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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 1007 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 357)
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 354)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 275)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 255)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 180)
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 173)
Journal of Applied Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 168)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 148)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 146)
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 144)
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 138)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 120)
Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 94)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : General     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 90)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 86)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 83)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 74)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Educational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Human Perception and Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55)
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Abnormal Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Emotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Clinical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 39)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Educational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Neuropsychologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Experimental Psychology : Applied     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Counseling Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Applied Sport Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Motivation and Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Developmental Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Journal for the Psychology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Personality Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Neuropsychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
European Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Research in Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Anxiety Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Trauma & Dissociation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Psychological Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Legal and Criminological Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Dreaming     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Development and Psychopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Psychosomatic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
International Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Methodology: European Journal of Research Methods for the Behavioral and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Personality Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Ethics & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Humanistic Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Developmental Psychobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Family Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
History of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Multivariate Behavioral Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Mathematical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Neuropsychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Psychotherapy Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Psychological Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pediatric Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Imagination, Cognition and Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Peace and Conflict : Journal of Peace Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Group Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Forum of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
New Ideas in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nonverbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Constructivist Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Phenomenological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Diagnostica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trauma Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Analytical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Black Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Human Psychopharmacology Clinical and Experimental     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Japanese Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Comparative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forum Psychotherapeutische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Neuropsychobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Russian & East European Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Forum der Psychoanalyse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Measurement Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Psicología     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dialectica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia : Teoria e Pesquisa     Open Access  
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Mentálhigiéné es Pszichoszomatika     Full-text available via subscription  
Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle     Full-text available via subscription  

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Mental Health Review Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.349
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1361-9322 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8758
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • The initial design and programme theory for a new work-focused
           psychotherapeutic intervention to treat moderate-severe recurrent
           depression and enhance job retention

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      Authors: Nicola Walker , Sally Hall
      Abstract: Here, this study aims to report a case study of the initial design and programme theory of an interdisciplinary work-focused relational group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) treatment programme for moderate-severe depression using realist methods. This case study shows how the authors designed the intervention using component analysis of existing literature and focus groups of frontline practitioners and former service users and mind-mapping analysis to establish its operational logic and evaluated the theory underpinning the intervention using realist synthesis and evaluation to establish its conceptual logic. An iterative hybrid approach of literature review, component analysis, focus group discussion and realist methods established the initial design and programme theory for the new intervention. The intervention focused on three areas of therapy, three inter-dependent outcomes, in a group format, with opportunities created for peer interaction. The main theoretical principles most likely to promote efficacy were to accelerate and optimise activation of one or more of six hypothesised mechanisms: realise, reflect, regulate, resolve, relate and retain/resume in the context of skilfully facilitated group psychotherapy. This study outlines a methodological approach based on the layered ontology of critical realist philosophy, applied to a successful example, which will be useful during the early stages of the design and development of new group-based psychotherapeutic interventions. By adopting the critical realist approach, the authors identified underlying mechanisms of change in relational group CBT. The theoretically integrated approach involving service users and practitioners from different professional backgrounds was unique and meant that the treatment programme was multi-modal rather than informed by a single therapeutic or theoretical approach.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-05-03
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-12-2020-0094
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Concerns over the prescription of clozapine for people diagnosed with
           

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      Authors: Keir Harding , Dan Warrender , Hollie Berrigan
      Abstract: The use of long-term anti-psychotic medication for borderline personality disorder contravenes prescribing guidelines in the UK. There is evidence to suggest clozapine can be beneficial yet anecdotally it is prescribed almost exclusively in locked settings. A single study suggests a substantial proportion of psychiatrists disapprove of this practice. The purpose of this paper is to articulate concerns about the use of clozapine for “BPD” that are absent from current literature. This paper summarises the reflections and experiences of the authors lived experience, academic and clinical backgrounds. The published literature is uniformly positive when describing the prescription of clozapine for those diagnosed with BPD; however, this in no way reflects the experience of the authors. There is no body of material reflecting a study showing that a substantial number of psychiatrists have issues with this practice. While it is a fact that there is a discrepancy between psychiatrists attitudes towards clozapine prescription for “BPD” and the published literature, the described concerns in this paper are based solely on the authors’ experiences and observations. Those seeking literature to articulate concerns about the use of clozapine with this population will likely be disheartened by the paucity of published literature. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to raise substantial concerns about the use of clozapine for those diagnosed with “BPD” and the circumstances in which it is prescribed.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-03-2022-0017
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • “It doesn’t get taken seriously until it gets bad”: experiences of
           risk management from people diagnosed with a borderline personality
           disorder

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      Authors: Andrew Ware , Anna Preston , Simon Draycott
      Abstract: People with a borderline personality disorder (BPD) diagnosis can require support from mental health services for managing risk behaviour. Current routine inpatient and community treatment can be unhelpful for this group. Positive risk taking has been developed to help community teams manage risk with people with a BPD. This study aims to explore experiences of risk management in an NHS Trust where positive risk taking is being implemented with people with a BPD. Interpretative phenomenological analysis is the methodology of transcripts from semi-structured interviews. Nine adults with a diagnosis of BPD and current or previous experiences of risk management approaches were sampled from one NHS Trust. Limited resources and interpersonal barriers had a negative impact on experiences of Positive risk taking. Participants experienced one-off risk assessments and short-term interventions such as medication which they described as “meaningless”. Traumatic experiences could make it difficult to establish therapeutic relationships and elicit unhelpful responses from professionals. Participants could only feel “taken seriously” when in crisis which contributed towards an increase in risky behaviour. Positive risk taking was contingent upon collaborative and consistent professional relationships which created a “safety net”, enabling open communication and responsibility taking which challenged recovery-relapse patterns of service use. Positive risk taking approaches to risk management may benefit people with a BPD. Findings complement those from other studies emphasising the importance of compassion and empathy when working with personality disorder. Training and increased resources are required to implement effective risk management with this group. Findings expand upon the sparse existing research in the area of risk management using the Positive risk taking approach with people with a BPD diagnosis, and provide idiographic understanding which is clinically meaningful. Participants’ experiences suggest Positive risk taking may provide a framework for improving quality of life and decreasing service use for people diagnosed with BPD engaging in risk management with Community Mental Health Teams, which facilitates recovery and other benefits.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-02-2021-0016
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The active factor of alliance in psychotherapy: differentiation of
           therapeutic alliance quality according to the psychotherapist’s
           theoretical orientation and type of disorder

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      Authors: Tomasz Prusiński
      Abstract: The results of empirical research on the patient–psychotherapist relationship have led to the fundamental conclusion that the therapeutic alliance is one of the key factors ensuring the positive outcomes of psychotherapy. The main aim of the present study is to determine what variables pertaining to the context of psychotherapy (type of treatment applied in accordance with the psychotherapist’s modality/orientation, type of disorder diagnosed in the patient) differentiated the alliance. Participants for the main study were recruited from public and private psychotherapy offices across Poland. The working alliance was assessed based on 262 psychotherapist–patient dyads. The sample consisted of 428 participants. To assess the quality of therapeutic alliance, the author used the full version of the Working Alliance Inventory as adapted into Polish. The results of analyses led to several basic conclusions. The study revealed a differentiating effect of type of psychotherapy on the quality of therapeutic alliance. Alliance quality was not differentiated by the type of disorder diagnosed in patients and treated in the psychotherapeutic process. The results of analyses presented in this empirical study allowed for exploring the quality of the therapeutic alliance with contextual variables related to the psychotherapeutic process taken into account.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-12-2021-0091
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • COVID-19 pandemic impact on mental health and quality of life among
           general population in Pakistan

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      Authors: Hafiz Muhammad Asif , Hafiz Abdul Sattar Hashmi , Rabia Zahid , Khalil Ahmad , Halima Nazar
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychosocial impact during the current epidemic situation of COVID-19 in Pakistan. A total of 1,149 respondents were recruited in the study. Mental health status and psychological impact of COVID-19 outbreak were measured by impact of events scale–revised (IES-R) instrument and depression, anxiety and stress scales (DASS-21), respectively. Results of IES-R revealed moderate or severe psychological impact in 13.05% respondents (score> 33). DAAS score revealed that severe and extremely severe depression (score: 21–42), anxiety (score: 15–42) and stress (score: 27–42) were reported in 6.35%, 6.87% and 2.78% respondents, respectively. Higher levels of stress, anxiety and depression were recorded in female gender, student, medical professionals, farmer and daily wages employed, exhibiting significant (p < 0.05) association with psychological impact of the COVID-19 outbreak. Majority of respondents received increased support, shared feeling and family care. Mild to moderate psychological impact on mental health status was recorded in this study, which enables further planning and opportunities for health authorities to design psychological interventions for the improvement of negative psychological impact of COVID-19 epidemic in vulnerable groups.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-04-07
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-06-2021-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Psychological treatments and therapy adaptations for psychological
           distress in dementia and mild cognitive impairment: a systematic review
           and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Amie Robinson , Nima Moghaddam
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of psychological treatments and identify required adaptations to increase acceptability and improve outcomes for people with dementia or mild cognitive impairment who experience psychological distress. The Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group Specialised Register and other databases were searched for eligible studies. Inclusion criteria identified nine randomised controlled trials comparing a psychological intervention (cognitive behavioural therapy, relaxation training therapies, multimodal therapies, psychodynamic therapy, counselling and cognitive rehabilitation) with usual care, with measures of depression and/or anxiety as an outcome. The appraisal of papers was conducted using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Data was analysed using meta-analysis. A small, significant effect size before to after intervention was revealed, suggesting that psychological treatments may be effective in reducing psychological distress in people with dementia, with several therapy adaptations identified. Because of methodological limitations and a small number of studies evaluated, the quality of evidence was low for outcomes for depression, and there were no significant outcomes in anxiety. The current review offers a unique contribution in identifying specific adaptations deemed helpful in improving the accessibility and acceptability of therapy for people with dementia, suggesting therapy can be adjusted enough to support this client-group. Future studies should use high-quality trials using standardised psychological interventions, of sufficient length, with long-term follow-up and offer of specific adaptations to increase accessibility and outcomes.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-31
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-05-2021-0043
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Mental health mobile app use to manage psychological difficulties: an
           umbrella review

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      Authors: Kiran Badesha , Sarah Wilde , David L. Dawson
      Abstract: A rapid increase in global smartphone ownership and digital health technologies offers the potential for mobile phone applications (apps) to deliver mental health interventions. The purpose of this paper is to bring together evidence reporting on mental health mobile apps to gain an understanding of the quality of current evidence, the positive and adverse effects of apps and the mechanisms underlying such effects. A systematic search was carried out across six databases, for any systematic reviews or meta-analyses conducted up to 2020. Review quality was assessed using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews. Across a total of 24 articles, a variety of clinical outcomes were assessed. Most compelling support was shown for apps targeting anxiety symptoms; some evidence favoured the use of apps for depression symptoms. Less evidence was available for the remaining clinical symptoms such as bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder, sleep disorders and substance use. Overall, there was limited evidence pertaining to adverse effects and change mechanisms and a lack of quality reporting across a large proportion of included reviews. The included reviews demonstrate the need for further robust research before apps are recommended clinically. This paper makes a valuable contribution to the current status of research and reviews investigating mental health mobile apps. Recommendations are made for improved adherence to review guidelines and to ensure risk of bias is minimised.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-02-2021-0014
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Social stigma among health-care providers toward patients with
           schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorders at tertiary hospital in
           Makkah, Saudi Arabia

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      Authors: Sami Saad , Jolan Ayman Bshawri , Sara Mohammed Alsaedi , Rahaf Emad Radi , Raneem Marwan Ghonim , Haya Mohammed Nasraldain , Abdullah Abdulqadeer Gadeer
      Abstract: Several previous studies showed strong social stigma toward mental illness patients from the health-care providers (HCPs) in Saudi Arabia. This stigma affects the level of care provided by HCPs. Stigma is a major barrier in treating schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) patients. Thus, it is important to clarify the difference regarding the social stigma between both diagnoses. This study aimed to identify and compare the existence of social stigma among HCPs towards schizophrenia patients compared to OCD patients. A total of 283 HCPs from King Abdullah Medical City (KAMC), Makkah, Saudi Arabia, were enrolled in this cross-sectional questionnaire-based study between middle and end of January 2021. The scale included a demographic questionnaire plus two vignette cases reflecting OCD and schizophrenia patients’ symptoms without mentioning diagnosis. Each case was followed with 18 questions, which measured some of the thoughts and attitudes of the social stigma of mental illnesses including negative stereotypes, discrimination, social distancing and emotional and cognitive prejudices against mental illness patients. The scale was validated by a pilot study (which included 15 other participants) with acceptable validity and reliability (Cronbach’s alpha: 81.4%). Most participants’ responses were “low” in the total score of their stigma score for both diagnosis [OCD (84.1%), mean ± SD (1.15  ±  0.366) and schizophrenia (74.2%), mean ± SD (1.25  ±  0.438)]. However, those who responded “high” in their stigma score regarding the schizophrenia section were higher in their number than those who responded “high” in the OCD section (25.8% vs 15.9%). Most participants had “low” total stigma scores for both diagnoses [OCD (84.1%), mean ± SD (1.15  ±  0.366) and schizophrenia (74.2%), mean ± SD (1.25  ±  0.438)]. However, of those with “high” stigma score responses, more were for the schizophrenia section compared to the OCD section (25.8% vs 15.9%). Being flexible to recruit any of them was more related to promoting them if they deserve promotion. The sample that answered wrong regarding OCD vignette diagnosis and had “high” stigma score was higher (n = 40) than the sample that answered correctly and had “high” stigma score (n = 5). In contrast, the sample that answered wrong regarding the schizophrenia case diagnosis and had “high” stigma score (n = 41) was not significantly different in terms of its number compared to the one that answered correctly and had “high” stigma score (n = 32). One aspect that reduces the strength of this study is that the target number of the participants could not be reached, meaning a 95% confidence level with a ±5% margin of error could not be reached. Another limitation is the lack of contact between HCPs at the KAMC in Makkah with mental illness patients owing to lack of psychiatric inpatient departments. However, this limitation may be a strength for this study, as we were able to primarily measure medical HCPs rather than psychiatric HCPs. Although the vignette methodology in stigma studies has many benefits, the participants do not respond to real patients, and therefore miss appearance and other nonverbal cues that are typically present in real interactions. The social stigma level among HCPs against schizophrenia patients is higher than that against OCD patients. The factor of knowing the diagnosis of the case has a positive effect on decreasing stigma toward OCD patients but not toward schizophrenia patients. Educational awareness about stigma against mental illness patients to HCPs, rather than focusing on increasing literature knowledge, may decrease stigma among HCPs.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-11-2021-0078
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Editorial: Taking a break in the “new normal”: virtual reality
           relaxation for a stressed workforce

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      Authors: Simon Riches , Holly Smith
      Abstract: Editorial: Taking a break in the “new normal”: virtual reality relaxation for a stressed workforce
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-06-2022-095
      Issue No: Vol. 27 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Caregivers’ experiences of therapeutic support for children exposed
           to developmental trauma

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      Authors: Megan Middlemiss , Lisa Caygill , Sarah Craven-Staines , Joyce Powell
      Abstract: Exposure to trauma in childhood can have lasting impacts upon development and psychological well-being. Services can be sought to help young people heal from their experiences; however, literature suggests that their care may not always be trauma-informed. This paper aims to generate a theory to explain caregivers’ experiences of accessing mental health and therapeutic services for young people exposed to developmental trauma. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used, using an iterative process of data collection and analysis. Nine individuals including foster carers, adoptive parents and a special guardian were interviewed following purposive and theoretical sampling. Techniques of initial, focused and theoretical coding, alongside constant comparative analysis were used to develop the end theory. The theory demonstrates that multiple factors can impact upon caregivers’ experiences when accessing support for young people exposed to trauma. Six themes emerged documenting caregivers’ journeys from the decision to seek support to the ending of service involvement. Barriers, challenges and positive experiences are described. Results are contextualised through consideration of wider organisations and systems. The theory highlights challenges caregivers face when accessing mental health and therapeutic support for young people exposed to developmental trauma. It provides new insights into what caregivers consider to be trauma-informed experiences of care in these settings. Tentative recommendations are provided in the hope of improving future care.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-02-2021-0010
      Issue No: Vol. 27 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Transitioning services for eating disorder treatment, the relative
           importance of factors from patient, carer and clinician perspectives: a
           Q-methodology study

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      Authors: Jackie Wales , Nicola Brewin , Iain Williamson , Jakub Štický , Rachael Lawrence , Alison Eivors
      Abstract: Effective transitions from child and adolescent to adult services are important for continuity of care for patients with eating disorders. This study aims to examine the relative importance of a series of statements about the transition process, elicited from an earlier service evaluation, from the perspectives of patients, parents/carers and clinicians. Twenty-eight participants completed a Q-sort task ranking 40 statements, developed from an earlier study, using a normal distribution pattern on a scale, which ranged from strongly agree to strongly disagree, to identify their priorities for transition. Analysis resulted in the extraction of four factors explaining 52% of the variance. Four distinct factors were elicited: “parents and carers need including too”, “facilitating effective transfer between services”, “supporting the patient through transition” and providing “timely, patient-centred care”. The study enabled similarities and differences in priorities to be observed for the three respondent groups. These rankings, noting the differences between the respondent groups, can be used to inform the development of effective transition protocols. This study suggests these protocols should ensure a person-centred approach; timely planning; include parents/carers; provide continuous care and have good transfer of information and sensible timing of transitions. Differences in priorities/opinions can be addressed through open communication channels. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first UK-wide study examining priorities for transition from the perspectives of patients, parents/carers and clinicians.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-10-2021-0074
      Issue No: Vol. 27 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Administrators within personality disorder services: their role and
           contribution in maintaining the overall structure and treatment approach

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      Authors: Emma Larsson-Thomas , Sukhi Ruprai , Louise Manonga , Tennyson Lee
      Abstract: People with personality disorders often present with interpersonal difficulties which affect their relationship with significant others but also with staff involved in their care. Administrators work in “frontline positions” where they are required to face challenging situations yet their role has not been studied. This study aims to describe the role and contribution of an administrator in a personality disorder service. A mixed-methods design was used. All incoming calls to a specialist personality disorder service over three months were documented. A semi-structured focus group (n = 7) with clinicians working in the service was conducted. The data was analysed using thematic analysis. Clinical vignettes are presented to highlight typical interactions. The qualitative results highlighted that the administrator is key in psychological preparations, managing pressure and maintaining clinical boundaries. Traits identified as useful in an administrator working in a personality disorder service are flexibility, consistency and assertiveness. Tensions between administrators and clinicians were related to the role definition of the administrator, boundaries, countertransference and process interaction. The majority of incoming calls were from patients scheduling and cancelling appointments. Only 3% of calls evoked negative feelings in the administrator such as feeling “annoyed” or “drained”. Results highlight a need for careful selection, training and supervision of staff. A key recommendation is the need for integration and close coordination of the administrator within the clinical team. This study represents one of the first efforts to explore the contribution of administrators within personality disorder services. It explores the impact of the administrator on the team.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-03-10
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-04-2021-0035
      Issue No: Vol. 27 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • A scoping review of older empty nesters’ mental health and its
           contributors

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      Authors: Cherrie Park , Angela Nancy Mendoza
      Abstract: Although the effects of the empty nest syndrome on mental health have long been examined, middle-aged empty nesters were generally at the focus of this examination. However, the number of older empty nesters, namely, empty nesters 60 years old or above, is expected to increase as the population is aging. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to examine previous studies concerning mental health outcomes specifically among older empty nesters and to identify major contributors to their mental health. The authors conducted a scoping review by following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) extension for scoping reviews guidelines. A total of 18 studies selected for this review had been all conducted in Asia. A majority indicated that older empty nesters were at higher risks of poor mental health than their peers who were not empty nesters. Major contributors to their mental health included gender, education, income, living arrangement, health behaviors, personality, coping styles, resilience, a sense of coherence and social support. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first scoping review which concerns older empty nesters and their mental health outcomes. This review offers recommendations for researchers, policy makers, and healthcare providers based on the findings and knowledge gaps in the current literature.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-15
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-07-2021-0057
      Issue No: Vol. 27 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Treatment resistant depression (TRD) service outpatient’s experience of
           sleep, activity, and using a Fitbit wearable activity and sleep tracker

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      Authors: Chris Griffiths , Kate Walker , Andy Willis , Lorraine Pollard
      Abstract: Depression, physical health, well-being, sleep and physical activity are interlinked. Healthy levels of physical activity and effective night-time sleep can reduce depressive symptoms. In the context of their lives and symptoms of depression, this paper aims to understand participants’ experiences of using a Fitbit, physical activity and sleep and the barriers and facilitators for healthy sleep and physical activity. Qualitative methods were used to conduct interviews with 19 patients (4 male; 15 female) diagnosed with treatment-resistant depression undergoing transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) treatment for depression. Reflexive thematic analysis was used. Healthy sleep and physical activity levels are interlinked and reduce depressive symptoms as well as improving well-being and physical health. A Fitbit is useful to enhance physical activity, self-awareness, motivation, healthier lifestyles and effective sleep. Barriers to healthy sleep and physical activity levels included depressive symptoms, environmental factors and anxieties. Facilitators for healthy sleep and physical activity levels included knowledge of the benefits, support from family and friends and applying sleep hygiene. There is a need to provide interventions using wearable activity trackers that build on the links between increased physical activity, improved sleep, enhanced well-being, better physical health and lower depressive symptoms. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time that patients undergoing TMS have had their experiences of sleep, activity and using a Fitbit investigated and reported.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-04-2021-0036
      Issue No: Vol. 27 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Are informal female workers better' Determinants of job stress on
           physical symptoms with risk-taking mental health stigma: a
           convergent-parallel approach

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      Authors: Hanvedes Daovisan , Jinpitcha Mamom
      Abstract: Lao PDR is a developing country with increasing female participation in the informal labour market. However, these informal female workers are often emotionally and physically drained due to stress in the workplace. This study aims to examine the determinants of job stress on physical symptoms associated with the mental health stigma of informal female workers in Lao PDR. A convergent parallel approach was used with 1,037 structured interviews and 15 in-depth interviews between October 2017 and June 2019. Fractional response regression was used to analyse the quantitative data and thematic analysis to analyse the qualitative data. The quantitative data showed a positive effect on job stress and physical symptoms associated with mental health stigma. The qualitative data illustrated that job characteristics, work environment, time pressure, job control, complexity related to workload, physical working conditions and physical demand were associated with emotional distress, depressive symptoms and long-term self-stigma. The study findings provide guidance for developing strategies for female workers in an informal economy to help mitigate the impacts of job stress related to physical symptoms and mental health stigma. This study offers a deeper understanding of the emotional and physical stress experienced by informal female workers in the workplace in Lao PDR, showing that job stress due to the physical workload leads to mental health stigma.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-08
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-01-2021-0001
      Issue No: Vol. 27 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The impact of integrating mental health services within a prison setting

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      Authors: Radha Kothari , Danielle White , Laura Craster , Eva Vicianova , Sophie Dennard , Fiona Bailey , John Kemp , Derek K. Tracy , Natasha Sarkissian
      Abstract: In 1999, the national health service (NHS) was made responsible for the commissioning of prison health care. Mental health inreach teams (MHIT) were set up to mirror community mental health teams and provide secondary care to prisoners diagnosed with severe and enduring mental illnesses (SEMI). Since then, the provision of mental health care to prisoners without a diagnosis of a SEMI has been variable. A rapid review of NHS health care in prisons conducted by Public Health England (PHE) (2016) highlighted the need for provision to be more integrated and meet the needs of prisoners without a diagnosis of a SEMI. In response, an integrated mental health and substance misuse service was implemented within her majesty’s prison/young offenders institution Pentonville. This study aims to evaluate its impact and share lessons learned. Routinely collected and anonymised data were reviewed for prisoners referred between 1 May 2018 and 31 December 2019. Data are presented on the quantity of referrals over time, and the type of support offered. Chi-square goodness of fit tests was conducted to determine whether the prisoners referred to the service were representative of the wider prison population in terms of age and ethnicity. Referrals showed a general pattern of increase over time and were representative of the wider prison population in terms of age and ethnicity, indicating equitable access. Lessons learned are discussed. Demand for therapeutic and substance misuse services was higher than that for SEMIs. Notable was the high quantity of referrals which provides further evidence for the disparity between high need and limited provision within prison settings, particularly for therapeutic interventions. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first service evaluation of a recently implemented integrated and holistic model of prison mental health care in line with recommendations from PHE (2016).
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2022-02-07
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-03-2021-0024
      Issue No: Vol. 27 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Emotions in our lives: the evaluation of a user-centered training course
           »living e-Motions« in the context of recovery of people with mental
           health challenges

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      Authors: Karin Bakračevič , Saša Zorjan , Sara Tement , Louise Christie , Bojan Musil
      Abstract: This paper aims to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a training course »Living e-Motions« for people living with mental health challenges in the context of their recovery. The course was developed in the joint project of partners from Spain, Estonia, Slovenia and the UK. The curriculum of the course is focused on emotional education. It uses a narrative approach as a practical way for participants to explore and regulate their emotions and consequently take charge of their recovery. Seventeen participants were included in the pilot training in Spain and Estonia. Impact of the training was assessed on measures of life satisfaction, emotion regulation, positive and negative affect and recovery at baseline and directly after training. The analysis revealed that participants reported higher life satisfaction, emotion regulation skills, positive affect and recovery after the training. However, because of the small sample size, the mean differences did not reach statistical significance. Further studies on larger samples are needed to test the effectiveness of the training course. Pilot study findings are encouraging and show that the developed training course has a potential for improving key competencies and abilities needed in daily life, concretely in emotion regulation, positive and negative affect, life satisfaction and recovery. This paper presents a novel training course that uses a narrative approach and focuses on recovery and improvement of key competencies and abilities of individuals with mental health issues.
      Citation: Mental Health Review Journal
      PubDate: 2021-12-21
      DOI: 10.1108/MHRJ-03-2021-0021
      Issue No: Vol. 27 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Mental Health Review Journal

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