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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
New School Psychology Bulletin     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
O Que Nos Faz Pensar : Cadernos do Departamento de Filosofia da PUC-Rio     Open Access  
OA Autism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Online Readings in Psychology and Culture     Open Access  
Open Journal of Medical Psychology     Open Access  
Open Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Organisational and Social Dynamics: An International Journal of Psychoanalytic, Systemic and Group Relations Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Organizational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Orientación y Sociedad : Revista Internacional e Interdisciplinaria de Orientación Vocacional Ocupacional     Open Access  
Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto)     Open Access  
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Papeles del Psicólogo     Open Access  
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Peace and Conflict : Journal of Peace Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Pensamiento Psicologico     Open Access  
Pensando Familias     Open Access  
Pensando Psicología     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Perceptual and Motor Skills     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Persona     Open Access  
Persona : Jurnal Psikologi Indonesia     Open Access  
Persona Studies     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 167)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access  
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal  
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Phenomenology & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Phenomenology and Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
physiopraxis     Hybrid Journal  
PiD - Psychotherapie im Dialog     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Poiésis     Open Access  
Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Porn Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
PPmP - Psychotherapie Psychosomatik Medizinische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Practice Innovations     Full-text available via subscription  
Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Problems of Psychology in the 21st Century     Open Access  
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Progress in Brain Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psic : Revista de Psicologia da Vetor Editora     Open Access  
Psico     Open Access  
Psicoanalisi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicobiettivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Psicogente     Open Access  
Psicol?gica Journal     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Prática     Open Access  
Psicologia da Educação     Open Access  
Psicologia della salute     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicología desde el Caribe     Open Access  
Psicologia di Comunità. Gruppi, ricerca-azione, modelli formativi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicologia e Saber Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Psicologia em Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia em Revista     Open Access  
Psicologia Ensino & Formação     Open Access  
Psicologia Hospitalar     Open Access  
Psicologia Iberoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia para América Latina     Open Access  
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicología, Conocimiento y Sociedad     Open Access  
Psicologia, Saúde e Doenças     Open Access  
Psicooncología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicoperspectivas     Open Access  
Psicoterapia e Scienze Umane     Full-text available via subscription  
Psikis : Jurnal Psikologi Islami     Open Access  
Psikohumaniora : Jurnal Penelitian Psikologi     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PsyCh Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
PSYCH up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psych. Pflege Heute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychê     Open Access  
Psyche: A Journal of Entomology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychiatrie et violence     Open Access  
Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychiatrische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 360)
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis, Self and Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychoanalytic Dialogues: The International Journal of Relational Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychoanalytic Inquiry: A Topical Journal for Mental Health Professionals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychodynamic Practice: Individuals, Groups and Organisations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Psychodynamic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologia : Advances de la Disciplina     Open Access  
Psychologica     Open Access  
Psychologica Belgica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 227)
Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Psychological Perspectives: A Semiannual Journal of Jungian Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychological Research on Urban Society     Open Access  
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 203)
Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 267)
Psychological Science and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science and Education psyedu.ru     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science In the Public Interest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Psychological Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychological Thought     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie in Erziehung und Unterricht     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology     Open Access  
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology and Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal  
Psychology and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Psychology in Russia: State of the Art     Free   (Followers: 2)
Psychology in Society     Open Access  
Psychology Learning & Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychology of Language and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Psychology of Leaders and Leadership     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Psychology of Men and Masculinity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Well-Being : Theory, Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychology Research and Behavior Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology, Community & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Psychology, Health & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychomusicology : Music, Mind, and Brain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Psychopathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
psychopraxis. neuropraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychosomatic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychosomatic Medicine and General Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Psychotherapy in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
PsychTech & Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Psyecology - Bilingual Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psyke & Logos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psykhe (Santiago)     Open Access  
Quaderni di Gestalt     Full-text available via subscription  
Quaderns de Psicologia     Open Access  
Qualitative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Qualitative Research in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quantitative Methods for Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Rehabilitation Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Religion, Brain & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Developmental Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.066
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 49  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0012-1649 - ISSN (Online) 1939-0599
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Adolescents provide more complex reasons for lowering the voting age than
           do adults: Evidence from national convenience samples.

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      Abstract: Debates about lowering the voting age often center on whether 16- and 17-year-old adolescents possess sufficient cognitive capacity and political knowledge to participate in politics. Little empirical research has examined age differences in adolescents’ and adults’ complexity of reasoning about political issues. We surveyed adults (n = 778; Mage = 38.5, SD = 12.5; 50% female; 72% non-Hispanic White) and 16- and 17-year-old adolescents (n = 397; 65% female; 69% non-Hispanic White) concerning judgments and justifications about whether the United States should change the minimum voting age. Justifications for changing the voting age were coded for integrative (i.e., integrating multiple perspectives to form a judgment about changing the voting age), elaborative (i.e., providing multiple reasons to support the same judgment about changing the voting age), and dialectical (i.e., recognizing multiple differing perspectives on changing the voting age) complexity of reasoning. Bayesian regressions indicated that adolescents provided greater integrative and elaborative complexity in their reasoning to change the voting age than adults. Adolescents and adults did not meaningfully differ in their dialectical complexity. Findings are consistent with past research indicating that adolescents possess the cognitive capacity and political knowledge to vote in U.S. elections. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 19 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Children expect others to prefer handmade items.

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      Abstract: Although children frequently engage in creative activities (in which they make foods and objects by hand), the development and scope of children’s thinking about handmade items is largely unexplored. In the present studies, we examined whether 4- to 12-year-old children at a local children’s museum (54% girls, 46% boys; 51% White, 11% Asian/Asian American, 10% more than 1 group, 4% Latinx, 3% Black/African American, 18% did not report race/ethnicity) would expect other people to prefer handmade over factory-made items, including foods and nonfoods. In Experiments 1 (n = 124) and 2 (n = 122), participants expected a child character to prefer items the character made themselves and items made by the character’s parent or a local person. However, this expectation did not persist at all costs: When considering imperfect handmade items in Experiment 3 (n = 122), children demonstrated a handmade preference when considering nonfoods made by a parent but demonstrated a factory-made preference when considering foods made by a parent. Children’s explanations were associated with their choices: When children’s explanations referred to emotions or relationships, they were more likely to select handmade items. When children referred to item features, they were more likely to select factory-made items. Across studies, we observed persistent age and gender effects: Children’s handmade preference increased with child age and girls demonstrated a more robust handmade preference than boys. These findings highlight children’s developing and nuanced reasoning about object value. At an early age, children consider who made an object as a contributor to its value. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Mother–child interactions and child anger proneness as antecedents of
           changes in sleep during the preschool period.

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      Abstract: Age-related developments in sleep during the preschool years are normative and consequential. Yet, very few studies have examined the antecedents of individual differences in such developments, and most have used parental reports of child sleep. This study aimed to investigate the roles of mutual responsiveness in mother–child interactions and child temperamental anger proneness in the prediction of changes in sleep during the preschool period. The sample was comprised of 94 children (44 girls, 50 boys) of mostly White (93%) and college-educated (85%) mothers. Mother–child mutual responsiveness and child anger proneness were assessed at 2 years, and sleep was assessed using actigraphy at the ages of 2, 3, and 4 years. Multilevel growth models revealed that higher temperamental anger proneness was concurrently associated with lower sleep efficiency and shorter nighttime sleep duration at 2 years. In regard to changes in sleep, nighttime sleep duration decreased between 2 and 4 years among children exposed to lower mutual responsiveness in interactions with their mothers. High anger proneness was related to an increase in sleep efficiency from 2 to 4 years, whereas low anger proneness was associated with a decrease in nighttime duration during the same period. No interactive effect was found between anger proneness and mother–child mutual responsiveness. These results suggest that mother–child relationships and child temperament may play different roles, not only in children’s concurrent sleep patterns but also in changes in sleep across the preschool period. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Genetic and environmental contributions to stability and change in social
           inhibition across the adolescent and adult life span.

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      Abstract: Feeling inhibited and socially not at ease is reflected in the trait social inhibition (SI). SI is associated with psychopathology that arises in young adulthood, such as anxiety. We aim for a better insight into the genetic and environmental contributions to SI across the life span, and as such examine their contributions to SI stability and change across adolescent and adult life span. We analyzed cohort-sequential longitudinal data from the Netherlands Twin Register (NTR), spanning a period of 25 years (Men (N, %): 17855, 37.4%; Age (Median, IQR): 19 years, 16–26 years; 7474 complete MZ twins and 8799 complete DZ twins). The data were organized into 7 age groups: < 14 (preadolescence), 15–16 (early adolescence), 17–18 (mid adolescence), 19–20 (late adolescence), 21–30 (young adulthood), 31–40 (adulthood), 41 + (middle-age—older adulthood). SI was assessed with the ASEBA-based proxy questionnaire. Phenotypic stability was established across the entire age range. Next, a longitudinal genetic simplex model was fitted to estimate the genetic and environmental contributions to the observed phenotypic stability. Results showed SI correlated well across follow-up of a single decade (.44 ≤ r ≤ .59) and moderately across the 25 years (.23 – .32) from adolescence to middle-age and older. Broad-sense heritability (h²) was between 40 and 48% across the 7 age groups. Additive and nonadditive genetic effects together explained most of the stability of SI across the life span (about 60–90% of the phenotypic correlation between ages), whereas environmental effects played a lesser role (about 10–40%). Concluding, SI, known to increase the risk of internalizing psychopathology, is phenotypically stable across the life span, which is largely attributable to genetic contributions to individual differences in SI. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Effect of daily school and care disruptions during the COVID-19 pandemic
           on child behavior problems.

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      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic profoundly affected American families and children, including through the closure or change in the nature of their care and school settings. As the pandemic has persisted, many children remain in remote schooling and those attending in-person childcare or school have contended with unpredictable closures. This study investigated the frequency and consequences of disruptions to children’s childcare and school arrangements during Fall 2020. The sample is parents who were hourly service-sector workers prior to the pandemic, had a young child between the ages of 3 and 8, and were at least partially responsible for their children’s school and/or care in Fall 2020 (N = 676); half of the sample were non-Hispanic Black, 22% were Hispanic, and 18% are non-Hispanic White. Parents were asked to complete 30 days of daily surveys about whether their care and school arrangements went smoothly and as predicted that day, about their mood, parenting behaviors, and children’s behavior. Results showed that daily disruptions to care and school were common, with families reporting a disruption on 24% of days. Families with children in exclusively remote schooling experienced more frequent disruption than families with children in in-person care or school. For all families, care or school disruptions were related to worse child behavior, more negative parental mood, and increased likelihood of losing temper and punishment. Within-family mediation suggests that parents’ difficulties supporting children’s learning, and to a lesser degree their mood and parenting behaviors, partially mediate effects of disruptions on child behavior. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Profiles of future expectations among urban adolescents in Cambodia.

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      Abstract: Adolescents are tasked with navigating competing priorities, including whether to marry, have children, pursue a job/career, go to college, and contribute to society. The developmental task of building expectations for the future is especially complex for Cambodian adolescents living within a society that strongly prioritizes family obligations yet increasingly provides educational and professional opportunities. The current study, guided by Seginer’s (2003) future orientation model, applied latent profile analysis (LPA) to explore patterns of Cambodian adolescents’ (N = 580, 64% female, Mage = 15.85) future expectations across key life domains and predictors of those patterns. LPA identified four profiles: Low Expectancy (low expectations across all domains; 12%), Family Focused (high expectations to get married and have children; 31%), Professional/Service Focused (high expectations across education, employment, and societal contribution domains; 27%), and High Expectancy (high expectations across all domains; 30%). Females were more likely than males to be in the Professional/Service Focused than High Expectancy profile. Adolescents with greater internal locus of control and family obligation were less likely to be in the Low Expectancy and Family Focused than High Expectancy profile, whereas adolescents in higher grade levels were more likely to be in the Family Focused than High Expectancy profile. Adolescents with closer relationships with mothers were less likely to be in the Professional/Service Focused than High Expectancy profile; adolescents with closer relationships with fathers were more likely to be in the Professional/Service Focused than High and Low Expectancy profiles. Findings elucidate configurations of adolescents’ future expectations, and factors distinguishing among adolescents with different configurations. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Trajectories of perceived parenting across an educational transition:
           Associations with psychosocial adjustment and identity development among
           Swiss adolescents.

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      Abstract: Educational transitions involve a number of changes for adolescents and can be challenging for adolescents and parents alike. The present study was designed to gain a better understanding as to how adolescents’ perceptions of parenting evolves across a major educational transition and how the parenting perceived across this transition may facilitate adolescents’ psychosocial adjustment and identity formation. Swiss adolescents (N = 483, Mage = 14.96 years old; 64.6% female) in their last year of mandatory secondary school completed self-report measures at two semiannual time points both prior to and following their educational transition. Adolescents reported on their perceptions of their parents’ autonomy support and psychological control as well as their self-esteem, risk-taking behaviors, and identity processes. Group-based trajectory analyses identified three parenting trajectory classes (i.e., Highly Supportive Parenting, Decreasing Supportive Parenting, Stable Controlling Parenting), three psychosocial adjustment trajectory classes (i.e., Low Self-Esteem/Low Risk-Taking, High Self-Esteem/Low Risk-Taking, Moderate Self-Esteem/Increasing Risk-Taking), and four identity trajectory classes (i.e., Lost Searchers, Guardians, Pathmakers, Successful Searchers). These solutions support the contention that adolescents are likely to experience academic transitions differently, whether in terms of their parent-adolescent relationship, their psychosocial adjustment, or their identity. Furthermore, parenting trajectory classes were associated with specific identity and psychosocial adjustment classes. Notably, Highly Supportive Parenting was associated with the High Self-Esteem/Low Risk-Taking class and the Pathmaker identity class, whereas Stable Controlling Parenting was most strongly associated with the Low Self-Esteem/Low Risk-Taking class and the Lost Searcher identity class. These findings highlight the importance of autonomy supportive parenting for adolescent development during educational transitions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The swerve: How childhood bilingualism changed from liability to benefit.

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      Abstract: Early research that relied on standardized assessments of intelligence reported negative effects of bilingualism for children, but a study by Peal and Lambert (1962) reported better performance by bilingual than monolingual children on verbal and nonverbal intelligence tests. This outcome led to the view that bilingualism was a positive experience. However, subsequent research abandoned intelligence tests as the assessment tool and evaluated performance on cognitive tasks, making the research after Peal and Lambert qualitatively different from that before their landmark study, creating a disconnect between the new and earlier research. These newer cognitive studies showed both positive effects of bilingualism and no differences between language groups. But why were Peal and Lambert’s results so different from previous studies that were also based on intelligence tests' The present study analyzed data from verbal and nonverbal intelligence tests that were collected from 6,077 participants across 79 studies in which intelligence tests were administered as background measures to various cognitive tasks. By including adults, the study extends the results across the life span. On standardized verbal tests, monolinguals outperformed bilinguals, but on nonverbal measures of intelligence, there were no differences between language groups. These results, which are different from those reported by Peal and Lambert, are used to reinterpret their findings in terms of the sociolinguistic, political, and cultural context in which the Peal and Lambert study was conducted and the relevance of those factors for all developmental research. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The cognitive costs and advantages of children’s exposure to parental
           relationship instability: Testing an evolutionary-developmental
           hypothesis.

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      Abstract: Guided by evolutionary-developmental models, this study tested the hypothesis that children’s exposure to parental relationship instability, defined by initiation and dissolution of caregiver intimate relationships, has both costs in cognitive impairments and benefits in enhanced learning skills. Participants included 243 mothers and their preschool children (M age 4.60 years; 56% girls) from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds (e.g., 46% Black; 19% Latinx). Consistent with hypotheses, higher levels of parental relationship instability during preschool predicted children’s poorer performance on explicit, higher-order cognitive functioning tasks (e.g., IQ, working memory) and better performance in detecting reward probabilities in an implicit learning task 2 years later. Results of the piecewise latent growth curve analysis of the implicit learning task revealed that children experiencing greater family instability were able to more rapidly identify the locations of the hidden rewards in the early, rather than later, stages of the games. Additional findings supported the role of children’s antagonistic representations of family relationships as an intermediary mechanism. More specifically, parental relationship instability significantly predicted higher levels of children’s antagonistic representations of their families 2 years later after controlling for their earlier antagonistic representations and demographic covariates. Children’s antagonistic representations, in turn, were concurrently linked with poorer explicit cognitive functioning and better implicit learning abilities when they were in first grade. The findings inform an understanding of cognitive tradeoffs of experiencing parental relationship instability and may have important implications for modifying educational and clinical programs to capitalize on the cognitive strengths of children who experience environmental unpredictability. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Social comparison effects on academic self-concepts—Which peers
           matter most'

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      Abstract: Social comparisons with peers are important sources of self-development during adolescence. Many previous studies showed that students’ academic self-concepts (ASC) form by contrasting one’s own achievement with the average of one’s class or school (the Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect [BFLPE]). Based on social comparison theory, however, we would expect some peers to be more likely social comparison targets than other peers, for example, because they are more visible or students perceive them as similar to themselves. In this study, we used sociometric data to analyze which peers play the most important role for social comparison effects on ASC. We examined how the average achievement of friends, study partners, peers perceived as popular by the student, as well as same-gender and same-ethnic peers affect the general ASC and how these effects compare to the effect of the classroom’s average achievement. The study was based on a German longitudinal sample of 2,438 students (44% no recent immigrant background, 19% Turkish immigrant background, 10% Eastern European immigrant background, 27% other immigrant background) from 117 school classes that were followed from grade 9 to 10. Results from longitudinal social network analysis do not confirm substantial incremental effects of specific types of peers, while class average achievement showed a stable negative effect (confirming the BFLPE). In addition, we could provide evidence for social selection effects based on ASC. We conclude that classrooms provide a specific setting that imposes social comparisons with the “generalized peer” rather than with specific subgroups of peers. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Patterns of intimacy crisis resolution and their associations with
           romantic loneliness in Polish and U.S. young adults.

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      Abstract: In Erikson’s model of development, intimacy and isolation denote polar outcomes of psychosocial crisis in young adulthood. Drawing on this model, the present study used three-wave longitudinal data to examine patterns of the success and lack of success in the resolution of Eriksonian crisis in relation to romantic loneliness as a negative outcome of the intimacy crisis, and compared across Poland and the United States. The data were collected from Polish and U.S. individuals aged 18–40 for Wave 1 (N = 763). Four patterns of the Eriksonian intimacy crisis were identified: (a) stable partnered status; (b) stable single status; (c) transition from single to partnered status; (d) transition from partnered to single status. In both countries, transition from single to partnered status was related to decreased romantic loneliness. Greater initial romantic loneliness was observed among Polish single adults who transited to partnered status in contrast to stable single adults. In turn, the U.S. partnered adults who transited to single status initially experienced lower romantic loneliness than stable single adults. Bivariate latent growth curve models pairing romantic loneliness with relationship satisfaction revealed that higher initial relationship satisfaction was associated with lower initial romantic loneliness, and a greater increase in relationship satisfaction was associated with smaller increases in romantic loneliness. The findings highlight that different resolutions of the intimacy crisis are related to diverse romantic loneliness and relationship satisfaction trajectories and these associations also appear to differ as a function of various marital and loneliness contexts in Poland and the United States. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Intersensory matching of faces and voices in infancy predicts language
           outcomes in young children.

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      Abstract: Parent language input is a well-established predictor of child language development. Multisensory attention skills (MASks; intersensory matching, shifting and sustaining attention to audiovisual speech) are also known to be foundations for language development. However, due to a lack of appropriate measures, individual differences in these skills have received little research focus. A newly established measure, the Multisensory Attention Assessment Protocol (MAAP), allows researchers to examine predictive relations between early MASks and later outcomes. We hypothesized that, along with parent language input, multisensory attention to social events (faces and voices) in infancy would predict later language outcomes. We collected data from 97 children (predominantly White and Hispanic, 48 males) participating in an ongoing longitudinal study assessing 12-, 18-, and 24-month MASks (MAAP) and parent language input (quality, quantity), and 18- and 24-month language outcomes (child speech production, vocabulary size). Results revealed 12-month intersensory matching (but not maintaining or shifting attention) of faces and voices in the presence of a distractor was a strong predictor of language. It predicted a variety of 18- and 24-month child language outcomes (expressive vocabulary, child speech production), even when holding traditional predictors constant: parent language input and SES (maternal education: 52% bachelor's degree or higher). Further, at each age, parent language input predicted just one outcome, expressive vocabulary, and SES predicted child speech production. These novel findings reveal infant intersensory matching of faces and voices in the presence of a distractor can predict which children might benefit most from parent language input and show better language outcomes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • How children’s media and teachers communicate exclusive and essentialist
           views of science and scientists.

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      Abstract: Language that uses noun labels and generic descriptions to discuss people who do science (e.g., “Let’s be scientists! Scientists discover new things”) signals to children that “scientists” is a distinctive category. This identity-focused language promotes essentialist beliefs and leads to disengagement from science among young children in experimental contexts. The extent to which these cues shape the development of children’s beliefs and behaviors in daily life, however, depends on (a) the availability of identity-focused language in children’s environments and (b) the power of these cues to shape beliefs over time, even in the noisier, more variable contexts in which children are exposed to them. Documenting the availability of this language, linguistic coding of children’s media (Study 1) and prekindergarten teachers’ language from one science lesson (Study 2; n = 103; 98 female, one male, four unknown; 66% White, 8% African American, 6% Asian/Asian American, 3% mixed/biracial; 21% of the sample, of any race, identified as Hispanic/Latinx) confirmed that identity-focused language was the most common form of science language in these two samples. Further, children (Study 3; n = 83; Mage = 4.36 years; 43 female, 40 male; 64% White, 12% Asian/Asian American, 24% mixed/biracial; 36% of the sample, of any race, identified as Hispanic/Latinx) who were exposed to lower proportions of identity-focused language from their teachers developed increasingly inclusive science beliefs and greater science engagement over time. These findings suggest that linguistic input is an important mechanism through which exclusive beliefs about science are conveyed to children in daily life. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Executive function mediates the association between cumulative risk and
           learning in Ghanaian schoolchildren.

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      Abstract: Research on the associations among adversity, executive function (EF), and academic outcomes in low- and middle-income countries, where developmental risk factors are more prevalent and impoverished environments are more widespread than in high income countries, is sparse. This study examines the relations among cumulative risk, EF, and learning outcomes measured 2-years later in Ghanaian third- and fourth-graders (N = 371; 49% female), shedding light on underlying mechanisms of how risk can undermine learning. A cumulative risk index was created based on a set of four child-reported risk factors: home aggression, unsafe home neighborhood, hunger, and having worked for pay. Cumulative risk and EF were negatively correlated. Learning outcomes (literacy and math test scores) were negatively correlated with earlier measures of cumulative risk and positively correlated with earlier measures of EF. EF mediated the association between cumulative risk and later learning outcomes, accounting for 65.3% of the total effect for literacy and 100% for math. This mediated pathway was robust to controls for child and household sociodemographic characteristics. The findings contribute to a small evidence base on the mediating role of EF in linking adversity and learning outcomes in a global context. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
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