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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 1082 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ad verba Liberorum : Journal of Linguistics & Pedagogy & Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 79)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 497)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 60)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 308)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 99)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 364)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Pilquen : Sección Divulgación Científica     Open Access  
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Applied and Preventive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 263)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Organisational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Australian Journal of Rehabilitation Counseling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 238)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 236)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 77)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Burnout Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers d’Études sur la Représentation     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 92)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access  
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
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Behavior Modification
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.877
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0145-4455 - ISSN (Online) 1552-4167
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1166 journals]
  • Evaluation of a Graduated Exposure Procedure to Teach Extended Mask
           Wearing in Various Settings to Children With Autism

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hallie M. Ertel, David A. Wilder, Ansley C. Hodges
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      During the COVID-19 outbreak, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommended that everyone 2 years and older wear a face mask while in a community setting. However, children with autism may be reluctant to wear a mask, particularly for extended durations. In the current study, we implemented a graduated exposure procedure to teach mask wearing for a minimum of 1 hour in an early intensive behavioral (EIBI) intervention clinic to three children diagnosed with autism. We subsequently probed mask wearing, and if necessary implemented the graduated exposure procedure, in each participant’s home and in a mock physician’s office. Finally, we collected probe data on mask wearing in another community setting and 1 month post-treatment maintenance data in the EIBI clinic. During baseline, participants wore masks for 0 second to 5 minutes. After treatment, all participants wore the mask for at least 1 hour in each setting, with maintenance probes indicating 4 to 5 hour mask tolerance.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-10-06T02:45:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211049546
       
  • The Role of Social Adjustment in a Collegiate Behavioral Activation
           Program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julia W. Felton, Justin D. Triemstra, Elizabeth K. Reynolds, Nicole Hale, Jessica F. Magidson, Carl W. Lejuez
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      The transition to college is associated with significant changes in social support networks and concomitant increases in depressive symptoms. First-year students who are more socially engaged within their new academic settings may experience greater overall wellbeing. Behavioral activation (BA) is an evidence-based intervention which promotes individuals’ engagement with valued activities and has been examined as a possible primary prevention for depressive symptoms among first-year students. Yet, the important role of social adjustment, and its impact on students’ activity level, has not yet been considered. The current study is a secondary data analysis of research evaluating a BA-based intervention embedded into a first-year orientation course. The aim of the project was to evaluate the efficacy of BA on improving social adjustment and the effect of social adjustment on subsequent depressive symptoms. A diverse sample of college students (n = 71) attending a state university in the mid-Atlantic region reported on their levels of depression, behavioral activation, and social adjustment. Students then received either BA or standard programming. Results suggest that improved engagement in valued activities at mid-intervention was associated with increases in students’ perceptions of their own social adjustment. This, in turn, predicted steeper decreases in rates of depressive symptoms post-intervention. Findings also indicate that greater social adjustment improved the efficacy of a BA-based intervention in reducing depressive symptoms, but had no impact on depressive symptoms for students receiving the standard orientation programming.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-10-01T11:54:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211047606
       
  • A Group Intervention for Motivational Deficits: Preliminary Investigation
           of a Blended Care Approach Using Ambulatory Assessment

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      Authors: Bénédicte Thonon, Marie-Noëlle Levaux, Evelyne van Aubel, Frank Larøi
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Motivational deficits are an important predictor of functional outcomes in individuals with a serious mental illness such as schizophrenia and mood spectrum disorders. The aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a group version of “Switch,” an intervention that targets motivational deficits, enriched with an ecological momentary intervention (EMI) approach (i.e., prompts on the participants’ smartphone to encourage the use of trained strategies in their daily life). Eight participants with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, or major depressive disorder entered the study. The intervention took place twice a week for 2 months. Assessment measures included traditional evaluations of motivational negative symptoms, apathy, quality of life and daily functioning, in addition to ambulatory assessment methods strategies, including the experience sampling method (ESM) to assess motivation and related processes, and actigraphy (daily step-count) to assess participants’ activity level. Four participants were considered as non-completers (followed less than 2/3 of the program) and four were considered as completers. Only completers presented a decrease in amotivation/apathy and an improvement in functional outcomes after the intervention and at follow-up. Furthermore, mixed-effects ESM models showed significant interaction effects on multiple processes related to motivation, indicating improvements only in completers: heightened motivation, increased engagement in meaningful and effortful activities, better mood, higher levels of confidence, increased frequency of projection into the future (pleasure anticipation), and of positive reminiscence. This preliminary investigation provides evidence that Switch may be an effective intervention, with specific effects on motivation and associated processes.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-09-29T06:22:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211047605
       
  • A Randomized Trial of Brief Online Interventions to Facilitate Treatment
           Seeking for Social Anxiety

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      Authors: Margaret R. Tobias, Lauren N. Landy, Michael E. Levin, Joanna J. Arch
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      This study developed and evaluated a brief, single-session online intervention designed to facilitate treatment seeking among adults with clinically significant social anxiety (SA) symptoms, who generally seek treatment at exceptionally low rates. Adults (N = 267) reporting significant SA symptoms were recruited online and randomized to a brief, single-session online intervention: Education consisted of brief psychoeducation and treatment resources, or Education+Motivation which added treatment seeking-focused motivational content adapted from Motivational Interviewing and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Attitudes, intentions, perceived control, and treatment seeking were assessed at Pre, Post, and 1-month follow-up (FU). Both interventions were feasible (90% completion) and improved all outcomes. At FU, 70% reported engaging in one or more SA treatment-seeking behaviors. Education+Motivation was more effective than Education at improving treatment-seeking attitudes and behaviors. A brief online intervention with educational and motivational content is a promising direction for promoting treatment seeking for adults with SA symptoms.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-08-28T10:44:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211040051
       
  • Occupational Stress and Burnout in the Fire Service: Examining the Complex
           Role and Impact of Sleep Health

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      Authors: Mari-Amanda A. Dyal, Todd D. Smith, David M. DeJoy, Brian A. Moore
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      The occupational stress inherent in firefighting poses both physiological and psychological risks to firefighters that have been found to possess a reciprocal nature. That is, the nature of these relationships in terms of indicator and impact are elusive, especially as it relates to sleep health (e.g., quality, quantity, hygiene, etc.) as a specific physiological risk and burnout as a specific psychological risk. A series of mediation models were assessed to examine the reciprocal relationships between occupational stress, burnout, and sleep health in a sample of 161 career firefighters. The mediation models confirmed reciprocity among the variables in so much that relationships were best described by the underlying mechanism at work. Comprehensive assessments of both subjective and objective markers of sleep health should be incorporated into firefighter research to supplement behavioral health assessments and interventions, especially related to burnout and occupational stress.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-08-26T04:51:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211040049
       
  • Machine Learning to Support Visual Inspection of Data: A Clinical
           Application

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      Authors: Tessa Taylor, Marc J. Lanovaz
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Practitioners in pediatric feeding programs often rely on single-case experimental designs and visual inspection to make treatment decisions (e.g., whether to change or keep a treatment in place). However, researchers have shown that this practice remains subjective, and there is no consensus yet on the best approach to support visual inspection results. To address this issue, we present the first application of a pediatric feeding treatment evaluation using machine learning to analyze treatment effects. A 5-year-old male with autism spectrum disorder participated in a 2-week home-based, behavior-analytic treatment program. We compared interrater agreement between machine learning and expert visual analysts on the effects of a pediatric feeding treatment within a modified reversal design. Both the visual analyst and the machine learning model generally agreed about the effectiveness of the treatment while overall agreement remained high. Overall, the results suggest that machine learning may provide additional support for the analysis of single-case experimental designs implemented in pediatric feeding treatment evaluations.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-08-12T11:38:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211038208
       
  • Clinical Presentation and Treatment of Early-Onset Behavior Disorders: The
           Role of Parent Emotion Regulation, Emotion Socialization, and Family
           Income

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      Authors: April Highlander, Chloe Zachary, Kaeley Jenkins, Raelyn Loiselle, Madison McCall, Jennifer Youngstrom, Laura G. McKee, Rex Forehand, Deborah J. Jones
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Parent emotion regulation and socialization have been linked to various aspects of child functioning. In the case of early-onset behavior disorders in particular, parent emotion regulation may be an important correlate of the coercive cycle implicated in early-onset behavior disorders thus, symptom presentation at baseline. Further, emotion socialization may be complicated by a pattern of parent-child interactions in which both supportive or unsupportive parenting behaviors in response to behavioral dysregulation may increase vulnerability for problem behavior in the future. Some work suggests standard Behavioral Parent Training may impact parent emotion regulation and socialization. Still little is known, however, about how such processes may vary by family income, which is critical given the overrepresentation of low-income children in statistics on early-onset behavior disorders. This study explored parent emotion regulation, socialization, and family income in a sample of socioeconomically diverse treatment-seeking families of young (3–8 years old) children. Findings suggest relations between parental emotion regulation, socialization, and child behavior although the pattern of associations differed at baseline and post-treatment and varied by family income. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-08-11T09:53:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211036001
       
  • Schedule Thinning Following Functional Communication Training: Effects of
           Chained and Multiple Schedules

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      Authors: Nadrat N. Nuhu, Sacha T. Pence
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Functional communication training (FCT) is used to reduce rates of problem behavior by teaching communicative responses that access functionally equivalent reinforcers. During FCT, the communicative response is typically placed on a dense schedule of reinforcement that is unlikely to be maintained in the natural environment. Experiment 1 evaluated the effects of two schedule-thinning procedures (chained schedules and multiple schedules) on problem behavior maintained by escape from demands for three participants following FCT. The chained and multiple-schedule procedures were effective in reducing rates of problem behavior. Compliance increased under both schedules, but the chained schedule resulted in higher levels of compliance with two participants. In Experiment 2, participants’ preference for the chained or multiple-schedule procedure was evaluated using a modified concurrent-chain procedure. One participant preferred the chained schedule. One participant preferred the multiple schedule. One participant did not appear to discriminate between conditions.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-08-04T04:45:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211036003
       
  • Mental Health Correlates of Probable Posttraumatic Stress Disorder,
           

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      Authors: Maya Zegel, Antoine Lebeaut, Nathaniel Healy, Jana K. Tran, Anka A. Vujanovic
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Firefighters demonstrate high rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD). Research has yet to compare how these diagnoses and their co-occurrence relate to firefighter mental health. This study evaluated trauma load, PTSD, alcohol use, depression, sleep, suicide risk, anger, and occupational stress across four discrete groups of firefighters (N = 660): (1) trauma-exposed only (n = 471), (2) probable PTSD-only (n = 36), (3) probable AUD-only (n = 125), and (4) probable PTSD-AUD (n = 28). Firefighters completed an online survey. Firefighters with probable PTSD-AUD demonstrated higher scores on all criterion variables, except trauma load, compared to firefighters with probable AUD-only or trauma-only. Firefighters with probable PTSD-AUD and probable PTSD-only reported similar levels of all indices, except alcohol use severity and suicide risk, which were higher among the probable PTSD-AUD group. Results provide preliminary empirical evidence of the deleterious impact of PTSD-AUD comorbidity among firefighters.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-07-29T10:07:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211033517
       
  • Using Self-Management and Visual Cues to Improve Responses to Nonverbal
           Social Cues in Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder

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      Authors: Shereen Cohen, Robert Koegel, Lynn Kern Koegel, Erin Engstrom, Kurtis Young, Anthony Quach
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Many individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) experience challenges with social communication, including recognizing and responding to non-verbal cues. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of self-management combined with textual cues to teach adults with ASD to recognize and respond to nonverbal expressions of boredom and confusion during social conversation. A multiple baseline across participants design was used to assess the efficacy of this intervention for three participants. Results showed substantial gains across all participants in their recognition and responsiveness to the targeted nonverbal cues. Moreover, this skill maintained after the completion of intervention and generalized to novel conversation partners and settings with large effect sizes. The findings add to the literature base on interventions for adults with ASD, and further support the use of self-management and textual cues as effective intervention strategies for improving nonverbal communication.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-07-23T06:11:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145445520982558
       
  • Behavioral and Occupational Health in Military Firefighters: An
           Understudied Population

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      Authors: Brian A. Moore, Jason L. Judkins, Mari-Amanda Dyal, Michael Schlenk, Eric Meyer, Casey L. Straud, Vincent Mysliwiec, Alan L. Peterson, Monty T. Baker
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      To our knowledge, no studies on health conditions in U.S. military firefighters exist. Data and demographics from the Defense Medical Epidemiology Database were analyzed on several shared medical issues among military personnel and civilian firefighters. Descriptive statistics and Chi-Square goodness of fit tests were conducted to support study aims. Between 2001 and 2015, substantial incidence rate increases (per 10,000) of tinnitus, PTSD, insomnia, and OSA (2005–2015) were observed. Modest to large increases in depressive disorders, adjustment reaction, generalized anxiety disorder, and panic disorder were observed. Decreasing rates were observed for alcohol dependence, hypertension, and tobacco use disorder. While efforts have examined the impact of sustained operations on military members, first responder military subgroups like firefighters are deficient. Cognitive Behavior Therapy interventions are efficacious for preventing and reducing behavioral health problems; therefore, tailoring them specifically for U.S. military firefighters could significantly improve quality of life and long-term health.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-07-22T11:13:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211033515
       
  • Amplification of Positivity Therapy for Co-occurring Alcohol Use Disorder
           with Depression and Anxiety Symptoms: Pilot Feasibility Study and Case
           Series

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      Authors: Elisabeth Akeman, Evan White, Kate Wolitzky-Taylor, Jessica Santiago, Timothy J. McDermott, Danielle C. DeVille, Jennifer L. Stewart, Martin Paulus, Charles T. Taylor, Robin L. Aupperle
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Positive valence system dysregulation is a relatively unexplored transdiagnostic mechanism and potential treatment target underpinning alcohol use and anxiety and depression symptoms. The current study examined the feasibility and potential benefit of a behavioral intervention focused on amplification of positivity (AMP) with eight adults (five female) diagnosed with alcohol use disorder and clinically significant depression or anxiety (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04278365). AMP for alcohol use (AMP-A) was delivered in 11 individual sessions involving positive activity interventions integrated alongside psychoeducation and alcohol use monitoring. Case descriptions are provided to illustrate treatment implementation. Treatment credibility and acceptability, participant endorsement of the therapy, and homework compliance were rated moderate to high. Exploratory, intent-to-treat analyses suggested medium to large effect sizes for post-treatment improvements in alcohol use, depression, anxiety, and positive affect. Results provide initial evidence of feasibility and acceptability of AMP-A and will be useful for informing future randomized clinical trials to examine clinical efficacy.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-07-13T05:27:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211030506
       
  • Systematic Review of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Individuals with
           Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Caregivers, and Staff

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      Authors: Yors Garcia, Anastasia Keller-Collins, Meredith Andrews, Yukie Kurumiya, Kaleiya Imlay, Brandon Umphrey, Elizabeth Foster
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this review was to quantitatively synthesize studies using acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) with individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders (NNDs), their parents, and staff members that support them. Thirty studies published in peer-reviewed journals between 2006 and 2020 met inclusion criteria. They were reviewed and coded on variables associated with participants’ characteristics, settings, dropouts, design type, ACT procedures and measures, social validity, treatment integrity, and main findings. The What Works Clearinghouse (WWC), the revised Cochrane risk-of-bias tool for randomized trials (RoB2) and the Risk of Bias in Nonrandomized Studies of Interventions (ROBINS-I) were applied to evaluate the quality of the studies. Results indicated that 20 studies used group designs and 10 studies used single-case designs. Participants with NNDs consisted predominantly of those with autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and learning disabilities. Group studies reported process and outcome measures exclusively; whereas, single-case studies also incorporated behavioral/direct measures. Overall, results showed mixed improvements across studies using indirect and direct measures. Lastly, quality assessment for group studies presented moderate or serious risk of bias and two single-case studies did not meet WWC evidence of effectiveness. Directions for future research and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-06-22T06:44:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211027301
       
  • Usability Evaluation of a Cognitive-Behavioral App-Based Intervention for
           Binge Eating and Related Psychopathology: A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Jake Linardon, Teagan King, Adrian Shatte, Matthew Fuller-Tyszkiewicz
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Despite their promise as a scalable intervention modality for binge eating and related problems, reviews show that engagement of app-based interventions is variable. Issues with usability may account for this. App developers should undertake usability testing so that any problems can be identified and fixed prior to dissemination. We conducted a qualitative usability evaluation of a newly-developed app for binge eating in 14 individuals with a diagnostic- or subthreshold-level binge eating symptoms. Participants completed a semi-structured interview and self-report measures. Qualitative data were organized into six themes: usability, visual design, user engagement, content, therapeutic persuasiveness, and therapeutic alliance. Qualitative and quantitative results indicated that the app demonstrated good usability. Key advantages reported were its flexible content-delivery formats, level of interactivity, easy-to-understand information, and ability to track progress. Concerns with visual aesthetics and lack of professional feedback were raised. Findings will inform the optimal design of app-based interventions for eating disorder symptoms.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-06-02T09:24:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211021764
       
  • Parent Ratings of Generalized and Indirect Effects of Functional
           Communication Training for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

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      Authors: Matthew J. O’Brien, Kelly E. Pelzel, Nicole M. Hendrix, Kelly M. Schieltz, Kenzie Miller, Nathan A. Call, Loukia Tsami, Dorothea C. Lerman, Wendy K. Berg, Todd G. Kopelman, David P. Wacker, Scott D. Lindgren
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Functional communication training (FCT) is a behavioral treatment that has been shown to reduce problem behavior and increase appropriate communication in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In this study, we assessed the effects of FCT on targeted and nontargeted problem behaviors outside of the training context, as well as parent stress, for 30 young children with ASD and their parents. Indirect measures of generalization treatment effects were administered prior to and following FCT treatment delivered via telehealth. Children demonstrated significant improvement on both targeted (measured via observation) and nontargeted (measured via checklist) problem behaviors, both within and outside of the training context, and parent stress was significantly reduced following treatment. These results suggest that the impact of FCT may extend beyond the training context for both the children being treated and the parents delivering treatment, even when generalization is not specifically programmed for during treatment.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-05-27T09:40:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211018815
       
  • Associations between Lower-Order Anxiety Sensitivity Facets and PTSD
           Symptomatology among Trauma-Exposed Firefighters

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      Authors: Antoine Lebeaut, Samuel J. Leonard, Nathaniel Healy, Amanda M. Raines, Sam J. Buser, Anka A. Vujanovic
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Firefighters are chronically exposed to potentially traumatic events, augmenting their risk of developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study aimed to examine the incremental associations of lower-order dimensions of anxiety sensitivity (AS), examined concurrently, and PTSD symptom severity among a sample of trauma-exposed firefighters. We hypothesized that AS physical and cognitive concerns would be strongly associated with all PTSD symptom clusters and overall symptom severity, after controlling for theoretically relevant covariates (trauma load; years in fire service; alcohol use severity; depressive symptom severity). Participants were comprised of firefighters (N = 657) who completed an online questionnaire battery and endorsed PTSD Criterion A trauma exposure. Results revealed that the AS cognitive concerns, but not AS physical concerns, was significantly and robustly associated with overall PTSD symptom severity, intrusion symptoms, and negative alterations in cognitions and mood (∆R2’s = .028–.042; p’s 
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-05-19T10:57:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211016819
       
  • Massed Prolonged Exposure for PTSD in Two Firefighters: Preliminary Case
           Study Findings

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      Authors: Sarah E. Zwetzig, Lauren M. Koch, Tabatha H. Blount, Melissa M. Graham, Alan L. Peterson
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Military service members and first responders experience significant trauma exposure in the line of duty. Service members who transition to first-responder positions may be at an increased risk for developing PTSD due to the cumulative effects of trauma exposure. A common criticism of the standard delivery methods for most evidence-based treatments for PTSD is high dropout rates. Massed-prolonged exposure (Massed-PE) has been demonstrated to be efficacious and reduces dropouts by about 50%. This case study is the first of its kind to specifically assess the clinical utility of using Massed-PE to treat PTSD in two firefighters. Results from this case study indicate that both firefighters had significant reductions in their PTSD symptoms. Massed-PE may be an effective approach to treating PTSD in firefighters and may help overcome some of the barriers of conventional treatment delivery. Additional controlled research is needed to further evaluate this promising treatment approach in firefighter populations.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-04-28T05:23:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211011977
       
  • Internalization of Behavior Management Skills among Teachers in a
           Specialized School Serving Students with Neurodevelopmental Disorders

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      Authors: Kathleen L. Ramsey, Stephanie D. Smith, Laura K. Hansen, Richard S. Mohn, Fayth C. Walbridge, Kimberly G. Barajas, Brandi M. Ellis, Brad A. Dufrene
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Prior studies suggest that the fidelity of teachers’ implementation of behavior management practices in the classroom diminish over time. Establishing how long it takes teachers to fully learn and sustain their independent use of these skills may aid in addressing implementation drift. The primary goals of this pilot study were twofold: (1) determine how long it takes teachers employed at a school serving students with Neurodevelopmental Disorders to internalize evidence-based behavior management practices (i.e., positive reinforcement, direct commands), and (2) establish whether some skills take longer than others for teachers to internalize. We also had the opportunity to evaluate whether a pre-determined threshold of skill internalization (e.g., 50% increase in skill use for three consecutive weeks) as defined in the extant literature translates into sustained skill implementation. Our results suggest that the length of standard teacher trainings may not be adequate given upwards of 2 months is required for the internalization of one skill and the time needed to reach internalization is dependent upon the skill taught and may deviate by at least 2 weeks across skills. However, given the variability observed in teachers’ implementation of skills following internalization, this pre-determined threshold of skill internalization may be insufficient and requires further examination in future studies.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T10:19:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211010708
       
  • On the Occurrence of Dangerous Problem Behavior during Functional
           Analysis: An Evaluation of 30 Applications

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      Authors: Joshua Jessel, Debra Rosenthal, Gregory P. Hanley, Lauren Rymill, Megan B. Boucher, Monica Howard, Jesse Perrin, Felipe M. Lemos
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Functional analyses are often conducted by behavior analysts to understand the environmental variables contributing to an individual’s problem behavior to better inform treatment implementation. While functional analyses are integral for designing function-based interventions, they often arrange contingencies to evoke and reinforce dangerous problem behavior. In Study 1 we reviewed 22 functional analyses with open-contingency classes including non-dangerous topographies of problem behavior and we found that participants were more likely to exhibit the non-dangerous behavior in 82% of the applications. We then conducted a single-subject comparison of closed and open-contingency classes with four additional participants in Study 2. Our results suggest that the functional analyses with the open-contingency class reduced the likelihood of observing dangerous problem behavior.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-04-23T10:16:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211010698
       
  • A Head-to-Head Comparison of Three Self-Help Techniques to Reduce
           Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors

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      Authors: Steffen Moritz, Danielle Penney, Kaser Ahmed, Stella Schmotz
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs) include skin picking, trichotillomania, nail biting and cavitadaxia/lip-cheek biting, among other behaviors. For the first time, we compared three different self-help techniques aimed at reducing BFRBs. We explored the acceptance and preliminary efficacy of the approaches and whether the techniques exerted differential effects depending on BFRB-type.A total of 113 participants with at least one BFRB were randomly allocated to either habit reversal training (HRT; active elements: awareness and competing response training), decoupling (DC) or decoupling in sensu (DC-is). Reassessment was conducted 4 weeks later. The Generic Body-Focused Repetitive Behavior Scale (GBS) served as the primary outcome. The completion rate was best for DC-is (68.6%) as compared to HRT (57.1%) and DC (53.5%). A total of 34.8% of completers in the DC group showed an improvement of at least 35% on the GBS compared to 10.0% in the HRT and 23.3% in the DC-is group. In accordance with previous work, moderator analyses showed that improvement under DC is best for non-skin-pickers. A dose-effect relationship emerged, particularly for HRT. Subjective appraisal ratings were more favorable for DC-is and HRT than for DC. With respect to completion rate, subjective appraisal and symptom improvement, DC-is yielded consistently satisfactory results, whereas HRT showed good subjective but rather poor objective improvement. Those who performed DC, especially non-skin-pickers, showed good improvement but overall completion and subjective efficacy were low. Future studies should investigate whether the three techniques exert add-on effects when combined and whether demonstration via new media (e.g., video) will augment comprehensibility and thus efficacy of the techniques.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-04-21T11:56:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211010707
       
  • A Preliminary Test of the Efficacy of Brief Self-Administered Behavioral
           Interventions for Rumination

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      Authors: Kate Wolitzky-Taylor, Haley Breland, Jaclyn Ross, Amy Sewart
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Rumination is theorized to be a cognitive avoidance process that is implicated in several manifestations of psychopathology. Few interventions directly target rumination as a core process maintaining emotional disorder symptoms. This pilot study compared the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of self-directed behavioral approaches for reducing rumination. Participants (N = 60) with elevations in rumination were randomized to 3 weeks of self-directed interventions: (a) scheduled rumination time; (b) a strategy combining mindfulness, shaping, and disengagement strategies; or (c) self-monitoring control. Both active treatment conditions outperformed self-monitoring control on post-treatment depression scores. Scheduled rumination time significantly outperformed the other two conditions on measures of rumination and worry. No between-group differences emerged on the secondary outcome (i.e., anxiety symptoms). Brief, self-directed, behavioral interventions targeting rumination are feasible and demonstrate preliminary efficacy. Scheduled rumination time shows moderate to large effects. The use of a small, non-treatment seeking sample was the primary limitation.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-04-15T09:49:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211010701
       
  • Merging Our Understanding of Anxiety and Exposure: Using Inhibitory
           Learning to Target Anxiety Sensitivity in Exposure Therapy

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      Authors: Chandra L. Bautista, Ellen J. Teng
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Exposure-based therapies are the gold standard treatment for anxiety disorders, and recent advancements in basic and clinical research point to the need to update the implementation of exposure. Recent research has highlighted the importance of transdiagnostic factors such as anxiety sensitivity (AS), or fear of anxiety-related sensations. Elevated AS is common among all anxiety disorders and contains three dimensions, or expectancies, that can be used to guide treatment. Recently, treatments directly targeting AS have shown potential in reducing symptoms of anxiety. In addition, inhibitory learning theory (ILT) provides an alternative explanation of exposure processes based on basic learning research. ILT extends the current framework by accounting for renewal of fear, which is important given the substantial number of individuals who experience a return of symptoms following treatment. The current paper will provide an overview of ILT and discuss several ILT techniques that can be used to target AS. These two converging bodies of research hold strong potential for optimizing treatment for anxiety.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-04-07T10:32:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211005073
       
  • Characteristics of Moderators in Meta-Analyses of Single-Case Experimental
           Design Studies

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      Authors: Mariola Moeyaert, Panpan Yang, Xinyun Xu, Esther Kim
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) has been recommended as a meta-analytic technique for the quantitative synthesis of single-case experimental design (SCED) studies. The HLM approach is flexible and can model a variety of different SCED data complexities, such as intervention heterogeneity. A major advantage of using HLM is that participant and-or study characteristics can be incorporated in the model in an attempt to explain intervention heterogeneity. The inclusion of moderators in the context of meta-analysis of SCED studies did not yet receive attention and is in need of methodological research. Prior to extending methodological work validating the hierarchical linear model including moderators at the different levels, an overview of characteristics of moderators typically encountered in the field is needed. This will inform design conditions to be embedded in future methodological studies and ensure that these conditions are realistic and representative for the field of SCED meta-analyses. This study presents the results of systematic review of SCED meta-analyses, with the particular focus on moderator characteristic. The initial search yielded a total of 910 articles and book chapters. After excluding duplicate studies and non peer-reviewed studies, 658 unique peer-reviewed studies were maintained and screened by two independent researchers. Sixty articles met the inclusion criteria and were eligible for data retrieval. The results of the analysis of moderator characteristics retrieved from these 60 meta-analyses are presented. The first part of the results section contains an overview of moderator characteristics per moderator level (within-participant level, participant level, and study level), including the types of moderators, the ratio of the number of moderators relative to the number of units at that level, the measurement scale, and the degree of missing data. The second part of the results section focuses on the metric used to quantify moderator effectiveness and the analysis approach. Based on the results of the systematic review, recommendations are given for conditions to be included in future methodological work.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-03-24T11:43:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211002111
       
  • Evaluating the Effects of Computer-Based Instruction on Trial-Based
           Functional Analyses Procedures

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      Authors: Jessica L. Amador, Ruth M. DeBar, Tina M. Sidener, Andrew W. Gardner
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Children who engage in problem behavior are often educated in the public schools. A trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) is an experimental functional analysis whereby conditions are embedded into scheduled activities of the school day to identify environmental variables responsible for problem behavior. To be included in this process, it is important that staff are trained effectively and efficiently. Computer-based instruction (CBI) offers several advantages as a staff training tool including less training time, less required supervision, and permits self-paced and individualized training. The efficacy of CBI on procedures of TBFA to practitioners remains unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of CBI teaching procedures of TBFA with 20 practitioners. Results indicate that CBI is an effective and efficient staff training procedure as post-test scores increased following the CBI training across participants with a mean training duration of less than an hour. Three practitioners successfully implemented four conditions of a TBFA with a confederate following CBI training. Following completion of the study, respondents ranked procedures of the CBI as socially valid.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-03-17T11:16:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145445520982552
       
  • Thwarted Belongingness and PTSD Symptom Severity among Firefighters: The
           Role of Emotion Regulation Difficulties

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      Authors: Samuel J. Leonard, Anka A. Vujanovic
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      The present investigation examined the associations among thwarted belongingness (TB), emotion regulation difficulties (ERD), and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity among firefighters. First, the associations of TB and ERD with PTSD symptom severity were evaluated. Second, the indirect effect of TB on PTSD symptom severity through ERD was examined. The sample included 246 trauma-exposed firefighters (M age = 40.21, SD = 9.93, 93.1% male) who completed an online questionnaire battery. Results demonstrate significant, positive associations among TB, ERD, and PTSD symptom severity; and an indirect effect of TB on PTSD symptom severity through heightened ERD (β = 0.17; CI [0.08, 0.29]). Alternate indirect effect models were also significant, underscoring the potentially bidirectional associations of these variables. These findings suggest that there is merit in investigating the role of interpersonal factors and ERD among firefighter populations to better understand PTSD symptomatology. Clinical and empirical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-03-16T10:09:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01454455211002105
       
  • Measuring Public Speaking Anxiety: Self-report, behavioral, and
           physiological

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      Authors: Ana Gallego, Louise McHugh, Markku Penttonen, Raimo Lappalainen
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Self-reports are typically used to assess public speaking anxiety. In this study, we examined whether self-report, observer report, and behavioral and physiological reactivity were associated with each other during a speech challenge task. A total of 95 university students completed a self-report measure of public speaking anxiety before and after the speech challenge. Speech duration (i.e., behavioral measure), physiological reactivity, as well as speech performance evaluated by the participants and observers were also recorded. The results suggest that self-reported public speaking anxiety predicts speech duration, as well as speech quality, as rated by the participants themselves and observers. However, the physiological measures were not associated with self-reported anxiety during the speech task. Additionally, we observed that socially anxious participants underrate their speech performance in comparison to their observers’ evaluations.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-02-17T05:23:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145445521994308
       
  • Preference for Alternative Communication Modality Based on Reinforcer
           Quality and Availability

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      Authors: Tom Cariveau, Katelyn Hunt, Halley Robbins, Alexandria R. Brown
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Preference for augmentative or alternative communication (AAC) systems has received growing interest in work with individuals with developmental disabilities. An individual may choose a modality based on technological (e.g., auditory-output) or aesthetic features of a system; however, it is ideal that functional features (i.e., effectiveness in producing a reinforcer) affect preference to a much greater extent. Prior research has treated preference as a static variable and may commonly report a lack of preference for a modality or control by irrelevant features of the assessment (e.g., position of the modality in an array). The current study assessed the preference for AAC modalities of a teenager with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability using a concurrent-chains procedure. This study extended prior research by including additional methods to ensure accurate assessment of preference (i.e., a control condition) and a reinforcer manipulation to determine whether preference was controlled by non-functional (e.g., aesthetic) or functional (i.e., reinforcer quality and availability) variables. Preference was found to be functionally related to reinforcer availability, including when rapidly alternated between modalities. Moreover, the participant consistently allocated responding away from the control condition. Implications for self-determination and suggestions for future research on preference for AAC systems are considered.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-02-04T10:29:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145445521992308
       
  • A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Virtual Reality and In Vivo Exposure
           Therapy as Psychological Interventions for Public Speaking Anxiety

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      Authors: Rachel Reeves, David Curran, Amanda Gleeson, Donncha Hanna
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Public speaking anxiety (PSA) is a prevalent condition with disabling occupational, educational, and social consequences. Exposure therapy is a commonly utilized approach for treating PSA. Traditionally, this intervention has been delivered as in vivo exposure therapy (IVET). Limitations inherent to in vivo as a mode of delivery have been identified and studies have increasingly explored the use of Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET) as an alternative. Understanding the efficacy of both VRET and IVET as psychological interventions for PSA is important. A systematic search identified 11 studies with 508 participants. Meta-analysis yielded a large significant effect wherein VRET resulted in significant reductions in PSA versus control of −1.39 (Z = 3.96, p 
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-02-03T12:10:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145445521991102
       
  • Improving Social Performance Through Video-feedback with Cognitive
           Preparation in Children with Emotional Problems

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      Authors: Silvia Melero, Alexandra Morales, José Pedro Espada, Mireia Orgilés
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Anxious children report a more negative perception of their social performance and increased nervous behaviors. The video-feedback with cognitive preparation allows children to contrast and modify their negative social self-image, increasing their self-confidence and decreasing anxiety behaviors. This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the Super Skills for Life (SSL) program in improving social performance in a sample of children with emotional symptoms. Results indicated that both objective and subjective evaluation showed positive effects of the SSL program on the children’s social performance, enhancing their social skills and reducing anxiety behaviors in social situations, both during the program and in the last session. Girls felt more comfortable and showed better speech and social performance than boys. Our findings increase the evidence about the short-term effects of the video-feedback with cognitive preparation of the SSL program and provide a useful transdiagnostic protocol for application in the clinical setting.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-01-29T11:58:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145445521991098
       
  • Effects of the Onset of Differential Reinforcer Quality on Skill
           Acquisition

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      Authors: Tom Cariveau, Astrid La Cruz Montilla
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Differential reinforcement of a target response is a necessary component of stimulus control transfer procedures. Recent research has further considered the timing (i.e., onset) of differential reinforcement of unprompted correct responding. To date, the onset of differential reinforcement has been inconsistently controlled in studies comparing skill acquisition programs for individuals with developmental disabilities. The current study serves as a systematic replication of prior comparative research to examine the effects of immediate and delayed differential reinforcement onset on the efficiency of acquisition for three individuals with developmental disabilities. The delayed onset of differential reinforcement required the fewest number of exposures to mastery per target across all comparisons. These findings failed to replicate those of prior research on differential reinforcement onset, possibly due to differences in participant characteristics, target tasks, or other required procedural modifications. Considerations for future research on differential reinforcement procedures in skill acquisition programs are described.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-01-20T06:38:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145445520988142
       
  • Effect of Therapist Coaching Statements on Parenting Skills in a Brief
           Parenting Intervention for Infants

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      Authors: Perrine Heymann, Brynna H. Heflin, Daniel M. Bagner
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Behavioral parenting interventions have been shown to decrease early childhood behavior problems by improving parenting skills. Few studies have examined the impact of therapist coaching statements on parenting skill acquisition, especially among ethnic minority families and non-English-speaking families. In this study, we examined therapists’ use of responsive and directive coaching statements during the first coaching session in a brief parenting intervention, the Infant Behavior Program (IBP), on changes in parenting skill acquisition. Participants were 24 mothers of 12- to 15-month-olds, with elevated levels of behavioral problems from primarily Latinx and low-income backgrounds. Mothers who heard more responsive coaching from their therapist showed greater increases in positive parenting skills. Spanish-speaking therapists used fewer responsive coaching statements and more commands, however, language spoken did not moderate the effect of these statements on changes in parenting skills. Responsive coaching statements in English and Spanish had a positive impact on parenting skill acquisition.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-01-15T12:22:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145445520988140
       
  • A Behavioral-Analytic Model for Assessing Stress in Firefighters

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      Authors: Bailee B. Schuhmann, Sarah N. Henderson, Ryan A. Black, Vincent B. Van Hasselt, Kristin Klimley Margres, Estefania V. Masias, Todd J. LeDuc
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      Research has documented a number of acute and chronic stressors unique to the fire service. Due to the rise in mental health concerns in firefighters, there has been increased awareness of the negative effects of unmanaged stress. The present study employed a behavioral-analytic model to construct a brief screening measure of stress for this population: the Firefighter Assessment of Stress Test (FAST). Psychometric properties of the FAST were evaluated using data from active-duty firefighters throughout the United States. Results indicated the FAST has good internal reliability (α = 0.89), as well as good convergent and discriminant validity. Also, the factor structure of the FAST revealed three significant subscales reflective of stress associated with responding to calls, administrative difficulties, and being overworked. Scoring and interpretation guidelines were established to suggest when further assessment is warranted. The FAST offers a brief and valid method of self-assessment of current stress levels in firefighters. Information obtained from the FAST (i.e., overall stress level and domains) has the potential to facilitate more immediate identification and recognition of stress in firefighters than what has been possible to date. Moreover, heightened awareness of stress and its effects will hopefully culminate in expanded efforts directed toward stress reduction and intervention for firefighters and their families.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-01-13T07:06:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145445520986137
       
  • Effects of the Color Wheel System on Students With Disabilities in
           Inclusion Classrooms

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      Authors: Kathleen B. Aspiranti
      Abstract: Behavior Modification, Ahead of Print.
      The Color Wheel System (CWS) is a class-wide, rule-based, behavior management strategy that incorporates multiple sets of classroom rules to provide specific behavioral expectations for different classroom activities. This study used the CWS within three inclusion classrooms to evaluate improvements of classroom behavior for students with disabilities. A multiple-baseline design across classrooms evaluated the effects of the CWS on on-task behavior for three students with identified disabilities in each classroom. Momentary time-sampling was used to record on-task behavior, which was operationally defined as eyes on teacher or work or following teacher instructions. Visual analysis of time-series graphs and nonoverlap of all pairs (NAP) measures suggested the CWS caused immediate, large, and sustained increases in on-task behavior for students with disabilities when data are aggregated by classroom. However, individual changes in on-task behavior were variable across students. Implications for using the CWS as part of a class-wide behavioral prevention program and directions for future research are discussed.
      Citation: Behavior Modification
      PubDate: 2021-01-11T09:15:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0145445520988139
       
 
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