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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 1082 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ad verba Liberorum : Journal of Linguistics & Pedagogy & Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 79)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 499)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 60)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 308)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 99)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 364)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Pilquen : Sección Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Applied and Preventive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 264)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Organisational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Australian Journal of Rehabilitation Counseling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 238)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 236)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 77)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Burnout Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers d’Études sur la Représentation     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 92)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access  
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 1754-470X
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [400 journals]
  • Brief psychological interventions for anxiety and depression in a
           secondary care adult mental health service: an evaluation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kate Roberts; Emma Travers-Hill, Siân Coker, Jordan Troup, Stephanie Casey, Katherine Parkin, Youngsuk Kim
      Abstract: Due to continuing pressures on the UK National Health Service’s mental health services, there has been increased interest in the development of brief psychological interventions (BPIs). These interventions are usually defined as including selected components of established psychological interventions, delivered over fewer sessions, and by staff with less specialised training (paraprofessionals). Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-based BPIs for anxiety and depression have been found to be helpful for clients with mild to moderate mental health problems. This project evaluates the introduction of BPIs for anxiety and depression in a secondary care adult mental health service, with clients experiencing moderate to severe mental health difficulties. The service developed CBT-based manuals for anxiety (anxiety management) and depression (behavioural activation) BPIs. The BPIs were delivered by mental health workers without core therapeutic training, who were offered training and group supervision by psychologists in the team. Measures of anxiety (GAD-7), depression (PHQ-9), wellbeing (SWEMWBS) and functioning (WSAS) were completed at the start and end of treatment. The data reported from a 2-year period suggest that BPIs are associated with reductions in symptoms of anxiety and low mood, and improvements in wellbeing and functioning. Whilst this is a small-scale initial evaluation, the results are promising for the potential benefit of BPIs for clients in secondary care settings. Given that this new way of working has possible additional benefits such as improving access to psychological treatment and cost-effectiveness, further research in the area is warranted and encouraged.Key learning aims
      (1) To overview the current evidence for BPIs.
      (2) To outline a possible model for offering BPIs in secondary care.
      (3) To illustrate the potential positive effects of BPIs within a secondary care population.
      (4) To consider the need for future research and development of BPIs.
      PubDate: 2021-10-08T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000258
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Survivor guilt: a cognitive approach

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      Authors: Hannah Murray; Yasmin Pethania, Evelina Medin
      Abstract: Survivor guilt is a common experience following traumatic events in which others have died. However, little research has addressed the phenomenology of survivor guilt, nor has the issue been conceptualised using contemporary psychological models which would help guide clinicians in effective treatment approaches for this distressing problem. This paper summarises the current survivor guilt research literature and psychological models from related areas, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, moral injury and traumatic bereavement. Based on this literature, a preliminary cognitive approach to survivor guilt is proposed. A cognitive conceptualisation is described, and used as a basis to suggest potential treatment interventions for survivor guilt. Both the model and treatment strategies require further detailed study and empirical validation, but provide testable hypotheses to stimulate further research in this area.Key learning aims
      (1) To appreciate an overview of the current available literature on the phenomenology and prevalence of survivor guilt.
      (2) To understand a preliminary cognitive conceptualisation of survivor guilt.
      (3) To understand and be able to implement treatment recommendations for addressing survivor guilt.
      PubDate: 2021-09-16T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000246
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Clinical supervision in CBT training: what do participants view as
           effective'

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      Authors: Nicola Kelly; Alex Hassett
      Abstract: Literature pertaining to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) supervision is limited, particularly about CBT supervision during training. This exploratory study outlines the thoughts of supervisors and supervisees in a training context about which elements make supervision effective. Four supervisees and four experienced CBT supervisors (all from a CBT training programme and independent of one another) were interviewed and asked to consider what makes CBT supervision during training effective. Their responses were evaluated using thematic analysis (TA) and key themes identified. The fit with existing literature was considered via the use of an adapted Delphi poll. Two main themes, containing seven subthemes, were identified from the thematic analysis: ‘supervision as structured learning’ and ‘supervisory relations and process’. The adapted Delphi poll was divided into six categories denoting important characteristics of CBT supervision: (1) the supervisory relationship, (2) ethical factors, (3) generic supervisory skills, (4) mirroring the CBT approach, (5) the supervisor’s knowledge and (6) addressing difficulties. There was a good fit between the TA themes and the Delphi categories. For those engaging in CBT supervision, establishing a structure that mirrors a CBT session, alongside a supportive supervisory alliance, may promote effective CBT supervision during training.Key learning aims
      (1) To consider what might make CBT supervision during training a better experience for participants, such as alliance factors and structured learning.
      (2) To discover how supervisors’ and trainees’ perspectives fit with existing research on CBT supervision.
      (3) To consider some potential supervisory implications related to aspects of CBT supervision that participants find useful.
      PubDate: 2021-09-14T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000222
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • A cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) approach for working with strong
           feelings of guilt after traumatic events

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      Authors: Kerry Young; Zoe J. Chessell, Amy Chisholm, Francesca Brady, Sameena Akbar, Millay Vann, Khadija Rouf, Lucinda Dixon
      Abstract: This article outlines a cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) approach to treating feelings of guilt and aims to be a practical ‘how to’ guide for therapists. The therapeutic techniques were developed in the context of working with clients with a diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); however, the ideas can also be used when working with clients who do not meet a diagnosis of PTSD but have experienced trauma or adversity and feel guilty. The techniques in this article are therefore widely applicable: to veterans, refugees, survivors of abuse, the bereaved, and healthcare professionals affected by COVID-19, amongst others. We consider how to assess and formulate feelings of guilt and suggest multiple cognitive and imagery strategies which can be used to reduce feelings of guilt. When working with clients with a diagnosis of PTSD, it is important to establish whether the guilt was first experienced during the traumatic event (peri-traumatically) or after the traumatic event (post-traumatically). If the guilt is peri-traumatic, following cognitive work, this new information may then need to be integrated into the traumatic memory during reliving.Key learning aims
      (1) To understand why feelings of guilt may arise following experiences of trauma or adversity.
      (2) To be able to assess and formulate feelings of guilt.
      (3) To be able to choose an appropriate cognitive technique, based on the reason for the feeling of guilt/responsibility, and work through this with a client.
      (4) To be able to use imagery techniques to support cognitive interventions with feelings of guilt.
      PubDate: 2021-09-09T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000192
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Understanding aggression and microaggressions by and against people of
           colour

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      Authors: Monnica T. Williams; Terence H. W. Ching, Jade Gallo
      Abstract: Efforts to understand racial microaggressions have focused on the impact on targets, but few studies have examined the motivations and characteristics of offenders, and none has examined microaggressions committed by members of racialized groups. The purpose of this study is to determine if racial microaggressions should be conceptualized as a form of aggression when committed by racialized individuals by examining the relationship between propensity to commit microaggressions and aggressive tendencies to help inform interventions. This nationwide survey recruited 356 Asian, Black and Hispanic American adults. Participants completed measures of likelihood of committing anti-Black microaggressions, aggression, negative affect, and ethnic identity. There was a significant negative correlation between ratings by diversity experts of microaggressive interactions being racist and participants’ likelihood of engaging in those same interactions. For each ethnoracial group, likelihood of committing anti-Black microaggressions was significantly positively correlated with all measures of aggression examined. The correlation between microaggressions and aggression was strongest for non-White Hispanic participants and weakest among Asian participants. A linear regression showed that aggression uniquely predicted microaggression likelihood, after controlling for respective co-variates within groups. Among non-White Hispanic participants, there was a significant positive correlation between negative affect and propensity to commit microaggressions, but this association disappeared in the regression analysis after accounting for aggression. A positive ethnic identity was not correlated with microaggression likelihood among Black participants. Findings indicate that microaggressions represent aggression on the part of offenders and constitute a form of behaviour that is generally socially unacceptable. Implications and cognitive behavioural treatment approaches are discussed.Key learning aims
      (1) People of colour generally recognize that racial microaggressions are unacceptable.
      (2) People of colour may commit microaggressions against other people of colour.
      (3) Anti-Black microaggressions are correlated to aggression in perpetrators.
      (4) Microaggressions are not solely attributable to negative affect or low ethnic identity.
      (5) Therapists should address microaggressions, even when committed by people of colour.
      PubDate: 2021-09-08T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000234
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • A qualitative study of patients’ experiences and acceptance of
           computerised cognitive behavioural therapy in primary care, Scotland

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      Authors: Eliane Du; Ethel Quayle, Hamish Macleod
      Abstract: Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (CCBT) has been made available within the National Health Service (NHS) across Scotland as an alternative treatment for mild to moderate anxiety and depression. However, the provision of CCBT services is still limited in the NHS, possibly affecting delivery of this computer-aided therapy to patients and inhibiting acceptance and uptake of this intervention. This paper reports on the qualitative exploration of patients’ experiences and acceptance of one CCBT programme delivering computer-assisted therapy (Beating the Blues: BTB), examining particularly the point of referral, access to treatment, and support. Thematic analysis was conducted on semi-structured face-to-face and email interviews with 33 patients at different NHS organisations across Scotland. Data analysis generated six key themes which illustrated patients’ experiences relating to referral and access to the treatment, and the challenges they faced: (1) information dissemination; (2) expectations and the impact of waiting for BTB; (3) impact of locations on experience of BTB; (4) preference for home access; (5) desire for better human support; and (6) desire for additional application support features. The findings highlighted that better methods of implementing and delivering such CCBT services together with the design of the technological interventions are vital to the success of these services.Key learning aims
      (1) To understand the service models and methods of implementing and delivering one CCBT programme (BTB) in routine care;
      (2) To learn about user experiences of accessing and using BTB; and
      (3) To learn about the implications and factors that might have influenced uptake and understand the implications.
      PubDate: 2021-09-03T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000210
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Increasing access to brief Coping Strategy Enhancement for distressing
           voices: a service valuation exploring a possible role for briefly-trained
           therapists – CORRIGENDUM

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Phil Clarke; Anna-Marie Jones, Mark Hayward
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000209
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Multiple emotions, multiple selves: compassion focused therapy chairwork

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      Authors: Tobyn Bell; Jane Montague, James Elander, Paul Gilbert
      Abstract: Compassion focused therapy (CFT) is rooted in an evolutionary view of the human mind as formed of a multitude of contrasting, and often conflicting, motivations, emotions and competencies. A core aim of the therapy is to help clients understand the nature of their mind in a way that is de-pathologizing and de-shaming. The approach is also focused on the cultivation of compassion to work with these difficult aspects of mind. CFT includes the ‘multiple-selves’ intervention which involves the differentiation of threat-based emotion and an exploration of their conflict. Compassion is then applied to the client’s affective world to aid regulation and integration. This paper focuses on clients’ experiences of a chairwork version of multiple-selves, wherein clients personify their emotions in separate chairs. Nine participants with depression were interviewed directly following the intervention and the resulting data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Three interconnecting themes were identified: appreciating emotional complexity; the role of chairwork process; and compassionate integration. The results highlight the importance of emotional differentiation in understanding internal multiplicity and conflict in depression, and the role of compassion in creating a sense of personal coherence. The embodied and enactive nature of chairwork was found to be of benefit in identifying and separating emotion, and in developing new forms of self-relating. The paper discusses the clinical implications of such findings for the treatment of depression.Key learning aimsAs a result of reading this paper, readers should:
      (1) Learn about the ‘multiple-selves’ framework for working with threat emotions.
      (2) Appreciate the complexity of emotions in depression.
      (3) Understand how chairwork processes can be used to access, differentiate and address emotional material.
      (4) Develop insight into how compassion can be used to regulate emotions and integrate aversive experiences.
      PubDate: 2021-07-19T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000180
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Stress and burnout in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT)
           trainees: a systematic review

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      Authors: Joel Owen; Louise Crouch-Read, Matthew Smith, Paul Fisher
      Abstract: For more than a decade, Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) has been training a new workforce of psychological therapists. Despite evidence of stress and burnout both in trainee mental health professionals, and qualified IAPT clinicians, little is known about these topics in IAPT trainees. Consequently, this systematic review sought to establish the current state of the literature regarding stress and burnout in IAPT trainees. Electronic databases were searched to identify all published and available unpublished work relating to the topic. On the basis of pre-established eligibility criteria, eight studies (including six unpublished doctoral theses) were identified and assessed for quality. This review identifies that research into the experience of IAPT trainees is under-developed. Existing evidence tentatively suggests that IAPT trainees may experience levels of stress and burnout that are higher than their qualified peers and among the higher end of healthcare professionals more generally. The experience of fulfilling dual roles as mental health professionals and university students concurrently appears to be a significant source of stress for IAPT trainees. More research regarding the levels and sources of stress and burnout in IAPT trainees is urgently needed to confirm and extend these findings. Recommendations for future research in the area are given.Key learning aims
      (1) To establish the current state of the literature regarding stress and burnout in IAPT trainees.
      (2) To raise practitioner, service and education-provider awareness regarding the levels and perceived sources of stress and burnout in IAPT trainees.
      (3) To make recommendations regarding future research on the topic.
      PubDate: 2021-07-16T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000179
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Attitudes and applications of chairwork amongst CBT therapists: a
           preliminary survey

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      Authors: Matthew Pugh; Tobyn Bell, Glenn Waller, Emma Petrova
      Abstract: Chairwork refers to a collection of experiential interventions which utilise chairs, their positioning, movement, and dialogue to facilitate therapeutic change. Chair-based methods are used in several models of psychotherapy, including cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). However, little is known about cognitive behavioural therapists’ use and attitudes towards chairwork. A mixed methods survey was conducted of 102 therapists who provided CBT. Overall, training in chairwork was weak amongst CBT therapists (35%). Quantitative results indicated that most therapists perceived chairwork to be clinically effective and consistent with the cognitive behavioural model, but did not feel competent using these methods. Perceived competence was highest amongst therapists who had been trained in chairwork and practised it frequently, but was unrelated to CBT accreditation or clinical experience. Qualitative feedback identified a number of factors that encouraged the use of chairwork (e.g. overcoming limitations associated with verbal restructuring methods), as well as inhibitors (e.g. therapist anxiety and limited access to training). These preliminary findings highlight a need for further research relating to cognitive behavioural chairwork and suggest that increased training in experiential interventions could go some way towards improving outcomes in CBT.Key learning aimsAs a result of reading this paper, readers should:
      (1) Understand cognitive behavioural therapists’ attitudes towards chairwork.
      (2) Appreciate therapists’ anxiety and avoidance in relation to chairwork.
      (3) Identify the key factors that facilitate or inhibit the use of cognitive behavioural chairwork.
      PubDate: 2021-07-15T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000052
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Internet-assisted cognitive behavioural therapy for non-cardiac chest
           pain: a pilot and feasibility study

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      Authors: Terje Thesen; Egil Jonsbu, Egil W. Martinsen, Joseph A. Himle, Frode Thorup, Gunvor Launes, Frode Gallefoss, Ingrid Klovning, Liv T. Walseth
      Abstract: Nearly half of patients with non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) experience significant complaints after a negative cardiac evaluation, at considerable costs for society. Due to the lack of treatment capacity and low interest for psychological treatment among patients with somatic complaints, only a minority receive effective treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility and usefulness of internet-assisted cognitive behavioural therapy (I-CBT), including encouragement of physical activity for this condition. Ten patients with NCCP received a six-session I-CBT intervention with minimal support from a therapist. Questionnaires assessing cardiac anxiety, fear of bodily sensations, depression, interpretation of symptoms, frequency of chest pain and impact of chest pain symptoms were collected at baseline, post-treatment and at 3-month follow-up. Semi-structured interviews employing a phenomenological hermeneutic approach assessed the participants’ experience of the intervention. Quantitative results showed clear improvements in several measures both at end of treatment and at 3-month follow-up. The retention rate was 100% and client satisfaction was high. The intervention was feasible to implement in a cardiac setting. This setting made it easier for patients to accept a psychological approach. Qualitative interviews revealed that the participants felt respected and taken care of, and they obtained a better understanding of their chest pain and how to cope with it. This pilot study yielded promising results regarding feasibility, clinical effect and patient satisfaction from a brief I-CBT intervention for NCCP in a cardiac setting. These results indicate that a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample size is warranted.Key learning aims
      (1) Feasibility of internet-assisted cognitive behavioural therapy (I-CBT) for non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP).
      (2) How NCCP patients experience I-CBT.
      (3) Possible effects of I-CBT.
      (4) How I-CBT can be delivered at the Cardiac Department.
      PubDate: 2021-07-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000155
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Exploring the concurrent use of standardised and idiographic measures to
           assess cognitive behavioural therapy in a university student with autistic
           spectrum condition – a single case experimental design

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      Authors: Nicola Birdsey; Linda Walz
      Abstract: Limited research has directly addressed the challenges of higher education for students with autism, who face additional difficulties in navigating social, personal and academic obstacles. With more students experiencing mental health difficulties whilst at university, therapeutic interventions on offer need to be suitable for those accessing support. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is widely used to support university students, as it is firmly established as an effective treatment for a range of issues, including social and generalised anxiety in typically developing populations (NICE, 2013; NICE, 2019). However, the efficacy of CBT for individuals with autistic spectrum condition (ASC) is less well known, despite the high prevalence rates of anxiety in this population. This paper seeks to address a gap in the literature and uses a single-case (A-B) experimental design over 16 sessions to reduce co-morbid social and generalised anxiety in a university student with high-functioning ASC. Clark’s (2001) cognitive model of social anxiety and Wells’ (1997) cognitive model of generalised anxiety were employed to formulate anxiety experienced in this case. Standardised outcome measures were used for social anxiety, i.e. the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN), and generalised anxiety, i.e. the Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), in conjunction with idiographic ratings to assess the impact of therapy. Findings indicate that CBT was an acceptable and useful intervention with mixed results; discrepancies were found between clinical change recorded on standardised measures compared with idiographic ratings. This paper discusses the use of standardised measures of anxiety for individuals with ASC and identifies directions for further research.Key learning aims
      (1) To appreciate the unique mental health challenges of university students with ASC.
      (2) To identify psychological interventions that are suitable for individuals with ASC.
      (3) To consider the value in employing more than one evidence-based cognitive model of anxiety when clients present with co-morbid mental health issues.
      (4) To question the utility of using standardised outcome measures compared with idiographic measures in therapy.
      PubDate: 2021-06-28T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000167
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Brief cognitive behavioural therapy for binge-eating disorder: clinical
           effectiveness in a routine clinical setting

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      Authors: Elana Moore; Michelle Hinde, Glenn Waller
      Abstract: Brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in working with non-underweight eating disorder patients across transdiagnostic groups. However, it is not clear whether it will be as effective in the treatment of binge-eating disorder, where emotional eating is likely to play a larger role than starvation-driven eating. This case series tested whether brief, 10-session CBT (CBT-T) would be effective in a case series of 53 patients with binge-eating disorder. Attrition rates were comparable to previous research. Eating attitudes, binge frequency, anxiety and depression were measured. Remission was measured comparing different categorical methods: ‘cut-off’; reliable change index (RCI); and clinically significant change (CSC). CBT-T was effective for binge-eating disorder patients, at comparable levels to other non-underweight patients. All measures of pathology were significantly reduced, with large to moderate effect sizes. When categorical changes were used to indicate remission, RCI and CSC levels were more appropriate than existing cut-off methods, potentially because of the lower levels of initial restrained eating in this clinical group. CBT-T’s effectiveness in transdiagnostic groups is replicated in binge-eating disorder patients, despite their greater level of emotionally driven eating. More stringent definitions of remission (CSC and RCI) should be used more widely, to ensure realistic estimates.Key learning aims
      (1) What is necessary for brief CBT to be effective for binge-eating disorder (BED)'
      (2) Is CBT for BED effective in the absence of purging behaviours'
      (3) What is the most appropriate way to measure remission in CBT for BED'
      PubDate: 2021-06-24T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000131
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Increasing access to brief Coping Strategy Enhancement for distressing
           voices: a service valuation exploring a possible role for briefly-trained
           therapists

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      Authors: Phil Clarke; Anna-Marie Jones, Mark Hayward
      Abstract: Hearing voices is a distressing and trans-diagnostic experience. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective psychological treatment for distressing voices, but is offered to only a minority of patients. Limited resources are a barrier to accessing CBT. Evaluations of brief forms of CBT for voices have offered encouraging findings, but the ability of briefly-trained therapists to deliver these brief therapies has yet to be explored. We evaluated the outcomes of a brief form of CBT (Coping Strategy Enhancement, CSE) for voices when delivered by highly-trained and briefly-trained therapists. This was a service evaluation comparing pre–post outcomes in patients who had completed brief CSE over four sessions, within NHS Mental Health Services, delivered by highly-trained and briefly-trained therapists. The primary outcome was the negative impact scale of the Hamilton Program for Schizophrenia Voices Questionnaire. Data were available from 92 patients who completed a course of brief CSE – nearly half of whom received therapy from a briefly-trained therapist. Modest benefits across the sample were consistent with previous evaluations and did not seem to be influenced by the training of the therapist. This service evaluation offers further evidence that brief CSE can begin a therapeutic conversation about distressing voices within routine clinical practice. The usefulness of this initial conversation does not seem to be reliant upon the extent of therapist training, suggesting that briefly-trained therapists may play a role in increasing access to these conversations for patients distressed by hearing voices.Key learning aims
      (1) How can access to CBT be increased for patients distressed by hearing voices'
      (2) Can a wider workforce of briefly-trained therapists start a CBT-informed conversation about distressing voices'
      (3) How do the outcomes of these conversations compare with the same conversations facilitated by highly trained therapists'
      PubDate: 2021-06-23T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000143
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Distinguishing between rumination and intrusive memories in PTSD using a
           wearable self-tracking instrument: a proof-of-concept case study

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      Authors: Ida-Marie T. P. Arendt; Lisa H. G. Riisager, Jakob E. Larsen, Thomas B. Christiansen, Stine B. Moeller
      Abstract: Rumination has been shown to play a part in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but its relation to the intrusions characteristic of PTSD has mainly been investigated experimentally. This proof-of-concept case study explored the occurrence, personal experiences, and possible relation between rumination and intrusions in two PTSD patients in their daily living using a mixed method approach. A novel wearable self-tracking instrument was employed which provided fine-grained temporal resolution of observation data and could eliminate recall bias. Furthermore, quantitative and qualitative data were collected on participants’ symptoms, rumination and experiences of using the self-tracking instrument. First, without distinguishing between the two phenomena, the participants tracked both for a week. After receiving psychoeducational training for distinguishing between rumination and intrusions, the differentiated phenomena were tracked for a week. Both participants reported being subjectively able to distinguish between rumination and intrusions and made observations with high adherence during the project. Data hinted at a possible temporal relation between the phenomena in line with theories posing rumination as a maladaptive coping strategy as well as an exacerbator of PTSD symptoms. However, relations to mood were inconclusive. Furthermore, by using the self-tracking instrument, participants gained a heightened awareness of the characteristics of rumination and intrusions and contextual cues for occurrence, as well as a greater sense of momentary agency. Results reveal promising prospects in using the wearable self-tracking instrument for further investigation of the relation between rumination and intrusions in the lived lives of PTSD patients, as well as potential for incorporating this method in clinical treatment.Key learning aims
      (1) Self-tracking with the One Button Tracker is a novel symptom registration method, particularly suited for use in psychotherapeutic treatment and research.
      (2) Rumination and intrusions appear to the participants as distinct cognitive phenomena and treatment targets in PTSD.
      (3) Registering rumination and intrusions in real-time could reveal important temporal relations between them and the contexts in which they occur.
      (4) The data obtained with this self-tracking method can potentially be used as a tool in, and for the further development of psychotherapy for PTSD.
      PubDate: 2021-05-03T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X2100012X
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Pilot study of a group worry intervention for recent onset psychosis

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      Authors: Teal Mackintosh; Melanie Lean, Kate Hardy
      Abstract: Worry is common among individuals with psychosis and has been found to be a causal factor in the development of paranoia. Previous research has shown that a cognitive behavioural therapy protocol targeting worry helps to reduce persecutory delusions and associated distress in a population experiencing longstanding psychotic symptoms. However, there has yet to be a published adaptation of the protocol for individuals experiencing a recent onset of psychosis. The current study aims to examine the feasibility of adapting the worry intervention for recent onset psychosis in a group setting. Six young adults with a recent onset of psychosis, aged 18–32 years, participated in a pilot study of an 8-week group intervention covering cognitive behavioural strategies for managing worry, including worry periods, worry postponement techniques, mindfulness and relaxation, and problem solving. Pre- and post-intervention data were collected on worry, anxiety, depressive symptoms, psychotic symptoms, and perceived recovery from psychosis. In addition, qualitative feedback from group members was gathered during a post-intervention focus group. Feasibility of the group appeared promising, despite high participant attrition. All components of the intervention were successfully implemented, and group members provided positive feedback regarding acceptability of the group. Contrary to prediction, there was not a consistent decrease in worry from pre- to post-intervention. Findings from secondary symptom measures were mixed and may have been related to participants’ subjective experience of the group. Specifically, participants who experienced high levels of group cohesion seemed to benefit more from the intervention.Key learning aims
      (1) To gain awareness of the gaps in treatment for early psychosis.
      (2) To understand the role of worry in psychosis.
      (3) To learn about the feasibility of implementing a group worry intervention for recent onset psychosis.
      (4) To consider the impact of group cohesion and symptom severity on treatment engagement.
      PubDate: 2021-04-05T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000106
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • The Infinity Formulation: how transdiagnostic behaviours and endeavours
           for behavioural change serve to maintain co-morbid mental health
           presentations

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      Authors: Alison Bennetts
      Abstract: Treatment recommendations for mental health are often founded on diagnosis-specific models; however, there are high rates of co-morbidity of mental health presentations and growing recognition of the presence of ‘transdiagnostic processes’ (cognitive, emotional or behavioural features) seen across a range of mental health presentations. This model proposes a novel conceptualisation of how transdiagnostic behaviours may maintain co-morbid mental health presentations by acting as a trigger event for the cognitive biases specific to each presentation. Drawing on existing evidence, psychological theory and the author’s clinical experience, the model organises complex presentations in a theory-driven yet accessible manner for use in clinical practice. The model offers both theoretical and clinical implications for the treatment of mental health presentations using cognitive behavioural approaches, positing that transdiagnostic behaviours be the primary treatment target in co-morbid presentations.Key learning aims
      (1) To understand the strengths and limitations of existing transdiagnostic CBT formulation models.
      (2) To learn about a novel, transdiagnostic and behaviourally focused formulation for use in clinical practice.
      (3) To understand how to use the tool in clinical practice and future research.
      PubDate: 2021-03-30T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000118
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Subthreshold personality disorder: how feasible is treatment in primary
           care'

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      Authors: William Barber; Frances Apps, Clara Strauss, Helen Startup, Juliet Couche
      Abstract: Individuals with subthreshold borderline personality disorder (BPD) are commonly encountered in primary care settings, yet the psychological treatments they receive are rarely tailored to their needs. In an effort to capture and treat this group of individuals in a targeted and meaningful way, some primary care settings offer Systems Training for Emotional Predictability and Problem Solving – Emotional Intensity (STEPPS-EI). This evaluation sought to assess the feasibility of STEPPS-EI within NHS primary care services. Employing an uncontrolled design, the evaluation examined recruitment, retention, effectiveness and group appraisal. Findings supported three out of four evaluation objectives for feasibility: uptake of the group was high at 74%, the group was well received by the group and significantly effective at reducing symptoms of BPD, depression and anxiety. However, retention rates were low, with only 43% classed as ‘completers’ of the programme. The results indicate preliminary evidence for STEPPS-EI as a potentially feasible intervention with possible modification to enhance retention and avenues for further study.Key learning aimsAfter reading this paper, the reader will be aware of:
      (1) Recent developments in the classification and diagnosis of personality disorder leading to the conceptualisation of subthreshold presentations.
      (2) The feasibility of conducting a primary care intervention for individuals with emotional intensity difficulties.
      (3) The preliminary beneficial outcomes of utilising a primary care intervention for individuals with emotional intensity difficulties.
      (4) Potential issues for participants and providers of primary care programmes with future direction for improvement and implementation.
      PubDate: 2021-03-24T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X2100009X
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Special Issue commentary: Specific impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on
           staff and patients from racialised groups

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      Authors: Richard Thwaites; Saiqa Naz
      PubDate: 2021-03-08T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000076
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Unaccompanied minors’ experiences of narrative exposure therapy

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      Authors: Glorianne Said; Yaman Alqadri, Dorothy King
      Abstract: Despite the understanding that unaccompanied minors’ (UAM) experience high rates of post-traumatic stress, the provision of evidence-based trauma-focused therapies is low for this population. Narrative exposure therapy (NET) is an effective short-term intervention for treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after multiple traumatic experiences, such as those experienced by UAM. Within the existing literature, there is a lack of research investigating unaccompanied minors’ experiences of NET or any trauma-focused therapy. Participants were four UAM experiencing PTSD who formed part of a pilot delivery of NET within a dedicated child and adolescent mental health service for refugee children. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). This project identified five themes that encapsulated unaccompanied minors’ experiences of receiving NET, including the process of preparing for this therapy, what it was like to receive it, and the differences they identified at the end of treatment. The significance of this taking place within a safe therapeutic relationship was explored within the context of the attachment losses experienced by UAM, and the impact this has on emotion regulation was considered. The potential of a reduction in PTSD symptoms facilitating a positive spiral in adolescence was reflected on within this paper.Key learning aims
      (1) To understand the experience of unaccompanied asylum-seeking minors (UAM) receiving narrative exposure therapy (NET) for post-traumatic stress disorder.
      (2) To understand the key concerns and motivators for UAM when considering engaging in NET.
      (3) To understand how these experiences relate to theoretical frameworks and the existing literature relating to emotional difficulties in adolescence.
      PubDate: 2021-03-08T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000088
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • The use of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) in addressing family
           accommodation (FA) for child anxiety

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      Authors: Gary Byrne
      Abstract: Many parents of children with anxiety tend to engage in varying levels of family accommodation (FA) in order to alleviate anxiety symptoms. This can exacerbate anxiety symptoms and have adverse effects for psychological treatments. A small number of general and specific interventions have been developed for FA but treatment research is at a nascent stage. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) may be an effective treatment for FA. This article reviews the potential advantages and uses of ACT and how ACT’s six core processes can help target particular features of FA. The theoretical support for ACT is reviewed relevant to FA. The article concludes by conjecturing how ACT may be a useful and adaptive treatment in targeting FA.Key learning aims
      (1) To understand how FA impacts on child anxiety.
      (2) To help provide an overview of how ACT may be a relevant treatment in addressing FA.
      (3) To look at how each of the six core processes may address specific components of FA.
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000064
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Experiences of online exposure-based treatment with parental support for
           teenagers with excessive worry

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      Authors: Tove Wahlund; Michaela Wallhem, Eva Serlachius, Hedvig Engberg
      Abstract: Worry is a common symptom that can become excessive and is related to several negative health outcomes. Our research group recently developed an online treatment for teenagers with excessive worry with a parallel programme for their parents. The treatment is characterized by a specific focus on exposure to uncertainty and other avoided stimuli, and includes a substantial amount of parental involvement. The aim of this study was to explore how teenagers and their parents experienced the treatment, especially how they perceived working independently with exposure tasks, parental involvement in the treatment programme, and a fixed treatment format. An experienced, independent clinical psychologist interviewed eight teenagers and nine parents in total. The verbatim transcripts were analysed with thematic analysis and two main themes emerged: ‘Seeing the worry in a new light’ and ‘Changing within a set format’, which both consisted of three subthemes. Based on the analysis, we concluded that teenagers can work actively with exposure and experience it as helpful even though it can be difficult and strange at first, and that parental involvement can be perceived as beneficial by both teenagers and their parents. While the online format placed a substantial responsibility on the families, and some would have wanted additional therapist support, working independently with one’s difficulties was acceptable.Key learning aims
      (1) To learn about experienced benefits and obstacles of exposure in the treatment of worry.
      (2) To learn about teenagers’ experiences of working independently with exposure.
      (3) To consider the impact of parental involvement in psychological treatments for teenagers.
      (4) To consider pros and cons of online treatment for teenagers and their parents.
      (5) To consider the use of qualitative research approaches to inform further development of psychological treatments for teenagers with excessive worry.
      PubDate: 2021-01-29T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000027
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Measuring therapist cognitions contributing to therapist drift: a
           qualitative study

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      Authors: Tiffany Rameswari; Brett Hayes, Ramesh Perera-Delcourt
      Abstract: Therapist beliefs have been identified as a contributing factor to ‘therapist drift’ in cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Scales have been developed to measure therapist beliefs, but none explicitly measure ‘therapy-interfering cognitions’, and there is no research on their usage. The aim of this study was to explore how best to conceptualise such a scale’s content and usage, based on clinicians’ perceptions and experiences of current scales. Three focus groups were conducted, involving 12 participants who were either qualified or trainee CBT therapists. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Four main themes were generated: (1) The Awareness and Importance of Cognitions, (2) Factors Fuelling Therapist Cognitions, (3) Addressing Therapist Cognitions, and (4) Using the Scale. Participants thought it important to be aware of and address therapist cognitions (not underlying beliefs). Participants emphasised that therapist cognitions are not just products of the individual, but are influenced by external factors. A scale could enable therapists to do better work through reflective practice, as long as it was used not just to identify cognitions but also to support changes in therapist behaviour. A scale could also meet a perceived need for making this part of routine practice. However, participants discussed how therapists might have reservations about disclosing cognitions in this way. Recommendations for current practice, and future research developing such a scale, are made.Key learning aims
      (1) To describe the phenomenon of therapist drift, and the contributions of therapist beliefs to this.
      (2) To explore the usage of current scales for measuring therapist beliefs.
      (3) To understand, based on therapist experience, how to address therapist beliefs in current practice using scales.
      PubDate: 2021-01-29T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000039
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Transdiagnostic CBT versus counselling sessions: a naturalistic trial from
           Saudi Arabia

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      Authors: Yousra Alatiq
      Abstract: In a previous feasibility trial, we found that transdiagnostic cognitive behavioural therapy (T-CBT) showed promising results in improving emotional disorders in adults from Saudi Arabia. The primary aim of this study was to replicate these findings and compare T-CBT results with results for counselling sessions. The overall sample consisted of 276 patients (175 in the T-CBT group and 101 in the counselling group). Of the overall sample, 110 patients (39.9%) completed the treatment plan, and 166 (60.1%) disengaged from treatment. The pre- and post-assessments of the clients who completed the treatment showed large effect sizes for almost all outcome measures for both the T-CBT and counselling groups. For patients who decided to disengage from therapy, T-CBT had medium effect sizes for all three measures (depression, anxiety and function), while counselling sessions had medium effect size for the anxiety measure only. This study provides additional evidence that T-CBT is suitable for patients from Saudi Arabia with emotional disorders. The study also provides information regarding when and why T-CBT or counselling was applied in a real clinical setting. Implications and recommendations are discussed.Key learning aims
      (1) To confirm a previous feasibility trial on the effect of T-CBT in Saudi Arabia.
      (2) To explore the effect of T-CBT compared with counselling in a real clinical setting.
      (3) To identify variables related to the choice of interventions.
      PubDate: 2021-01-20T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X20000628
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Thanks to Reviewers

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      PubDate: 2021-01-20T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000015
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Cultural adaptations of cognitive behaviour therapy for the Orthodox
           Jewish community: a qualitative study of therapists’ perspectives

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      Authors: Chaim Golker; Maria Cristina Cioffi
      Abstract: Cultural factors are influential in the prevalence, diagnosis and treatment efficacy of mental health conditions. Although the literature has advanced substantially towards the development of cultural adaptations of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for various minority cultural groups, research into cultural adaptations of CBT for the Orthodox Jewish community has been scarce. This qualitative study interviewed five CBT therapists about their experiences working with clients from the London Orthodox Jewish community and uncovered several key practical implications for the clinical practice of CBT with this client group. This study indicates that CBT is a culturally appropriate psychological treatment for this client group that accords with Orthodox Jewish teachings and religious beliefs. CBT therapists are encouraged to become familiar with Orthodox Jewish cultural practices and beliefs and adopt a culturally sensitive approach to treatment. Despite the reduced mental health stigma within the community, this study recommends that CBT therapists normalise mental health conditions and therapy with Orthodox Jewish clients. Due to the close-knit nature of the community, it is suggested that CBT therapists display heightened confidentiality with this client group. To overcome the mistrust of their Orthodox Jewish clients, CBT therapists are advised to display cultural sensitivity and genuine respect for the Orthodox Jewish way of life, in addition to building a strong therapeutic alliance. Further qualitative research exploring different perspectives is necessary to produce evidence-based guidelines for the cultural adaptation of CBT for the Orthodox Jewish community.Key learning aims
      (1) To explore how CBT therapists work with the religious beliefs and practices of Orthodox Jewish clients.
      (2) To discover the challenges faced by Orthodox Jewish clients when accessing psychological treatment.
      (3) To consider the ways in which CBT can be culturally adapted to meet the needs of the Orthodox Jewish community.
      PubDate: 2021-01-19T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X20000616
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Editorial: BABCP journals, openness and transparency

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      PubDate: 2021-01-14T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X20000604
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Using targeted cognitive behavioural therapy in clinical work: a case
           study

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      Authors: Olivia Harris; Claudia Kustner, Rachel Paskell, Chris Hannay
      Abstract: Research shows high levels of complex co-morbidities within psychiatric populations, and there is an increasing need for mental health practitioners to be able to draw on evidence-based psychological interventions, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), to work with this population effectively. One way CBT may be utilised when working with complexity or co-morbidity is to target treatment at a particular aspect of an individual’s presentation. This study uses a single-case A-B design to illustrate an example of using targeted diagnosis-specific CBT to address symptoms of a specific phobia of stairs in the context of a long-standing co-morbid diagnosis of schizophrenia. Results show the intervention to have been effective, with a change from a severe to mild phobia by the end of intervention. Clinical implications, limitations and areas for future research are discussed.Key learning aims
      (1) There are high levels of co-morbid, complex mental health problems within psychiatric populations, and an increasing need for mental health practitioners to be able to work with co-morbidity effectively.
      (2) Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) remains one of the most well-evidenced psychological interventions with a large amount of research highlighting the effectiveness of diagnosis-specific CBT.
      (3) One way evidence-based diagnosis-specific CBT approaches could be utilised when working with more complex co-morbidity may be to target an intervention at a specific set of symptoms.
      (4) An example of using a targeted CBT intervention (to tackle a specific phobia of stairs in the context of a long-standing co-morbid diagnosis of schizophrenia and ongoing hallucinations) is presented. The outcomes show significant changes in the specific phobia symptoms, suggesting that CBT can be effectively used in this targeted manner within real-world clinical settings. The impact of co-morbid mental health difficulties on therapeutic process and outcomes are highlighted.
      (5) The use of cognitive restructuring techniques was identified as key to engagement and therapeutic process, supporting the importance of including cognitive techniques in the treatment of phobias compared with purely behavioural exposure-based interventions.
      PubDate: 2021-01-14T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X20000586
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
  • Cognitive therapy for moral injury in post-traumatic stress disorder

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      Authors: Hannah Murray; Anke Ehlers
      Abstract: Moral injury is the profound psychological distress that can arise following participating in, or witnessing, events that transgress an individual’s morals and include harming, betraying, or failure to help others, or being subjected to such events, e.g. being betrayed by leaders. It has been primarily researched in the military, but it also found in other professionals such as healthcare workers coping with the COVID-19 pandemic and civilians following a wide range of traumas. In this article, we describe how to use cognitive therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder (CT-PTSD) to treat patients presenting with moral injury-related PTSD. We outline the key techniques involved in CT-PTSD and describe their application to treating patients with moral injury-related PTSD. A case study of a healthcare worker is presented to illustrate the treatment interventions.Key learning aims
      (1) To recognise moral injury where it arises alongside PTSD.
      (2) To understand how Ehlers and Clark’s cognitive model of PTSD can be applied to moral injury.
      (3) To be able to apply cognitive therapy for PTSD to patients with moral injury-related PTSD.
      PubDate: 2021-01-13T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S1754470X21000040
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2021)
       
 
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