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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
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Developmental Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.066
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 53  
 
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ISSN (Print) 0012-1649 - ISSN (Online) 1939-0599
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Longitudinal relations between independent walking, body position, and
           object experiences in home life.

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      Abstract: How do age and the acquisition of independent walking relate to changes in infants’ everyday experiences' We used a novel ecological momentary assessment (EMA) method to gather caregiver reports of infants’ restraint, body position, and object holding via text messages sparsely sampled across multiple days of home life at 10, 11, 12, and 13 months of age. Using data from over 4,000 EMA samples from N = 62 infants recruited from across the United States and sampled longitudinally, we measured changes in the base rates of different activities in daily life. With age, infants spent more time unrestrained. With the onset of walking, infants spent less time sitting and prone and more time upright. Although rates of object holding did not change with age or walking ability, we found that infants who can walk hold objects more often in an upright position compared with nonwalkers. We discuss how accurately measuring changes in lived experiences serves to constrain theories about developmental mechanisms. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Jan 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001678
       
  • Is reproductive development adaptively calibrated to early experience'
           Evidence from a national sample of females.

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      Abstract: Many developmental theories have not been sufficiently evaluated using designs that control for unobserved familial confounds. Our long-term goal is to determine the causal structure underlying associations between early environmental conditions and later psychosocial and health outcomes. Our overall objective in this study was to further evaluate predictions derived from applications of life history theory to female reproductive development, key among them that reproductive milestones translate early environmental risk into fertility, health, and behavioral outcomes. To this end, we used female data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 and structural equation modeling to conduct increasingly severe tests, beginning with covariate control and then progressing to sibling control and behavioral genetic designs. After adjusting for confounds varying between sets of siblings, we did not find evidence that age at menarche reflected components of early environment or that any focal outcomes reflected early fragmented family structure (birth to age nine). Although we detected no links between measured environment and individual differences in age at sexual debut, we did find that it reflected both shared and nonshared influences in our behavior genetic models. Interestingly, delayed sexual debut (into young adulthood) reflected identification of parents as the greatest influences and forecasted an array of fertility-related outcomes. Taken together, these findings challenge theories suggesting menarche timing is adaptively calibrated to early environment. They also highlight the need for more research using sibling control and related designs to examine the roles of environments in development. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Jan 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001681
       
  • Academic achievement, same- and cross-ethnic positive peer regard among
           Asian American and Latinx adolescents.

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      Abstract: This article presents a short-term longitudinal study examining bidirectional associations between academic achievement and positive peer regard among Asian American and Latinx adolescents. Specifically, our investigation distinguished between positive peer regard within and across different ethnic groups in a diverse school setting. Three hundred and thirty-five middle school students (52.8% girls; 65% Asian American, 35% Latinx; assessment at the first time point Mage = 12.27 years, SD = 0.71) were followed across two consecutive school years. Participants completed a peer-nomination inventory assessing multiple dimensions of positive peer regard (i.e., reciprocal friendship, social acceptance, and respect), and grades were obtained from school records. Academic achievement was predictive of prospective positive peer regard received from same-ethnic peers only for Asian American adolescents. In contrast, academic achievement predicted prospective positive peer regard received from cross-ethnic peers only for Latinx adolescents. These results suggest that academic achievement was linked to social gains with peers from different ethnic backgrounds for Asian American and Latinx students. The findings underscore the importance of disentangling the sources of positive peer regard in multiethnic school environments. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Jan 2024 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001668
       
  • A cross-sectional study using self-defining memories to explore personal
           identity throughout adulthood.

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      Abstract: Little research has examined changes in personal identity over different periods of adult development. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to target these changes through the characterization of the main dimensions in self-defining memories (SDMs; thematic content, specificity, integrative meaning, tension, contamination/redemption, and emotion) and their interactions. Our final sample was composed of 652 healthy French adults aged from 18 to 97 years, divided into four age groups: young adults (n = 163, M = 23.7 years), middle-aged adults (n = 135, M = 44.0 years), young-old adults (n = 178, M = 64.5 years), and old-old adults (n = 176, M = 79.6 years). Participants were asked to recollect three SDMs. A similar pattern of thematic content was observed throughout adulthood, except for relationship narratives were more frequent in the two younger groups. The findings highlighted that specific and integrated SDMs decreased with age and that tension and contaminative sequences were the most frequent in young adults. Redemptive memories did not significantly differ whatever the age of participants. No clear positivity effect was observed with aging. Finally, an analysis of the correlations among the main SDMs’ dimensions showed that specificity correlated positively with tension in young adults and integrative meaning with redemption in young and middle-aged participants. We found no significant correlation between specificity and integration in any age group. For the first time, this study sheds new light on lifelong identity adjustments. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001611
       
  • The benefits of math activities depend on the skills children bring to the
           table.

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      Abstract: Playing board games and other math activities can provide young children with opportunities to develop their math skills. However, it is critical to understand for whom these activities may be most beneficial. In two studies, we examine the extent to which foundational cognitive skills moderate the effects of playing math games on math skills. In Study 1, we look cross-sectionally at the association between parents’ frequency of math activities with their 3- to 4-year-old children (N = 124) and children’s math achievement, examining the extent to which children’s skills moderate this relation. We find that frequent math activities are only associated with better math performance for children with better number knowledge. In Study 2, we test this experimentally by randomly assigning parents and children (N = 76) to play with a number-related board game, an active control board game, or a business-as-usual control group. Controlling for number knowledge, inhibitory control, and vocabulary at pretest, no differences in math skills at posttest were observed between the training groups. However, a significant interaction emerged between training group assignment and number knowledge, such that children with higher pretest number knowledge had higher posttest math scores when assigned to the number board game condition compared to the two control conditions, but no differences among conditions were seen for children with lower number knowledge. Collectively, these findings suggest that math activities may be most beneficial for math skills when children have stronger number knowledge and underscore the need for tailoring activities to children’s current skill level. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Dec 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001637
       
  • Maternal contingent responses to distress facilitate infant soothing but
           not in mothers with depression or infants high in negative affect.

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      Abstract: Depression in mothers is consistently associated with reduced caregiving sensitivity and greater infant negative affect expression. The current article examined the real-time behavioral mechanisms underlying these associations using Granger causality time series analyses in a sample of mothers (N = 194; 86.60% White) at elevated risk for depression and their 3-month-old infants (46.40% female) living in a major metropolitan area in the United States. Overall, mothers contingently responded to infant distress, and mothers’ responses to infant distress increased the likelihood of infant soothing in real time. However, there was no evidence for maternal contingent responding or facilitation of infant soothing in subsamples of mothers who were currently experiencing elevated depression symptoms or in mothers of highly negative infants. These findings suggest real-time behavioral mechanisms by which risks for maladaptive self-regulation may develop. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001607
       
  • Shyness and inhibitory control in preschool dyads: An actor–partner
           model of social behavior.

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      Abstract: The risk potentiation model of cognitive control posits that inhibitory control heightens children’s risk for problematic outcomes in the context of shyness because it limits shy children’s ability to engage flexibly with their environment. Although there is empirical support for the risk potentiation model, most studies have been restricted to parent report of children’s outcomes and do not consider the influence of shyness and inhibitory control on other children’s social behavior. In the present study, we used an actor–partner interdependence model to examine whether shyness and inhibitory control at Time 1 (N = 105, 52 girls, Mage = 3.50 years; 87% White; Mincome = between $75,000 and $100,000 in Canadian dollars) predicted children’s own and their partner’s observed social behavior with an unfamiliar peer at Time 2 (Mage = 4.76 years). When the child’s own inhibitory control was high, the child’s own shyness was negatively associated with their own approach behaviors but negatively associated with their partner’s avoidance behaviors. However, when the child’s own inhibitory control was low, the child’s own shyness was unrelated to their own approach behaviors but positively associated with their partner’s avoidance behaviors. Although inhibitory control was negatively associated with approach-related behavior for some shy children, this did not translate to more avoidance from the social partner. These results highlight the importance of examining the child’s own behavior in addition to their partner’s behavior when considering children’s socioemotional development. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001663
       
  • Talk it out or tuck it away: The contribution of maternal socialization of
           coping to depression in youth with early pubertal maturation.

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      Abstract: Theory and research highlight the mismatch between puberty-associated challenges and personal coping resources among youth with early actual or perceived pubertal timing. This study (N = 167; Mage = 12.41 years; 51.5% female; 77.8% White American) examined whether coping resources provided by mothers (maternal socialization of coping) exert protective or exacerbating effects on risk for depression among early-maturing youth. Results revealed that earlier perceived timing predicted higher subsequent depressive symptoms in girls with low (B = .40, SE = .15) but not high (B = −.08, SE = .17) levels of engagement coping suggestions, whereas earlier perceived timing predicted higher subsequent depressive symptoms in boys with high (B = .40, SE = .17) but not low (B = −.12, SE = .15) levels of engagement coping suggestions. These findings build on prior theory and research by highlighting that maternal coping suggestions may mitigate or enhance depression risk in youth who perceive themselves as early maturers; the differential effects in girls and boys suggest that the impact of these suggestions may depend on whether they are in line with gender-specific norms for coping. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001610
       
  • Negative trait inference in behaviorally inhibited children influences
           their internalizing behaviors.

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      Abstract: Behavioral inhibition (BI) is an early-appearing temperamental trait characterized by intense negative affect and withdrawal behaviors to novel and challenging situations. Inhibited children are more likely to display social withdrawal and experience an increased risk for internalizing problems. Trait inference, the way children interpret behaviors and infer the characteristics of others, may be one potential mechanism. The current study examined the individual differences of BI in trait inference using a cross-sectional design (Study 1, Age 4, N = 80, 38 boys, Chinese) and explored the role of trait inference (Age 4) in relation to early BI (Age 2) and later internalizing behaviors (Age 4) using a longitudinal design (Study 2, N = 163, 93 boys). Trait inference was measured by children’s personality judgments after watching four pieces of behavioral information of animated actors in two conditions: a high positive information condition and a high negative information condition. We found that high BI children exhibited a more negative trait inference than low BI children did in two studies, except for the trait inference in the high negative information condition of Study 2. Besides, in Study 2, trait inference in the high positive information condition partially mediated the BI-internalizing behavior link, and such mediation effect was moderated by the level of trait inference. These findings highlight the contribution of social information processing in the social adjustment of children with extreme temperament and have implications for prevention and intervention. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001649
       
  • Children underperform following “math” but not
           “spatial” task framing.

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      Abstract: Increasing evidence suggests that success in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields is not only dependent upon one’s actual STEM-relevant abilities but also upon one’s STEM-relevant attitudes—in particular, math and spatial attitudes. Here, we examine whether simply mentioning the math or spatial relevance of a task affects children’s performance and the moderating role of children’s math and spatial attitudes. Further, we examine gender differences in performance given pervasive gender gaps in STEM and early-emerging gender differences in math and spatial attitudes. Participants (221 first- to fourth-grade children from the United States; 113 girls, 108 boys; 52% White, 16% Black, 14% Asian, 9% Hispanic or Latinx, 18% multiple races/ethnicities) were introduced to a novel task framed as tapping into math or spatial abilities (or no framing [control condition]). Children then completed math and spatial anxiety and self-concept measures. Results indicate that children who heard the math task framing were less accurate relative to children in the control condition, and the effect was larger for those with higher math anxiety or lower math self-concept, but it was not different for boys and girls. Children who heard the spatial task framing, however, performed comparably to children in the control condition. Though both math and spatial attitudes revealed identical patterns of gender differences (with higher anxiety and lower self-concept in girls than boys), there were no gender differences in performance. This study highlights the salient role of math attitudes early in development and provides key insights for future work aimed at increasing STEM outcomes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 02 Nov 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001603
       
  • A unified approach to demographic data collection for research with young
           children across diverse cultures.

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      Abstract: Culture is a key determinant of children’s development both in its own right and as a measure of generalizability of developmental phenomena. Studying the role of culture in development requires information about participants’ demographic backgrounds. However, both reporting and treatment of demographic data are limited and inconsistent in child development research. A barrier to reporting demographic data in a consistent fashion is that no standardized tool currently exists to collect these data. Variation in cultural expectations, family structures, and life circumstances across communities make the creation of a unifying instrument challenging. Here, we present a framework to standardize demographic reporting for early child development (birth to 3 years of age), focusing on six core sociodemographic construct categories: biological information, gestational status, health status, community of descent, caregiving environment, and socioeconomic status. For each category, we discuss potential constructs and measurement items and provide guidance for their use and adaptation to diverse contexts. These items are stored in an open repository of context-adapted questionnaires that provide a consistent approach to obtaining and reporting demographic information so that these data can be archived and shared in a more standardized format. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001623
       
  • Employment status and psychosocial adjustment among adolescents and
           parents during the COVID-19 pandemic: Multi-informant data from ecological
           momentary assessments.

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      Abstract: During the COVID-19 pandemic, many families experienced financial and health stressors associated with parental employment. Using multi-informant and daily-diary data from a nationwide U.S. sample of parents and children (626 dyads; 18,780 daily assessments across 30 days: May 18, 2020–June 1, 2020, October 19, 2020–November 2, 2020; parents: Mage = 43, 15% male; children: Mage = 15, 42% male; 36% Black, 26% White, 14% multiracial, 12% Latinx, 11% Asian American, and 1% Native American), this intensive longitudinal study investigated (a) the mediating role of health stress and financial stress in the link between parental employment status and psychosocial adjustment among adolescents and their parents and (b) whether this link differed by families’ socioeconomic status or receipt of government subsidies. Results indicated that families who experienced job loss tended to report higher levels of health stress and financial stress, which in turn was associated with heightened negative affect and poorer sleep quality for both parents and adolescents. When parents work from home (WFH), families tended to have lower levels of health stress and financial stress, which in turn weakened the positive links with negative affect and sleep quality. Lower- (vs. higher-) income families experienced weaker protective effects associated with WFH arrangements. Government subsidies were associated with lower stress and better psychosocial outcomes in families experiencing job loss. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Oct 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001636
       
  • Three decades of infant motor development: Cohort effects in motor skill
           onsets.

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      Abstract: Infant motor development is affected by the sociocultural context in which it takes place. Because societal and cultural practices are dynamic, this exploratory study examined whether the ages at which infants typically learned to crawl, cruise, and walk changed over the past 3 decades. We compiled archival data from 1,306 infants born between January 31, 1992, and December 10, 2021. Parents originally reported milestone onsets in interviews and by using diaries. For each motor milestone, a linear regression model predicted the onset age using birth date. Segmented regression analyses inspected changes in slopes over time. Covariates included rural/urban housing, gestation age, season of birth, and birth weight. Infants’ average crawling, cruising, and walking onset ages changed over time. After controlling for the covariates, infants’ crawling onset age steadily increased until 2012, after which crawling onset age decreased. Infants’ cruising onset age increased from 1991 to 2001, after which cruising onset age remained stable. After controlling for the covariates, infants’ walking onset increased until 2015, after which walking onset age decreased. Thus, when infants were born explained a small but significant amount of variability in infant motor skill onset. While the current study showed that motor development changed over the years, motor development is just a model system for development more generally: Cohort effects may be pervasive across developmental domains. Using motor development as a model system for studying change suggests that generational effects due to a changing society may be pervasive across developmental domains. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001628
       
  • The development of emotion understanding in children: The importance of
           parents, teachers, and peers.

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      Abstract: Emotion understanding (EU) develops through emotion socialization provided by children’s social environments, but the relative importance of various socializing agents has not been determined. In this prospective study, the unique contributions of parents, teachers, and peers to changes in EU from 4 to 8 years of age were therefore investigated in a birth cohort sample of 924 Norwegian children (50.1% boys). A warm parent–child relationship at 4 years of age predicted increased EU at 6 years of age but not from 6 to 8 years of age. A close teacher–child relationship forecasted enhanced EU at both 6 and 8 years of age. The results are in accordance with previous research on parents’ roles and bring new knowledge by underscoring the importance of teachers in children’s development of EU. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Sep 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001627
       
  • Children’s knowledge and feelings align in response to emotional
           music.

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      Abstract: Examining emotion recognition and response to music can isolate recognition of and resonance with emotion from the confounding effects of other social cues (e.g., faces). In a within-sample design, participants aged 5–6 years in the eastern region of the United States (N = 135, Mage = 5.98, SDage = .54; 78 female, 56 male; eight Asian, 43 Black, 62 White, 13 biracial, and nine “other”) listened to clips of calm, scary, and sad music. In separate sessions, participants identified the emotional content of the music or reported on the feelings elicited by the music clip, with above-chance accuracy. Emotion recognition was associated with age and higher levels of child emotional verbal expressivity. Children with higher parent-reported empathy reported greater resonance with the emotion conveyed by music, specifically for sad music. Recognition and resonance were correlated (i.e., alignment), although the relationship varied as a function of the emotion expressed, with the greatest alignment for sad music. Results provide insights into emotion recognition and resonance in the absence of direct social signals and provide evidence that children’s ability to recognize and resonate with emotion differs depending on characteristics of the music and the child. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2024 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/dev0001572
       
 
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