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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 1066 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 102)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 79)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 503)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 52)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 313)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 100)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 373)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Pilquen : Sección Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 273)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Organisational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Australian Journal of Rehabilitation Counseling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 245)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 243)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 78)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers d’Études sur la Représentation     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 92)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access  
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.731
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 36  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0887-6177 - ISSN (Online) 1873-5843
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [416 journals]
  • The Science of Brain Health: State-of-the-Art Perspectives and Clinical
           Applications

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Randolph J; Miller J.
      Pages: 1255 - 1256
      Abstract: The science of brain health has developed rapidly over the last decade. Although neuropsychological research has provided many important insights about brain functioning, the focus has largely been on documenting cognitive dysfunction, with considerably less attention paid to brain health and cognitive wellness. A more balanced literature considering both brain function and dysfunction will clarify the entire spectrum of brain health from states of wellness and thriving function through brain disease. This would allow for a far richer understanding of evidence-based, cognition-enhancing strategies useful across varied settings where neuropsychologists provide services, and, importantly, increase the utility and appeal of our work for the general public. An overarching perspective on promoting brain and cognitive health, positive neuropsychology, is grounded in these ideas (Randolph, 2013, 2018).
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acab048
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Reducing Your Risk of Alzheimer’s Dementia: Building a Better Brain
           as We Age

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bennett D.
      Pages: 1257 - 1265
      Abstract: AbstractAlzheimer’ dementia is a large and growing public health problem. Of utmost importance for limiting the impact of the disease on society is the prevention of dementia, that is, delay onset either by years whereby death ensues prior to dementia onset. The Religious Orders Study and the Rush Memory and Aging Project are two harmonized cohort studies of aging and dementia that include organ donation at death. Ongoing since 1994 and 1997, respectively, we published on the association of numerous experiential, psychological, and medical risk factors for dementia, many of which are potentially modifiable. Here, selected findings are reviewed based on a presentation at the 2020 National Academy of Neuropsychology given virtually in Chicago in October of 2020.
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acab052
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Psychosocial Protective Factors in Cognitive Aging: A Targeted Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zahodne L.
      Pages: 1266 - 1273
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveThe lack of disease-modifying pharmacological agents for dementia highlights the critical importance of prevention, but known modifiable factors (e.g., education, physical health and health behaviors, depression, and social isolation) do not fully represent potential intervention targets. Positive psychosocial factors predict cognitive aging outcomes above and beyond known risk factors and may also correspond to upstream determinants that open up new avenues for prevention and intervention, as well as for reducing racial/ethnic inequalities in dementia. In this brief report, I summarize contemporary evidence for three positive psychosocial factors that appear to be particularly relevant to cognitive aging: perceived control, religious involvement, and social relations.MethodsTargeted review and synthesis of published studies.ResultsEach of the multidimensional constructs appears to contain “active ingredients” that could help to optimize cognitive aging through disparate mechanisms. Although historically marginalized racial/ethnic groups face disproportionate barriers to accessing certain psychosocial protective factors (e.g., perceived control), these same groups also exhibit naturally occurring sources of psychosocial resilience (e.g., religious involvement) that allow them to achieve better late-life cognitive health than would be otherwise expected. With regard to social relations, converging evidence from disparate studies shows that fostering late-life friendships in particular may have high potential for building cognitive reserve and promoting healthy cognitive aging.ConclusionsPositive psychosocial factors represent culturally relevant resources that, through careful research, could ultimately be harnessed to promote better cognitive aging for a growing and increasingly diverse population of older adults.
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Jul 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acab051
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Productive Social Engagement as a Vehicle to Promote Activity and
           Neuro-Cognitive Health in Later Adulthood

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      Authors: Carlson M.
      Pages: 1274 - 1278
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveWe have witnessed two key findings that shift our understanding of human brain aging in new directions. First, we learned that the adult brain remains plastic beyond childhood development, generating new neurons in response to activity and new experiences, particularly in regions that integrate memories in social contexts. The second emerging finding is the importance of physical activity and social engagement to cognitive aging. I integrate these and other empirical findings with our understanding of brain development over the life span and the later-life developmental need to give back to younger generations to posit the importance of maintaining our “social” brain through retirement and into later life when activity remains beneficial to brain health.ConclusionsOpportunities for improved cognitive and brain health that can be brought to scale need to capitalize on aging adults’ need to remain socially relevant and on community infrastructures so that those with lower neighborhood access to activity can safely engage. Evidence is summarized here from one such community-based model of social engagement through school-based, volunteer service, entitled Experience Corps®. This program seeks to increase daily physical, cognitive, and social activity to promote cognitive and mental health.
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acab058
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Helping Children and Teens Strengthen Executive Skills to Reach Their Full
           Potential

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      Authors: Dawson P.
      Pages: 1279 - 1282
      Abstract: AbstractExecutive skills are brain-based skills that develop across childhood and that take a minimum of 25 years to reach full maturation. They are skills that support goal-directed behavior and although essential to school success, they are typically not explicitly listed in local, state, or national curriculum standards. When the pandemic closed schools in the USA in March 2020, the resulting reliance on remote-learning instruction exposed how much support teachers and in-person learning provide to students with immature executive skills. This paper will describe those supports and will build the case that in the absence of the kind of scaffolding teachers provide for students with weak executives, many students have struggled. Three strategies for strengthening executive skills will be outlined. These include: modifying the environment to make it more supportive and less punishing for students with weak executive skills; explicitly teaching executives by embedding them in daily routines; and offering incentives or motivators to entice students to practice skills which are laborious in their early stages of acquisition. Focusing on strengthening students’ executive skills will address the problem of “learning loss” that has resulted from the disruption the pandemic has caused.
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acab057
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Mindfulness Meditation: Impact on Attentional Control and Emotion
           Dysregulation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Prakash R.
      Pages: 1283 - 1290
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveTheoretical models of mindfulness meditation conceptualize the cultivation of focused attention and regulation of emotional states, with the attitudinal foundations that promote nonjudgment and acceptance, to facilitate cognitive and affective processing resulting in improved brain health. Within the scientific study of mindfulness meditation, outcomes assessing behavioral and neural correlates of attentional control and emotion regulation have been examined for their malleability as a function of engagement in mindfulness practices. This review synthesizes the results of our pilot trials examining the preliminary effects of mindfulness meditation on metrics of cognitive, affective, and brain health in older adults and in individuals with multiple sclerosis.ConclusionsThere is promising support for mindfulness meditation to enhance attentional control, reduce mind-wandering, and reduce emotion dysregulation. However, well-powered efficacy trials, with an objective assessment of mindfulness practice data are needed to further provide causal and comprehensive evidence supporting the efficacy of mindfulness meditation for brain health. Inclusion of independently derived and validated brain-based signatures of cognitive and affective functioning can additionally enable a parsimonious understanding of how mindfulness meditation can causally impact metrics of functional and structural integrity of the human brain.
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acab053
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • How Can Cognitive Reserve Promote Cognitive and Neurobehavioral
           Health'

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      Authors: Stern Y.
      Pages: 1291 - 1295
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveThis review is aimed at understanding how cognitive reserve and related concepts contribute to promoting neurobehavioral and cognitive health, consistent with goal of the 2020 national academy of neuropsychology (NAN) Annual Meeting.Research indicates that lifestyle factors such as achieving educational and work milestones, participating in leisure and social activities and IQ are all associated with reduced risk of cognitive decline in normal aging and of developing dementia. Many of these lifestyle factors have also been associated with better cognition in other psychiatric and neurological conditions. The cognitive reserve hypothesis posits that these lifestyle factors result in individual differences in the flexibility and adaptability of brain networks that may allow some people to cope better than others with age- or dementia-related brain changes. Recent evidence also supports the idea that specific genetic and lifestyle factors may help preserve a healthy brain or enhance brain reserve, a process that has been called brain maintenance. The complementary concept of brain reserve posits that structural brain features can guard against dementia and related conditions. This review defines these theoretical concepts, their research basis, how they are studied and their clinical applications.ConclusionEvidence supports the concept of reserve, which can be influenced by experiences in every stage of life. Focused research in this area can maximize the chance for successful intervention.
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acab049
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • A Clinical Pilot Study of Spaced Retrieval Practice with a Self-Generation
           Booster to Improve Health-Related Memory in Persons With HIV Disease

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      Authors: Woods S; Babicz M, Matchanova A, et al.
      Pages: 1296 - 1306
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveSpaced retrieval practice (SRP) and self-generation are among the most replicated and effective mnemonic strategies in the cognitive psychology literature, but their benefits have not yet been realized in healthcare settings. This study used a randomized, between-subjects design to examine the hypothesis that SRP with a self-generation booster can improve memory for health-related information among clinically referred persons with HIV (PWH), who often have difficulty acquiring new health knowledge.MethodA consecutive series of 41 PWH referred to a county-funded urban neuropsychology clinic were enrolled. Participants were randomly assigned to learn four statements about the treatment of a mock infectious disease in either a massed study control condition (n = 20) or an SRP condition (n = 21) in which they received two distributed free recall training tests supplemented with self-generation for missed items. The primary outcome was participants’ free recall of the four treatment statements after a 20-minute delay filled with nonverbal tests.ResultsPWH participants in the SRP condition were four times more likely than controls to recall at least one treatment statement at the 20-minute delay. SRP was not related to post-test recognition or health-related decision-making performance but was associated with moderately better self-efficacy for decision-making.ConclusionsFindings from this pilot study show the potential of SRP with a self-generation booster to improve learning and memory for health-related information among PWH in clinic.
      PubDate: Sat, 30 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acaa130
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Medication Management Performance in Parkinson’s Disease:
           Examination of Process Errors

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      Authors: Sumida C; Lopez F, Van Etten E, et al.
      Pages: 1307 - 1315
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveIndividuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) are at risk for increased medication mismanagement, which can lead to worse clinical outcomes. However, the nature of the errors (i.e., undertaking or overtaking medications) contributing to mismanagement and their relationship to cognition in PD is unknown. Therefore, this study sought to examine errors committed on the Medication Management Ability Assessment (MMAA) between PD participants with normal cognition (PD-NC) or mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI) relative to healthy adults (HA).MethodHA (n = 74), PD-NC (n = 102), and PD-MCI (n = 45) participants were administered the MMAA to assess undertaking, overtaking, and overall errors as well as overall performance (total score). Additionally, participants were administered a comprehensive neuropsychological battery from which cognitive composites of Attention, Learning, Memory, Language, Visuospatial, and Executive Functioning were derived.ResultsSeparate negative binomial regression analyses indicated the PD-MCI group performed significantly worse overall on the MMAA (total score) and committed more undertaking and overall errors relative to HA and PD-NC. In the PD-MCI group, poorer MMAA performance was associated with worse delayed memory performance, whereas cognitive performance was not related to MMAA in HA or PC-NC.ConclusionCompared to PD and healthy adults with normal cognition, PD-MCI patients exhibited greater difficulty with medication management, particularly with undertaking medications. Poorer medication management in PD-MCI was associated with worse delayed recall. Thus, PD-MCI patients experiencing memory problems may require additional assistance with their medications. Findings have clinical relevance suggesting that objective measures of medication errors may assist clinicians in identifying PD patients needing adherence strategies.
      PubDate: Wed, 24 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acab004
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Development and Initial Validation of the Perceptual Assessment of Memory
           (PASSOM): A Simulator Study

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      Authors: Koenitzer J; Herron J, Whitlow J, et al.
      Pages: 1326 - 1340
      Abstract: AbstractObjectivePerformance validity tests (PVTs) are an integral component of neuropsychological assessment. There is a need for the development of more PVTs, especially those employing covert determinations. The aim of the present study was to provide initial validation of a new computerized PVT, the Perceptual Assessment of Memory (PASSOM).MethodParticipants were 58 undergraduate students randomly assigned to a simulator (SIM) or control (CON) group. All participants were provided written instructions for their role prior to testing and were administered the PASSOM as part of a brief battery of neurocognitive tests. Indices of interest included response accuracy for Trials 1 and 2, and total errors across Trials, as well as response time (RT) for Trials 1 and 2, and total RT for both Trials.ResultsThe SIM group produced significantly more errors than the CON group for Trials 1 and 2, and committed more total errors across trials. Significantly longer response latencies were found for the SIM group compared to the CON group for all RT indices examined. Linear regression modeling indicated excellent group classification for all indices studied, with areas under the curve ranging from 0.92 to 0.95. Sensitivity and specificity rates were good for several cut scores across all of the accuracy and RT indices, and sensitivity improved greatly by combining RT cut scores with the more traditional accuracy cut scores.ConclusionFindings demonstrate the ability of the PASSOM to distinguish individuals instructed to feign cognitive impairment from those told to perform to the best of their ability.
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acaa126
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Normative Reference Values, Reliability, and Item-Level Symptom
           Endorsement for the PROMIS® v2.0 Cognitive Function-Short Forms 4a, 6a
           and 8a

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      Authors: Iverson G; Marsh J, Connors E, et al.
      Pages: 1341 - 1349
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveReliable, valid, and precise measures of perceived cognitive functioning are useful in clinical practice and research. We present normative data, internal consistency statistics, item-level symptom endorsement, and the base rates of symptoms endorsed for the PROMIS® v2.0 Cognitive Function-Short Forms.MethodThe four-, six -, and eight-item short form of the PROMIS® v2.0 Cognitive Function scale assess subjective cognitive functioning. We stratified the normative sample from the U.S. general population (n = 1,009; 51.1% women) by gender, education, health status, self-reported history of a depression or anxiety diagnosis, and recent mental health symptoms (i.e., feeling anxious or depressed in the past week) and examined cognitive symptom reporting.ResultsInternal consistency was measured using Cronbach’s alpha and ranged from .85 to .95 for all three forms, across all groups. Mann–Whitney U test comparisons showed that individuals with past or present mental health difficulties scored significantly lower (i.e., worse perceived cognitive functioning) on the self-report questionnaires, particularly the eight-item form (history of depression, men: p < .001, Cohen’s d = 1.07; women: p < .001, d = .99; history of anxiety, men: p < .001, d = 1.06; women: p < .001, d = .98; and current mental health symptoms, men: p < .001, d = 1.38; women: p < .001, d = 1.19).ConclusionsAll three short forms of the PROMIS® v2.0 Cognitive Function scale had strong internal consistency reliability, supporting its use as a reliable measure of subjective cognitive functioning. The subgroup differences in perceived cognitive functioning supported the relationship between emotional and cognitive well-being. This study is the first to present normative values and base rates for several community-dwelling subgroups, allowing for precise interpretation of these measures in clinical practice and research.
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Jan 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acaa128
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Survey of Spanish Language Neuropsychological Test Use in the Assessment
           of Hispanic Americans/Latino/as/x

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      Authors: Gasquoine P; Weimer A, Estevis E, et al.
      Pages: 1350 - 1360
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveTo identify the Spanish language neuropsychological tests most frequently used in the evaluation of Hispanic Americans/Latino/as/x across eight neuropsychological domains. To compare these with previously surveyed most frequently used English language tests in the US/Canada. To describe the norms used with Spanish language tests.MethodAn anonymous, uncompensated, 12-min survey was emailed to 169 members of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, Hispanic Neuropsychological Society, and National Academy of Neuropsychology who self-identified as providing neuropsychological evaluations in Spanish via organizational websites.ResultsThe response rate was 36%. Respondents were all licensed U.S. psychologists with the majority fluent in Spanish, conducting less than half their evaluations in Spanish. There was an overlap between the versions of the three most frequently used Spanish versus English neuropsychological tests, but it varied by domain with 3/3 similar for visual–spatial/visuoconstructional skills and sensory/motor functioning domains and 2/3 similar for all other domains except memory (0/3). English language norm use predominated within the mood/personality and sensory/motor functioning domains. In all other domains, Spanish language norms collected in the continental US were preferred to those from foreign Spanish-speaking countries. The most frequently used foreign norms were from Mexico.ConclusionExcept for the memory domain, there was a sizeable overlap between the three most frequently used Spanish and English language neuropsychological tests in the US. Spanish language tests are primarily interpreted with Spanish norms collected in the continental US except within the mood/personality and sensory/motor functioning domains where English language norms predominate.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acaa131
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Stereotype Threat and Neuropsychological Test Performance in the U.S.
           African American Population

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      Authors: Whaley A.
      Pages: 1361 - 1366
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveThis cross-sectional study tested stereotype threat theory using the Modified-Symbol Digit Modalities Test (M-SDMT), a neurocognitive test, with the African American subsample (N = 3570) of the National Survey of American Life. The primary hypothesis is that those classified as experiencing stereotype threat will achieve the lowest scores.MethodAfrican American respondents who perceived race as a barrier to life goals and scored above the median in endorsement of negative racial stereotypes were classified as experiencing stereotype threat. M-SDMT scores were regressed on threat group classification with adjustments for gender, age, income, and education. Nonparametric test of the effect sizes for threat group classification versus demographic variables was also conducted.ResultsThe stereotype threat group obtained statistically significantly lower M-SDMT scores than the no threat group. However, the stereotype threat effect became nonsignificant in regression analyses adjusted for demographic variables. The nonparametric test revealed a statistically significantly larger average effect size for demographic variables than threat group classification.ConclusionThe relatively less influential role of stereotype threat than other biological and social factors limit its explanatory power for racial disparities in neuropsychological test performance among African Americans.
      PubDate: Wed, 07 Apr 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acab020
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Appreciation of Social Norms in Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum

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      Authors: Brown W; Burnett K, Vaillancourt A, et al.
      Pages: 1367 - 1373
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveAnecdotal reports regarding high-functioning adults with agenesis of the corpus callosum (AgCC) suggest that they often lack psychosocial insight. We attempted to determine whether adults with AgCC are able to correctly identify appropriate behaviors within social contexts using the Social Norms Questionnaire.MethodThe Social Norms Questionnaire measures knowledge of norms and judgments of what is appropriate to do in particular contexts. It was administered online to individuals with AgCC and control participants.ResultsIndividuals with AgCC scored significantly lower in understanding social norms than controls, tending to over-adhere to social norms significantly more than controls. There was no significant difference regarding breaking of social norms.ConclusionResults suggest that adults with AgCC have deficient judgment regarding the nuances of appropriate behaviors in social contexts. They adhere to social norms concretely, lacking the ability to integrate context in social scenarios to make appropriately nuanced judgments.
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acab003
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Electroencephalography, Magnetoencephalography, and Cognitive Reserve: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Balart-Sánchez S; Bittencourt-Villalpando M, van der Naalt J, et al.
      Pages: 1374 - 1391
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveCognitive reserve (CR) is the capacity to adapt to (future) brain damage without any or only minimal clinical symptoms. The underlying neuroplastic mechanisms remain unclear. Electrocorticography (ECOG), electroencephalography (EEG), and magnetoencephalography (MEG) may help elucidate the brain mechanisms underlying CR, as CR is thought to be related to efficient utilization of remaining brain resources. The purpose of this systematic review is to collect, evaluate, and synthesize the findings on neural correlates of CR estimates using ECOG, EEG, and MEG.MethodWe examined articles that were published from the first standardized definition of CR. Eleven EEG and five MEG cross-sectional studies met the inclusion criteria: They concerned original research, analyzed (M)EEG in humans, used a validated CR estimate, and related (M)EEG to CR. Quality assessment was conducted using an adapted form of the Newcastle–Ottawa scale. No ECOG study met the inclusion criteria.ResultsA total of 1383 participants from heterogeneous patient, young and older healthy groups were divided into three categories by (M)EEG methodology: Eight (M)EEG studies employed event-related fields or potentials, six studies analyzed brain oscillations at rest (of which one also analyzed a cognitive task), and three studies analyzed brain connectivity. Various CR estimates were employed and all studies compared different (M)EEG measures and CR estimates. Several associations between (M)EEG measures and CR estimates were observed.ConclusionOur findings support that (M)EEG measures are related to CR estimates, particularly in healthy individuals. However, the character of this relationship is dependent on the population and task studied, warranting further studies.
      PubDate: Mon, 01 Feb 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acaa132
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2021)
       
  • Normative Data for a Tablet-Based Dual-Task Assessment in Healthy Older
           Adults

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      Authors: Lussier M; Saillant K, Vrinceanu T, et al.
      Pages: 1316 - 1325
      Abstract: AbstractObjectiveThe objective of this study is to provide normative data for a tablet-based dual-task assessment in older adults without cognitive deficits.MethodIn total, 264 participants aged between 60 and 90 years, French and English-speaking, were asked to perform two discrimination tasks, alone and concurrently. The participants had to answer as fast as possible to one or two images appearing in the center of the tablet by pressing to the corresponding buttons. Normative data are provided for reaction time (RT), coefficient of variation, and accuracy. Analyses of variance were performed by trial types (single-pure, single-mixed, dual-mixed), and linear regressions assessed the relationship between performance and sociodemographic characteristics.ResultsThe participants were highly educated and a large proportion of them were women (73.9%). The accuracy on the task was very high across all blocks. RT data revealed both a task-set cost and a dual-task cost between the blocks. Age was associated with slower RT and with higher coefficient of variability. Men were significantly slower on dual-mixed trials, but their coefficient of variability was lower on single-pure trials. Education was not associated with performance.ConclusionsThis study provides normative data for a tablet-based dual-task assessment in older adults without cognitive impairment, which was lacking. All participants completed the task with good accuracy in less than 15 minutes and thus, the task is transferable to clinical and research settings.
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Dec 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acaa121
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 7 (2020)
       
 
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