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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 1023 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 360)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 180)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 82)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 248)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Pilquen : Sección Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access  
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 124)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 150)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers d’Études sur la Représentation     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access  
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Current Opinion in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current psychology letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Current Research in Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Decision     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Development and Psychopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 23)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Developmental Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.066
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 48  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0012-1649 - ISSN (Online) 1939-0599
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Replication studies of critical findings from the peer literature: An
           introduction.

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      Abstract: Despite its importance, replication has remained in the background of social development research. The aim of this special section was to elucidate and elevate the role of replication in peer relations research, examining its challenges and its utility for moving the field forward. To accomplish this aim, five sets of researchers undertook identifying an important finding from a widely cited article in the peer literature and tried to replicate its basic results using new data. As a group, the resulting five articles cover a broad range of topics, measures, and methods that are seen in peer research. Four of the five articles provide evidence of replication. This evidence was seen more for basic principles or processes observed in earlier studies than for exact or specific findings. In addition, the authors used varied approaches to replication, highlighting the need to embrace diverse methods when attempting to replicate complicated mechanisms of social development. It is argued that replication efforts should be aimed at identifying basic principles and processes of social development while clarifying the parameters that account for variability across studies in the specific findings. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • A genetically-controlled, cross-lagged study of the association between
           friends’ deviance and participants’ delinquency during adolescence: A
           replication.

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      Abstract: The goal of the present study was to replicate Burt et al. (2009) and Hou et al. (2013) findings by determining the contribution of peers’ deviance to changes in participants’ (monozygotic [MZ] twins’) self-reported delinquency from mid- to late adolescence while controlling for possible gene-environment correlations (rGE) through the use of the cotwin method in the context of a cross-lagged design. Two separate samples were used to this purpose. The first sample included 289 MZ-twin pairs (48.42% female; 65.5% of European descent, 21.7% of African descent, 12.8% other; average age at first assessment = 16.20 years) and relied on perceived measures of peer deviance, as in the two original studies. The second sample comprised 181 MZ-twin pairs (50.67% female; 84% of European descent, 3% of African descent, 2% of Asian descent, 2% Native North Americans, and 9% unspecified; average age at first assessment = 13.05 years) and used direct measures to assess peers’ deviance. Participants in the first sample were part of a large representative sample of American adolescents, whereas the second sample included families with twins born in a large Canadian city. Results showed that within-pair differences in self-reported delinquency were stable from midadolescence to late adolescence in both samples. As in Burt et al. (2009) and Hou et al. (2013) within-pair differences in peer deviance did not predict changes in within-pair differences in self-reported delinquency in both samples (i.e., no socialization effect). In contrast to Burt et al. (2009) and Hou et al. (2013), however, we found no predictive link from twins’ self-reported delinquency to peers’ deviance (i.e., no selection effect). Finally, as in Burt et al. (2009) we found that peers’ deviance was stable from middle to late adolescence and that peers’ deviance and participants’ delinquency were cross-sectionally correlated in the first sample, but not in the second sample. These results are interpreted in the context of the ongoing debate in regard to peers’ socialization vs selection effects. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Contextual variations in associations between measures of aggression and
           withdrawal and functioning with peers: A replication study.

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      Abstract: Data from 790 older school-age (Mage = 10.2 years, SD = 1.2 years) girls (N = 427) and boys from Barranquilla, Colombia (N = 449) and Montréal, Canada (N = 331) were used to replicate findings reported by Valdivia et al. (2005). This prior study revealed contextual variations in the association between two measures of social behavior, specifically aggression and withdrawal, and two measures of effective functioning with peers, specifically sociometric preference and friendship. The Montréal participants were primarily from families with European backgrounds. The ethnicity of the participants from Barranquilla can be described as Latinx/Caribbean. Multilevel analyses provided evidence of replication of place differences only for the associations between measures of aggression and sociometric preference. Stronger negative associations were observed between (a) measures of aggression and sociometric preference, (b) measures of withdrawal and sociometric preference, and (c) withdrawal and friendship in peer groups that were high in collectivism. These findings are interpreted as largely replicating the deep structure of the findings from the Valdivia et al. study. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • From social withdrawal to depression: A quasireplication and extension of
           Boivin, Hymel, and Bukowski (1995).

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      Abstract: Tenets of the Boivin et al. (1995) social process model were reexamined with two longitudinal samples using both the original and contemporary analytic strategies. Study goals included reconstructing (e.g., quasireplicating) Boivin et al.’s (1995) original findings and evaluating hypothesized relations across both comparable and longer developmental epochs. Samples included 491 children (245 girls, Mage = 10.0; 80.1% White;19.1% low-, 43.1% middle- or higher-income) followed from grades 4 to 12 and 272 children (148 girls, Mage = 9.61; 84.2% White; 8.2% low-, 17.1% middle-, 74.7% upper middle to higher-income) followed from grades 4 to 5. The assumption that social withdrawal instigates a cascade of within-person changes in the quality of peer relationships, sense of loneliness and social dissatisfaction, and depression was evaluated using Boivin et al.’s (1995) original regression strategy plus two variants of cross-lagged panel models (classical CLPM; Latent Curve Model with Structured Residuals [LCM-SR]). Unlike classical CLPM, LCM-SR allowed for isolating within-person changes and testing hypothesized predictors of within-person increases and decreases. Results differed by type of analysis. Regression and classical CLPM yielded greater substantiation for some of the processes stipulated by Boivin et al. (1995). LCM-SR results, however, called into question the assumption of a cascade effect of early social withdrawal and the reliance on traditional regression and CLPM analyses to test for presumed predictors of within person change. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Peer victimization and well-being as a function of same-ethnicity
           classmates and classroom social norms: Revisiting person × environment
           mismatch theory.

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      Abstract: Person × Environment mismatch theory has been applied to understanding how the classroom social ecology moderates associations between peer victimization and socioemotional well-being. In 2004, Bellmore et al. applied this theory to the ethnic composition and social climate of the classroom. The current study tested whether their findings replicate with a slightly younger, rural sample from the Southeastern United States, whether associations held longitudinally, and whether child ethnicity moderated effects. Participants were 4th-grade and 5th-grade students from 13 elementary schools (N = 1,448; Mage = 10.13 years; 701 girls; 37.9% Black, 4.40% Latina/o, 57.7% White). Measures included peer-reports of peer victimization, teacher-reports of loneliness, social withdrawal, and anxiety, and self-reports of prosocial peer treatment. Classroom social disorder was assessed using teacher-reports of aggressive behavior and peer victimization. Evidence that having a large percentage of same-ethnicity peers amplifies peer victimization-adjustment linkages was limited. Although the exact nature of identified interactive effects somewhat varied from Bellmore et al., findings similarly underscored the benefits of low social disorder and ethnically diverse classrooms. Together, these findings point to a need to understand the proximal sociostructural impact of ecological factors when studying the consequences of peer victimization. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Revisiting the hypothesis that friends buffer against diminished
           self-esteem arising from poor quality parent–adolescent relationships: A
           replication study.

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      Abstract: This replication study revisited conclusions from 2 previous investigations (Gauze, Bukowski, Aquan-Assee, & Sippola, 1996; van Aken & Asendorpf, 1997), which suggested that support from friends buffers against diminished self-esteem arising from poor quality relationships with mothers during the transition into adolescence. The aim of this replication study was to conduct an independent test of these findings with both concurrent and longitudinal data. Concurrent data for replication analyses were drawn from 4 projects, involving a total of 959 boys and 1,119 girls (ages 10 to 14) from Canada and the United States. Three samples reported participant ethnic descent: Africa (12.1%), Asia (5.6%), Europe (65.3%), Latin America (12.1%), and Native North America (0.9%). Child and mother reports of mother–child relationship quality assayed (a) maternal social support (in 3 data sets), and (b) family cohesion and adaptability (in 2 data sets). Main effects were replicated but hypothesized buffering effects were not. Maternal social support and friend social support were independently associated with adolescent self-esteem, concurrently, but not longitudinally. Family cohesion (but not adaptability) was associated with adolescent self-esteem, concurrently and longitudinally. Friend social support did not moderate associations between mother–child relationship quality and adolescent self-esteem, concurrently or longitudinally. The findings are consistent with a cumulative effects model wherein friends uniquely contribute to adolescent self-worth, over and above the contribution of mothers. The findings do not support claims that friends moderate associations between mother–child relationship quality and adolescent self-esteem. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Sharing and belonging: Children’s social status and their sharing
           behavior with in-group and out-group members.

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      Abstract: The association between children’s social-status within their peer-group and their prosociality was examined among fourth and sixth graders (N = 276), using sociometric nominations, and actual sharing with a fellow in-group member, or a member of an out-group. Results show an overall increase in sharing with age, and an overall correlation between children’s social status among peers and their sharing behavior—however, across both age groups, this association was significant only in the in-group condition, not when the recipient child was an out-group member. Specifically, less accepted children behaved in a less prosocial manner only toward in-group members, not toward out-group ones. This suggests that situational factors and characteristics of the prospective recipient play an important part in the degree to which less socially accepted children are willing to act prosocially. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Examining transactional relations between behavioral self-regulation and
           social-emotional functioning during the transition to kindergarten.

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      Abstract: The present study examined longitudinal associations between behavioral self-regulation and social-emotional functioning across four waves of measurement during the transition from preschool to kindergarten in a low-income sample. Participants included two cohorts of children (N = 558; 51% male). Children in both cohorts were 4 years old (Cohort 1: M = 4.82 years, SD = .31; Cohort 2: M = 4.80 years, SD = .31). Forty-four percent of children were Black, 32% were White, 13% were Latino, 10% were Multiracial, and 1% were Asian. Monthly income ranged from $0–5,539 (M = $1,508.18, SD = $892.92). Two statistical methods were used to examine relations among constructs. The cross-lagged panel model revealed a mixed pattern of relations between behavioral self-regulation and two indicators of social-emotional functioning (social skills and behavior problems) over time. There were no significant relations among behavioral self-regulation and social-emotional functioning during the preschool year; however, evidence for bidirectional associations were found between the spring of preschool and the fall of kindergarten. There were no significant relations among behavioral self-regulation and behavior problems at any time point. Finally, there were bidirectional relations among social skills and behavior problems in preschool, but directional relations emerged after this time point. A second model that included random intercepts was also run with the cross-lagged paths. Results from this model indicated that the random intercepts between behavioral self-regulation, social skills, and behavior problems were significantly related. Implications for future research are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Are math and behavioral skills interrelated' A longitudinal analysis
           in early childhood.

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      Abstract: The interrelationships between math and behavioral skill development prior to school entry are not well understood, yet have important implications for understanding how to best prepare young children for kindergarten. This study addresses this gap by utilizing a sample of 1,750 children (53% male; 47% White, 16% Black, 16% Hispanic, 8% Asian, and 13% other or multirace) from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B) to examine the interrelationships between behavioral (parent-reported prosocial skills and externalizing problems) and math skills (directly assessed) across the ages of 4, 5, and 6 years. Results from a random intercept cross-lagged panel model (RICLPM) revealed significant between-person associations between each of these skills over time. After controlling for these between-person differences, findings identified several significant within-person associations both between and within domains, with prosocial skills at age 4 predicting both prosocial and math skills at age 5. At age 5, math skills were predictive of future math and prosocial skills at age 6. Externalizing problems were not significantly associated with either of the other skills at any time points, but did predict continued externalizing problems from ages 5 to 6. Findings highlight the importance of supporting children’s prosocial and math skills in conjunction with one another during early childhood prior to school entry. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Executive functions and science achievement during the five-to-seven-year
           shift.

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      Abstract: Executive functions (EF) are domain-general cognitive skills that predict foundational academic skills such as literacy and numeracy. However, less is known about the relation between EFs and science achievement. The nature of this relation might be explained by the theory of mutualism, which states that development is the result of complex and interacting processes, in which growth in one domain influences growth in another domain. The present study examined the bidirectional associations between science achievement and children’s cognitive flexibility and working memory in a nationally representative sample of children in the United States (Early Childhood Longitudinal Study: Kindergarten Class of 2010-2011 [ECLS-K:2011]; N = 18,174). Using random intercepts cross-lagged panel modeling, results revealed a heterogeneous pattern of associations between EF and science achievement, consistent with mutualism theory. Trait-like and construct stability emerged in the between-person and within-person estimates of EF and science. Cognitive flexibility and working memory in kindergarten each predicted science achievement in first grade. Science achievement at the beginning of first grade predicted cognitive flexibility at the end of first grade. There were also bidirectional associations between working memory and science achievement from the beginning to the end of the first grade year. Although effect sizes were small, findings reveal the complex interplay between EF and science achievement during early childhood and highlight a core tenet of mutualism theory—that small gains in academic and cognitive domains are positively associated with future skills and abilities within and across domains. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Same-race friendship preference across the middle school years: The role
           of school racial/ethnic context.

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      Abstract: The current study examined the developmental trajectory of same-race friendship preference of racially/ethnically diverse students over the course of middle school. Participants were African American, Asian, Latinx, and White youth recruited at the start of middle school in 6th grade (N = 4,361; Mage = 11.33 years) and followed across the 3 years of middle school. School racial/ethnic diversity and the racial/ethnic representation of students in their academic classes, including honors classes, were examined as predictors of friendship preferences over time. Results from latent growth curve models revealed that same-race friendship preference increased over the course of middle school and was shaped by both the school and classroom racial/ethnic context, above and beyond availability. Greater school racial/ethnic diversity predicted steeper increases in same-race friendship preference over time for all racial/ethnic groups. However, there were interactions involving race/ethnicity when the analyses focused on how students were represented in their academic classes compared with school. African American and Asian youth who were underrepresented in honors classes showed steeper increases in same-race friendship preference over time. Implications for prejudice reduction and creating more inclusive school environments are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Testimony bias lingers across development under uncertainty.

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      Abstract: Children have a powerful ability to track probabilistic information, but there are also situations in which young learners simply follow what another person says or does at the cost of obtaining rewards. This latter phenomenon, sometimes termed bias to trust in testimony, has primarily been studied in children preschool-age and younger, presumably because reasoning capacities improve with age. Less attention has been paid to situations in which testimony bias lingers—one possibility is that children revert to a testimony bias under conditions of uncertainty. Here, participants (4 to 9 years old) searched for rewards and received testimony that varied in reliability. We find support for testimony bias beyond preschool-age, particularly for uncertain testimony. Children were sensitive to trial-by-trial uncertainty (Experiment 1: N = 102, 59 boys, 43 girls; the sample included nine Hispanic/Latinx, 93 non-Hispanic/Latinx participants, of whom six were Black/African American, seven were Asian American, eight were multiracial, 77 were White, and four indicated “other” or did not respond), and with uncertainty defined as a one-time, unexpected change in the testimony (Experiment 3: N = 129; 68 boys, 61 girls; the sample included 12 Hispanic/Latinx, 117 non-Hispanic/Latinx [10 Black/African American, four Asian American, nine multiracial, 103 White, and three “other”]). However, the impact of the testimony bias decreased with age. These effects were specific to the testimony coming from another person as opposed to resulting from a computer glitch (Experiment 2: N = 89, 52 boys, 37 girls; five Hispanic/Latinx, 80 non-Hispanic/Latinx, of whom one was Black/African American, three were Asian American, 15 were multiracial, 66 were White, and four did not report race). Taken together, these experiments provide evidence of a disproportionate influence of testimony, even in children with more advanced reasoning skills. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Family context in association with the development of child sensory
           processing sensitivity.

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      Abstract: Informed by the biological sensitivity to the context (BSC) theory, this multimethod, longitudinal study sought to examine how family context may be associated with the development of child sensory processing sensitivity (SPS) over a year. Participants were 235 young children (Mage = 2.97 at the first measurement occasion, 55.3% were girls) and their parents (median annual household income: $55,000 to 74,999), who were followed for two annual measurement occasions. These children consisted of 56.2% White, 21.3% African American, and 16.2% mixed race. Child SPS was measured via behavioral observation within multiple laboratory tasks at both waves and exhibited moderate stability over time. A curvilinear association between environmental harshness and the change in child SPS emerged, which proved consistent with the U-shaped pattern hypothesized by the BSC theory. Children remain at similar levels of SPS over the year under low and high levels of environmental harshness but exhibited decreases in SPS under moderate levels of environmental harshness. A follow-up exploration for the developmental implication of SPS change showed that children with higher SPS benefited more from the supportive environment by developing greater cognitive and behavioral functioning. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The associations of maternal warmth and hostility with prosocial and
           antisocial outcomes in justice-involved adolescents.

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      Abstract: Parental warmth and hostility are two key dimensions of parenting for child development, but the differential effects of these parenting dimensions on child prosocial and antisocial development has not been adequately investigated. The current study hypothesized that parental warmth would be uniquely related to child callous–unemotional traits and prosocial behavior, whereas parental hostility would be uniquely related to child delinquency and aggression. These hypotheses were investigated in a diverse sample of 1,216 adolescent males (13 to 17 years old, 46% Latino, 37% Black) with justice-system involvement in the 5 years following their first arrest. Hybrid models estimated within- and between-individual associations over time, while controlling for the overlap between parental warmth and hostility and between child prosocial and antisocial outcomes. Results indicated that maternal warmth showed consistent associations with callous–unemotional traits and prosocial behavior over time, whereas maternal hostility showed consistent associations with delinquency and aggression over time. Further, the findings were similar across racial and ethnic groups. Implications for developmental models of antisocial behavior, particularly for those including the role of callous–unemotional traits, are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Beyond destructive and constructive interparental conflict: Children’s
           psychological vulnerability to interparental disorganization.

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      Abstract: Guided by models of family unpredictability, this study was designed to identify the distinctive sequelae of disorganized interparental conflict, a dimension of interparental conflict characterized by abrupt, inexplicable changes in parental emotional lability, conflict tactics, and verbalizations. Participants included 208 kindergarten children (M age = 5.74 years; 56% girls), mothers, and their caregiving partners from racially diverse backgrounds (e.g., 44% Black) who participated in a longitudinal study with two annual measurement occasions. At Wave 1, trained observers assessed disorganized interparental conflict. Observational and survey assessments were used to assess several family (i.e., interparental conflict, parenting difficulties, parent psychopathology, family instability) and demographic (i.e., children’s gender, household income, parent education) characteristics. Assessments of child functioning at each wave included psychological adjustment (i.e., externalizing and internalizing symptoms, prosocial behavior), social information processing difficulties, and attention to emotion cues. Findings from structural equation modeling analyses indicated disorganized interparental conflict significantly predicted decreases in children’s prosocial behavior and increases in their externalizing problems, angry reactivity to social problems, and biased attention to angry and sad cues over a one-year period. Results were significant while controlling for established measures of interparental conflict, parenting difficulties, parent psychopathology, family instability, and demographic characteristics. The findings suggest that disorganized characteristics of interparental conflict may be an important domain of clinical change beyond the established targets of family harshness and adversity. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Development in context: What we need to know to assess children’s
           attachment relationships.

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      Abstract: Attachment studies mostly follow the Western middle-class model in theory and methods. To demonstrate that the assessment of children’s caregiving context is an often neglected, but crucial prerequisite for attachment studies, we (a) conducted a literature analysis of attachment research in non-Western contexts and (b) empirically investigated the caregiving arrangements and cultural concepts of attachment figures in three cultural groups in Costa Rica: rural Guanacaste, urban San José, and rural indigenous Bribri. All persons involved in caring for 65 infants (7–20 months) participated in the study, resulting in a total of 179 semistructured interviews. The samples showed differences in caregiving practices, with the urban sample resembling Western middle-class contexts emphasizing the maternal importance; the two rural samples showing extensive caregiving networks; however, differently composed. Moreover, the three samples revealed culturally specific concepts of potential attachment figures. The study emphasizes the need for culturally sensitive conceptual and methodological approaches in attachment research. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Is implicit social cognition developmentally stable' A longitudinal
           study.

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      Abstract: To examine whether implicit social cognition is developmentally stable or variable, this study investigated three primary types of implicit social cognition (self-esteem, the gender-science stereotype, and racial attitude) across 2 years in a sample of Chinese adolescents and emerging adults (N = 608; 56% female; 15- to 27-year-olds). Rank-order stability analyses indicated that implicit self-esteem and implicit racial attitude manifested low stability (r = .16, .19, respectively), whereas implicit gender-science stereotype was highly stable (r = .75). Latent change score model analyses showed that: (a) the mean level of implicit self-esteem decreased across the 2 years, whereas the mean levels of implicit gender-science stereotype and implicit racial attitude manifested no changes; (b) individual changes were heterogeneous for all the three types of implicit social cognition (while some of the participants manifested increasing tendencies, 15%–46%, the others exhibited decreasing tendencies); (c) 30% of participants manifested similar changes across the three types of implicit social cognition (either increasing or decreasing over time on all three), while the remaining participants exhibited distinct changes across them. Together, these findings indicate that, developmentally, implicit social cognition is variable but also stable, though the degree of variability and stability vary across individuals and domains. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Preschool executive function and adult outcomes: A developmental cascade
           model.

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      Abstract: The present study examined longitudinal associations between preschoolers’ executive function (EF) and adult educational attainment, impulse control, and general health directly and through its cascading effects on childhood and adolescent EF using a large, national, and prospective longitudinal sample of participants. Data were drawn from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (NICHD SECCYD) and included a diverse sample (52% male at birth; 76% White; 13% Black; 6% Hispanic; and 5% other; 14.23 mean years of maternal education) of 1,364 participants born in 1991 and followed through age 26. Four main findings emerged. First, we observed significant bivariate relations between EF measured at 54 months and adult educational attainment (r = .36, p < .01), and impulse control (r = .11, p = .01). Second, early EF measured during preschool and childhood explained variance in adult educational attainment and impulse control above and beyond adolescent EF. Third, childhood EF mediated the association between preschool EF and adult educational attainment and impulse control but did not operate through adolescent EF. Finally, neither preschool EF nor EF measured at other developmental stages predicted health during adulthood. Together, these findings shed light on the direct and cascading influences of EF across development on important domains of adult functioning. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The externalizing and internalizing pathways to marijuana use initiation:
           

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      Abstract: Adolescent marijuana use has become increasingly more problematic compared with the past; thus, understanding developmental processes that increase the liability of marijuana use is essential. Two developmental pathways to adolescent substance use have been proposed: an externalizing pathway that emphasizes the expression of aggressive and delinquent behavior, and an internalizing pathway that emphasizes the role of depressive symptoms and negative affect. In this study, we aimed to examine the synergistic role of impulsiveness and sensation seeking in the two risk pathways to determine whether both high and low levels of the traits are risk factors for marijuana use. Our study included 343 adolescents (52% were girls, 78% identified as Hispanic) that oversampled high-risk youth (78% had a family history of substance use disorder), assessed biannually between the ages of 13–16 years old. Moderated mediation analyses revealed that high levels of sensation seeking indirectly predicted marijuana use through higher mean levels of externalizing behavior. The positive relationship between sensation seeking and externalizing behavior was only significant at high levels of impulsiveness. Conversely, low levels of sensation seeking indirectly predicted marijuana use through higher mean levels of internalizing behavior. The negative relationship between sensation seeking and internalizing behavior was only significant at low levels of impulsiveness. Collectively, these results demonstrate that high and low levels of both impulsiveness and sensation seeking confer increased risk of marijuana use, albeit through different mechanisms. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Identity processes and identity content valences: Examining
           bidirectionality.

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      Abstract: Developing identities that are well-aligned with sociocultural expectations is a key psychosocial developmental task for adolescents and emerging adults. Most studies have examined identity development focusing on how individuals develop their identities (identity process), such as identity exploration and commitment. Meanwhile, researchers have emphasized incorporating the what of identity development (identity content) with identity processes to further the understanding of identity development in sociocultural contexts. This study focuses on the positive and negative valences of identity defined by desirable and undesirable images shared in sociocultural contexts. We investigated the bidirectional associations of identity exploration and commitment processes with positive and negative identity elements using longitudinal data over three measurement waves. Participants were 2,313 Japanese emerging adults enrolled in higher education (70.95% women; Mage = 20.43). The cross-lagged panel analysis and random-intercept cross-lagged panel analysis were used to estimate associations at both between- and within-person levels. Results indicated that commitment making negatively predicted negative identity elements, whereas identification with commitment positively predicted positive identity elements. Meanwhile, positive identity elements positively predicted identification with commitment only for participants with low levels of negative identity elements, while negative identity elements negatively predicted commitment making and identification with commitment. These associations were found only at the between-person level. The findings highlight that emerging adults develop identities through close interactions in which they engage in identity exploration and commitment processes, as well as construct identity content valences. Developmental sequences of identity, along with their sociocultural contexts and practical implications, are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
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