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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lamella     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Evolution, Mind and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediation Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Family Trauma, Child Custody & Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Creativity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Psychosocial Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Play in Adulthood     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychology and Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Performance and Mindfulness     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School & Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jungian Journal for Scholarly Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
KULA : knowldge creation, dissemination, and preservation studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Service Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
JCPP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Know and Share Psychology     Open Access  
Methods in Psychology     Open Access  
Gadjah Mada Journal of Professional Psychology     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Katharsis     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
Human Arenas : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Psychology, Culture, and Meaning     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cognitive Enhancement     Hybrid Journal  
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Dhammathas Academic Journal     Open Access  
INSAN Jurnal Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Heroism Science     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Psychology     Open Access  
Gogoa     Open Access  
Journal of Global Engagement and Transformation     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Journal of Cognitive Systems     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi Terapan     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Jurnal Educatio : Jurnal Pendidikan Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal  
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Musiktherapeutische Umschau : Forschung und Praxis der Musiktherapie     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Assessment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.519
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1073-1911 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3489
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Dimensions of Depressive Symptoms in Young Children: Factor Analysis of
           the Preschool Feelings Checklist–Scale

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicolas L. Camacho, Carina H. Fowler, Michael S. Gaffrey
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The current study is an investigation of the dimensionality of the Preschool Feelings Checklist–Scale (PFC-S), a caregiver-report questionnaire of early childhood depressive symptom severity. Caregivers of 450 young children, ages 3–8 years (M = 5.62, SD = 0.95; 49% female; 7% Hispanic; 66% White), completed the PFC-S and questionnaires on child emotion regulation and expression and self-reported depressive symptomatology. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that a one-factor structure did not adequately fit the current PFC-S data. Using exploratory factor analysis, a three-factor structure emerged as interpretable and structurally sound, yielding reliable factors related to social and behavioral anhedonia, emotional and behavioral dysregulation, and excessive guilt and sadness. This factor structure showed configural and scalar invariance across preschool-aged and early middle childhood–aged children as well as children assigned male and female sex at birth. Correlations between the three factors and constructs related to depression suggested preliminary construct validity. The current study provides initial evidence for a multidimensional structure of the PFC-S and improves our understanding of early childhood depressive symptoms.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-06-15T06:21:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241256443
       
  • Measuring Children’s Reward and Punishment Sensitivity: An Initial
           Psychometric Evaluation of the Contingency Response Rating Scale

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daniel A. Waschbusch, Vanessa T. Cao, Delshad M. Shroff, Pevitr S. Bansal, Michael T. Willoughby
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Existing research shows that children’s responses to rewards and punishments are essential for understanding attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and callous-unemotional traits. The present study developed the Contingency Response Rating Scale (CRRS) to fulfill the need for a reliable and valid measure of children’s contingency response style that is brief, easy to use in applied settings, and provides additional information to existing clinical measures. We examined the psychometric properties of the CRRS in a sample of 196 children (ages 5–12), most of whom were referred to evaluate attention and behavior problems in an outpatient clinic. Using principal axis factoring, we identified five factors: (a) punishment ineffectiveness, (b) reward ineffectiveness, (c) punishment dysregulation, (d) reward dysregulation, and (e) contingency insensitivity. The subscales based on these factors showed acceptable test–retest and internal consistency reliability, and scale intercorrelations varied from low to moderate. The subscales also captured significant variance not explained by child or parent demographics and were associated with measures of psychopathology and impairment. The results provide preliminary evidence that the CRRS may be a helpful tool for assessing reward and punishment sensitivity in children with attention and behavior problems.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-06-13T11:55:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241256536
       
  • Though Forced, Still Valid: Examining the Psychometric Performance of
           Forced-Choice Measurement of Personality in Children and Adolescents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mengtong Li, Bo Zhang, Yi Mou
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Unveiling the roles personality plays during childhood and adolescence necessitates its accurate measurement, commonly using traditional Likert-type (LK) scales. However, this format is susceptible to various response biases, which can be particularly prevalent in children and adolescents, thus likely undermining measurement accuracy. Forced-choice (FC) scales appear to be a promising alternative because they are largely free from these biases by design. However, some argue that the FC format may not perform satisfactorily in children and adolescents due to its complexity. Little empirical evidence exists regarding the suitability of the FC format for children and adolescents. As such, the current study examined the psychometric performance of an FC measure of the Big Five personality factors in three children and adolescent samples: 5th to 6th graders (N = 428), 7th to 8th graders (N = 449), and 10th to 11th graders (N = 555). Across the three age groups, the FC scale demonstrated a better fit to the Big Five model and better discriminant validity in comparison to the LK counterpart. Personality scores from the FC scale also converged well with those from the LK scale and demonstrated high reliability as well as sizable criterion-related validity. Furthermore, the FC scale had more invariant statements than its LK counterpart across age groups. Overall, we found good evidence showing that FC measurement of personality is suitable for children and adolescents.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-06-13T06:07:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241255841
       
  • Further Validation of the Persecutory Ideation Questionnaire in the
           Italian Context: Results From Classical and Modern Test Theory

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      Authors: Daiana Colledani, Paola Boragno, Elena Maria Fiabane, Ilaria Setti, Paola Gabanelli
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Persecutory Ideation Questionnaire (PIQ) is a valuable instrument to measure persecutory ideation. The aim of this study is to validate the scale in the Italian context and to extend the study of its psychometric properties using approaches from both classical and modern test theories. The results of the study, involving 700 individuals, confirmed the one-factor structure and the good validity and reliability of the scale. Full metric invariance and partial scalar and strict invariance were also supported across gender, age, and education level groups. Rasch analysis indicated that the 5-point response scale is well-functioning and that the PIQ is most appropriate to measure high levels of persecutory ideation. The results contribute to a better understanding of the measurement properties of the PIQ. The paper discusses the advantages and contributions of each method used to explore the measurement properties of the scale.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-06-11T08:04:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241257012
       
  • Assessing Social, Emotional, and Behavioral Skills in Just a Few Minutes:
           96-, 45-, and 20-Item Short Forms of the BESSI

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      Authors: Madison N. Sewell, Hee J. Yoon, Clemens M. Lechner, Christopher M. Napolitano, Beatrice Rammstedt, Brent W. Roberts, Christopher J. Soto
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) skills matter for individuals’ well-being and success. The behavioral, emotional, and social skills inventory (BESSI) uses 192 items to assess 32 specific SEB skills across five broad skill domains. This research developed three short forms of the BESSI-192 and explored their measurement properties, predictive validity, and cross-cultural comparability. We found that BESSI-96, BESSI-45, and BESSI-20 largely captured the psychological content of the BESSI-192 measure, retained a robust multidimensional structure, and demonstrated adequate reliability. At the domain and facet level, the BESSI short forms showed patterns of associations with external criteria that were similar to the BESSI-192 and preserved most of the BESSI-192’s predictive power. The BESSI short forms also demonstrated full or partial measurement invariance between the primarily U.S.-based and German adult samples. We conclude by discussing contexts in which the short forms may be useful for researchers and practitioners.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-06-07T06:06:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241256434
       
  • Development and Validation of the Five-Factor Borderline Inventory–Super
           Short Form and Screener

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      Authors: Hilary L. DeShong, Courtney K. Mason, Ben Porter, Kren Kelley, Stephanie N. Mullins-Sweatt, Donald R. Lynam, Joshua D. Miller, Thomas Widiger
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Five-Factor Borderline Inventory (FFBI) and FFBI-Short Form (FFBI-SF) are 120-item and 48-item measures that assess the underlying maladaptive personality traits of borderline personality disorder (BPD). The purpose of this study was to develop a super short form (FFBI-SSF) and an FFBI-Screener to facilitate the use of dimensional trait measures for BPD. Using item response theory analyses, the 48-item measure was reduced to 22 items using a large undergraduate sample (N = 1300) and then retested using a Mechanical Turk sample (N = 602), demonstrating strong replicability. IRT was again used to further reduce the measure from 22 items to four items to provide a brief screening tool. Correlations of the FFBI-SSF and Screener with measures of BPD-related variables were compared across five samples (N = 919, 204, 580, 281, and 488). Overall, the FFBI-SSF showed similar relations to the FFBI-SF at the full scale and domain-level scales, while the FFBI-screener demonstrated similar relations at the full scale level. This super short form and screener may best be used in large-scale research studies or as part of a screening tool in clinical settings.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-06-06T09:19:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241256439
       
  • Testing the Impact of Variations in Administration on the Kessler
           Psychological Distress Scale (K10)

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      Authors: Miranda R. Chilver, Richard A. Burns, Ferdi Botha, Peter Butterworth
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Self-report measures are useful in psychological research and practice, but scores may be impacted by administration methods. This study investigated whether changing the recall period (from 30 to 7 days) and response option order (from ascending to descending) alters the score distribution of the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). Participants were presented with the K10 with either different recall periods or different response option orders. There was weak evidence of lower mean K10 scores when using a 7-day recall period than when using the 30-day recall period (B = 1.96, 95% CI [0.04–3.90]) but no evidence of a change in the estimated prevalence of very high psychological distress. Presenting the response options in ascending order did not affect mean scores, but there was weak evidence of reduced prevalence of very high distress relative to the descending order (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.60, 95% CI [0.36–0.98]). These findings suggest that varying the administration method may result in minor differences in population estimates of very high psychological distress when using the K10.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-06-06T06:23:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241256430
       
  • Psychometric Properties of the Diagnostic Interview for Sexual
           Dysfunctions in Women in a Symptom-Reporting Sample

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rebekka Schwesig, Maike Borchardt, Julia Velten, Jürgen Hoyer
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      While structured clinical interviews are considered the gold standard for diagnosing mental disorders, respective instruments are still lacking in the field of sexual dysfunctions. The study evaluates the psychometric properties of the new Diagnostic Interview for Sexual Dysfunctions in Women (DISEX-F), which is based on the eleventh edition of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) and the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), in a sample of 100 women with self-reported sexual problems. Participants were interviewed twice by trained diagnosticians with the DISEX-F. A third diagnostician evaluated the audio records of the initial interview. Participants also completed self-report measures of sexual functioning/distress and interview acceptance. The DISEX-F demonstrates excellent inter-rater reliability, good test-retest reliability, and strong convergent and discriminant evidence of validity. Furthermore, it achieves high acceptance among participants. Discordant diagnostic outcomes were especially linked to false differential diagnostic decisions and information variance in participants reporting. The results strongly support using the DISEX-F for women presenting with self-reported sexual problems in practice and research.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-06-03T11:36:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241253659
       
  • Exploring Potential Ethnic Bias Among MMPI-3 Scales in Assessing
           Personality Psychopathology

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      Authors: Nicole Shumaker, Tessa Long, Andy Torres, Alfonso Mercado, Ryan J. Marek, Jaime L. Anderson
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined statistical bias in the measurement of personality psychopathology in the Latinx population using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-3 (MMPI-3). Data were extracted from two studies that yielded a composite data set of 103 White individuals and 250 Latinx individuals. All participants were administered the MMPI-2-Restructured Form-Extended Battery (MMPI-2-RF-EX) or MMPI-3 and the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5 Short Form (PID-5-SF). First, we conducted correlation analyses between theoretically overlapping scales of the PID-5-SF and the MMPI-3 among White and Latinx individuals. The majority of theoretically associated scales were found to be at least moderately associated in the total sample. In addition, Steiger’s z-tests indicated that correlations were similar in magnitude across the White and Latinx ethnic groups. Hierarchical regression subsequently determined the presence of slope and/or intercept bias. Only one analysis (the MMPI-3 Anger Proneness prediction of PID-5-SF Negative Affectivity) indicated statistically significant intercept bias. No evidence of slope bias was found. In other words, these analyses indicated that the vast majority of the relationships between MMPI-3 scales and associated personality psychopathology constructs (as measured by the PID-5-SF) remained consistent across both ethnic groups. Overall, the results supported the appropriate cross-cultural use of the MMPI-3 to assess personality psychopathology.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-05-31T06:11:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241254341
       
  • Competing Models of Personality Disorder: Relations With Psychosocial
           Functioning

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eunyoe Ro, Hallie Nuzum, Lee Anna Clark
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th Edition (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013), includes 10 categorical personality disorders (PD) in Section II (Section II PD) and a dimensional alternative model of PD (AMPD) in Section III. We compared the two models in explaining concurrent psychosocial functioning levels in psychiatric outpatients and community residents screened as at risk for PD pathology (N = 600). The AMPD’s fully dimensional form showed stronger associations with psychosocial difficulties and explained more of their variance compared with the categorical Section II PD. AMPD Criterion A (personality functioning impairment) and Criterion B (pathological traits) incrementally predicted psychosocial functioning about equally with some unique predictions. Finally, AMPD’s six categorical PD diagnoses did not show stronger associations with psychosocial functioning than the corresponding Section II PD diagnoses. Findings directly comparing the two models remain important and timely for informing future conceptualizations of PD in the diagnostic system.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-05-27T11:30:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241253409
       
  • Campbell’s Law Explains the Replication Crisis: Pre-Registration
           Badges Are History Repeating

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      Authors: E. David Klonsky
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Campbell’s Law explains the replication crisis. In brief, useful tools such as hypotheses, p-values, and multi-study designs came to be viewed as indicators of strong science, and thus goals in and of themselves. Consequently, their use became distorted in unanticipated ways (e.g., hypothesizing after results were known [HARKing], p-Hacking, misuses of researcher degrees of freedom), and fragile findings proliferated. Pre-registration mandates are positioned as an antidote. However, I argue that such efforts, perhaps best exemplified by pre-registration badges (PRBs), are history repeating: Another useful tool has been converted into an indicator of strong science and a goal in and of itself. This, too, will distort its use and harm psychological science in unanticipated ways. For example, there is already evidence that papers seeking PRBs routinely violate the rules and spirit of pre-registration. I suggest that pre-registration mandates will (a) discourage optimal scientific practice, (b) exacerbate the file drawer problem, (c) encourage pre-registering after results are known (PRARKing), and (d) create false trust in fragile findings. I conclude that multiple design features can help support replicability (e.g., adequate sample size, valid measurement, robustness checks, pre-registration), none should be canonized, replication is the only arbiter of replicability, and the most important solution is sociocultural: to foster a field that reveres and reinforces robust science—just as we once revered and reinforced flashy but fragile science.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-05-24T04:54:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241253430
       
  • Measures of Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Children and Adolescents: A
           Systematic Review and Recommendations for Use in Clinical and Research
           Settings

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      Authors: Richard T. Liu, Alexandra H. Bettis, Hannah R. Lawrence, Rachel F. L. Walsh, Ana E. Sheehan, Olivia H. Pollak, Auburn R. Stephenson, Marin M. Kautz, Rachel M. Marlowe
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Empirically supported measures of suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STBs) are needed to serve as reference outcomes for suicide risk screening tools and to monitor severity and treatment progress in children and adolescents with STBs. The present paper systematically reviewed existing measures of STBs in youth and studies evaluating their psychometric properties and clinical utility. Measures were then evaluated on reliability, validity, and clinical utility. Sixteen articles (20 independent samples) were found with psychometric data with youth samples for eight measures. Interview-based measures were found to have the strongest psychometric support and clinical utility. Significant limitations exist for all self-report measures due to inherent characteristics of these measures that cannot be remedied through additional psychometric study. There is an urgent need for the development and validation of new self-report measures of STBs, particularly for preadolescent children, sexual and gender minority youth, and racial/ethnic minority youth.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-05-14T12:15:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241249438
       
  • Assessing Implicit Theories in Sexual Offending Using Indirect Measures:
           Feasibility, Reliability, and Incremental Validity

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      Authors: Mirthe G. C. Noteborn, Jelle J. Sijtsema, Jaap J. A. Denissen, Stefan Bogaerts
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study assessed psychometric qualities of indirect measures assessing Implicit Theories (ITs) of sexual offending: Implicit Association Task (IAT), Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP), and Relational Responding Task (RRT). For comparison reasons, aggressive behavior was also assessed. In a male sample from the general population (N = 109), we assessed each measure’s (a) feasibility (mean latency, error rate, passing criteria), (b) internal consistency, (c) convergent and discriminant validity, and (d) incremental and predictive validity. Results indicated that no indirect measure met all criteria. Although the IAT was reasonably feasible and reliable in measuring aggression, ITs could not be reliably assessed. The RRT was feasible and somewhat reliable in assessing ITs, whereas the IRAP showed limited feasibility, high task complexity, low reliability, and the presence of a method factor. No measure had incremental predictive validity over the use of self-report measures, although we note that the power to detect such associations was limited. As none of the indirect measures performed satisfactorily on the measured criteria, the use of these measures in clinical practice seems currently unwarranted to assess ITs.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-05-08T04:29:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241245009
       
  • Introducing Diagnostic Classification Modeling as an Unsupervised Method
           for Screening Probable Eating Disorders

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      Authors: Jihong Zhang, Shuqi Cui, Yinuo Xu, Tianxiang Cui, Wesley R. Barnhart, Feng Ji, Jason M. Nagata, Jinbo He
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Screening for eating disorders (EDs) is an essential part of the prevention and intervention of EDs. Traditional screening methods mostly rely on predefined cutoff scores which have limitations of generalizability and may produce biased results when the cutoff scores are used in populations where the instruments or cutoff scores have not been validated. Compared to the traditional cutoff score approach, the diagnostic classification modeling (DCM) approach can provide psychometric and classification information simultaneously and has been used for diagnosing mental disorders. In the present study, we introduce DCM as an innovative and alternative approach to screening individuals at risk of EDs. To illustrate the practical utility of DCM, we provide two examples: one involving the application of DCM to examine probable ED status from the 12-item Short form of the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-QS) to screen probable thinness-oriented EDs and the Muscularity-Oriented Eating Test (MOET) to screen probable muscularity-oriented EDs.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-04-27T11:49:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241247483
       
  • Maternal Postpartum Work Resumption Stress: Questionnaire Development and
           Validation

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      Authors: Ana Okorn, Madelon L. M. van Hooff, Antonius H. N. Cillessen, Roseriet Beijers
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Transitioning back to work after maternity leave is increasingly common. While differences exist, for many mothers this transition represents a stressor. This study aimed to define the construct of maternal postpartum work resumption stress and develop and validate a self-report measure in a low-risk sample of Dutch mothers. First, the item pool (N = 71) and face and content validity of the questionnaire were established. Next, two independent samples of mothers returning to work (N = 298, N = 291) were recruited to identify factor structure, reduce the number of items, and assess the dimensionality, reliability, convergent and discriminant validity of the questionnaire. Based on exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, the reliable and valid REturn to Work INventory (REWINd) with 30 items across three factors was established. While further validation is needed, REWINd can be used to further study the nature and consequences of maternal postpartum work resumption stress.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-04-27T11:43:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241246607
       
  • Development and Initial Validation of the Parenting Styles Circumplex
           Inventory (PSCI)

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      Authors: Samuel N. Meisel, Nolan E. Ramer, Christopher J. Hopwood, Craig R. Colder
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Parenting style refers to the emotional climate in which parents nurture and guide their child’s social development. Despite the prominence of parenting style research, many studies still create their own psychometrically untested measures of parenting styles, use measures that do not capture the uninvolved parenting style, or use median splits to convert dimensional assessments into parenting style typologies. To address these measurement issues, the current studies developed the Parenting Styles Circumplex Inventory (PSCI) which is rooted in Contemporary Integrative Interpersonal Theory and provides a framework to unite typology and dimensional parenting style measurement approaches. The current article describes the development and initial validation of the PSCI across three samples of college students (Ns = 571, 361, 385). The 32-item PSCI consists of eight octant scales which each assess unique combinations of parental responsiveness and demandingness. The measure asks respondents to answer each question about their mother- and/or father-figure. The circumplex structure of the PSCI was confirmed and replicated across studies and the PSCI demonstrated meaningful associations with indicators of parenting practices, relationship functioning, psychopathology symptoms, and substance use. Results from this study provide initial support for the PSCI as a path forward for measuring parenting styles.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-04-26T05:26:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241246340
       
  • Investigating the Functioning of Rating Scales With Rasch Models

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      Authors: Daiana Colledani, Adriana P. González Pizzio, Maria Devita, Pasquale Anselmi
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The hypothesis implicit in the rating scale design is that the categories reflect increasing levels of the latent variable. Rasch models for ordered polytomous items include parameters, called thresholds, that allow for empirically testing this hypothesis. Failure of the thresholds to advance monotonically with the categories (a condition that is referred to as “threshold disordering”) provides evidence that the rating scale is not functioning as intended. This work focuses on scales consisting of rather large numbers of categories, whose use is often recommended in the literature. Threshold disordering is observed in both an extended 8-point scale specially developed for the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the original 10-point scale of the Behavioral Religiosity Scale. The results of this work prompt practitioners not to take the functioning of the rating scale for granted, but to verify it empirically.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T09:23:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241245792
       
  • Comparisons of Self-Report With Objective Measurements Suggest Faster
           Responding but Little Change in Response Quality Over Time in Ecological
           Momentary Assessment Studies

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      Authors: Raymond Hernandez, Stefan Schneider, Amy E. Pinkham, Colin A. Depp, Robert Ackerman, Elizabeth A. Pyatak, Varsha D. Badal, Raeanne C. Moore, Philip D. Harvey, Kensie Funsch, Arthur A. Stone
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Response times (RTs) to ecological momentary assessment (EMA) items often decrease after repeated EMA administration, but whether this is accompanied by lower response quality requires investigation. We examined the relationship between EMA item RTs and EMA response quality. In one data set, declining response quality was operationalized as decreasing correspondence over time between subjective and objective measures of blood glucose taken at the same time. In a second EMA study data set, declining response quality was operationalized as decreasing correspondence between subjective ratings of memory test performance and objective memory test scores. We assumed that measurement error in the objective measures did not increase across time, meaning that decreasing correspondence across days within a person could be attributed to lower response quality. RTs to EMA items decreased across study days, while no decrements in the mean response quality were observed. Decreasing EMA item RTs across study days did not appear problematic overall.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-04-18T10:35:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241245793
       
  • Longitudinal Measurement Invariance of the ASEBA Youth/Adult Self-Reports
           Across the Transition From Adolescence to Adulthood

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      Authors: Daniel P. Moriarity, Naoise Mac Giollabhui, Dener Cardoso Melo, Catharina Hartman
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The ability to quantify within-person changes in mental health is central to the mission of clinical psychology. Typically, this is done using total or mean scores on symptom measures; however, this approach assumes that measures quantify the same construct, the same way, each time the measure is completed. Without this quality, termed longitudinal measurement invariance, an observed difference between timepoints might be partially attributable to changing measurement properties rather than changes in comparable symptom measurements. This concern is amplified in research using different forms of a measure across developmental periods due to potential differences in reporting styles, item-wording, and developmental context. This study provides the strongest support for the longitudinal measurement invariance of the Anxiety Scale, Depression/Affective Problems: Cognitive Subscale, and the Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Scale; moderate support for the Depression/Affective Problems Scale and the Somatic Scale, and poor support for the Depression/Affective Problems: Somatic Symptoms Subscale of the Dutch Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment Youth Self-Report and Adult Self-Report in a sample of 1,309 individuals (N = 1,090 population-based, N = 219 clinic-based/referred to an outpatient clinic before age 11 years) across six waves of data (mean ages = 11 years at Wave 1 and 26 years at Wave 6).
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-04-18T10:30:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241245875
       
  • Measurement Invariance of the Children’s Social Desirability
           Scale–Short Version (CSD-S) Across Gender, Grade Level, and
           Race/Ethnicity

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      Authors: Zi Jia Ng, Shengjie Lin, Luping Niu, Christina Cipriano
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Social desirability bias is a methodological challenge with participant self-reports. Social desirability measures are often used to control the potential effects of social desirability bias on participant self-reports, but whether these measures are interpreted similarly across different demographic groups remains unclear. This study examines the factor structure and measurement invariance of the Children’s Social Desirability Scale–Short version (CSD-S) across gender, grade level, and race/ethnicity with a large sample of children and adolescents in the United States. Results indicate a close fit to a one-factor model. Tests of measurement invariance show partial strong invariance across gender (male vs. female) and grade level (elementary vs. middle vs. high schoolers) as well as strong invariance across race/ethnicity (Asian vs. Black/African American vs. Hispanic/Latine vs. White vs. Bi/Multiracial). Latent mean differences were found across grade level and race/ethnicity but not gender, with lower grades reporting higher social desirability than upper grades and Bi/Multiracials reporting lower social desirability than Asians and Hispanics/Latines. Findings provide preliminary evidence for the use of CSD-S in detecting social desirability bias and assessing meaningful social desirability differences in diverse children and adolescents.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-04-12T12:11:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241245789
       
  • Interpersonal Problem Profiles of Personality and Psychopathology
           Constructs in Chinese Undergraduates and Offenders

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      Authors: Yuping Liu, Christopher J. Hopwood, Aaron L. Pincus, Bingtao Zhou, Jiali Yang, Shuliang Bai, Bo Yang
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The interpersonal problem circumplex is extensively used in the field as an assessment framework for understanding the interpersonal implications of a range of personality and psychopathology constructs. The vast majority of this large literature has been conducted in Western convenience and clinical samples. We computed interpersonal problem structural summary parameters for a range of personality and psychopathology variables in two Chinese offender samples (N = 424 and N = 555) and one undergraduate sample (N = 511) to test how well findings from Western samples generalize to Chinese undergraduates and offenders. The results showed that findings in Western samples generalized reasonably well to Chinese young adult and forensic contexts, although the interpersonal profiles of external variables were less specific in Chinese samples. Compared with undergraduates, interpersonal distress has stronger associations with the mental health of offenders. This study further elaborates the interpersonal correlates of individual differences in personality and psychopathology across cultures and assessment contexts, and it also extends the literature examining interpersonal problems in forensic settings.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-04-12T12:06:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241241495
       
  • Convergent Validity Between the Motor Domain of PediaTracTM and Ages and
           Stages in Term and Preterm Infants at 2, 4, 6, and 9 Months of Age

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      Authors: Patricia C. Lasutschinkow, Jin Bo, Seth Warschausky, Trivellore Raghunathan, Patricia Berglund, Alissa Huth-Bocks, H. Gerry Taylor, Angela D. Staples, Jennifer Cano, Gabrielle N. Le Doux, Angela Lukomski, Jennifer C. Gidley Larson, Renée Lajiness-O’Neill
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the convergent validity of the Motor domain (MOT) of PediaTracTM v3.0, an online developmental tracking instrument based on caregiver reports, with fine and gross motor domains (ASQ-FM and ASQ-GM) of the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ-3) in infants between 2- and 9 months of age. Participants were caregivers of 571 infants born term or preterm (gestational age
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-04-06T04:59:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241241144
       
  • Psychometric Evaluation of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) in Algeria:
           A Comprehensive Approach Utilizing Network Analysis, Confirmatory Factor
           Analysis, and the Polytomous Rasch Model

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      Authors: Ahmed Kerriche
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to evaluate the psychometric characteristics of the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN) by employing network analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and the Polytomous Rasch Model. A cross-sectional data set was collected comprising 1,530 participants, with 959 being women and 571 being men. The Bootstrap Exploratory Graph Analysis unveiled the presence of two dimensions, with Items 17, 15, 5, 14, 6, and 9 exhibiting the highest strength centrality index. Notably, the Network Comparison Test indicated no differences in Network Invariance and global strength between the networks of women and men. Furthermore, the confirmatory factor analysis results demonstrated that the two extracted dimensions displayed an acceptable goodness of fit. In addition, the reliability coefficient values were acceptable, exceeding the threshold of 0.70. The Rasch analysis results suggested an overall fit, but some items exhibited overlap, suggesting their potential removal. Furthermore, it was recommended to develop new items to address gaps between existing items, particularly for measuring the lower levels of Social Anxiety Disorder. In conclusion, these findings provide robust evidence supporting the reliability and validity of the SPIN as a tool for measuring Social Anxiety Disorder in Algeria.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-30T04:59:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241239772
       
  • Age-Neutral Measurement Of Personality Functioning and Maladaptive
           Personality Traits

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      Authors: M. F. Facon, S. P. J. van Alphen, E. Dierckx, G. Rossi
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      As previous studies have shown that personality disorder (PD) assessment in older adults is often hampered because assessment tools are tailored toward younger adults, establishing the age-neutrality of novel tools is crucial. This study primarily aimed to evaluate the age-neutrality of the Level of Personality Functioning Brief Form (LPFS-BF 2.0) and the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 Modified + (PID-5-BF+M), using a sample of 254 community-dwelling adults. The analysis of Differential Item Functioning (DIF) demonstrated the age-neutrality of both instruments, with only 8.3% of LPFS-BF 2.0 items and 5.6% of PID-5-BF+M items exhibiting DIF. Differential Test Functioning (DTF) analyses revealed large DTF for the LPFS-BF 2.0 total score, indicating that age-specific norms might be necessary for this score. In summary, this study supports the use of these instruments in both older and younger adults, enhancing the assessment of PDs across the life span.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T06:14:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241240626
       
  • Development and Validation of the Positive Outcomes of Cannabis Use Scale
           (POCUS) Among Predominantly White Adults in the United States

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      Authors: Jamie E. Parnes, Mark A. Prince, Bradley T. Conner
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Operant conditioning and social learning theories suggest that positive cannabis use–related outcomes are a primary contributor to maintained use and risk for dependence. However, currently there does not exist a reliable, validated measure of positive cannabis-related outcomes. This study sought to develop and psychometrically evaluate the Positive Outcomes of Cannabis Use Scale (POCUS). We collected three samples, college students (N = 883), community adults (N = 214), and college students (N = 615), of predominantly White adults in the United States who completed an online survey. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses evaluated scale structure and identified four factors: social enhancement, mood enhancement, cognitive enhancement, and sexual enhancement. Positive outcomes were positively associated with recent use, controlling for expectancies and negative outcomes. Positive outcomes were also differentiated from positive expectancies and more influential in predicting typical use frequency. Findings indicate that the POCUS is psychometrically sound and clinically useful for measuring positive cannabis use–related outcomes among predominantly White adults in the United States.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T06:10:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241240618
       
  • Validation of the Self-Report Version of the German Strengths and
           Weaknesses of ADHD Symptoms and Normal Behavior Scale (SWAN-DE-SB)

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      Authors: Friederike Blume, Lilly Buhr, Jan Kühnhausen, Rieke Köpke, Lydia A. Weber, Andreas J. Fallgatter, Thomas Ethofer, Caterina Gawrilow
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) experience impairing levels of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity, while individuals without ADHD experience these symptoms to a lesser extent. Yet, ADHD self-report scales so far hardly captured continuous distributions across the general population. In addition, they focused on weaknesses and ignored strengths. To address these shortcomings, we present here the Strengths and Weaknesses of ADHD and Normal-Behavior Scale Self-Report (SWAN-DE-SB). The normal distribution of the data collected and the scale’s internal consistency, and factorial and convergent validity were assessed using data from a general population sample. Its clinical utility was evaluated by comparing scores from a clinical sample and a sample of individuals without ADHD and by calculating optimal cut-off values for specificity and sensitivity. The SWAN-DE-SB demonstrated normal distribution of the data collected, high internal consistency, and factorial and convergent validity. It reliably discriminated individuals with and without ADHD, with high specificity and sensitivity. It should therefore be considered a psychometrically convincing measure to assess strengths and weaknesses of ADHD symptoms and normal behavior in clinical and general population samples.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-25T05:46:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241236699
       
  • Low Overlap and High Heterogeneity Across Common Measures of Eating
           Disorder Pathology: A Content Analysis

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      Authors: Kara A. Christensen Pacella, Lidia Wossen, Kelsey E. Hagan
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated symptoms assessed in common measures of eating disorder pathology and tested overlap to evaluate the extent to which measures may be interchangeable. Six measures were included: Bulimia Test-Revised, Eating Attitudes Test-26, Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale, Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire, Eating Pathology Symptoms Inventory, and Questionnaire for Eating Disorder Diagnoses. Content overlap was quantitatively estimated using the Jaccard Index. Mean overlap was low (.195), likely due to the wide range of symptoms (87) assessed. The mean overlap of each measure with all others was .117 − .267, and the overlap among individual measures was .083 − .382. Implications of low overlap among measures include variable characterization of eating disorder phenotypes and the risk for lower generalizability of findings due to measurement variability.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-23T04:24:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241238084
       
  • Development and Initial Validation of a Momentary Cannabis Craving Scale
           Within a Homogeneous Sample of U.S. Emerging Adults

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      Authors: Christal N. Davis, Kathryn S. Gex, Lindsay M. Squeglia, Timothy J. Trull, Denis M. McCarthy, Nathaniel L. Baker, Kevin M. Gray, Aimee L. McRae-Clark, Rachel L. Tomko
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Given the popularity and ease of single-item craving assessments, we developed a multi-item measure and compared it to common single-item assessments in an ecological momentary assessment (EMA) context. Two weeks of EMA data were collected from 48 emerging adults (56.25% female, 85.42% White) who frequently used cannabis. Eight craving items were administered, and multilevel factor analyses were used to identify the best fitting model. The resulting scale’s factors represented purposefulness/general desire and emotionality/negative affect craving. Convergent validity was examined using measures of craving, cannabis use disorder symptoms, frequency of use, cannabis cue reactivity, cannabis use, negative affect, and impulsivity. The scale factors were associated with cue-reactivity craving, negative affect, impulsivity, and subfactors of existing craving measures. For researchers interested in using a single item to capture craving, one item performed particularly well. However, the new scale may provide a more nuanced assessment of mechanisms underlying craving.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-22T05:14:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241237055
       
  • A Network Analysis of Digital Clock Drawing for Command and Copy
           Conditions

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      Authors: Brandon Frank, Sabyasachi Bandyopadhyay, Catherine Dion, Erin Formanski, Emily Matusz, Dana Penney, Randall Davis, Maureen K. O’Connor, Rhoda Au, Shawna Amini, Parisa Rashidi, Patrick Tighe, David J. Libon, Catherine C. Price
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Graphomotor and time-based variables from the digital Clock Drawing Test (dCDT) characterize cognitive functions. However, no prior publications have quantified the strength of the associations between digital clock variables as they are produced. We hypothesized that analysis of the production of clock features and their interrelationships, as suggested, will differ between the command and copy test conditions. Older adults aged 65+ completed a digital clock drawing to command and copy conditions. Using a Bayesian hill-climbing algorithm and bootstrapping (10,000 samples), we derived directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) to examine network structure for command and copy dCDT variables. Although the command condition showed moderate associations between variables ([math]= 0.34) relative to the copy condition ([math] = 0.25), the copy condition network had more connections (18/18 versus 15/18 command). Network connectivity across command and copy was most influenced by five of the 18 variables. The direction of dependencies followed the order of instructions better in the command condition network. Digitally acquired clock variables relate to one another but differ in network structure when derived from command or copy conditions. Continued analyses of clock drawing production should improve understanding of quintessential normal features to aid in early neurodegenerative disease detection.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-18T07:09:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241236336
       
  • Assessing Between- and Within-Person Reliabilities of Items and Scale for
           Daily Procrastination: A Multilevel and Dynamic Approach

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      Authors: Xiaohui Luo, Yueqin Hu, Hongyun Liu
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Intensive longitudinal data (ILD) has been collected to capture the dynamic fluctuations of procrastination; however, researchers have typically measured daily procrastination by modifying trait measures (e.g., adding a time reference “today”) without adequately testing their reliabilities. The main purpose of this study was to use an advanced approach, dynamic structural equation modeling, to assess the between- and within-person reliabilities of a widely used six-item measure of daily procrastination. A total of 252 participants completed retrospective measures of various types of trait procrastination and daily measures of procrastination over 34 consecutive days. The results showed that the entire scale for daily procrastination and five of its six items had high between- and within-person reliabilities, but one item had much lower reliabilities, suggesting that this item may be inappropriate in everyday contexts. Furthermore, we found moderate to strong associations between the latent trait factor of procrastination and trait measures of procrastination. In addition, we identified substantial between-person variation in person-specific reliabilities and explored its relevant factors. Overall, this study assessed the reliabilities of a daily measure of procrastination, which facilitated future studies to obtain more reliable and consistent results and to better estimate the reliability of ILD.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-18T07:02:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241235467
       
  • Measuring Process Factors of Fluid Reasoning Using Multidimensional
           Computerized Adaptive Testing

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      Authors: Hanif Akhtar, Kristof Kovacs
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Although many fluid reasoning (Gf) tests have been developed, there is a lack of figural tests measuring its lower-order process factors simultaneously. The present article introduces the development of the Multidimensional Induction-Deduction Computerized Adaptive Test (MID-CAT) to measure two process factors of Gf. The MID-CAT is designed to provide an instrument that is flexible, efficient, and entirely free for non-commercial use. We created 530 items and administered them to a sample of N = 2,247. Items were fitted and calibrated using the Rasch model. The results indicate that the final item pool has a wide range of difficulties that could precisely measure a wide range of test-takers’ abilities. A simulation study also indicates that MID-CAT provides greater measurement efficiency than separate-unidimensional CAT or fixed-item test. In the discussion, we provide perspectives on how the MID-CAT can be used for future research.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-16T09:32:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241236351
       
  • Good Fit Is Weak Evidence of Replication: Increasing Rigor Through Prior
           Predictive Similarity Checking

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      Authors: Wes Bonifay, Sonja D. Winter, Hanamori F. Skoblow, Ashley L. Watts
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Replication provides a confrontation of psychological theory, not only in experimental research, but also in model-based research. Goodness of fit (GOF) of the original model to the replication data is routinely provided as meaningful evidence of replication. We demonstrate, however, that GOF obscures important differences between the original and replication studies. As an alternative, we present Bayesian prior predictive similarity checking: a tool for rigorously evaluating the degree to which the data patterns and parameter estimates of a model replication study resemble those of the original study. We apply this method to original and replication data from the National Comorbidity Survey. Both data sets yielded excellent GOF, but the similarity checks often failed to support close or approximate empirical replication, especially when examining covariance patterns and indicator thresholds. We conclude with recommendations for applied research, including registered reports of model-based research, and provide extensive annotated R code to facilitate future applications of prior predictive similarity checking.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-15T05:06:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241234118
       
  • The Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory: Psychometric Properties and Symptom
           Comparisons in Women With and Without Brain Injuries Due to Intimate
           Partner Violence

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      Authors: Justin E. Karr, Agnes E. White, Sharon E. Leong, T K Logan
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study psychometrically evaluated the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) among women survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV) and compared symptoms between women with no brain injury history (n = 93) and women with IPV-related brain injury history (n = 112). Women completed the NSI and questionnaires on traumatic brain injury (TBI), hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI-BI), and lifetime IPV history. A four-factor NSI model, including affective, somatosensory, cognitive, and vestibular factors, had the best fit (comparative fit index = 0.970, root mean square error of approximation = 0.064), with strong reliability for the total score (ω = .93) and subscale scores (ω range = .72–.89). In group comparisons, women with IPV-related brain injuries reported greater total, affective, and cognitive symptom severity after adjusting for age and education; however, no group differences were observed after adjusting for IPV severity. When examining lifetime number of brain injuries, HI-BI count was independently predictive of total, cognitive, and vestibular symptom severity after adjusting for age, education, and IPV severity; whereas TBI count did not independently predict any NSI scores after adjusting for these covariates. The NSI had acceptable psychometric properties for measuring neurobehavioral symptoms among women survivors of IPV. The association between HI-BI count and cognitive and vestibular symptoms may indicate the importance of studying repetitive nonfatal strangulation as an injury mechanism in this population.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-14T07:21:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241236687
       
  • The State of Open Science Practices in Psychometric Studies of Suicide: A
           Systematic Review

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      Authors: Pablo Ezequiel Flores-Kanter, Jesús M. Alvarado
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The adoption of open science practices (OSPs) is crucial for promoting transparency and robustness in research. We conducted a systematic review to assess the frequency and trends of OSPs in psychometric studies focusing on measures of suicidal thoughts and behavior. We analyzed publications from two international databases, examining the use of OSPs such as open access publication, preregistration, provision of open materials, and data sharing. Our findings indicate a lack of adherence to OSPs in psychometric studies of suicide. The majority of manuscripts were published under restricted access, and preregistrations were not utilized. The provision of open materials and data was rare, with limited access to instruments and analysis scripts. Open access versions (preprints/postprints) were scarce. The low adoption of OSPs in psychometric studies of suicide calls for urgent action. Embracing a culture of open science will enhance transparency, reproducibility, and the impact of research in suicide prevention efforts.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-12T04:41:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241236315
       
  • Using the MMPI-2-RF, IOP-29, IOP-M, and FIT in the In-Person and Remote
           Administration Formats: A Simulation Study on Feigned mTBI

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      Authors: Luciano Giromini, Claudia Pignolo, Alessandro Zennaro, Martin Sellbom
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Our study compared the impact of administering Symptom Validity Tests (SVTs) and Performance Validity Tests (PVTs) in in-person versus remote formats and assessed different approaches to combining validity test results. Using the MMPI-2-RF, IOP-29, IOP-M, and FIT, we assessed 164 adults, with half instructed to feign mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and half to respond honestly. Within each subgroup, half completed the tests in person, and the other half completed them online via videoconferencing. Results from 2 ×2 analyses of variance showed no significant effects of administration format on SVT and PVT scores. When comparing feigners to controls, the MMPI-2-RF RBS exhibited the largest effect size (d = 3.05) among all examined measures. Accordingly, we conducted a series of two-step hierarchical logistic regression models by entering the MMPI-2-RF RBS first, followed by each other SVT and PVT individually. We found that the IOP-29 and IOP-M were the only measures that yielded incremental validity beyond the effects of the MMPI-2-RF RBS in predicting group membership. Taken together, these findings suggest that administering these SVTs and PVTs in-person or remotely yields similar results, and the combination of MMPI and IOP indexes might be particularly effective in identifying feigned mTBI.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-12T04:39:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241235465
       
  • Are In-the-Moment Resilience Processes Predicted by Questionnaire-Based
           Measures of Resilience'

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      Authors: Daniel Ventus, Patrik Söderberg
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Research on resilience is a growing field, and resilience has been conceptualized and operationalized in multiple ways. The aim of this study was to compare the Brief Resilient Coping Scale (BRCS), a conventional measure of resilience, with within-person process indicators derived from experience sampling method (ESM). A sample of 177 teachers from southern Finland participated in the study, commencing with a startup session followed by an 8-day ESM period. Through twice-daily prompts, participants reported their immediate positive and negative affect as well as recent stressors encountered, such as workload and challenging social interactions. As expected, within-person variation in affect was predicted by stressors. However, contrary to expectations, individual differences in affective reactivity to stressors were not predicted by BRCS (βpositive affect [95% CI] = −.20, [−.51, .11]; βnegative affect = .33, [−.07, .69]). Item response theory analyses of the BRCS revealed problems with precision. The results call into question the validity of measuring resilience using single administrations of retrospective self-report questionnaires such as the BRCS.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-08T09:41:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241234220
       
  • Using the Indonesian Computer-Based Game Prototype as a Computer-Based
           Game Inventory for Executive Function in Children and Adolescents: A
           Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Concurrent Validity Study

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      Authors: Tjhin Wiguna, Kusuma Minayati, Fransiska Kaligis, Sylvia Dominic Teh, Maria Krishnandita, Nabella Meriem Annisa Fitri, Raden Irawati Ismail, Adilla Hastika Fasha, Steven, Raymond Bahana
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Executive function influences children’s learning abilities and organizes their cognitive processes, behaviors, and emotions. This cross-sectional study examined whether an Indonesian Computer-Based Game (ICbG) prototype could be used as a Computer-Based Game Inventory for Executive Function (CGIEF) in children and adolescents. The study was conducted with 200 children, adolescents, and their parents. The parents completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning (BRIEF) questionnaire, and the children and adolescents completed the CGIEF. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) were performed using LISREL Version 8.80. The construct of CGIEF was valid/fit with normal theory-weighted least squares = 15.75 (p> .05). SEM analysis showed that the theoretical construct of the CGIEF was a valid predictor of executive function. The critical t value of the pathway was 2.45, and normal theory-weighted least squares was 5.74 (p> .05). The construct reliability (CR) for CGIEF was 0.91. Concurrent validity was assessed using the Bland–Altman plot, and the coefficient of repeatability (bias/mean) was nearly zero between the t scores of total executive functions of the CGIEF and BRIEF. This preliminary study showed that the CGIEF can be useful as a screening tool for executive dysfunction, metacognitive deficits, and behavioral regulation problems among children and adolescents in clinical samples.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-03-05T06:30:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241234734
       
  • An Automated Online Measure for Misophonia: The Sussex Misophonia Scale
           for Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julia Simner, Louisa J. Rinaldi, Jamie Ward
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Misophonia is a sound sensitivity disorder characterized by a strong aversion to specific sounds (e.g., chewing). Here we present the Sussex Misophonia Scale for Adults (SMS-Adult), within an online open-access portal, with automated scoring and results that can be shared ethically with users and professionals. Receiver operator characteristics show our questionnaire to be “excellent” and “good-to-excellent” at classifying misophonia, both when dividing our n = 501 adult participants by recruitment stream (self-declared misophonics vs. general population), and again when dividing them with by a prior measure of misophonia (as misophonics vs. non-misophonics). Factor analyses identified a five-factor structure in our 39 Likert-type items, and these were Feelings/Isolation, Life consequences, Intersocial reactivity, Avoidance/Repulsion, and Pain. Our measure also elicits misophonia triggers, each rated for their commonness in misophonia. We offer our open-access online tool for wider use (www.misophonia-hub.org), embedded within a well-stocked library of resources for misophonics, researchers, and clinicians.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T05:35:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241234104
       
  • Development and Validation of Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence
           Perpetration and Victimization Scales Among Adults

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      Authors: Jone Martínez-Bacaicoa, Miguel A. Sorrel, Manuel Gámez-Guadix
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Technology-facilitated sexual violence (TFSV) includes different forms of digital violence, such as online gender-based violence, online gender- and sexuality-based violence, digital sexual harassment, online sexual coercion, and nonconsensual pornography. The aim of this study was to design and validate a measure to assess the perpetration and victimization of each dimension of TFSV. The relationships between the different dimensions and differences by gender and sexual orientation were also analyzed. The participants were a sample of 2,486 adults (69% women) from Spain, aged between 16 and 79 (M = 25.95; DT = 9.809) years. The Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence Scales were found to be valid and reliable instruments, supporting our recommendation for the use of these scales. Network analysis and solution-based exploratory factor analyses showed that the dimensions of online sexual coercion and nonconsensual pornography clustered together. All the perpetration variables were related to sexism. Finally, cis women and nonheterosexual people reported higher victimization scores overall compared to cis men and heterosexuals, respectively, while cis men reported higher perpetration scores overall than cis women.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T10:07:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241229575
       
  • One Score to Rule Them All' Comparing the Predictive and Concurrent
           Validity of 30 Hearts and Flowers Scoring Approaches

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      Authors: Tiffany Wu, Christina Weiland, Meghan McCormick, JoAnn Hsueh, Catherine Snow, Jason Sachs
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Hearts and Flowers (H&F) task is a computerized executive functioning (EF) assessment that has been used to measure EF from early childhood to adulthood. It provides data on accuracy and reaction time (RT) across three different task blocks (hearts, flowers, and mixed). However, there is a lack of consensus in the field on how to score the task that makes it difficult to interpret findings across studies. The current study, which includes a demographically diverse population of kindergarteners from Boston Public Schools (N = 946), compares the predictive and concurrent validity of 30 ways of scoring H&F, each with a different combination of accuracy, RT, and task block(s). Our exploratory results provide evidence supporting the use of a two-vector average score based on Zelazo et al.’s approach of adding accuracy and RT scores together only after individuals pass a certain accuracy threshold. Findings have implications for scoring future tablet-based developmental assessments.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T05:08:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241229566
       
  • Longitudinal and Gender Measurement Invariance of the General Health
           Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) From Adolescence to Emerging Adulthood

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      Authors: Pascal Schlechter, Sharon A. S. Neufeld
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Psychological distress often onsets during adolescence, necessitating an accurate understanding of its development. Assessing change in distress is based on the seldom examined premise of longitudinal measurement invariance (MI). Thus, we used three waves of data from Next Steps, a representative cohort of young people in the UK (N = 13,539) to examine MI of the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12). We examined MI across time and gender from ages 15 to 25 in four competing latent models: (a) a single-factor model, (b) a three-factor correlated model, (c) a bifactor model of “general distress” and two orthogonal specific factors capturing positive and negative wording, and (d) a single-factor model including error covariances of negatively phrased items. We also tested acceptability of assumptions underlying sum score models. For all factor models, residual MI was confirmed from ages 15 to 25 years and across gender. The bifactor model had the best fit. While sum score model fit was not unequivocally acceptable, most mean differences across time and gender were equivalent across sum scores and latent difference scores. Thus, GHQ-12 sum scores may be used to assess change in psychological distress in young people. However, latent scores appear more accurate, and model fit can be improved by accounting for item wording.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T06:32:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241229573
       
  • A Bifactor Evaluation of Self-Report and Clinician-Administered Measures
           of PTSD in Veterans

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      Authors: Amanda M. Raines, Kate E. Clauss, Dustin Seidler, Nicholas P. Allan, Jon D. Elhai, Jennifer J. Vasterling, Joseph I. Constans, Kelly P. Maieritsch, C. Laurel Franklin
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) and the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5) are two of the most widely used and well-validated PTSD measures providing total and subscale scores that correspond with DSM-5 PTSD symptoms. However, there is little information about the utility of subscale scores above and beyond the total score for either measure. The current study compared the proposed DSM-5 four-factor model to a bifactor model across both measures using a sample of veterans (N = 1,240) presenting to a Veterans Affairs (VA) PTSD specialty clinic. The correlated factors and bifactor models for both measures evidenced marginal-to-acceptable fit and were retained for further evaluation. Bifactor specific indices suggested that both measures exhibited a strong general factor but weak lower-order factors. Structural regressions revealed that most of the lower-order factors provided little utility in predicting relevant outcomes. Although additional research is needed to make definitive statements about the utility of PCL-5 and CAPS-5 subscales, study findings point to numerous weaknesses. As such, caution should be exercised when using or interpreting subscale scores in future research.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T06:27:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241229568
       
  • Reliability and Validity of a Multidimensional Measure of Subjective
           Community Well-Being

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      Authors: R. Noah Padgett, Matthew T. Lee, Renae Wilkinson, Heather Tsavaris, Tyler J. VanderWeele
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      An individual’s flourishing is sustained by and dependent on their community’s well-being. We provide one of the first studies of a measure of communal subjective well-being, focusing on individuals’ relationships with their community. Using two samples from the Greater Columbus, Ohio region, we provide evidence of the reliability and validity of the Subjective Community Well-being (SCWB) assessment. The five domains of the SCWB are Good Relationships (α = .92), Proficient Leadership (α = .93), Healthy Practices (α = .92), Satisfying Community (α = .88), and Strong Mission (α = .81). A community-based sample (N = 1,435) and an online sample of Columbus residents (N = 692) were scored on the SCWB and compared across domains. We found evidence that the SCWB scores differentiate between active and less active community members. We discuss the appropriate uses of the SCWB as a measure of well-being and provide recommendations for research that could profitably utilize the SCWB measure to examine community well-being.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T12:30:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241229060
       
  • The Effect of Missing Item Data on the Relative Predictive Accuracy of
           Correctional Risk Assessment Tools

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      Authors: Bronwen Perley-Robertson, Kelly M. Babchishin, L. Maaike Helmus
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Missing data are pervasive in risk assessment but their impact on predictive accuracy has largely been unexplored. Common techniques for handling missing risk data include summing available items or proration; however, multiple imputation is a more defensible approach that has not been methodically tested against these simpler techniques. We compared the validity of these three missing data techniques across six conditions using STABLE-2007 (N = 4,286) and SARA-V2 (N = 455) assessments from men on community supervision in Canada. Condition 1 was the observed data (low missingness), and Conditions 2 to 6 were generated missing data conditions, whereby 1% to 50% of items per case were randomly deleted in 10% increments. Relative predictive accuracy was unaffected by missing data, and simpler techniques performed just as well as multiple imputation, but summed totals underestimated absolute risk. The current study therefore provides empirical justification for using proration when data are missing within a sample.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T10:38:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231225191
       
  • Development and Psychometric Validation of the Body Trust Scale

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      Authors: William Grunewald, Sydney N. Waitz-Kudla, Cheri A. Levinson, Tiffany A. Brown, April R. Smith
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Interoception (e.g., abilities to recognize/attend to internal sensations) is robustly associated with psychopathology. One form of interoception, body trust, is relevant for the development of disordered eating and suicidal thoughts/behaviors. However, measures of body trust are narrow, despite research suggesting body trust is multifaceted. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive measure of body trust: The Body Trust Scale (BTS). 479 U.S. adults completed self-report surveys containing the BTS and psychopathology measures. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed a three-factor structure: Comfort with One’s Body, Physical Attractiveness, and Comfort with Internal Sensations. Factors showed strong construct, convergent, and divergent validity, as well as moderate predictive validity for suicidal thoughts/non-suicidal self-injury. Furthermore, factors showed strong internal consistency, test–retest reliability, and were invariant across the gender binary. The BTS can be used in research and clinical settings to understand how specific facets of body trust relate to psychopathology.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T07:20:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231225200
       
  • The Behavioral, Emotional, and Social Skills Inventory: A Spanish
           Adaptation and Further Validation in Adult Population

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      Authors: Álvaro Postigo, Covadonga González-Nuevo, Jaime García-Fernández, Eduardo García-Cueto, Christopher J. Soto, Christopher M. Napolitano, Brent W. Roberts, Marcelino Cuesta
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) skills encompass a broad range of interpersonal and intrapersonal abilities that are crucial for establishing and maintaining relationships, managing emotions, setting and pursuing goals, and exploring new learning opportunities. To address the lack of consensus regarding terminology, definition, and assessment of SEB skills, Soto et al. developed the Behavioral, Emotional, and Social Skills Inventory (BESSI), which consists of 192 items, 32 facets, and 5 domains. The objective of the current study was to adapt the BESSI to Spanish (referred to as BESSI-Sp) and enhance the overall understanding of the BESSI framework. A sample of 303 people was employed with a mean age of 30.35 years (SD = 14.73), ranging from 18 to 85 years. The results indicate that the BESSI-Sp demonstrates strong psychometric properties. Its facet- and domain-level structure aligns with the theoretical expectations and closely resembles the English-language source version. The facets exhibit high reliability (mean ω = .89), and the scores demonstrate adequate stability after 3 to 4 weeks (mean rICC = .77). The BESSI-Sp also displays evidence of convergent validity and integrates well with the Big Five framework, providing incremental validity for various outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for the assessment of SEB skills and future research in this field.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T07:11:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231225197
       
  • Are We Measuring ADHD or Anxiety' Examining the Factor Structure and
           Discriminant Validity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale in an Adult
           Anxiety Disorder Population

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      Authors: Arij Alarachi, Colleen Merrifield, Karen Rowa, Randi E. McCabe
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Adults with clinical anxiety have significant symptom overlap and above average rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite this, ADHD remains a vastly under-detected disorder among this population, indicating the need for a screener with well-understood symptom dimensions and good discriminant validity. The current study compared competing models of ADHD as well as discriminant properties of self-reported ADHD symptoms as measured by the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) in 618 adults with clinical anxiety. A three-factor correlated model of Inattention, Impulsivity, and Hyperactivity, with the movement of one item, talks excessively, to a factor of Impulsivity from Hyperactivity fit better than the one-factor, two-factor, and traditional three-factor models of ADHD. Discriminant properties of the screener were fair to good against measures of clinical anxiety and distress; however, some items within the Hyperactivity factor (e.g., difficulty relaxing; feeling driven by a motor) loaded more strongly onto factors of clinical anxiety than ADHD when measures were pooled together. These results suggest that clinicians making differential diagnoses between adult ADHD and anxiety or related disorders should look for evidence of ADHD beyond the overlapping symptoms, particularly for those within the Hyperactivity factor.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T09:27:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231225190
       
  • Uncovering Hidden Framings in Dark Triad Self-Ratings: What
           Frames-of-Reference Do People Use When Responding to Generic Dark Triad
           Items'

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      Authors: Julian Schulze, Manuel Heinrich, Jan-Philipp Freudenstein, Philipp Schäpers, Stefan Krumm
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      In typical Dark Triad (DT) questionnaires, generic items oftentimes refer to “others” or “people” in general. Hence, respondents have to mentally aggregate their behavior across several kinds of “others” (e.g., work colleagues, family members, and friends). It remains unknown if individuals consider different kinds of interaction partners equally or if their self-reports contain “hidden” interaction partner-specific tendencies. To shed light on this issue, we assessed generic and contextualized DT items (referring to family, friends, work, and strangers; N = 814 from the general population). The correlated trait-correlated (method − 1) model was used to investigate preregistered research questions. On average, generic DT items showed the strongest association with work-contextualized DT items and the weakest association with family-contextualized DT items. However, the associations varied considerably across DT items and traits. In sum, our results suggest that hidden framings exist in some DT items, which may impact their ability to predict relevant criteria due to contextual (a)symmetries. The generalizability of the findings to other DT instruments, items, and participant groups should be examined in future research.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T11:33:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231220357
       
  • Stress Appraisal Measure: Investigating the Factor Structure and Validity
           in the French Language

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      Authors: Elise Grimm, Lea Francia, Stefan Agrigoroaei
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Stress Appraisal Measure (SAM) captures six different types of cognitive appraisals in anticipation of an upcoming stressful situation. The goal of this article was to examine the factorial structure and the validity of the scale in the French language while accounting for existing limitations in the literature. These include factorial structure instability and low internal consistency for specific subscales across multiple validation studies in other languages. In the first study (N = 425), the results from an exploratory factor analysis reliably suggested the removal of five items, the bridging of the threat and challenge subscales as one, and a new general five-factor structure. The new structure and its construct, convergent, and discriminant validity were confirmed in a second study (N = 308). We discuss the relevance of this five-factor scale for the studies focused on individual differences in stress and appraisals.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T12:50:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231223120
       
  • The Duration-Adjusted Reliable Change Index: Defining Clinically Relevant
           Symptom Changes of Varying Durations

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      Authors: Marieke A. Helmich
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The time period over which relevant symptoms shifts unfold is not uniform across individuals. This article proposes an adaptation of the Reliable Change Index (RCI) to detect symptom changes of varying durations in individual patients’ time series: the Duration-Adjusted RCI (DARCI). The DARCI proportionally raises the RCI cut-off to account for its extension over additional time increments, resulting in different DARCI thresholds for different change durations. The method is illustrated with a simulation study of depressive symptom time series with varying degrees of discontinuity and overall mean change, and four empirical case examples from two clinical samples. The results suggest that the DARCI may be particularly useful for identifying symptom shifts that appear relatively abrupt, which can help indicate when a patient is showing significant improvement or deterioration. Its ease of use makes it suitable for application in clinical contexts and a promising method for exploring transitions in psychiatric populations.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T12:50:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231221808
       
  • Psychometric Properties and Validity of the Screen for Child Anxiety
           Related Emotional Disorders: Parent Version (SCARED-P) in an Early
           Childhood Sample

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      Authors: Bethan Scoberg, Christopher Hobson, Stephanie van Goozen
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders: Parent Version (SCARED-P) was originally developed for use in middle childhood and adolescence. The present study examined the psychometric properties and validity of the SCARED-P in an early childhood sample (predominantly aged 4–7 years). The 41-item version of the SCARED-P was administered to the parents of 233 children (mean age = 6.31 years, SD = 1.08; females = 34.3%). Confirmatory factor analysis provided mixed support for the original five-factor model of the SCARED-P. The SCARED-P demonstrated good to excellent internal consistency (total α = .94, subscale α = .68–.89), and good construct validity with the Child Behavior Checklist, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, and the Developmental and Well-being Assessment. These findings indicate overall initial support for the SCARED-P’s utility as a measure of anxiety in early childhood, but further psychometric and validation studies are needed in larger community-based samples of young children.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T09:33:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231225203
       
  • Measuring Anxiety Among Latino Immigrant Populations: Within-Country and
           Between-Country Comparisons

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      Authors: Sumeyra Sahbaz, Ronald B. Cox, Pablo Montero-Zamora, Christopher P. Salas-Wright, Mildred M. Maldonado-Molina, Melissa M. Bates, Augusto Pérez-Gómez, Juliana Mejía-Trujillo, Saskia R. Vos, Carolina Scaramutti, Patrizia A. Perazzo, Maria Duque, Maria Fernanda Garcia, Eric C. Brown, Seth J. Schwartz
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Anxiety is the most prevalent mental health disorder among adults worldwide. Given its increased prevalence among migrants due to their marginalized position in the societies where they reside, psychometric evaluations of anxiety measures such as the Generalized Anxiety Disorder–7 (GAD-7) are needed for use with migrants. The present study is the first attempt to compare the structure of GAD-7 scores for (a) different Latino groups in the same country and (b) the same Latino group in two different countries. Using three samples of Mexican and Venezuelan migrants (total N = 933), we provide reliability and validity evidence of the GAD-7 for use with adult Latino migrants. Utilizing confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory, we demonstrate that the GAD-7 is internally consistent, possesses a strong single-factor structure, and generates scores with equivalent psychometric properties. GAD-7 is appropriate for use with Mexican and Venezuelan migrants across differing gender groups and education levels.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T11:29:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231223715
       
  • The Short Executive Function Scale

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Justin E. Karr
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study involved a psychometric evaluation of the Short Executive Function Scale (SEFS), a new 15-item self-report questionnaire measuring five constructs: Planning, Inhibition, Working Memory, Shifting, and Emotional Control. Participants included 717 U.S. undergraduate students (M = 18.9 years old, SD = 1.9; 78.8% cisgender female, 81.7% White) who completed the SEFS. A subset of 156 participants (M = 18.8 years old, SD = 0.9; 79.5% cisgender female, 83.3% White) completed the SEFS again at 2- to 3-month retest along with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult (BRIEF-A) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8). The five-factor model fit well (CFI = 0.941, RMSEA = 0.079) and each scale had acceptable internal consistency (ω range: .68–.81) and test–retest reliability (ICC range: .75–.89). Apart from Shifting, all SEFS scales had significantly larger convergent validity coefficients with their respective BRIEF-A scales (r range: −.25 to −.70) than discriminant validity coefficients with the PHQ-8 (r range: −.06 to −.28). These findings provide preliminary psychometric support for the SEFS.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T11:18:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231223122
       
  • Predicting Completion of Ecological Momentary Assessments Among
           Substance-Using Women Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Manshu Yang, Melissa R. Schick, Tami P. Sullivan, Nicole H. Weiss
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Noncompletion of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) surveys is a common issue and may yield bias in results if not properly handled. Using data observed at scheduled times as well as data retrieved later to fill missing responses, this study aims to investigate predictors of EMA completion, including demographic characteristics, time-related factors, and momentary experiences/behaviors. Data were from a 30-day EMA study including 145 women currently experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) and using substances. The average rate of EMA completion was initially 51.4% at the scheduled times and increased to 72.6% after incorporating data from later-retrieved surveys. Participants who were younger, had more children, or had lower mean levels of negative affect dysregulation showed lower completion rates. At the momentary survey level, more days into the study and afternoon/evening reports (vs. morning reports) were associated with lower completion; lower levels of negative affect dysregulation, less smoking or alcohol use, and experiencing IPV were linked to lower momentary completion. Implications of the results for handling missing data in EMA are discussed and have important ramifications for future research, practice, and theory.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T12:44:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231216948
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lamella     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Evolution, Mind and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediation Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Family Trauma, Child Custody & Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Creativity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Psychosocial Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Play in Adulthood     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychology and Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Performance and Mindfulness     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School & Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jungian Journal for Scholarly Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
KULA : knowldge creation, dissemination, and preservation studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Service Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
JCPP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Know and Share Psychology     Open Access  
Methods in Psychology     Open Access  
Gadjah Mada Journal of Professional Psychology     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Katharsis     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
Human Arenas : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Psychology, Culture, and Meaning     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cognitive Enhancement     Hybrid Journal  
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Dhammathas Academic Journal     Open Access  
INSAN Jurnal Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Heroism Science     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Psychology     Open Access  
Gogoa     Open Access  
Journal of Global Engagement and Transformation     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Journal of Cognitive Systems     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi Terapan     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Jurnal Educatio : Jurnal Pendidikan Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal  
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Musiktherapeutische Umschau : Forschung und Praxis der Musiktherapie     Hybrid Journal  

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