Study 1: F = 36.79, p < .001; Study 2: F = 7.25, p = .001). MBI-induced self-transcendent states were associated with decreases in pain intensity (Study 1: β =  − .26, p = .001; Study 2: β =  − .30, p = .004), pain unpleasantness (β =  − .21, p = .008), and anxiety (β =  − .36, p < .001) immediately after the preoperative intervention. The depth of self-transcendent states achieved during meditation before surgery predicted better postoperative physical function (β = .21, p = .033) in Study 1 and less postoperative pain intensity (β =  − .35, p = .016) and pain interference (β =  − .32, p = .019) in Study 2. Conclusions These two studies suggest self-transcendence is a therapeutic mechanism of mindfulness that is accessible to a general sample of surgical patients and can improve clinical outcomes. Clinical Trial Registration for Study 1: ClinicalTrials.gov = NCT03665727. Clinical Trial Registration for Study 2: ClinicalTrials.gov = NCT04520958.
      PubDate: 2022-05-03
       
  • The Impact of Compassion from Others and Self-compassion on Psychological
           Distress, Flourishing, and Meaning in Life Among University Students

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      Abstract: Objectives Research shows that compassion from others and from the self may enable university students to face, overcome, and bounce back from adversity and generate a greater sense of thriving and meaning in life. However, the underlying processes are largely unknown. The present study aimed to examine the associations of compassion with psychological distress, flourishing, and meaning in life among university students and explore the mechanisms underlying these associations. Methods A total of 536 Hong Kong university students completed questionnaires measuring their experiences of compassion from others, self-compassion, resilience, psychological distress, flourishing, and meaning in life. Results Serial mediation analyses showed that compassion from others was associated positively with self-compassion, which was, in turn, linked to greater resilience and consequently lower levels of psychological distress and higher levels of flourishing and meaning in life. Conclusions Our findings reveal the associations of compassion from others and self-compassion with the well-being and life meaning of university students. The findings highlight the importance of being open and receptive to love and kindness from others. The findings also point to the importance of developing a caring attitude toward oneself.
      PubDate: 2022-04-29
       
  • Association Between Dispositional Mindfulness, Clinical Characteristics,
           and Emotion Regulation in Women Entering Substance Use Disorder Treatment:
           an fMRI Study

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      Abstract: Objectives Dispositional mindfulness (DM) is associated with emotion regulation (ER) in healthy populations and may be protective for individuals with substance use disorders (SUD). We tested hypotheses concerning the associations of DM with ER, mental health symptoms, drug use severity, and behavioral and brain metabolic responses during an emotional Go-Nogo task. Methods Women entering an SUD treatment program (N = 245) self-reported on the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ); Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21); Addiction Severity Index (ASI); and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS). A subgroup of 45 women completed the emotional Go-Nogo task while undergoing fMRI. Associations between DM and self-reported ER and clinical characteristics were tested in the full sample. Associations between DM and behavioral and neural responses during the Go-Nogo emotion regulation challenge were tested in the fMRI sub-sample. Results In the full sample, FFMQ correlated with DASS-stress (r =  − .43, p < .0001), DASS-depression (r =  − .52, p < .0001), DASS-anxiety (r =  − .32, p < .0001), DERS (r =  − .66, p < .0001), and ASI-Drug scores (r =  − .28, p < .0001). In the subsample, inhibition of the natural avoidance response while approaching a fearful stimulus recruited activity in the inferior frontal gyrus and the insular cortex (IC). Activity in the IC cluster was positively correlated with FFMQ scores (r = 0.38, p = .015). FFMQ scores correlated with activation in the striatum and IC during face processing. Conclusions Among women with SUD, DM beneficially correlated with ER, mental-health symptoms, addiction severity, and recruitment of neural substrates underlying ER.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
       
  • Mindfulness and Depersonalization: a Nuanced Relationship

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      Abstract: Objectives Although depersonalization has been described as the antithesis of mindfulness, few studies have empirically examined this relationship, and none have considered how it may differ across various facets of mindfulness, either alone or in interaction. The present study examined the relationship between symptoms of depersonalization and facets of dispositional mindfulness in a general population sample. Methods A total of 296 adult participants (139 male, 155 female, 2 other) were recruited online via Qualtrics and completed the Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale; Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale; and Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire. Results Controlling for general distress, depersonalization symptoms were positively associated with Observe, Describe, and Nonreactivity facets and negatively associated with Acting with Awareness and Nonjudgment facets. After controlling for intercorrelations among the facets, depersonalization symptoms remained significantly associated with higher Nonreactivity and lower Acting with Awareness. The overall positive relationship between depersonalization symptoms and the Observe facet was moderated by both Nonjudgment and Nonreactivity. Specifically, higher Observing was related to increased depersonalization symptoms at low levels of Nonjudgment and to decreased symptoms at low levels of Nonreactivity. Conclusions The current study provides novel insight into the relationship between depersonalization symptoms and various aspects of mindfulness. Experiences of depersonalization demonstrated divergent relationships with mindfulness facets, alone and in interaction. The results may inform theoretical models of depersonalization and mindfulness-based interventions for depersonalization.
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
       
  • Mechanisms of Change Underlying Mindfulness-Based Practice Among
           Adolescents

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      Abstract: Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate how mindfulness-based practice influenced self-regulation and self-compassion during adolescence. Of particular interest was the reciprocal interplay between the subcomponents of these two constructs. Methods The participants included 538 high school students (52.2% male), mean age 16.59 (SD = .74) recruited from three high schools in Philadelphia, PA. Students participated in a 12-week school-based mindfulness intervention and completed the Self-compassion Scale-Short Form and the Adolescent Self-regulation Inventory at pretest (T1) and posttest (T2). Results A key finding was that the models with directional paths from self-regulation to self-compassion best fit the data. Specifically, long-term self-regulation at T1 was positively associated with mindfulness and self-kindness at T2 while short-term self-regulation at T1 was negatively associated with self-judgment, over-identification, and isolation at T2. Conclusions These findings suggest that self-regulation precedes and enables the actualization of self-compassion within the context of mindfulness practice. The implications for understanding the specific mechanisms underlying mindfulness-based practice and its benefits for adolescents’ psychological well-being are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-04-26
       
  • The Impacts of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) on Mindfulness
           and Well-being for Regular and Novice Meditators

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      Abstract: Objectives As mindfulness practices become mainstream, it is increasingly common for participants in mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) to have previous meditation experience. The primary aim of this study was to assess whether the impacts of a mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program on a variety of self-report measures differed for novice meditators (NM) and regular meditators (RM). Methods A total of 158 Japanese participants in 10 cohorts completed questionnaires before and after an 8-week community-based MBSR program. The questionnaire consisted of Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), Total Mood Disturbance (TMD) from Profile of Mood States 2, Mental Component Summary (MCS) and Physical Component Summary (PCS) of the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (2nd version), and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Baseline scores and pre-post change scores were compared for RM (participants who had reported meditating ≥ 45 min/week prior to MBSR) and NM (< 45 min/week). Results At baseline, RM (38.0% of the sample) had significantly higher scores than NM on FFMQ, SCS, and MCS, and lower scores on TMD and PSS (i.e., less mood disturbance and less stress). Post-program, both groups showed significant improvements in all measures except PCS, with NM’s post-MBSR scores comparable to RM’s baseline scores. A significant Group (NM vs. RM) × Time (pre- vs. post-) interaction was observed only for FFMQ. Conclusions Regular meditators, who show greater self-compassion and better mental health than novice meditators at baseline, can benefit from MBSR to a similar extent in measures of self-compassion and other aspects of well-being.
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
       
  • Science-Based Buddhist Practice: an Illustration Using Doctrinal Charts of
           Won Buddhism

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      Abstract: Abstract The recognition of mindfulness-based interventions as an effective approach to address psychological distress and improve well-being has stimulated the development of a multitude of programs, each designed for specific applications. While many mindfulness-based interventions are focused on addressing particular psychological needs, so-called second-generation mindfulness-based interventions typically include overtly spiritual content but also remain secular in their delivery. More recently, explicitly religion-themed mindfulness programs have emerged that are yet to be evaluated scientifically, raising questions as to how this to occur in the most appropriate manner. Referring to doctrinal charts in Won Buddhism, we illustrate an example of how the distinction can be made transparent between content that can be subjected to scientific inquiry and content related to religious and personal beliefs. By delineating elements of belief from practice, areas can be identified that are open for scientific verification without causing offense. Program participants and other practitioners can then clearly identify the specific aspects for which there is widely accepted evidence for their effectiveness, which may then also be communicated as science-based Buddhist practices.
      PubDate: 2022-04-23
       
  • Mindful Eating Questionnaire for Children: Validation and Reliability in
           Turkish Children

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      Abstract: Objectives This study aims to adapt the Mindful Eating Questionnaire for Children (MEQ-C) to Turkish and test its validity and reliability. Methods A total of 227 children (118 boys, 109 girls, aged 8–11 years) participated in the study. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews using surveys that contained the MEQ-C, Emotional Eating Scale Adapted for Use in Children and Adolescents (EES-C), and the Children’s Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was applied for categorical data. For the evaluation of external construct validity, Spearman’s correlation coefficient was calculated between MEQ-C scores and EES-C and CEBQ. Reliability was examined in terms of internal consistency and test–retest reliability. Results A confirmatory factor analysis confirmed that the 12-item Turkish version of the MEQ-C measures two underlying factors (Mindless eating and Awareness). The fit indices were found to be acceptable. The Cronbach alpha coefficient was found to be 0.82 for the Mindless eating subscale, while it was found to be 0.80 for the Awareness. The test–retest reliability was 0.78 for the Mindless eating and 0.75 for the Awareness. Also, the total contribution of two factors to the variance was 51.70%. The Mindless eating subscale had significant positive correlations both with the EES-C and its subscales and with the CEBQ scale, and the Awareness subscale had statistically significant negative correlations with Food Responsiveness and Emotional Undereating subscales. Conclusions The two subscales (Mindless eating and Awareness) are valid and reliable tools for measuring mindful eating in Turkish children.
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
       
  • Soles of the Feet Mindfulness-Based Program for Students with Autism
           Spectrum Disorder and Challenging Behavior

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      Abstract: Objectives To examine whether a brief mindfulness-based program (MBP) reduces observable challenging behavior in elementary students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), when delivered one-on-one by a natural intervention agent. Methods Using a concurrent multiple baseline design, we examined whether Soles of the Feet (SoF) reduces challenging behavior in children with ASD when delivered by a school staff member in an elementary school setting. Three 9-to-10-year-old children with ASD, presenting with high rates of challenging behavior and IQ scores above 85, were recruited from a private special education school. The school mental health counselor (MHC) was trained on SoF over 8 h and deemed competent after receiving 100% on a fidelity checklist. Following baseline data collection, the MHC implemented SoF across five 20–30-min sessions, one-on-one with each student, and fidelity of implementation was monitored. Results Results found that, from baseline to post-treatment, all three students showed a stable and decreasing trend of observed challenging behavior in individually identified problematic contexts, representing a strong effect (NAP = 100%). Teacher social validity ratings indicated the acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of SoF for use in school settings, while two of three students indicated that the treatment was socially valid. Although teacher-rated overall challenging behavior did not decrease for all students, SoF reduced individually defined observable challenging behavior for each student in specific targeted contexts. Conclusions MBPs may provide a way for children with ASD to self-manage challenging behaviors, which may ameliorate the need for more intensive individual interventions in schools.
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
       
  • Implications of a “Null” Randomized Controlled Trial of Mindfulness
           and Compassion Interventions in Healthy Adults

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      Abstract: Objectives Extensive research suggests that short-term meditation interventions may hold therapeutic promise for a wide range of psychosocial outcomes. In response to calls to subject these interventions to more methodologically rigorous tests, a randomized controlled trial tested the effectiveness of a mindfulness meditation intervention and a compassion meditation intervention against an active control in a demographically diverse sample of medically and psychiatrically healthy adults. Methods Two hundred and four participants completed a battery of questionnaires to assess psychological experience, participated in a laboratory stress test to measure their biological stress reactivity, and wore the Electronically Activated Recorder (EAR) to assess daily behaviors before and after an eight-week intervention (mindfulness meditation intervention, compassion meditation intervention, or health education discussion group). Results Neither meditation intervention reliably impacted participants’ subjective psychological experience, biological stress reactivity, or objectively assessed daily behaviors. Furthermore, post hoc moderation analyses found that neither baseline distress nor intervention engagement significantly moderated effects. Conclusions Results from this trial—which was methodologically rigorous and powered to detect all but small effects—were essentially null. These results are an important data point for the body of research about meditation interventions. Implications of these non-significant effects are discussed in the context of prior studies, and future directions for contemplative intervention research are recommended. Clinical Trial Registry Registry Number: NCT01643369.
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
       
  • Being Hopeful and Mindful During Adversity: A Longitudinal Study on
           College Students’ Adjustment During COVID-19

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      Abstract: Objectives The current study examined whether hope and mindfulness were associated with changes in two maladjustment measures, internalizing and externalizing behaviors, during the COVID-19 pandemic and tested sense of coherence as a mediator. The salutogenic theory of health, which posits that sense of coherence is central to individuals’ well-being in stressful situations and that individuals derive their sense of coherence from their generalized resistance resources (GRRs), was used to guide the analyses. Methods On two occasions separated by about 6 months, 253 Hong Kong college students (mean age = 21.0 years at time 1; 86% of them were women) filled in online questionnaires during the COVID-19 outbreaks. Path analysis was conducted to examine the interrelationships among hope and mindfulness, sense of coherence, and internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Results Results indicated that hope and mindfulness at time 1 were associated with internalizing and externalizing behaviors at time 2, even after controlling for confounding variables and prior levels of internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Moreover, sense of coherence at time 1 significantly mediated these associations. Conclusions Findings pointed to the potential roles of hope, mindfulness, and sense of coherence in understanding Chinese college students’ adjustment during the COVID-19 pandemic. Future research is needed to test whether sense of coherence and behavioral adjustment can be promoted through hope- and mindfulness-based intervention programs. Future research is also needed to examine the interrelationships among health-promoting assets, sense of coherence, and individual adjustment in samples of diverse cultural backgrounds.
      PubDate: 2022-04-19
       
  • Cultivating Skillful Means of Care in Schools Through Compassion Practice
           and Individual and Joint Inquiry

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      Abstract: Objectives We examined the extent to which compassion practices helped guide skillful means of care among educators. We engaged educators in a collaborative design (co-design) process that foregrounded two components: (1) contemplative practice and (2) developing skill in how social interactions are embedded within wider systems through individual and joint inquiry. We analyzed the ways educators developed awareness of social suffering and set intentions to alleviate suffering. We examined how co-design fostered an understanding of compassion and new ideas about how to respond skillfully to suffering in schools. Methods Using qualitative methods, we analyzed data from educators who participated in co-design, including their written reflections, field notes, semi-structured interviews, and surveys. Results Educators identified multiple opportunities for acting with compassion, including approaching school-based interactions with compassion, cultivating compassion for themselves, and envisioning school change through a lens of compassion. Educators’ experiences in co-design directly informed how they imagined compassionate action in their schools. Specific elements highlighted were contemplative practice, reflection, and individual and joint inquiry. Conclusions The adaptation of a general program on compassion training can benefit from attending to how to show compassion in the context of concrete interactions in schools, and this can support educators in developing skillful means of care. Our analyses provide insight into the components that supported educators to offer compassion and suggest that educators’ skillful means of care can be cultivated through both contemplative practice and inquiry into social suffering. We offer a conceptual model for developing skillful means of care educational settings.
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
       
 
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