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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lamella     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Evolution, Mind and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediation Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Family Trauma, Child Custody & Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Creativity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Psychosocial Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Play in Adulthood     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychology and Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Performance and Mindfulness     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School & Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jungian Journal for Scholarly Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
KULA : knowldge creation, dissemination, and preservation studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Service Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
JCPP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Know and Share Psychology     Open Access  
Methods in Psychology     Open Access  
Gadjah Mada Journal of Professional Psychology     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Katharsis     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
Human Arenas : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Psychology, Culture, and Meaning     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cognitive Enhancement     Hybrid Journal  
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Dhammathas Academic Journal     Open Access  
INSAN Jurnal Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Heroism Science     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Psychology     Open Access  
Gogoa     Open Access  
Journal of Global Engagement and Transformation     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Journal of Cognitive Systems     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi Terapan     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Jurnal Educatio : Jurnal Pendidikan Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal  
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Musiktherapeutische Umschau : Forschung und Praxis der Musiktherapie     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
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Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.825
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 25  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1524-8380 - ISSN (Online) 1552-8324
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Domestic Violence in Asian Communities: A Scoping Review of Quantitative
           Literature

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yafan Chen
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Domestic violence (DV) is a prevalent social problems that threaten individuals’ health and well-being, and the issue of DV in Asian communities requires extensive and comprehensive investigation. Following the steps by Arksey and O’Malley, a scoping review was conducted to (a) summarize and synthesize existing quantitative evidence on the topic of DV in Asian immigrant communities in North America, and (b) identify research gaps in the literature to guide future work. Inclusion criteria were that (a) the studies must comprise a sample of Asian immigrants in North America, (b) the focus of the article was specifically on individuals’ experiences of DV in the past year or lifetime, (c) DV was measured as either independent or dependent variable, (d) full-text publications written in English, (e) articles must be peer-reviewed, quantitative studies. On completion of the review process, 35 full-text articles were identified for review. Across studies, five main topics emerged: factors related to DV victimization, prevalence and forms of DV, individuals’ attitudes and/or perceptions about DV, DV-related consequences, and intervention evaluation. Some less common topics include help-seeking behaviors and sources and culturally responsive scales. The findings of this review suggest that future research will benefit from using a nationally representative Asian sample and culturally sensitive tools, examining potential protective factors against DV victimization, and employing an experimental design to evaluate the effectiveness of culturally sensitive interventions. Policies should provide stronger support to agencies and practitioners to deliver culturally sensitive services.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-06-24T10:25:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241263313
       
  • Police Violence Exposure and Traumatic Stress Among Youth: A Systematic
           Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shoshana Oppenheim, Lindsey Webb, Alexander Testa, Rebecca L. Fix, Laura Clary, Tamar Mendelson, Dylan B. Jackson
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Youth exposure to violence increases the risk of poor mental and physical health outcomes lasting into adulthood. Traumatic stress is an outcome of particular concern as the physiological stress response impacts the developing brain. Recently, youth exposure to police violence has been conceptualized as an adverse childhood experience that may impact traumatic stress. To examine this possibility, we conducted a systematic review, drawing upon five databases to gather the existing quantitative and qualitative peer-reviewed research on exposure to police violence and traumatic stress in youth. Searches yielded 27 relevant articles utilizing various study designs: thirteen quantitative, thirteen qualitative, and one mixed method. Twenty-six of the 27 studies found evidence of a relationship between police violence exposure and traumatic stress in youth. Police violence was associated with youth traumatic stress across three types of exposures: direct, vicarious, and anticipated. Studies also explored differential impacts by race and gender. The review revealed current gaps in the literature, such as a lack of data on select sociodemographic groups (e.g., rural youth, LGBTQ+ youth) and potential protective factors (e.g., resilience and school connectedness). In line with the findings, we put forth a research agenda as well as policy and practice recommendations to improve police interactions with youth and mental health services for youth who have been exposed to police violence. Recommendations include improving systematic data collection to track all types of police violence exposure, creating spaces for positive police interactions with youth, and training mental health practitioners to support youth exposed to police violence.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-06-21T07:59:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241255735
       
  • Preventing Religion-Based Hate Crime Victimization Among Youth: A
           Systematic Review of Personal, Collective, and Policy Responses

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      Authors: Sophie Litvak, Janne Kivivuori, Markus Kaakinen
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Hate crime victimization targeting the victim’s religious identity poses a serious problem for individuals, communities, and societies. This systematic review describes countermeasures to such victimization, aiming for broad descriptive inclusion by canvassing personal adaptations, collective programs, and institutional-governmental policies. Targeting peer-reviewed articles published between 2002 and 2022, we found 44 articles describing measures related to religion-based victimization prevention. We classified the studied measures into 12 main types. The most salient personal adaptations included camouflage-type blending in to avoid victimization, using religion as a source of resilience, and changing routines to deflect risk. At the collective level, mobilizing community resilience, stereotype reduction, and place-based solutions were often researched. The relatively few institutional-level studies addressed measures to enhance the connection between victims and authorities by various means. The experimental studies heavily concentrated on experiments supporting the efficacy of changing people’s perceptions as a means of prevention. The review concludes with a discussion about research and policy implications.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-06-13T08:50:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241257198
       
  • Vicarious Growth, Traumatization, and Event Centrality in Loved Ones
           Indirectly Exposed to Interpersonal Trauma: A Scoping Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Whitney Willcott-Benoit, Jorden A. Cummings
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      It is well-known that interpersonal traumatic events can impact the physical and mental health of those indirectly exposed to the events. Less studied are populations of loved ones who have been indirectly exposed to interpersonal trauma. We conducted a scoping review to synthesize literature related to potential consequences of indirect interpersonal trauma exposure, specifically vicarious traumatization (VT) and vicarious posttraumatic growth (VPTG). We used the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology. Inclusion criteria included: (1) participants were indirectly exposed to the interpersonal trauma of a loved one in adulthood, (2) discussion of VT, VPTG, or related terms, (3) published peer-reviewed empirical journal articles, and (4) available in English. We used a three-step search strategy to find relevant articles. Keywords found from the first two steps were entered into PsycINFO, PsycArticles, PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases. Reference lists of the included articles were also examined. The identified articles were then screened using the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Twenty-eight articles met inclusion and exclusion criteria. Twenty-six articles referenced VT or related terms, one referenced VPTG, and one referenced vicarious trauma keywords. Results of this scoping review are summarized by definitions, measures, key findings, and knowledge gaps. Future research should focus on vocabulary management, diverse samples, and VPTG in this population, including the identification or creation of appropriate measures.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-06-13T08:48:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241255736
       
  • Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Policies and Interventions that
           Improve Health, Psychosocial, and Economic Outcomes for Young People
           Leaving the Out-of-Home Care System

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Taylor, Bianca Albers, Georgina Mann, Jane Lewis, Russell Taylor, Philip Mendes, Geraldine Macdonald, Aron Shlonsky
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Young people who transition to adulthood from out-of-home care (OOHC) are more likely to experience a range of poorer outcomes relative to their same-age peers in the community. This systematic review assessed the effectiveness of policies or interventions (hereafter “interventions”) aimed at improving housing, health, education, economic, and psychosocial outcomes for youth leaving OOHC (hereafter “care leavers”). Eleven databases of published literature were reviewed along with gray literature. Eligible studies used randomized or quasi-experimental designs and assessed interventions that provided support to care leavers prior to, during, or after they left OOHC. Primary outcomes were housing and homelessness, health and well-being, education, economic and employment, criminal and delinquent behavior, and risky behavior, while secondary outcomes were supportive relationships and life skills. Where possible, results were pooled in a meta-analysis. Certainty of evidence was assessed using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation. Fourteen studies published in 27 reports were identified that examined independent living programs (ILPs) (n = 5), intensive support services (n = 2), coaching and peer support (C&PSP) (n = 2), transitional housing (n = 1), health information or coaching (n = 2), and extended care (n = 2). All but one study was conducted in the United States. Twenty small meta-analyses were undertaken encompassing ILPs and C&PSP, with two showing results that favored the intervention with certainty. The level of confidence in each meta-analysis was considered very low. A significant risk of bias was identified in each of the included studies. While some interventions showed promise, particularly extended care, the scope and strength of included evidence is insufficient to recommend any included approach.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-06-03T10:24:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241253041
       
  • A Rapid Review on Complaint Mechanisms for Interpersonal Violence:
           Integrating Research-Based Recommendations from Multiple Sectors to Inform
           Sport Settings

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephanie Radziszewski, Sylvie Parent, Elisabeth St-Pierre, Isabelle V. Daignault, Martine Hébert, Karine Baril
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Past studies have highlighted the lack of independent formal complaint mechanisms as one of the most significant barriers to reporting interpersonal violence (IV) in sport. Some countries have since implemented complaint mechanisms specific to sport settings. Evaluations of similar mechanisms in other sectors could inform the development and implementation of complaint mechanisms for IV in sport. This rapid review included studies inside and outside the sport context to document the characteristics of complaint mechanisms of IV, barriers or limitations related to such mechanisms, and recommendations resulting from their evaluation. Following the Cochrane Rapid Reviews Interim Guidance, six databases were searched for peer-reviewed references in English or French, published between 2012 and 2022, and pertaining to the evaluation of formal reporting mechanisms of IV. The 35 references covered mechanisms mainly targeting IV in general (any type) or sexual violence specifically. Complaint mechanisms varied in scope and as a function of their setting, including work, university, military, and medical. We identified barriers and limitations concerning fear of consequences, lack of knowledge, lack of efficiency, lack of trust, and unsupportive culture. Finally, we documented 18 recommendations to improve complaint mechanisms of IV, spanning four categories: (a) organizational accountability, (b) awareness and accessibility, (c) adapted process, and (d) ongoing evaluation. This rapid review draws recommendations from various research disciplines and types of mechanisms to offer a comprehensive portrait of best practices. The findings show that numerous aspects of complaint mechanisms at multiple levels should be considered when developing and implementing complaint mechanisms of IV.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-30T09:59:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241253822
       
  • Child Sexual Abuse in Nigeria: A Systematic Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Moninuola Ifayomi, Parveen Ali, Katie Ellis
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a major social and public health issue that creates short- and long-lasting impacts on victims, families, and society. While global researchers have considered the topic of CSA since the 19th century, the Nigerian context has been largely ignored. Yet, without sufficient evidence and understanding, making changes to practices and policies becomes almost impossible. The review aimed to gain insights into the nature and extent of CSA and identify areas for improvement in practice and research in Nigeria. This article presents the findings of a systematic review of 31 empirical articles related to CSA in Nigeria. Using key search terms along Boolean operators and truncation, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ASSIA, PILOTS, African Journals Online, and Google Scholar were searched. A total of 1,325 studies were found, and 31 empirical studies, including 20 quantitative, 9 qualitative, and 2 mixed methods studies, were included. The review findings reveal the discourse on CSA and delve into various aspects such as its prevalence, manifestation patterns, root causes, management, and consequential impact on victims and societal domains. The gaps in the existing literature are identified and explored to identify areas for improvement in victim services, societal awareness, and healthcare practices and relevant policies. The sociocultural norms not only heightened children’s vulnerability to sexual abuse but also posed significant barriers to them disclosing such abuse. Survivors of CSA often receive inadequate care, indicating a pressing need for improvements in this area. Implications for research, policy, and conclusion were discussed.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-30T06:52:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241254077
       
  • Maternal Emotional and Behavioral Regulation/Dysregulation and Parenting
           Practices: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Camila Regina Lotto, Elisa Rachel Pisani Altafim, Maria Beatriz Martins Linhares
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Emotional and behavioral regulations are crucial for the development of perceptive, responsive, and flexible parenting. Moreover, maternal emotional dysregulation constitutes a risk for maltreatment behaviors. The present study aimed to conduct a systematic review of empirical studies on the associations between mothers’ emotional and behavioral regulations and parenting practices with their children or adolescents. A systematic review was conducted, including papers that addressed these variables, analyzing the direct effects, and moderation or mediation effects of maternal emotional and behavioral regulation on parenting practices, targeting child and adolescent samples. We identified 35 studies for analysis. Most of the studies (86%) showed significant associations between maternal emotional and behavioral regulation and parenting practices. Mothers’ emotional dysregulation was related to a high risk of maltreatment and negative parenting, such as unsupportive reactions and harsh discipline. High maternal emotional dysregulation and negative parenting, in turn, were associated with children’s aggressive behaviors. Conversely, when mothers exhibited high emotional regulation, they engaged in more positive and supportive parenting. Additionally, maternal behavioral regulation with inhibitory control and effortful control led to supportive and warm parenting. Individual and contextual factors, such as maternal victimization history and symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity, had effects on maternal emotional dysregulation, which, in turn, impacted their parenting practices. Consequently, emotional and behavioral regulation played a crucial role in mothers’ parenting practices with their children and adolescents. The findings of the current review could contribute to planning parenting interventions, including maternal emotional and behavioral regulation skills, aimed at preventing maltreatment of their children.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T12:57:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241253036
       
  • Systematic Review Overview: Violence Against Adults with Disabilities

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      Authors: Samira Sadat Badakhshiyan, Azam Naghavi, Rezvan Alsadat Jazayeri
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to conduct an overview of systematic reviews in the field of violence against adults with disability. Eight electronic databases as well as gray literature from January 2022 to April 2023 were searched to identify systematic reviews that focused on violence against adults with disabilities. A total of 13 high-quality systematic reviews were included in the overview. Findings show that adults with disabilities experience a higher rate of emotional and physical violence than the general population. Sociodemographic, financial, and cultural risk factors, prevention, and treatment approaches were discussed. Although the large body of studies on disability and violence have explored different aspects of the issue, there are some limitations and gaps in the literature that need further attention. The most important gap in the literature is the lack of attention to diversity. Accordingly, there is little knowledge about disability and violence in a variety of geographical locations. In addition, studies on violence based on ethnicity/race, age, gender identifications, and some types of disabilities such as hearing impairments or severe disabilities were scarce. There is a need to reach diverse populations of adults with disabilities, through employing a variety of data collection methods and qualitative research methodology. Prevention and treatment programs should be developed with attention to types of disability, and they should be culturally and linguistically sensitive.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T12:54:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241253034
       
  • Experiences of Women Receiving Trauma-Informed Care: A Qualitative
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Verity Chandelle Liu, LaRon E. Nelson, Shefaly Shorey
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Exposure to trauma elevates the risk of illness in women, resulting in increased healthcare costs. The trauma-informed care approach seeks to enhance patient engagement and promote more effective recovery for those with a history of psychological trauma. This qualitative systematic review aims to synthesize evidence related to the experiences of women receiving trauma-informed care using Sandelowski and Barroso’s two-step approach for qualitative research synthesis. A comprehensive search was conducted across 10 electronic databases from their inception until September 2023, coupled with an extensive bibliography search of relevant studies and reviews. In total, eleven studies meeting the inclusion criteria were selected: qualitative peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed studies in English with findings on the experiences of adult heterosexual women aged 19 to 64 years old who underwent various trauma-informed psychosocial interventions. From these studies, four main themes emerged, elucidating women’s experiences as they engage with trauma-informed care: (a) Readiness to seek healing; (b) Healthcare providers: Extending the first hand; (c) An empowering paradigm shift; and (d) Better days ahead. Our major findings emphasize the importance of healthcare providers demonstrating sensitivity to trauma and culture, adopting a gender-sensitive approach, and taking a proactive stance in initiating discussions about trauma. Moreover, allocating more time for consultations, with an increased focus on building an initial rapport to ensure women’s comfort, is also vital. The review further underscores the benefits of group sessions in aiding women’s recovery from trauma. Ultimately, this review holds substantial implications for shaping future practices, emphasizing the critical necessity of personalized treatment plans.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T12:51:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241234346
       
  • Help-Seeking Among Children Impacted by Commercial Sexual Exploitation: A
           Scoping Review

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      Authors: Jennifer E. O’Brien, Kate McKinney, Lauren Martin, Lisa M. Jones
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      This scoping review aims to summarize current research on help-seeking behaviors and patterns among children who have experienced commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) victimization and/or are at high risk of exploitation. Because the literature on help-seeking specific to CSEC victimization is limited, the current review was expanded to summarize findings from help-seeking research for children who have experienced harms that often co-occur with CSEC, such as maltreatment and homelessness. The authors searched three large article databases (PsycInfo, Ovid MEDLINE, and Web of Science) for articles that were (a) empirical; (b) measured or used the term “help-seeking” in their framing and/or results; (c) included children between the ages of 12 and 18; (d) primarily focused on children from the United States; (e) published in English. Ultimately, 22 articles met all inclusion criteria and were included in the final review. Results suggest that cisgender white females are the most likely to seek help, followed by sexual and gender minority children. Cisgender male children were the least likely to engage in help-seeking behaviors. Universally, children were more likely to engage in informal help-seeking rather than formal help-seeking, with younger children being more likely to reach out to parents and older children more likely to reach out to friends. Importantly, ethnically diverse children were under-represented, leading to limited information about how and why these children seek help. Implications for help-seeking by children impacted by commercial sexual exploitation are discussed, providing guidance for programming and research related to CSEC prevention.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T12:44:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241253045
       
  • A Qualitative Systematic Review of the Barriers and Facilitators of the
           Reintegration of Men Convicted of a Sexual Offense From Prison or Secure
           Care into the Community

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      Authors: Emma Tuschick, Nikki Carthy, Nadia Wager, Marty Chamberlain
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      This article is the first qualitative systematic review of studies examining the barriers and facilitators to male sex offenders reintegration from prison or secure care into the community. A search of 16 electronic databases produced 14,218 potential sources, which, after screening, resulted in 79 articles for inclusion. Papers were included if they used qualitative research methods about the barriers, facilitators, perceptions, experiences, and attitudes toward community reintegration from prison or secure care for men convicted of sexual offenses. Included papers were critically appraised and the findings were thematically synthesized. The findings identified that formal and cultural aspects of reintegration, such as probation services, stigmatization, and registration, were the three largest barriers that men faced upon their release, with stability aspects, such as positive relationships, religion, and support groups, being key facilitators to their successful reintegration. The implications for future research, and policy and practice, including prioritizing risk assessment and management, offering appropriate and timely treatment and rehabilitation, educating the community, better access to housing and employment, and services adopting a collaborative approach, are discussed.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T12:28:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241254080
       
  • The Consequences of A History of Violence on Women’s Pregnancy and
           Childbirth in the Nordic Countries: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Hafrún Rafnar Finnbogadóttir, Lena Henriksen, Hanne Kristine Hegaard, Sigridur Halldórsdóttir, Eija Paavilainen, Mirjam Lukasse, Lotte Broberg
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Violence against women (VAW) is a global challenge also in the childbearing period. Despite high gender equality, there is a high prevalence of VAW in the Nordic countries. This scoping review aims to explore predictors for and consequences of a history of violence on women’s pregnancy and childbirth in the Nordic countries, including women’s experience of the impact of violence and the interventions used to detect, address consequences, and prevent further violence. The framework by Arksey and O’Malley was followed, and English, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Danish, and Swedish literature was included. The population was women aged ≥18 residing in the Nordic countries during the perinatal period. Eight databases were searched: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, ASSIA, Social Services-, and Sociological abstracts. There was no limitation of the search time frame. The initial screening resulted in 1,104 records, and after removing duplicates, 452 remained. Finally, 61 papers met the inclusion criteria. The results covering the past 32 years indicated that childbearing women with a history of violence are at greater risk of common complaints and hospitalization during pregnancy, fear of childbirth, Cesarean section, breastfeeding difficulties, and physical and mental health problems. While extensive research was found on the associations between a history of and current violence and outcomes related to pregnancy, there was a lack of intervention studies and studies from Finland. Efforts must be made to scientifically test the methods used to reduce and treat the adverse effects of a history of violence and prevent further violence.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T05:29:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241253044
       
  • The Effectiveness of Schema Therapy in Individuals Who Committed Crimes: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Marta Sousa, Cláudia Gouveia, Olga Cunha, Andreia de Castro Rodrigues
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Research suggests that individuals who commit crimes often exhibit various early maladaptive schemas (EMSs). EMSs are a broad and pervasive theme or pattern consisting of memories, emotions, cognitions, and bodily sensations concerning oneself and one’s relationships with others. Furthermore, EMSs play a crucial role in the onset and maintenance of different types of offending behaviors, highlighting the need to implement schema therapy (ST) for perpetrators. Therefore, the present systematic review assesses the effectiveness of ST for individuals who committed crimes. Four databases (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Scielo) were searched for studies examining the effectiveness of ST for individuals who committed crimes. Seventeen studies were identified, but only 15 met the criteria for inclusion. Results showed that ST can lead to beneficial effects in EMSs, schema modes, personality symptoms, and risk factors to commit crimes (e.g., cognitive distortions). However, the studies, besides being scarce, revealed some methodological limitations. ST is a promising therapy for individuals who committed crimes, despite the studies’ methodological shortcomings, which prevent us from drawing more firm conclusions. Although promising, more research is needed to enhance our understanding of the impact of ST therapies in forensic settings.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T11:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241254082
       
  • Health Impact of Racism-Based Experiences Among Black African Immigrant
           Adults in the United States: An Integrative Review

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      Authors: Robert O. Motley, Danielle T. Walker, Jamelia Willock, William Byansi
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Racism-based experiences among Black African immigrants in the United States are a growing concern due to the prevalence of these events and risk for negative health (mental, behavioral, and physical) outcomes. This integrative review appraised published studies (2012–2023) addressing the relationship between racism-based experiences and adverse health for Black African immigrants. Articles were identified using structured search terms in several databases (APA PsycINFO, CINAHL, PubMed, Web of Science), Google Scholar, and citation mining. A total of fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Studies found a significant positive association between racism-based experiences and adverse mental (n = 9), behavioral (n = 3), and physical (n = 2) health outcomes. Racism-based experiences appear to have mental, behavioral, and physical health consequences for Black African immigrant adults. Given the growing population of Black African immigrants in the United States, more work is needed to elucidate the relationship between racism-based experiences and negative health outcomes.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T11:33:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241253827
       
  • Intersections of Intimate Partner Violence and Natural Disasters: A
           Systematic Review of the Quantitative Evidence

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      Authors: Jennifer Boddy, Celeste Harris, Patrick O’Leary, Madeleine Hohenhaus, Christine Bond, Christopher Panagiotaros, Leah Holdsworth
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Natural disasters and extreme weather events are increasing in both intensity and frequency. Emerging evidence suggests that there is a relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and natural disasters. However, there is a scarcity of methodologically sound research in this area with no systematic review to date. To address the gap, this paper systematically assesses the quantitative evidence on the association between IPV with natural disasters between 1990 and March 2023. There were 27 articles that meet the inclusion criteria for the data extraction process. A quantitative critical appraisal tool was used to assess the quality of each study and a narrative synthesis approach to explore the findings. The review found an association between IPV and disasters, across disaster types and countries. However, more research is needed to explore the nuances and gaps within the existing knowledge base. It was unclear whether this relationship was causal or if natural disasters heightened existing risk factors. Further, it is inconclusive as to whether disasters create new cases of IPV or exacerbate existing violence. The majority of studies focused on hurricanes and earthquakes with a dearth of research on “slow onset disasters.” These gaps represent the need for further research. Further research can provide a more thorough understanding of IPV and natural disasters, increasing stakeholders’ ability to strengthen community capacity and reduce IPV when natural disasters occur.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T11:29:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241249145
       
  • Systematic Review of Intimate Partner Violence Interventions for Latinas
           in the U.S

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      Authors: Iris Cardenas, Cynthia Fraga Rizo, Malorie Ward, Tina Jiwatram-Negrón
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Despite increased risks associated with intimate partner violence (IPV) among Latinas, there is limited knowledge about interventions focused on preventing and responding to IPV among this group or the culturally relevant components of these interventions. To address this gap, we conducted a systematic review of IPV interventions for Latinas. To be included in the review, articles had to be peer-reviewed and available in English or Spanish; evaluate an IPV intervention conducted in the U.S. (including Puerto Rico); include Latinas; and quantitatively report at least one outcome. Our initial search yielded 3,344 unduplicated peer-reviewed articles, of which 20 met the inclusion criteria. The 20 resultant articles evaluated 14 unique interventions among 16 different study samples. Half of the studies focused on interventions that aimed to prevent IPV, whereas the other half focused on interventions that aimed to respond to IPV (i.e., provide services to those who had experienced or were experiencing IPV). Eight of the 14 interventions integrated culturally specific elements. While six studies were randomized controlled trials, most were pre-experimental in design. Interventions generally demonstrated positive outcomes on various measures. However, nine interventions reported mixed findings, emphasizing the complex factors influencing IPV among Latinas. Findings suggest the need for more mechanistic and nuanced research on potentially relevant culturally responsive content and approaches in IPV programming with Latinas, focusing on cultural strengths and structural challenges. Policies are needed to expand funding for innovative and rigorous IPV intervention research to further advance and strengthen existing practice options for Latina survivors.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T11:22:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241253037
       
  • Justice for Women After Sexual Assault: A Critical Interpretive Synthesis

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      Authors: Joanna Collaton, Paula Barata, Mavis Morton, Kim Barton, Stephen P. Lewis
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Justice after sexual assault is often understood and enacted through the criminal legal system such that the outcomes are binary (i.e., justice is achieved or not achieved). Previous research indicates that survivors have specific wants and needs following an assault in order to experience justice, which may or may not align with current practices. We conducted a critical interpretive synthesis of 5 databases to create a sampling frame of 4,203 records; the final analysis included 81 articles, book chapters, and policy documents. Results indicate that justice is an individualized and dynamic process which may include the experience of voice, connectedness, participating in a process, accountability, and prevention. The experiences of safety and control are central to each of these domains. Survivors may seek and enact these justice domains through several avenues, including the criminal justice and legal systems, restorative justice, medical/mental health spaces, activism, art, and social media. Existing actors within currently available justice systems, including legal, medical, and mental health personnel should encourage survivors to identify and define their own experience of justice, including locating helpful behaviors rooted in safety and control, and resist a binary model of justice. Extant systems should therefore be flexible and accessible to help survivors realize their preferred modes of justice.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T06:51:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241248411
       
  • Hospital-Based Healthcare Workers’ Experiences of Involvement in
           Perinatal Child Protection Processes: A Scoping Literature Review

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      Authors: Maegan Johnsen, Melissa O’Donnell, Maria Harries, Colleen Fisher
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      As the number of infants entering Out-of-Home Care at birth internationally continues to rise, Hospital-based healthcare workers (HBHCWs) are increasingly likely to become involved in ethically, morally, and legally complex child protection processes. This scoping review aimed to identify and synthesize qualitative literature pertaining to the perspectives of HBHCWs with experiences of involvement in child protection processes occurring in the perinatal period. JBI Methodology for Scoping Reviews guided this review. Databases Ovid MEDLINE, CINAHL Plus, PsycINFO, ProQuest, Web of Science, SCOPUS, and Informit were searched between March 1 and April 30, 2023. Eighteen sources were identified as meeting the criteria for inclusion following screening by two independent reviewers. Data extracted from the included sources are presented in narrative and tabular formats. Involvement in child protection processes is an inherently conflictual experience for HBHCWs and gives rise to internal, interpersonal, and interorganizational tensions. Involvement can have an enduring impact on the HBHCWs, particularly when an infant is removed from hospital by child protection authorities. Appropriate peer, managerial, and organizational level responses are essential to ameliorate risk to HBHCWs themselves and subsequently their practice with women, infants, and families. HBHCWs can provide valuable insight into the challenges of delivering healthcare at the interface of child protection. Future research should focus on building understanding of experiences across disciplines to ensure that interventions designed to prepare and support HBHCWs are effective and evidence-based.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-30T11:55:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241247001
       
  • CORRIGENDUM to The Effect of Victim Resistance on Rape Completion: A
           Meta-Analysis

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      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T12:14:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241252701
       
  • Child-to-Parent Violence and Abuse: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Michaela M. Rogers, Charlotte Ashworth
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Child-to-parent violence and abuse (CPVA) is a pattern of behavior where a parent or carer is abused by a child they are caring for. The main body of work on CPVA is relatively recent and evolving at pace. This scoping review explores the characteristics of parents, carers, children, and young people in cases of CPVA, the characteristics of CPVA, and barriers to and facilitators of help-seeking in cases of CPVA. The scoping review did not exclude any studies on the basis of geographical location or date of the study. The databases Scopus, CINAHL, Web of Science, Medline, and PubMed were searched in August 2023, along with hand searches of key journals. A total of 145 reports were included in the review, selected for their relevance to the scoping review questions. The main findings were: (a) the field of CPVA is rapidly growing, doubling in the last decade but with a predominance of quantitative studies; (b) there is no agreed universal definition; (c) children and young people with disabilities; who identify as trans or nonbinary gender, or who are adopted or fostered, are almost completely absent from the existing research; (d) there is very limited research focusing on protective factors or on help-seeking.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T11:47:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241246033
       
  • Strategies to Prevent Violence Against Children in the Home: A Systematic
           Review of Reviews

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      Authors: Jorge Cuartas, Ana Salazar, Sophia Backhaus, Madison T. Little, Dana McCoy, Hirokazu Yoshikawa, Michelle Bass, Nicholas Metheny, Felicia Knaul
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Violence against children (VAC) in the home, or by household members, is a human rights and social problem with long-lasting consequences for individuals and society. Global policy instruments like the INSPIRE package have proposed strategies to prevent VAC, including Implementation and enforcement of laws, Norms and values, Safe environments, Parent and caregiver support, Income and economic strengthening, Response and support services, and Education and life skills. This systematic review of reviews aimed to synthesize the recent evidence base (i.e., published since 2000) for each INSPIRE strategy to reduce VAC in the home or by household members. We searched four databases using controlled vocabularies and keywords and searched for additional records in prior reviews of reviews. A total of 67 studies were included in this review, including literature reviews, meta-analyses, systematic reviews, and other types of reviews. We found extensive evidence supporting the effectiveness of parent and caregiver support interventions. However, reviews on other INSPIRE strategies were scarce. We also found a vast underrepresentation of samples from low- and- middle-income countries, children with disabilities, and families affected by forced displacement and conflict. In sum, this systematic review suggests that there are several promising strategies to prevent VAC (e.g., home visiting and parent education), but further research is necessary to strengthen the current body of evidence and effectively inform the implementation and scale-up of evidence-based interventions to protect children from violence globally.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T10:06:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241247018
       
  • Unmasking the Struggle: A Scoping Review Exploring Post-Traumatic Stress
           Symptoms in Caregivers of Individuals with Neurodevelopmental, Psychiatric
           and Neurocognitive Disorders

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      Authors: Jan Mei Lim, Joanna Barlas, Divjyot Kaur, Pamela Ng
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      The impact of caregiving on caregivers’ mental health is typically considered within the caregiver stress and burden literature; however, more recently, research has investigated the experience of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in caregivers. As an emerging area of research, it is timely to conduct a scoping review to map the existing literature in relation to PTSS among adult caregivers of children and adults with neurodevelopmental disorders (NDD), neurocognitive disorders, and psychiatric disorders. The scoping review was conducted using Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Extension for Scoping Reviews guidelines and Arksey and O’Malley’s five-stage methodology framework. Published and unpublished gray literature between 2005 and 2022 was included in the scoping review. Nine thousand one hundred and twenty-five studies were originally identified for screening and 22 studies were selected for inclusion in the final review. Trauma and PTSS experienced by NDD caregivers were related to news breaking, NDD diagnosis, and behavioral issues, whereas caregivers of individuals with psychosis reported aggression and violence as traumatic events. Studies showed that up to half of caregivers reported PTSS, although no conclusions could be drawn about prevalence rates. A wide variety of tools measuring PTSS were used across the 22 studies. Many symptoms of PTSS were reported by caregivers, and cognitive appraisals were associated with PTSS in caregivers. The findings highlight the importance of recognizing the impact of trauma in caregiver mental health and the potential value of using traumatic stress frameworks with these populations. Research should be expanded to establish prevalence rates and to examine the long-term impact of trauma on caregiving as caregivers and care recipients age.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-27T07:33:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241241018
       
  • A Review of Evidence-Based Dating Violence Prevention Programs With
           Behavioral Change Outcomes for Adolescents and Young Adults

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      Authors: Shweta Amy Chawla, Julie Solomon, Clea Sarnquist
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescent dating violence (DV) is not only a social but also a public health problem, necessitating the development and scale-up of prevention strategies. We conducted a review of the literature to identify adolescent and young adult DV prevention programs that have shown promising behavioral outcomes. The literature search covered articles published from 1996 to 2022 and indexed in Medline, Cochrane, Scopus, PsycINFO, and Embase. The review focused on programs implemented and evaluated in the United States or Canada that included intervention and comparison groups, a baseline assessment, and at least one post-assessment conducted after the intervention exposure. Promising behavioral outcomes were defined as positive, statistically significant differences between intervention and comparison groups with respect to DV perpetration or victimization or bystander behavior in relation to DV. A total of 118 articles were screened by abstract and read in-depth. Eighteen programs that met the inclusion criteria were identified. Of these programs, one showed reductions in DV victimization, six showed reductions in DV perpetration, and nine showed behavioral reductions in both violence perpetration and victimization. The review highlighted that while multiple programs have demonstrated efficacy in preventing or reducing intimate partner violence in North American youth populations, more robust research on the replication of these programs outside researcher-controlled environments is needed. Furthermore, issues with program inclusivity, such as with sex and gender-minority individuals, should be considered in future intervention development and replication research.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-27T04:30:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241246779
       
  • The Role of Wait Time During the Questioning of Children: A Systematic
           Review

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      Authors: Annie Yun An Shiau, Kelly McWilliams, Shanna Williams
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      The benefits of wait time in classroom discourses have been well documented in the field of education since the 1970s. While current forensic interview guidelines recognize the importance of pauses, whether there is sufficient empirical evidence to inform wait time guidelines in the legal context remains unanswered. This systematic review aimed to synthesize and provide a holistic update on the available research on the role of wait time when questioning children and recommended future direction to develop wait time guidelines specific to child forensic interviews. Systematic searches were conducted using four databases (PsycINFO, MedLine, ERIC, and Scopus). A total of 3,953 unique articles were returned, following a title and abstract screening, 68 full texts were reviewed, and 26 (including five additional studies identified through a hand search) were included. Inclusion criteria were the study sample included children under 18, published a measure of wait time in a questioning context, and in English. Overall, most knowledge of wait time remains in the field of education. Natural wait time is short, but with training, extended wait time yields significant benefits for both child and adult talk. Only one study examined the role of wait time in the forensic interviewing setting where a 10-s wait time appears to be more productive than shorter pauses. Extended wait time is a promising and simple interviewing practice with the potential to facilitate children’s disclosure. The current review is a call for research in the area as it pertains to forensic interviewing of children and youth.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-25T12:15:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241246793
       
  • How Health Professionals Identify and Respond to Perpetrators of Domestic
           and Family Violence in a Hospital Setting: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Danielle Schalk, Christina Fernandes
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      There is heightened awareness that a whole-of-systems approach to perpetrator responses is key to addressing domestic and family violence (DFV). This paper reports on the findings from a scoping review which mapped the international literature on how health professionals identify and respond to perpetrators of DFV within a hospital setting. A comprehensive scoping review methodology was used. The search, spanning January 2010 to January 2022, yielded 12,380 publications from four databases. Eligibility for inclusion included peer-reviewed literature with any reference to inpatient hospital health professionals identifying or responding to perpetrators of DFV. Fourteen articles were included in the final review. The review presents the literature categorized by levels of prevention, from primary, secondary, through to tertiary preventive interventions. An additional category “other practices” is added to capture practices which did not fit into existing levels. Despite glimpses into how health professionals can identify, and respond to perpetrators of DFV, the current knowledge base is sparse. The review did not identify any mandated or formal procedures for identifying and/screening or responding to perpetration of abuse in hospitals. Rather, responses to perpetrators are inconsistent and rely on the motivation, skill, and self-efficacy of health professionals rather than an embedded practice that is driven and informed by hospital policy or procedures. The literature paints a picture of missed opportunities for meaningful work with perpetrators of DFV in a hospital setting and highlights a disjuncture between policy and practice.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T12:29:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241246783
       
  • Operational Definitions of Poly-Victimization: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Christin M. Ogle, Caroline Harmon-Darrow, Lisa Fedina, Darlene Nichols, Carrie F. Mulford, Bethany L. Backes
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Throughout the last two decades, research on poly-victimization (PV) has evolved from examinations of a core set of past-year victimization types in youth samples to investigations of a broad range of victimization types experienced during variable time intervals in diverse samples of varying ages. As the concept of PV expands, greater clarity regarding the definition and measurement of PV is needed to advance understanding of its risk and protective factors as well as its associated outcomes. This scoping review aimed to (a) identify approaches used to operationally define and measure PV across studies and (b) synthesize empirical findings concerning risk factors and outcomes associated with PV. A systematic search of peer-reviewed research published before 2022 across 12 databases yielded 98 studies that met inclusion criteria. Study characteristics including the research design, sample type, victimization timeframe, operational definition(s) of PV, measurement of PV, analytic methods, and key findings were synthesized across studies. Findings indicated that the majority of reviewed studies were cross-sectional investigations that utilized categorical measures of lifetime PV in samples of youth. Results also demonstrated that PV is robustly associated with a broad range of predictors, including mental health symptoms and diagnoses as well as family- and community-level factors. PV is also associated with numerous adverse outcomes including depression, anxiety, suicidality, substance use, and delinquency across diverse study types and populations. Future research that examines the conditional effects of PV is needed to identify subgroups of individuals at higher risk of adverse outcomes following PV and modifiable targets for interventions.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T10:46:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241246522
       
  • Exploring the Nexus of Adverse Childhood Experiences and Aggression in
           Children and Adolescents: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Laura Stoppelbein, Elizabeth McRae, Shana Smith
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      A strong relation between adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and aggression has been established in adult populations, with less research examining this relation earlier in development. The purpose of this study was to complete a scoping review of the current evidence available on the relation between ACE and aggression and subtypes of aggression within a child and adolescent population. Inclusion criteria for the review included publications in English between 1998 and 2023, use of a child/adolescent population, and peer-review and quantitative publications. Databases searched included PubMed, APA PsycINFO, Scopus, and EBSCO, and search terms included words related to ACE and aggression. Initial selection was based on title and abstract, with 32 papers meeting eligibility criteria for inclusion. Two authors extracted the relevant characteristics of the studies independently and conferred on any disagreements. The overall findings from the scoping review suggest that there is a strong link between aggression and ACE; however, this link may not be as strong for specific subtypes of aggression. Additionally, characteristics of ACE may play role in understanding this relation, but little research is available within a child and adolescent population. A few studies have attempted to examine potential mediators and moderators of this relation; however, none have been replicated within a child and adolescent population. The findings from this review support the need for additional research in this area and identify significant gaps in the literature that need to be addressed within a child and adolescent population.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T12:43:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241246764
       
  • Prevalence of Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Serving Military
           and Veteran Populations: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Rory Grinsill, Matilda Kolandaisamy, Katelyn Kerr, Tracey Varker, Andrew Khoo
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Serving military personnel and veterans are known to be at elevated risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and some veterans have been shown to respond poorly to current standard treatments. Evidence so far suggests that according to the 11th edition of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems guidelines, complex PTSD (CPTSD) may be of higher prevalence in the general population than PTSD. The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of CPTSD compared to PTSD in serving and ex-serving military populations. A systematic review was conducted with the search criteria set to peer-reviewed English language journal articles, focusing on serving military or veteran populations, reporting on the prevalence of CPTSD, not restricted by year. Four comprehensive databases (Psycinfo, Pubmed, CINAHL, and Embase) were searched. Of the 297 identified articles, 16 primary studies were eligible for inclusion. The review was registered in the PROSPERO database (CRD42023416458), and results were reported based on Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Of the 16 studies, 13 demonstrated higher prevalence of CPTSD than PTSD. Studies were predominantly veteran focused. Prevalence of CPTSD ranged from 5% to 80.63%, while prevalence of PTSD ranged from 3.8% to 42.37%. There was high heterogeneity in study populations, preventing meta-analysis. This is the first systematic review to assess the prevalence of CPTSD in serving military and veteran populations, with the findings demonstrating a higher rate of CPTSD compared to PTSD. It is hoped that the review will assist clinicians and military and veteran health services with appropriate assessment, diagnosis, and intervention for those affected by CPTSD, as well as PTSD.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T12:37:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241246996
       
  • Association Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Academic Performance
           Among Children and Adolescents: A Global Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Guangbo Qu, Liqin Shu, Haixia Liu, Shaodi Ma, Tiantian Han, Huimei Zhang, Christy Huang, Jun Wang, Linsheng Yang, Yehuan Sun
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      This study was conducted to quantify the association of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and the academic performance of children and adolescents. The literature was systematically searched in six electronic databases, and a meta-analysis was conducted. Twenty studies with a total of 1,196,631 children and adolescents from five countries were included. Meta-analysis showed that ACE score was positively associated with poor academic achievement, grade repetition, and special education support. Compared with children and adolescents without any ACE, those with one or more ACE had a significantly higher risk of poor academic achievement (pooled odds ratio [OR]: 1.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.13, 1.85], I2 = 82.6%) and grade repetition (pooled OR: 1.36, 95% CI [1.29, 1.43], I2 = 71.0%). Moreover, all types of ACEs were positively associated with poor academic achievement and grade repetition. In addition, there was a significant dose-response relationship between the ACE score and the risk of poor academic achievement. This study supported that ACE had a significant impact on the academic performance of children and adolescents. Based on these findings, we recommend that early screening of ACEs for children and adolescent is critical and appropriate support and prevention in education should be developed for those with ACEs. Further studies are needed to further explore the long-term effect of ACEs on education and its gender differences.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T12:37:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241246758
       
  • Judicial Actors’ Understanding of the Mental Health Impacts of Intimate
           Partner Violence: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Susan Lynn Heward-Belle, Parveen Azam Ali, Julieta Marotta, Debbie Hager, Michaela Rogers, Lynette Stevenson
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a global public health issue that has grave physical and mental health consequences for millions of women. The judicial system plays a critical role in responding to IPV principally through the criminal justice system, family law, and/or child welfare jurisdictions. However, victims/survivors who interact with the legal system report negative experiences. An under-researched area of scholarship is the degree to which judicial actors understand the mental health impacts of IPV on victims/survivors and how they apply that knowledge in practice. This scoping review aimed to identify and synthesize existing scholarship on judicial actors’ understanding of the mental health impacts of IPV on women survivors. We searched 10 databases (Medline, Scopus, PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Westlaw, HeinOnline, the Cochrane Library, and the Joanna Briggs Library databases) for studies published between 2000 and 2023. A total of 27 studies were included in the review. We identified five main themes, including: awareness of survivors’ experiences, gap in judicial actors’ knowledge, understanding of perpetrator tactics and risk factors, disclosing mental health problems, training, and guidance. The review highlights significant gaps in judicial actors’ understanding of this issue and recommends strategies to increase the awareness and understanding of IPV among judicial actors. The findings can be used to justify future research to better understand the training and development needs of judicial actors to improve their level of awareness of the dynamics and impact of IPV and to make policy and practice recommendations to build the capacity of the judicial workforce.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-17T12:44:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241244494
       
  • Prevalence, Disclosure, and Help Seeking in Black and Asian Male Survivors
           of Sexual Violence in the United Kingdom: A Rapid Review

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      Authors: B. Kennath Widanaralalage, Stacey Jennings, Coral Dando, Jay-Marie Mackenzie
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual violence against men has been significantly overlooked, and under-researched, with minimal attention paid to the influence of culture and ethnicity on survivors’ experiences of abuse. This rapid review examines prevalence, disclosure, help-seeking, and criminal justice experiences of Black and Asian male survivors in the United Kingdom. Eight empirical studies published since 2003 involving Black and Asian sexual violence survivors were included through comprehensive database searches, including gray literature and reference lists. Findings suggest prevalence data underestimate the true extent of victimization in ethnic minority groups in the United Kingdom. Barriers to disclosure and help-seeking were associated with specific cultural factors unique to Black and Asian male experiences, as revealed by three qualitative studies. However, accessing and reporting to the criminal justice system remains largely unexplored for Black and Asian male survivors. Methodological limitations within existing studies emphasize the urgent need for substantial, high-quality research that addresses issues with inconsistent definitions, measurements, and lack of ethnic-specific approaches across prevalence, disclosure, help-seeking, and criminal justice experiences. Culturally informed professional training emerges as a critical requirement to sensitively address the unique challenges faced by ethnic minority male survivors. Additionally, targeted outreach initiatives hold the potential to engage minority male survivors more effectively. A collaborative, system-wide approach is vital to bring to the forefront the overlooked experiences of ethnic minority males, thereby promoting an environment of support, understanding, and recovery.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-17T11:33:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241246217
       
  • The Use of Dance and Movement for the Embodied Healing of Interpersonal
           Trauma in Women and Girls: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Catherine X. Liang, Thema Bryant
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Interpersonal trauma is a pervasive issue with devastating consequences for women and girls of diverse identities. Research has shown that there are many potential physiological consequences for experiencing trauma, and as such, treatment for trauma should incorporate the body. Dance/Movement Therapy (DMT) has been emerging in the current literature as one body-oriented treatment approach effective in helping women and girls heal from interpersonal trauma. This review uses textual narrative evidence synthesis to examine how practitioners are currently using DMT for this population, what treatment outcomes have been observed, and what the racial/ethnic identities and international contexts are for survivors who have benefited from DMT. Inclusion criteria for the present review included peer-reviewed studies published in English between the years 2000 to 2022, reporting data on the use of dance or movement to help women and/or adolescent girls aged 12 and older heal from interpersonal trauma. Studies were identified through electronic databases, and 16 total studies met criteria. This review found that the characteristics and structure of DMT vary greatly between different practitioners, the participants of DMT are very diverse, and there are many commonly observed outcomes such as increased physical ability, increased emotional capacity, mind-body integration, safety, aid with trauma processing, empowerment, social support, and fun. This review also gives recommendations for practitioners who wish to utilize dance and movement in treatment: offer group interventions; use the body to create metaphor, imagery, and symbolism; give survivors choices in how they participate; use music purposefully; and don’t forget to cultivate joy.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-16T05:51:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241243399
       
  • The Uptake and Measurement of Alternative Approaches to Domestic Violence
           Intervention Programs: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Julia K. Campbell, Sydney Nicolla, Deborah M. Weissman, Kathryn E. Moracco
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      This scoping review explores the breadth and depth to which Domestic Violence Intervention Programs (DVIPs) in the United States and globally: (a) incorporate components that address the relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and social injustice, racism, economic inequality, and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs); (b) use restorative (RJ)/transformative justice (TJ) practices, individualized case management, partnerships with social justice actors, and strengths-based parenting training in current programming; and (c) measure effectiveness. In 2021, we searched 12 academic databases using a combination of search terms and Medical Subject Headings. In all, 27 articles that discussed at least one key concept relative to DVIP curricula were included in the final review. Findings suggest that very few DVIPs address ACEs and/or the relationship between structural violence, social inequality, and IPV perpetration. Even fewer programs use restorative practices including RJ or TJ. Furthermore, DVIPs use inconsistent methods and measures to evaluate effectiveness. To respond to IPV perpetration more effectively and create lasting change, DVIPs must adopt evidence-informed approaches that prioritize social and structural determinants of violence, trauma-informed care, and restoration.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T09:14:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241244398
       
  • Women’s Experiences of Gender-Based Interpersonal Violence in Sport: A
           Qualitative Meta-Synthesis

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      Authors: Kirsty Forsdike, Fiona Giles
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Violence against women in sport is pervasive. Prevalence rates of interpersonal violence range from 26% to 74% across psychological, physical, and sexual violence. This review synthesizes adult women’s experiences of gender-based interpersonal violence in sport. A systematic review of qualitative studies was conducted. Five databases were searched, including CINAHL, Web of Science, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO, and Sociological Abstracts. In total, 1,617 records were retrieved and screened. Twenty-five records representing 24 studies were eligible for inclusion. Following a meta-ethnographic approach, both authors synthesized first- (participants) and second-(researcher) order constructs to create a new interpretation (third-order construct) beyond the individual studies reviewed. A feminist socio-ecological lens was applied. Five themes were constructed: women’s safety work, the normalization of abusive behaviors in the sports context, sport family violence, organizational impotence and hostility, and women’s status in a patriarchal system. Women’s experiences of abuse are mapped within and across the individual, relational, organizational, and cultural levels of the socio-ecological model, with (lack of) power being a central factor within each level as well as flowing between the levels. A fifth socio-ecological level was developed pertaining to the unique context of sport—that of the sport family. This sits between the relational and organizational levels of the model and covers both intense familial relationships and patriarchal familial organizational structures in sport that facilitate and silence the abuse. Sporting bodies must co-design interventions encompassing all socio-ecological levels to address gender-based violence in sport.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T09:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241244397
       
  • Risk and Protective Factors of Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children
           and Adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Enoch Boafo Amponsah, Alhassan Abdullah, Bothaina Eltigani, Lucie D. Cluver
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) has emerged as a critical child protection and public health concern in recent years. While the phenomenon is prevalent globally, its impact is compounded in sub-Saharan Africa owing to the cultural and socioeconomic challenges that leave many households in the region vulnerable. The present study synthesized existing evidence using the socioecological model as a guiding framework to assess the risk and protective factors associated with CSEC in sub-Saharan Africa. A protocol for the study was published in PROSPERO (CRD42022331832) with pre-specified inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies were screened and extracted from eight databases: PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science, PROQUEST (Social Science Premium), PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and MEDLINE via Ovid. After an initial screening of 4,377 papers, seven studies were found eligible for the final review. The review followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guide for reporting systematic reviews. Included studies were appraised and rated using the Cambridge Quality Checklist and GRADE. Findings revealed risk factors, including adverse childhood experience and victimization, females aged 16 years and older, school dropouts, technology influence, child and parental alcohol use, and separation from caregivers. On the other hand, protective factors such as the number of female adolescents in a household, frequent health screening in schools, children being in school, and high parental monitoring were found to be associated with a lower risk of CSEC. Based on these findings, we recommend that interventions in sub-Saharan Africa adopt a holistic approach that addresses identified risk factors while harnessing protective factors to combat CSEC effectively.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-30T12:15:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241241021
       
  • The Long-Term Effect of Early-Life Uncertainty on Mental Health in
           Adolescence and Adulthood: A Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Lei Shao, Chengjia Zhao, Guoliang Yu
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Turbulent changes in early life are a hidden source of childhood trauma, increasing potential risks for mental illness. Many studies have identified the link between childhood uncertainty and mental health. However, research on the long-term effect of early-life uncertainty (EU) on mental health has not been systematically synthesized. This meta-analysis aims to provide a quantitative estimate of the association between EU and subsequent mental health outcomes. Eight electronic databases and gray literature were searched. Twenty-eight studies met our inclusion criteria: samples of non-clinical adolescents or adults and clear and valid assessments. Random-effect models were used to calculate the pooled effect sizes of EU on internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and well-being. Meta-regression and subgroup analysis were used to explore potential moderators. Results indicated small to moderate associations involving EU and internalizing problem (r = .28; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.228, 0.326]) and externalizing problem (r = .16; 95% CI [0.102, 0.220]). EU was not significantly associated with well-being (r = −.41; 95% CI [−0.738, 0.071]). Furthermore, moderator analyses found that composite uncertain experiences in childhood had a stronger negative effect than single experiences. EU was a stronger predictor of mental health problems in adults than in adolescents. Cross-sectional studies would amplify the correlation between EU and mental illness compared to longitudinal studies. In the future, childhood uncertain and unpredictable risks should receive more attention. More research needs to focus on positive psychological indicators and samples from non-Western countries.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T10:46:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241241028
       
  • Leaking in Intimate Partner Homicide: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Tanita Rumpf, Stefanie Horn, Catharina Vogt, Kristin Göbel, Thomas Görgen, Kim Marie Zibulski, Vanessa Uttenweiler, Rebecca Bondü
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner homicides (IPH) are serious offenses by a heterogeneous group of offenders with diverse risk factors that are too unspecific for the successful prediction of an offense. Recent research suggested several warning signs that may precede IPH and enhance its prevention, but little is still known about “leaking.” Leaking comprises all offense-related statements, behaviors, or actions that express the perpetrator’s thoughts, fantasies, ideas, interests, feelings, intentions, plans, or positive evaluations of an own violent act or previous similar offenses prior to the own attack. This review aims to identify the forms, recipients, and media of leaking as well as potential subgroup differences in cases of IPH. We identified 47 relevant publications via a systematic search of eight databases and additional methods. We included publications that did not explicitly use the term, but described behaviors that could be interpreted as leaking. Up to now, leaking has not been systematically researched in cases of IPH. Nevertheless, publications described several behaviors that are in line with our definition of leaking and were categorized into five broader categories: (a) homicide announcements, (b) previous severe acts of violence, (c) suicidal behavior, (d) planning activities, and (e) interest in similar offenses/offenders. Information on recipients and media as well as subgroup differences was sparse. Leaking is relevant in IPH, but more systematic research is needed to understand its potential role in future risk analyses procedures and prevention of IPH.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T10:00:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241237213
       
  • A Rapid Evidence Assessment on The Effectiveness of Interventions for
           Autistic Adolescents with Harmful Sexual Behaviors

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      Authors: Sebastian Trew, Douglas Hugh Russell
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      The management and treatment of harmful sexual behaviors (HSBs) in autistic adolescents is a complex area of research and clinical practice. Autistic adolescents face unique challenges in understanding social and sexual interactions, putting them at a higher risk of engaging in HSBs. Existing research on interventions for HSBs among autistic adults is growing, but evidence for adolescents is not well understood. Thus, understanding the effectiveness of interventions targeting HSBs in autistic adolescents is crucial. We conducted a rapid evidence assessment to review peer-reviewed research on the effectiveness of interventions for autistic adolescents at risk of or engaging in HSBs. In all, 12 studies met the criteria for review. Inclusion criteria required articles to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, be related to HSB prevention and intervention in adolescents aged 12 to 18 with autism spectrum disorder, be written in English, and include original data. Six databases were used, and we screened the titles and abstracts of 34 studies. The reviewed studies described cognitive-behavioral therapy, pharmacological interventions, family involvement, and multidisciplinary team approaches in addressing HSBs. However, the literature has significant limitations and we suggest that the literature is not robust enough to indicate a promising evidence-based approach for interventions for autistic adolescents who are at risk of or who display and engage in HSBs, and the findings are not transferable to practice. Additional research is required to better prepare healthcare professionals for addressing HSBs in autistic adolescents.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T09:50:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241241024
       
  • Understanding the Perspectives and Experiences of Male Perpetrators of
           Sexual Violence Against Women: A Scoping Review and Thematic Synthesis

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      Authors: Josefina Jiménez Aceves, Laura Tarzia
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Worldwide, sexual violence is a significant public health issue. Although any person can be victimized, the vast majority of sexual violence is perpetrated by men against women. Research has increasingly explored the experiences of victims, however, the perspectives of male perpetrators of sexual violence have largely been sidelined. This limits the ability to design effective public health and policy responses to sexual violence. Our aim was to synthesize the available peer-reviewed qualitative research exploring the perspectives of adult male perpetrators of sexual violence against women. Five databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, CINAHL and SocINDEX. We included qualitative, peer-reviewed English-language studies published in the past 40 years, focused on the perceptions and experiences of male perpetrators of sexual violence. Fourteen articles (describing 12 studies) were identified. Most (10) of the articles examined the perspectives of convicted male sex offenders serving a custodial sentence. Of the remaining four articles, two focused on anonymous users of the online forum, Reddit.com, and the remaining two focused on students on university campuses. These four articles were the most recent. We developed four major themes from our thematic analysis of the study findings that represent the experiences and perceptions of male perpetrators of sexual violence. These themes describe deflecting blame onto the victim, external circumstances as mitigating factors, or the perpetrator’s uncontrollable biological urges. One theme involved some expression of remorse or acceptance of responsibility. Although our findings may have implications for prevention and rehabilitation programs, further research is urgently needed in this area.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T06:59:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241241014
       
  • Scoping Review of Intimate Partner Violence Prevention Programs for
           Undergraduate College Students

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      Authors: Soonok An, Chiquitia Welch-Brewer, Helen Tadese
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Recognizing that intimate partner violence (IPV) negatively affects college students’ health and well-being, colleges offer preventive interventions to address these effects. However, scholarly evidence on this effort has been limited, such that we know little about the risk factors addressed, theoretical approaches, target outcomes, and other essential intervention characteristics. To address this gap, this study reviewed evidence-based IPV preventive interventions conducted in U.S. colleges reported in 25 peer-reviewed articles and dissertations published between 2010 and 2020. Findings showed that IPV preventive interventions for college students were designed to address multilevel risk factors of IPV, typically via bystander interventions and emerging skill-building interventions. Most IPV preventive interventions were theoretically driven primary preventions or a combination of primary and secondary preventions. Most studies of program outcomes focus on awareness of IPV and bystander roles, but 44% of the included articles measured participants’ behavioral outcomes (e.g., actual bystander behavior, reaction to IPV disclosure, IPV screening behavior, social emotional skill use, or decreased rates of IPV perpetration) based on participants’ use of skill-building components (e.g., bystander strategies, healthy relationship skills, conflict resolution, communication skills, empathy, and self-regulation). Student participants in the included studies were predominantly white (>60%) and only two studies included any Latinx students or students at historically Black colleges and universities. This review indicates that future IPV prevention practice, policy, and research must further define and explore how multilevel IPV prevention approaches can address the various systems level of needs among diverse student subpopulations.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-27T10:59:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241237201
       
  • Digital-Based Interventions for Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: A
           Systematic Literature Review

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      Authors: Meg Blackie, Kathleen De Boer, Liz Seabrook, Glen Bates, Maja Nedeljkovic
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Research has shown that complex post-traumatic stress disorder (cPTSD) differs from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on core symptoms relating to the individual’s sense of self, and this has driven the need for treatment approaches to address these specific features of cPTSD. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the increased use of digital-based interventions (DBIs) to treat mental illnesses, including trauma-related disorders. However, while evidence for the use of DBIs for PTSD has previously been synthesized, the current review is the first synthesis of research on the use of DBIs for cPTSD. A systematic search of Scopus, PsychINFO, and EBSCOhost was conducted, using search terms targeting “cPTSD” and “DBIs,” to identify research on the use of DBIs to treat cPTSD symptoms. Ten papers were identified, which provided preliminary evidence for the efficacy of DBIs to reduce cPTSD symptoms. Further, DBIs were reported as acceptable by individuals with a history of complex trauma. The paper also provides insight into the therapeutic approaches adopted, digital modalities utilized, safety measures included, and whether/to what degree support was provided. While DBIs show promise for treating cPTSD, there is substantial room for advancement of the empirical evidence base for these approaches. Both clinical and research-based recommendations are provided separately.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-27T10:19:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241238760
       
  • Systematic Review of Dispositional Mindfulness and Posttraumatic Stress
           Disorder Symptomology: A Targeted Examination of Avoidance

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      Authors: Allison M. Sylvia, Kristen Jastrowski Mano, Erica L. Birkley, Quintino R. Mano
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      High rates of nonresponse to evidence-based treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have fueled the search for improved intervention. Evidence suggests that improvements in dispositional mindfulness (i.e., tendency to attend to the present with nonjudgment and nonreactivity) may help reduce PTSD symptoms. While some research suggests that transdiagnostic mindfulness-based interventions particularly target avoidance symptoms, the association between dispositional mindfulness and avoidance has yet to be systematically examined. To address this gap, we examined peer-reviewed studies that reported quantitative associations between avoidance and dispositional mindfulness among trauma-exposed adults, following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2009 guidelines. Sixteen studies were identified for final review from PsycINFO and PubMed databases. Results suggest that mindfulness has a weak relationship with effortful avoidance. This weak relationship may be obscured in studies where effortful avoidance is measured among other symptoms (e.g., anhedonia). Mindfulness appeared to have stronger associations with symptoms of hyperarousal and negative alterations in cognition and mood. An important clinical implication is that high effortful avoidance may manifest among patients who report strong mindfulness skills. It may be helpful for clinicians to carefully assess how mindfulness is being used to cope.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-25T06:58:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380231221278
       
  • The Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Postpartum
           Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Congrui Fu, Cong Li, Xin Wan, Yu Yang, Shuxin Zhang, Jie Hu
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Although numerous factors have been found to influence postpartum depression (PPD), no previous meta-analysis have systematically explored whether it is affected by adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). This study aimed to explore the influence of ACEs and their subtypes on PPD. A systematic literature search was conducted using Web of Science, PubMed, Embase, Wan Fang, China Science and Technology Journal Database, Chinese Biomedical Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and literature was screened according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. Methodological quality assessment and data extraction were performed on the included studies. A random-effects model was used to pool the effects. In total, 24 studies were included, and 73 independent effects were extracted from them. The meta-analysis revealed that ACE was a risk factor for PPD (odds ratio [OR] = 2.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] [2.04, 2.63]). The subgroup analysis results showed that emotional abuse was the ACE subtype most strongly related to the occurrence of PPD (OR = 2.95, 95% CI [2.08, 4.20]), followed by emotional neglect (OR = 2.87, 95% CI [1.89, 4.36]) and sexual abuse (OR = 2.81, 95% CI [1.93, 4.09]). In addition, family member incarceration (OR = 2.62, 95% CI [1.51, 4.54]), physical abuse (OR = 2.31, 95% CI [1.67, 3.19]), and physical neglect (OR = 2.15, 95% CI [1.36, 3.39]) also have strong effects on PPD. ACE is a risk factor for PPD. Early screening of ACE plays an important role in the prevention and intervention of PPD.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-22T10:01:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241235639
       
  • Engaging Parents in Child-Focused Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Education
           Strategies: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Douglas Hugh Russell, Sebastian Trew, Lottie Harris, Jessica Dickson, Kerryann Walsh, Daryl John Higgins, Rhiannon Smith
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Parents are their children’s first teachers and there are long-standing calls for their involvement in child sexual abuse prevention. In this rapid systematic review, we asked the following questions: what rationales are used to justify parental involvement in child-focused child sexual abuse (CSA) prevention programs' what approaches are used for parental engagement in child-focused CSA prevention programs' and what are the facilitators and barriers to parental involvement in child-focused CSA prevention programs' We searched CINAHL, Cochrane, ERIC, Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus, and SocINDEX in May 2021. A total of 57 papers met our inclusion criteria, comprised of 50 empirical studies, and 7 program descriptions. Rationales for parental involvement included monitoring and shaping parental attitudes toward CSA program delivery in schools; reinforcing children’s learning at home; promoting parent–child communication about CSA prevention; building parent capacity to respond to child disclosures; and supporting program delivery for preschoolers. Types of parental involvement included the following: communication, learning at home, volunteering, decision-making, and collaboration with the community. Barriers to parent involvement included ineffective program engagement modalities, and parental fears and misconceptions.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-13T12:18:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241235895
       
  • Child Maltreatment, Adult Trauma, and Mental Health Symptoms Among Women
           Veterans: A Scoping Review of Published Quantitative Research

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      Authors: Candice Presseau, Jessica R. Carney, Nora K. Kline, Alyssa A. Grimshaw, Lauren DeMoss, Craig Gunderson, Galina A. Portnoy
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this scoping review was to describe and synthesize the measures, methods, and key findings of published quantitative research examining the influence of child maltreatment (i.e., abuse and/or neglect) and adult trauma exposure on mental health symptoms among women Veterans. A systematic search from database inception to June 2023 generated 18,861 unique articles retrieved and independently screened for eligibility. A total of 21 articles met pre-established inclusion criteria: (a) quantitative data and results within a sample or subsample of U.S. women veterans, (b) published in a peer-reviewed journal, and (c) examining variables of interest simultaneously (i.e., child maltreatment, adult trauma exposure, mental health symptom) in quantitative analyses. Reviewed literature showed a lack of uniformity in measurement and methodologies to evaluate women veterans’ lifetime trauma exposure in relation to mental health. Studies most frequently used self-report survey data to evaluate exposure to child maltreatment and/or adult trauma with convenience samples of women veterans (52.4%, n = 11) and examined depressive and/or posttraumatic stress symptomatology. Findings demonstrate the need for additional research attending to the interplay between child maltreatment and adult trauma exposures in relation to women veterans’ mental health using comprehensive assessment, longitudinal methods, and understudied as well as more representative samples.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-12T05:47:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241234345
       
  • Violence, Abuse and Neglect in Older Women in Rural and Remote Areas: A
           Scoping Review and Prevalence Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Adrián Jesús Ricoy-Cano, Carlos Vladimir Zambrano-Rodríguez, Yolanda María de la Fuente-Robles, Gabriela Estefanía Vásquez-Peña
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      This systematic review addressed the issue of the abuse and neglect of older women (age 60 and over) in rural and remote areas, examining these phenomena’s prevalence, risk and protective factors, consequences, and associated perceptions. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines and the Arksey and O’Malley methodological framework, peer-reviewed articles published until September 2023 were identified in six electronic databases. Out of the manuscripts initially identified (n = 219), 28 articles met the selection criteria. The study’s quality was assessed using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. The included studies provided a comprehensive overview of this phenomenon, encompassing data from 6,579 older rural women. Prevalence rates of abuse and neglect exhibited wide variability, with an average of 27.3%. Among the risk factors, financial dependence and incapacity stood out, while higher income and education levels were protective factors, among others. Emotional/psychological abuse emerged as the most common form, with significant impacts on older women’s physical and mental health. Cultural norms and gender expectations also influenced perceptions of abuse and victims’ coping mechanisms. In a context in which access to specialized resources and services is hampered by significant limitations, community awareness and education prove vital to address this issue, which positions social work as key to addressing these challenges. The prevalence of abuse against older rural women is significant. Emotional abuse stands out as a major issue, underscoring the need for comprehensive interventions accounting for cultural and gender factors.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-03-04T05:32:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241234342
       
  • Association of Childhood Emotional Maltreatment with Adolescents’
           Psychopathology: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Mohammad Hashim, Zainab Alimoradi, Amir Pakpour, Monique Pfaltz, Sameer Ansari, Resham Asif, Naved Iqbal
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Childhood Emotional Maltreatment (CEM) is a significant but under-studied risk factor for impaired mental health, with adolescents being particularly susceptible. This systematic review and meta-analysis, prospectively registered in PROSPERO as CRD42022383005, aims to synthesize the findings of studies investigating the association between CEM and adolescent psychopathology, making it the first attempt to the best of our knowledge. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses 2020 guidelines, a comprehensive search (PubMed, Scopus, PsycINFO, Science Direct, Embase, and ProQuest) yielded 12,224 studies, from which 72 were included in the qualitative synthesis. The meta-analysis was conducted on 76 effect sizes (ranging from 0.01 to 0.57) extracted from 56 studies. The assessment of publication bias utilized funnel plots, Egger’s regression test, and the trim and fill method, if required. Additionally, a predictor analysis investigated the influence of study-level variables on the CEM-psychopathology association. Results revealed a significant positive correlation between CEM and adolescent psychopathology (Pooled association: 0.24–0.41) Furthermore, assessment of publication bias indicated no significant bias. The predictor analysis suggested minimal influence of study-level variables. The study underscores the urgent need to address CEM as a crucial risk factor for adolescent psychopathology. The significant positive correlation between CEM and psychopathological outcomes highlights the detrimental effects of CEM on adolescents. Awareness, prevention efforts, and targeted interventions are essential to mitigate these effects. Further studies with culturally diverse and larger sample sizes are required, with emphasis on methodological rigor, given that most of the identified studies showed a high risk of bias.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T09:17:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241233538
       
  • Associations Between Trauma and Health Behaviors and Outcomes Among Sexual
           Minoritized Adults: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Vanessa L. Parker, Janet M. Liechty, Nicole P. Cantoni
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual minoritized (SM) adults experience health disparities and report higher rates of trauma history compared to heterosexual adults. This scoping review synthesizes the extant literature that investigates associations between trauma and physical health among SM adults. It also describes research instruments utilized to assess trauma in relation to health outcomes among SM adults. We searched CINAHL, LGBT+ Life, PsycINFO, and PubMed to identify studies meeting inclusion criteria: peer-reviewed, English, assessed trauma as an independent variable, and assessed health behaviors or outcomes among SM adults. From 587 nonduplicate articles, 69 full texts were reviewed; 18 met criteria and were included in this review. To enhance rigor, we utilized the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Scoping Reviews checklist. Most (n = 12) of the included studies were cross-sectional. Trauma was assessed 16 different ways, including 9 validated measures, in relation to 5 health behaviors and 17 health conditions. Trauma was operationalized by history of childhood sexual abuse, adverse childhood experiences, lifetime rape, current symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, and lifetime victimization among SM adults. All but one study found associations between trauma and one or more unfavorable health behaviors or outcomes. Studies used widely heterogeneous instruments to assess trauma, health, and SM identity. Greater specification and standardization of measurement is needed, along with contextualized assessments of trauma and its impact on health such as sexual minority stress-related victimization and resilience, and post-traumatic growth and recovery processes.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T09:14:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241233270
       
  • Measuring Healing and Recovery After Gender-Based Violence: A Scoping
           Review

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      Authors: Laura Sinko, Claire Dubois, Karen Birna Thorvaldsdottir
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Healing after gender-based violence (GBV) is multidimensional, with varying instruments used in the scientific literature to capture this phenomenon quantitively in survivor populations. The purpose of this scoping review was to (a) describe quantitative measures used to evaluate recovery after GBV, (b) compare these findings with domains uncovered in a qualitative metasynthesis about survivors’ perspectives about healing after GBV, and (c) summarize recovery relationships found. We searched Pubmed, PsycInfo, and Violence/Criminology/Family Studies s. Studies were included for review if they (a) used quantitative methods, (b) evaluated healing or recovery in survivors of GBV, (c) were available in English, and (d) were empirical articles in peer-reviewed journals. Two thousand nine hundred thirty-five articles were reviewed by title and abstract, and 92 articles were reviewed by full text. Twenty-six articles were included in this review. Eight studies used an alleviation of adverse symptomology as a proxy for recovery, eight used growth-related outcomes, and ten used a combination of both types of measures. While the quantitative instruments synthesized in this review seemed to map onto some of the recovery domains identified through qualitative metasynthesis, no study synthesized measured all domains simultaneously. Studies synthesized identified that recovery-related outcomes may be influenced by social support, symptom burden, disclosure, and various therapeutic intervention programs tested in the literature to date. Synthesizing research on recovery after GBV is an essential step to understand gaps in measurement and understanding. Streamlining and using holistic recovery outcome measurement can aid in the development of evidence-based interventions to promote healing in survivor populations.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-26T10:56:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241229745
       
  • Protective Factors Affecting Trauma Recovery Among Female South Asian
           Immigrant Intimate Partner Violence Survivors: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Farida Bibi Mughal, Denise Saint Arnault
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a pressing public health issue affecting women worldwide. Thirty percent of women experience some form of violence throughout their lifetime globally, and South Asian countries have a higher prevalence of IPV (33%–51%). Notably, IPV has detrimental psychological impacts not only on women but also on their children. Despite this, limited empirical attention has explored protective factors for IPV trauma recovery. This review examines protective factors aiding South Asian immigrant IPV survivors’ trauma recovery using Joanna Briggs Institute JBI methodology. The study draws on PubMed, Scopus, and PsychINFO data, resulting in 20 articles retrieved using Rayyan software. Protective factor’s themes and subthemes revealed in the literature operated at multiple levels, including personal, interpersonal, community, and professional factors. Personal factors were selfhood, collective self, and adaptation, as well as those that enabled the utilization of interpersonal, community, and professional factors; interpersonal factors were family and friends, children as motivators, and religion; and community and professional factors were resources and technology usage. Immigrant status and culture significantly impacted the protective factors, acting as barriers among some IPV survivors. Therefore, future research should focus on exploring the experiences and cultural values of South Asian immigrant women with other influencing factors that may hinder the development and impact of protective factors on IPV trauma recovery. These findings can help design culturally sensitive support services that incorporate the unique needs of female South Asian immigrant IPV survivors.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T07:20:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241231602
       
  • What are the Experiences of and Interventions for Adult Survivors of
           Childhood Sexual Abuse in South Asia' A Systematic Review and Narrative
           Synthesis

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      Authors: Shivangi Talwar, Carlos Osorio, Rajesh Sagar, Rebecca Appleton, Jo Billings
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) may experience emotional, social, and psychological difficulties, heightened due to the interpersonal nature of harm. Despite the demonstrated effectiveness of trauma-focused treatments in the West, a culturally specific understanding of the needs of and treatments for survivors in South Asia is still in its infancy. The study aimed to systematically review research findings on the mental health impacts of CSA on adult survivors and current treatment approaches and their efficacy and acceptability in South Asia. Seven databases (Scopus, Ovid, CINAHL, ProQuest, EThOS, Google Scholar, and Dogpile) and five peer-reviewed South Asian journals were searched from inception until March 30, 2023. Searches included participants who were adult survivors of CSA of South Asian origin residing in South Asia. Studies on their mental health, different treatments, and the efficacy and acceptability of these treatments were included. Quality assessment tools were used to appraise the quality of included studies. The results were synthesized narratively. A total of 3,362 records were retrieved, and 24 articles were included in the final review. Twenty studies reported mental health impacts of CSA on adult survivors, four studies reported current treatments offered, and two studies were on recovery. However, no study focused on the efficacy or acceptability of the treatments being delivered. Even though the needs of adult CSA survivors in South Asia have been partly identified, there is very little research into the treatments for them.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-22T12:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241231603
       
  • Effectiveness of Mental Health and Wellbeing Interventions for Children
           and Young People in Foster, Kinship, and Residential Care: Systematic
           Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Rob Trubey, Rhiannon Evans, Sarah McDonald, Jane Noyes, Mike Robling, Simone Willis, Maria Boffey, Charlotte Wooders, Soo Vinnicombe, G. J. Melendez-Torres
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      The mental health and wellbeing of children and young people who have been in care, primarily foster care, kinship care or residential care, remains a public health priority. The Care-experienced cHildren and young people’s Interventions to improve Mental health and wEll-being outcomes Systematic review (CHIMES) synthesized evidence for the effectiveness of interventions targeting: subjective wellbeing; mental, behavioral and neurodevelopmental disorders; and suicide-related outcomes. Searches were conducted in 16 bibliographic databases and 22 websites between 1990 and 2022. This was supplemented by citation tracking, screening of relevant systematic reviews, and expert recommendation. We identified 35 interventions, with 44 evaluations via randomized controlled trials. Through meta-analyses, we found that interventions have a small beneficial impact on a variety of mental health outcomes in the short term (0–6 months). Interventions improved total social, emotional, and behavioral problems (d = −0.15, 95% CI [−0.28, −0.02]), social-emotional functioning difficulties (d = −0.18, 95% CI [−0.31, −0.05]), externalizing problem behaviors (d = −0.30, 95% CI [−0.53, −0.08]), internalizing problem behaviors (d = −0.35, 95% CI [−0.61, −0.08]); and depression and anxiety (d = −0.26, 95% CI [−0.40, −0.13]). Interventions did not demonstrate any effectiveness for outcomes assessed in the longer term (>6 months). Certainty of effectiveness was limited by risk of bias and imprecision. There was limited available evidence for interventions targeting subjective wellbeing and suicide-related outcomes. Future intervention design and delivery must ensure that programs are sufficient to activate causal mechanisms and facilitate change. Evaluation research should use a robust methodology.PROSPERO Registration: CRD42020177478
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T10:09:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241227987
       
  • “All you Gain is Pain and Sorrow”: Facilitators and Barriers to the
           Prevention of Female Genital Mutilation in High-income Countries

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      Authors: Fatima Younas, Leslie Morrison Gutman
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a harmful practice that has long-lasting negative impacts on the physical and psychological health of victims. Deemed a global concern, this practice persists in high-income countries (HIC) among certain migrant communities. Given the deleterious effects of the practice, we conducted an updated systematic review of the facilitators and barriers associated with the prevention of FGM in HIC.Method:A systematic review of published qualitative studies of FGM in HIC was conducted from 2012 to 2022. The search resulted in 276 studies. Of these, the majority were from low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) and excluded. A total of 14 studies were deemed fit for inclusion and none were excluded during quality appraisal. Relevant data were extracted from the studies and thematically analyzed to identify prevalent themes.Results:A total of 12 themes were identified and the majority reflected barriers to the prevention of FGM including beliefs about female virtue, beliefs about social sanctions, and the preservation of culture, among others. Facilitators to the prevention of FGM were fewer and included memory and trauma from experiencing FGM, knowledge and awareness of the female anatomy, and legislative protection from FGM due to migration. A few themes, such as religious beliefs, acted as both facilitators and barriers.Conclusion:Findings highlight the importance of shared cultural and social threads among FGM practicing communities in HIC. Interventions can use these findings to guide the development of sociocultural strategies centered on community-level prevention and reduction of FGM in HIC.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T09:59:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241229744
       
  • Health and Wellness Outcomes of Intimate Partner Violence Support Workers:
           A Narrative Review

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      Authors: Tara Lundy, Joanne Crawford
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Workers who support survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) witness some of the most traumatic acts of violence in their everyday work life. These experiences may cause distress that has implications for health and their ability to cope. This narrative literature review sought to explore what is known about the health, wellness, and coping strategies of IPV workers in diverse settings. A comprehensive academic literature search of five databases for peer-reviewed journal articles, available in English, published between January 2000 and October 2023 was conducted. A total of 34 articles on workers’ experiences in relation to health, wellness, and coping strategies were included in the review. Thematic analysis generated the following themes: (a) diversity of IPV workplace settings and roles; (b) meaningful aspects of IPV support work including purpose and fulfillment, compassion satisfaction, rewarding and valuable work; (c) adverse experiences such as psychological distress and physiological discomfort, interpersonal social challenges, environment and organizational challenges, burnout, compassion fatigue and secondary trauma; and (d) coping strategies that considered coping behaviors and self-care, workplace support and accommodation, and meaningful sacrifice and adaptation. While the review provided important insights regarding the meaningful aspects of IPV support work and coping strategies, the adverse experiences of supporting survivors significantly dominated the literature. Unfortunately, the majority of studies did not clarify the context of workplaces, and this represents a gap in understanding workers’ experiences. Future research is needed to understand context-related experiences of IPV support workers in relation to health and coping. The current review provides unique insights on diverse IPV support work settings and roles, work-related issues that may influence workers’ wellness, and rewarding aspects of IPV support work.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T06:43:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241231604
       
  • The Intersection of Human Trafficking and Natural Disasters: A Scoping
           Review

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      Authors: Katherine Hoogesteyn, Leanne McCallum Desselle, Kelle Barrick, Rebecca Pfeffer, Lauren Vollinger
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Natural disasters have increased in frequency and severity in recent years. Emerging research also suggests that natural disasters increase the risk of human trafficking. This confluence of phenomena makes it critically important to better prepare communities for preventing and responding to human trafficking during and after a natural disaster. Yet, there is no available synthesis of the extant research to inform these preparations. The present scoping review aims to fill this gap by outlining the existing literature on the nexus of disasters and human trafficking. The review follows the Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis—Scoping Review guidelines. Sources were identified through manual reference checking and in four databases: PubMed, Web of Science, APA PsychINFO, and EBSCO Discovery Service. In total, 46 sources met the inclusion criteria, that is, they focused on the nexus between human trafficking and natural disasters, demonstrated scientific rigor, and were published after 2000 and in English. Overall, the reviewed literature provided initial evidence on the association between natural disasters occurrences and increases in national and transnational human trafficking activity, understanding of the compounding vulnerabilities conducive to trafficking following disasters, and recommendations for the prevention and response to human trafficking in the wake of disasters. Future studies should evaluate prevention initiatives, including awareness campaigns and interventions that mitigate trafficking vulnerabilities. In practice, it is crucial to integrate anti-trafficking efforts into disaster relief protocols, empower vulnerable populations, and advocate for enhanced legal protections for displaced and migrant individuals.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T08:12:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241227985
       
  • The Effect of Peer Victimization During Adolescence on Depression and
           Gender Differences: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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      Authors: Qianqian Song, Tongshuang Yuan, Yueyang Hu, Xiaoying Liu, Junsong Fei, Xixi Zhao, Ren Gao, Jingyi Yue, Songli Mei
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Peer victimization during adolescence has a detrimental impact on the mental health of victims throughout their lives. However, it remains unclear whether these effects are gender-specific. The present study conducted a systematic review to examine the effects of peer victimization on depression status, explore potential sources of heterogeneity, and investigate gender differences in these effects. We systematically searched four electronic databases (Web of Science, PubMed, Embase, and CNKI) for relevant articles that published as far as July 2022. We then extracted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to assess the association between peer victimization during adolescence and depression, and potential gender differences in the relation. Meta-analysis was performed, using fixed effects models and random effects models, to evaluate the association between each exposure and the outcome. A meta-analysis of 27 studies revealed that peer victimization during adolescence was significantly associated with higher risks of depression (OR = 2.79, 95% CI [2.43, 3.21], p 
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T07:27:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241227538
       
  • Adolescents’ Experiences of Cyber-Dating Abuse and the Pattern of Abuse
           Through Technology, A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Rojan Afrouz, Sevi Vassos
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      While the proliferation of online social platforms has become a significant part of virtual interactions between intimate partners, digital technology has also created the conditions for increased control and abuse, which is known as “cyber-dating abuse,” a technology-facilitated form of intimate partner violence. This paper reports a scoping review of qualitative studies to explore the patterns, nature, and consequences of cyber-dating abuse among young people and how digital technology influences dating abuse. Several databases were searched to find relevant papers, including EBSCOhost, Scopus, SocINDEX, ProQuest, Taylor and Francis Online, PubMed, and Google Scholar. All peer-reviewed papers that used qualitative and mixed methods exploring cyber-dating abuse since 2010 were scanned, and 23 papers were included in this scoping review. Thematic analysis was employed to analyze the data. Findings showed that online platforms and digital technology have potentially exacerbated the monitoring, control, and surveillance of young women, often by young men. This scoping review also found a mixed report of gender-based victimization in relation to cyber-dating abuse; however, girls were more likely to face severe and negative consequences compared to boys. Gender-based societal norms and associated behavioral and social factors may increase the risk of cyber-dating abuse among young women. The scoping review reinforces the importance and value of preventative and early identification strategies in young people’s school-based education, with a sharp focus on violence and abuse in the online space, respectful relationships, and informed consent in intimate relationships.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T10:27:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241227457
       
  • Group-Related Variables in Intervention Programs for Intimate Partner
           Violence Perpetrators: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Manuel Roldán-Pardo, Marisol Lila, Faraj A. Santirso, Enrique Gracia
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Intervention programs for male intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators mostly use the group intervention modality. Notwithstanding, the literature has neglected the study of group-related variables and their possible association with these interventions’ functioning and outcomes. This systematic review aimed to analyze group-related variables, their predictors, and their relation to the functioning and outcomes of intervention programs for IPV perpetrators. The systematic review was conducted according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. The following databases were searched from inception to November 2022: Web of Science, Scopus, PUBMED, and PsycINFO. Of the 5,941 identified studies, 13 were included in the review. The main predictors of group-related variables were: intervention stage, motivational strategies, and leadership (counseling approach). The group-related variables as predictors of intervention outcomes were: group management behaviors and support (facilitator behavior within the group); positive confrontation, protherapeutic behavior, active involvement, positive interaction with peers, and positive interaction with the facilitator (participant behavior within the group); and group cohesion and group climate (group dynamics). Group cohesion and participants’ protherapeutic behavior stood out for their association with positive treatment outcomes (i.e., greater participation and working alliance, lower rates of violent behavior during follow-up). The findings from this review suggest that group processes are key factors in intervention programs for IPV perpetrators, and a better understanding of how these group processes are shaped, and how they can contribute to positive program outcomes, provides a new approach and insights to improve their effectiveness.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T10:21:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241226655
       
  • Intervention Program Dropout Among Perpetrators of Intimate Partner
           Violence: A Meta-Analysis of Correlated Variables

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      Authors: Olga Cunha, Jéssica Pedrosa, Bárbara Silva Pereira, Sónia Caridade, Andreia de Castro Rodrigues, Teresa Braga
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Dropout in perpetrator intervention programs (PIPs) is extensively documented in the literature, yet findings across various studies exhibit global inconsistency. This meta-analysis aimed to identify dropout rates among individuals attending PIPs and examine sociodemographic, violence-related, intrapersonal, interpersonal, and external variables related to dropout. A search was conducted across six databases, encompassing studies published between 2010 and 2022 in English, Spanish, or Portuguese. Thirty manuscripts, comprising data from 31 independent samples, were included. Dropout rates varied from 9% to 67%. Bivariate analysis results indicated that younger age (OR = 0.69), non-White ethnicity (OR = 1.54), unemployment (OR = 1.78), offender typology other than family only (OR = 2.45), substance abuse (OR = 1.78), presenting a personality disorder (OR = 1.21), engaging in problematic leisure activities (OR = 1.28), possessing a greater criminal history (OR = 1.47), and experiencing more adversity in childhood (OR = 1.44) were significantly correlated with dropout. Additionally, the inclusion of motivational strategies in treatment (OR = 0.44) significantly decreased the likelihood of dropout. Results from multivariate analyses revealed that younger age (OR = 0.63), presenting a personality disorder (OR = 1.73), and experiencing more adversity in childhood (OR = 2.16) were significantly associated with dropout. Notably, intimate partner violence characteristics established a significant negative relation with dropout (OR = 0.59). Findings indicate that variables associated with dropout align with those related to general and intimate partner violence recidivism, suggesting that individuals requiring more intensive intervention are those who derive less benefit from it.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T10:14:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380231224036
       
  • Operationalizing Street Harassment Using Survey Instruments: A Systematic
           Review of Measuring Harassment in Public Spaces Using Surveys

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      Authors: Chloe Keel, Rebecca Stewart, Jacques Mellberg
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Quantitative research has an omitted variable problem when it comes to measuring and modeling non-criminal threats in the urban environment. This systematic review identified questionnaires and surveys used to measure incidences of street harassment/harassment in public, to discuss how they operationalize street harassment/harassment in public, and to report the characteristics of those with the best evidence of reliability and validity. We searched five databases and included peer-reviewed articles published in English from 1994 to 2022 that measured street harassment using a survey instrument. Our search resulted in 54 included studies. Of these studies, 16 primarily focused on understanding street harassment. To design effective prevention strategies in response to street harassment, research must first effectively measure the prevalence of street harassment and the contexts in which street harassment occurs. Due to the inconsistencies in definition, our review identified prevalence rates were inconsistent. Incidents of street harassment provide a promising avenue for future research, although scholars must first seek to appropriately operationalize this concept in survey research. We provide suggestions for future research that seeks to use surveys to understand harassment in public places.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T06:10:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380231219258
       
  • Effectiveness of Community-Based Programs on Aggressive Behavior Among
           Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Shan Jiang, Yinglin Chen, Lin Wang
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescent aggressive behavior has increasingly become a central issue affecting the safety of both school campuses and the broader society. Despite the existence of numerous community interventions targeting this issue, there has been a paucity of efforts to consolidate the findings on the effectiveness of community-based programs in preventing aggressive behavior. This meta-analysis sought to address this gap by reviewing and assessing the impact of community-based initiatives on reducing adolescent aggression. A thorough search was carried out on 12 electronic databases: EBSCO, ERIC, PubMed, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, the China National Knowledge, Wanfang Databases, and China Science and Technology Journal Database. Sixteen studies were finalized, and meta-analyses were performed using a random effect model on RevMan v5.4 software developed by Cochrane. The analysis encompassed 16 published studies, involving a total of 2,585 participants. The key components of existing programs for aggression reduction included providing behavioral skills and training for adolescents, employing a problem-solving approach to address behavioral issues, offering psychological treatment, and emphasizing community supervision. The results indicate a significant positive effect of community-based interventions on aggression reduction (standardized mean difference = −0.26, 95% confidence intervals [−0.39, −0.13], Z = 3.84, p 
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T11:56:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241227986
       
  • A Systematic Review of Conceptualizations and Operationalizations of Youth
           Polyvictimization

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      Authors: Spenser R. Radtke, Christopher J. Wretman, Cynthia Fraga Rizo, Hannabeth Franchino-Olsen, Denise Yookong Williams, Wan-Ting Chen, Rebecca J. Macy
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Violence against youth is a global issue impacting millions each year. Increasingly, research has focused on studying those impacted by multiple forms of violence, or polyvictims. Evidence strongly suggests that polyvictimized youth tend to have worse physical and mental health outcomes than those who have experienced single forms of violence. Moreover, minoritized youth (i.e., racial and/or sexual minority youth, youth with disabilities) are more likely to experience polyvictimization, making this a social justice and equity concern. To date, there is no universal consensus on what exactly constitutes polyvictimization. This systematic review aims to examine the ways in which polyvictimization is being studied to inform both research and practice. As such, relevant databases were searched to amass the extant literature related to youth polyvictimization internationally. Empirical studies published since 2006 that focused on youth (under age 18) polyvictimization were included. After the review process, 264 studies met eligibility criteria, however 55 studies employed person-centered/finite mixture analyses and were removed for a separate review, resulting in 209 featured in the current systematic review. Results demonstrate that researchers are defining and operationalizing polyvictimization in different ways: (a) using individual victimization event counts; (b) employing domain-based counts; and (c) taking a “highest-victimized” percentage of their sample. The most used measurement tool was the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire, though other validated tools and researcher-constructed questions were frequently utilized. Research on polyvictimization is burgeoning worldwide; however, this research is being conducted in disparate ways, making it difficult to compare findings and further advance the field.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T08:44:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380231224026
       
  • Domestic Violence Against Women in Nepal: A Systematic Review of Risk
           Factors

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      Authors: Bindu Devkota Sapkota, Padam Simkhada, Dillon Newton, Sara Parker
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      A systematic review was conducted to examine the factors that put women at risk of domestic violence in Nepal. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA), PubMed, Cochrane, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and PsycINFO were searched supplemented by searching of the reference list manually. Of the 143 studies identified 24 were included in the final review. Search strategy was developed, and studies were included if they considered female participants (age 15–49 years) in heterosexual relationship, with exposure of different factors and whose outcomes were the magnitude of any form of violence (physical, sexual, and emotional/psychological). The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool was used to assess the quality of the studies included. The findings are categorized based on the four levels of the ecological framework. At the individual level, the alcohol consumption level of husband, education level of both women and men, women’s age at the time of marriage and childhood exposure to violence were found to be highly prevalent risk factors. At the relationship level, most prevalent risk factors were controlling husband and decision-making capacity of women. At the community level, belonging to underprivileged community or low caste system and living in Terai region were the risk factors. At the societal level, patriarchal belief and norms supporting violence were the risk factors. The complex nature of violence against women in Nepal requires culturally sensitive interventions along with organized efforts from the local and intra government to improve the status of Nepalese women at all levels of the ecological framework.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T08:38:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380231222230
       
  • Effectiveness of Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for Maltreated
           Families: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

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      Authors: Huiping Zhang, Weiwei Wang, Zihui Li
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      This meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) for maltreated families and examined potential moderators associated with the intervention. Seven English electronic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, MEDLINE, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global) were systematically searched to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published before January 20, 2023. Eleven studies involving 1,069 maltreated or high-risk families were included in the meta-analysis. Our results showed that PCIT significantly reduced child externalizing behaviors, improved parenting skills, and decreased parenting stress and child abuse potential in maltreated families. Additionally, families with confirmed maltreatment history reported larger effect sizes across all outcomes than those at high risk of maltreatment; parenting skills outcomes were more effective in adapted PCIT versions, using per-protocol analysis, and American caregivers, whereas none of the outcomes were related to the number of sessions. These findings provide encouraging evidence for the use of PCIT as an intervention for families with a history of maltreatment, although more high-quality RCTs are required to confirm its effects.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T08:32:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380231222041
       
  • Mediators of Outcome in Trauma-Focused Psychotherapy with Youth: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Sonja Protić, Lutz Wittmann, Svenja Taubner, Sonia Conejo-Cerón, Yianna Ioannou, Erkki Heinonen, Andrea Saliba, Patricia Moreno-Peral, Jana Volkert, Rasa Barkauskiene, Stefanie Julia Schmidt, Margarida Isabel Rangel Santos Henriques, Catarina Pinheiro Mota, Célia M.D. Sales, Jan Ivar Røssberg, Asta Adler, Dina Di Giacomo, Filipa Mucha Vieira, Nikola Drndarević, Randi Ulberg, Tjasa Stepisnik Perdih, Jose M. Mestre
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      This article aimed to provide a systematic narrative synthesis of existing studies on the mediators of change in psychotherapy with adolescents (10–19 years) and transition age youth (TAY) (20–29 years) who have experienced trauma-related symptoms or posttraumatic disorder. Additionally, we were interested in identifying psychotherapy-, trauma type-, and clients’ age- and gender-specific mediators of treatment outcome. Following the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses, a total of 3,723 studies published in PubMed and PsycINFO databases were screened against inclusion criteria, revealing 15 eligible studies. No studies with only TAY were found; therefore, all results were limited to therapy with adolescents. Cognitive mediators were tested in 66% of selected studies, followed by parents/family-related, mental-health-related, therapy-related, and behavioral mediators. Moderate evidence was found for posttraumatic cognitions, whereas therapeutic alliance seemed to be a promising candidate for future research. Striking absence of non-cognitive-behavioral therapy interventions, emotional and adolescent-specific mediators, as well as studies with males and in non-Western societies was evident. Future original studies would benefit from applying methodological rigor in respect to mediation testing.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T02:19:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380231223264
       
  • The Effectiveness and Implementation of Psychological First Aid as a
           Therapeutic Intervention After Trauma: An Integrative Review

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      Authors: Ling Wang, Ian Norman, Victoria Edleston, Christopher Oyo, Mary Leamy
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Psychological First Aid (PFA) is known to be an initial early intervention following traumatic exposure, yet little is known about its optimal implementation and effectiveness. This review aims to examine the evidence for the effectiveness of PFA interventions and how PFA interventions have been designed, implemented, and experienced. MEDLINE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Cochrane Library, PsychINFO, Embase, Web of Science, PILOTS, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (in Chinese) databases were searched. Twenty studies from 4,735 records were included and quality rated, followed by an integrative synthesis of quantitative and qualitative evidence. PFA intervention following trauma exposure shows a positive effect for reducing anxiety and facilitating adaptive functioning in the immediate and intermediate term, yet the evidence for reducing Post-traumatic stress disorder/depressive symptoms is less compelling. Furthermore, commonalities in the components and techniques across different PFA approaches identified tend to align with four of Hobfoll’s five essential elements: safety, calm, efficacy, and connectedness (as reflected among 7/11 PFA protocols), whereas the “hope” element was less developed. These commonalities include active listening, relaxation/stabilization, problem-solving/practical assistance, and social connection/referral. Intensive techniques such as cognitive reconstruction have also been incorporated, intensifying PFA delivery. The substantial variation observed in PFA format, timing, and duration, coupled with inadequate documentation of fidelity of implementation and adaptation, further constrains the ability to inform best practices for PFA. This is concerning for lay frontline providers, vital in early trauma response, who report implementation challenges despite valuing PFA as a time-sensitive, supportive, and practical approach.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T02:15:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380231221492
       
  • Interprofessional Education in Child Protection for Preservice Health and
           Allied Health Professionals: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Lauren Elizabeth Lines, Tracy Alexis Kakyo, Helen McLaren, Megan Cooper, Nina Sivertsen, Alison Hutton, Lana Zannettino, Rebecca Starrs, Donna Hartz, Shannon Brown, Julian Grant
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Health and allied health professionals are uniquely positioned to collaborate in prevention, early intervention and responses to child maltreatment. Effective collaboration requires comprehensive interprofessional education (IPE), and inadequate collaboration across sectors and professions continually contributes to poor outcomes for children. Little is known about what interprofessional preparation health and allied health professionals receive before initial qualification (preservice) that equips them for interprofessional collaboration and provision of culturally safe care in child protection. This scoping review aimed to identify what is known internationally about IPE in child protection for preservice health and allied health professionals. Thirteen manuscripts reporting 12 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the synthesis. Key characteristics of the educational interventions are presented, including target disciplines, core content and their learning objectives and activities. Findings demonstrated primarily low-quality methodologies and educational interventions that had not been replicated beyond their initial context. Many educational interventions did not provide comprehensive content covering the spectrum of prevention, early intervention and responses for all types of child maltreatment, and/or did not clearly indicate how IPE was achieved. Key challenges to delivering comprehensive interprofessional child protection include lack of institutional support and competing priorities across disciplines who must meet requirements of separate regulatory bodies. Consequently, there is a need for further development and robust evaluation of educational interventions to explore how interprofessional collaborative skills for child protection can be developed and delivered in preservice health and allied health professional education.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T02:11:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380231221279
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence Against Women Before, During, and After
           Pregnancy: A Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Xiao-Yan Chen, Camilla Kin Ming Lo, Qiqi Chen, Shuling Gao, Frederick K. Ho, Douglas Austin Brownridge, Wing Cheong Leung, Patrick Ip, Ko Ling Chan
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Intimate partner violence (IPV) against pregnant women negatively impacts women’s and infants’ health. Yet inconsistent results have been found regarding whether pregnancy increases or decreases the risk of IPV. To answer this question, we systematically searched for studies that provided data on IPV against women before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and after childbirth. Nineteen studies met our selection criteria. We meta-analyzed the nineteen studies for the pooled prevalence of IPV across the three periods and examined study characteristics that moderate the prevalence. Results showed the pooled prevalence estimates of IPV were 21.2% before pregnancy, 12.8% during pregnancy and 14.7% after childbirth. Although these findings suggest a reduction in IPV during pregnancy, our closer evaluation of the prevalence of IPV after childbirth revealed that the reduction does not appear to persist. The prevalence of IPV increased from 12.8% within the first year after childbirth to 24.0% beyond the first year. Taken together, we should not assume pregnancy protects women from IPV, as IPV tends to persist across a longer-term period. Future studies are needed to investigate if IPV transits into other less obvious types of violence during pregnancy. Moderator analyses showed the prevalence estimates significantly varied across countries by income levels and regions.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T11:07:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241226631
       
  • Outcomes Associated with Adolescent Dating and Sexual Violence
           Victimization: A Systematic Review of School-Based Literature

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      Authors: Ashley B. Woolweaver, Nadin Abu Khalaf, Dorothy L. Espelage, Ziyi Zhou, Roslyn Reynoso Marmolejos, Mary Calnan, Rachel Mirsen
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Dating and sexual violence (DSV) is a common occurrence among school aged youth and has been associated with numerous harmful long-term outcomes. The goal of this article is to better understand the range of outcomes associated with DSV during youth and adolescence. This systematic review consists of 28 school-based studies from 20 journals discussing outcomes of youth experiences of DSV. Results demonstrate significant associations between DSV victimization and mental health symptoms, substance use, sexual health, academic, and social outcomes. To better understand this issue, this article recommends that schools offer additional training for staff on recognizing DSV. Additionally, improved research is needed in this area including surveys that are inclusive of diverse student identities and include more comprehensive measures of DSV, and additional research on DSV explicitly focused on minoritized groups.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T11:00:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241226618
       
  • When Institutions Harm Those Who Depend on Them: A Scoping Review of
           Institutional Betrayal

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      Authors: Maria-Ernestina Christl, Kim-Chi Tran Pham, Adi Rosenthal, Anne P. DePrince
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      The term institutional betrayal (Smith and Freyd, 2014) builds on the conceptual framework of betrayal trauma theory (see Freyd, 1996) to describe the ways that institutions (e.g., universities, workplaces) fail to take appropriate steps to prevent and/or respond appropriately to interpersonal trauma. A nascent literature has begun to describe individual costs associated with institutional betrayal throughout the United States (U.S.), with implications for public policy and institutional practice. A scoping review was conducted to quantify existing study characteristics and key findings to guide research and practice going forward. Multiple academic databases were searched for keywords (i.e., “institutional betrayal” and “organizational betrayal”). Thirty-seven articles met inclusion criteria (i.e., peer-reviewed empirical studies of institutional betrayal) and were included in analyses. Results identified research approaches, populations and settings, and predictor and outcome variables frequently studied in relation to institutional betrayal. This scoping review describes a strong foundation of published studies and provides recommendations for future research, including longitudinal research with diverse individuals across diverse institutional settings. The growing evidence for action has broad implications for research-informed policy and institutional practice.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T06:42:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380241226627
       
  • Empowering Young People with Special Educational Needs to Recognize and
           Report Child Sexual Exploitation and Abuse: A Mixed-Methods Review

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      Authors: Laura E. McMinn, Juliane A. Kloess, Zoe Stephenson
      Abstract: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, Ahead of Print.
      Young people with special educational needs (SEN), such as intellectual disability and/or autism, are particularly vulnerable to child sexual exploitation and abuse (CSEA). This mixed-methods systematic literature review consolidates findings in respect to how young people with SEN are currently being taught about CSEA in the UK, incorporating empirical and practice-based findings to counteract publication bias. Key databases were searched, and relevant organizations were contacted regarding studies published between 2015 and 2022 (inclusive). Thirteen articles met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 10 adopted a qualitative methodology, and three a mixed-methods approach. The thematic synthesis of the qualitative studies identified the following themes: (a) beliefs and stereotypes about CSEA, vulnerability. and risk have led to young people with SEN being misinformed and misunderstood, and (b) anxiety about the topic of sex and abuse creates polarized views regarding CSEA education in adult guardians of young people with SEN. Themes are discussed in the context of societal biases in respect to vulnerability and risk, and these biases are considered to have a negative effect on how young people with SEN are supported. The findings of this review encourage providers of CSEA awareness education to be mindful of not endorsing harmful stereotypes, and to involve parent–carers as much as possible. This review additionally encourages services and organizations to increase focus on practitioner reflexivity and regular training to counteract potential biases in respect to gender, vulnerability, and risk.
      Citation: Trauma, Violence, & Abuse
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T10:30:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248380231217047
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lamella     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Evolution, Mind and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediation Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Family Trauma, Child Custody & Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Creativity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Psychosocial Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Play in Adulthood     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychology and Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Performance and Mindfulness     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School & Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jungian Journal for Scholarly Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
KULA : knowldge creation, dissemination, and preservation studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Service Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
JCPP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Know and Share Psychology     Open Access  
Methods in Psychology     Open Access  
Gadjah Mada Journal of Professional Psychology     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Katharsis     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
Human Arenas : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Psychology, Culture, and Meaning     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cognitive Enhancement     Hybrid Journal  
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Dhammathas Academic Journal     Open Access  
INSAN Jurnal Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Heroism Science     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Psychology     Open Access  
Gogoa     Open Access  
Journal of Global Engagement and Transformation     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Journal of Cognitive Systems     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi Terapan     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Jurnal Educatio : Jurnal Pendidikan Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal  
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Musiktherapeutische Umschau : Forschung und Praxis der Musiktherapie     Hybrid Journal  

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