A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 347)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 66)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 267)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 346)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 209)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 200)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 199)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

        1 2 3 4 5        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Assessment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.519
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1073-1911 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3489
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • An Automated Online Measure for Misophonia: The Sussex Misophonia Scale
           for Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julia Simner, Louisa J. Rinaldi, Jamie Ward
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Misophonia is a sound sensitivity disorder characterized by a strong aversion to specific sounds (e.g., chewing). Here we present the Sussex Misophonia Scale for Adults (SMS-Adult), within an online open-access portal, with automated scoring and results that can be shared ethically with users and professionals. Receiver operator characteristics show our questionnaire to be “excellent” and “good-to-excellent” at classifying misophonia, both when dividing our n = 501 adult participants by recruitment stream (self-declared misophonics vs. general population), and again when dividing them with by a prior measure of misophonia (as misophonics vs. non-misophonics). Factor analyses identified a five-factor structure in our 39 Likert-type items, and these were Feelings/Isolation, Life consequences, Intersocial reactivity, Avoidance/Repulsion, and Pain. Our measure also elicits misophonia triggers, each rated for their commonness in misophonia. We offer our open-access online tool for wider use (www.misophonia-hub.org), embedded within a well-stocked library of resources for misophonics, researchers, and clinicians.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T05:35:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241234104
       
  • Development and Validation of Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence
           Perpetration and Victimization Scales Among Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jone Martínez-Bacaicoa, Miguel A. Sorrel, Manuel Gámez-Guadix
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Technology-facilitated sexual violence (TFSV) includes different forms of digital violence, such as online gender-based violence, online gender- and sexuality-based violence, digital sexual harassment, online sexual coercion, and nonconsensual pornography. The aim of this study was to design and validate a measure to assess the perpetration and victimization of each dimension of TFSV. The relationships between the different dimensions and differences by gender and sexual orientation were also analyzed. The participants were a sample of 2,486 adults (69% women) from Spain, aged between 16 and 79 (M = 25.95; DT = 9.809) years. The Technology-Facilitated Sexual Violence Scales were found to be valid and reliable instruments, supporting our recommendation for the use of these scales. Network analysis and solution-based exploratory factor analyses showed that the dimensions of online sexual coercion and nonconsensual pornography clustered together. All the perpetration variables were related to sexism. Finally, cis women and nonheterosexual people reported higher victimization scores overall compared to cis men and heterosexuals, respectively, while cis men reported higher perpetration scores overall than cis women.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-21T10:07:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241229575
       
  • One Score to Rule Them All' Comparing the Predictive and Concurrent
           Validity of 30 Hearts and Flowers Scoring Approaches

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tiffany Wu, Christina Weiland, Meghan McCormick, JoAnn Hsueh, Catherine Snow, Jason Sachs
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Hearts and Flowers (H&F) task is a computerized executive functioning (EF) assessment that has been used to measure EF from early childhood to adulthood. It provides data on accuracy and reaction time (RT) across three different task blocks (hearts, flowers, and mixed). However, there is a lack of consensus in the field on how to score the task that makes it difficult to interpret findings across studies. The current study, which includes a demographically diverse population of kindergarteners from Boston Public Schools (N = 946), compares the predictive and concurrent validity of 30 ways of scoring H&F, each with a different combination of accuracy, RT, and task block(s). Our exploratory results provide evidence supporting the use of a two-vector average score based on Zelazo et al.’s approach of adding accuracy and RT scores together only after individuals pass a certain accuracy threshold. Findings have implications for scoring future tablet-based developmental assessments.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T05:08:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241229566
       
  • Longitudinal and Gender Measurement Invariance of the General Health
           Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) From Adolescence to Emerging Adulthood

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pascal Schlechter, Sharon A. S. Neufeld
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Psychological distress often onsets during adolescence, necessitating an accurate understanding of its development. Assessing change in distress is based on the seldom examined premise of longitudinal measurement invariance (MI). Thus, we used three waves of data from Next Steps, a representative cohort of young people in the UK (N = 13,539) to examine MI of the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12). We examined MI across time and gender from ages 15 to 25 in four competing latent models: (a) a single-factor model, (b) a three-factor correlated model, (c) a bifactor model of “general distress” and two orthogonal specific factors capturing positive and negative wording, and (d) a single-factor model including error covariances of negatively phrased items. We also tested acceptability of assumptions underlying sum score models. For all factor models, residual MI was confirmed from ages 15 to 25 years and across gender. The bifactor model had the best fit. While sum score model fit was not unequivocally acceptable, most mean differences across time and gender were equivalent across sum scores and latent difference scores. Thus, GHQ-12 sum scores may be used to assess change in psychological distress in young people. However, latent scores appear more accurate, and model fit can be improved by accounting for item wording.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T06:32:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241229573
       
  • A Bifactor Evaluation of Self-Report and Clinician-Administered Measures
           of PTSD in Veterans

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amanda M. Raines, Kate E. Clauss, Dustin Seidler, Nicholas P. Allan, Jon D. Elhai, Jennifer J. Vasterling, Joseph I. Constans, Kelly P. Maieritsch, C. Laurel Franklin
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) and the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5) are two of the most widely used and well-validated PTSD measures providing total and subscale scores that correspond with DSM-5 PTSD symptoms. However, there is little information about the utility of subscale scores above and beyond the total score for either measure. The current study compared the proposed DSM-5 four-factor model to a bifactor model across both measures using a sample of veterans (N = 1,240) presenting to a Veterans Affairs (VA) PTSD specialty clinic. The correlated factors and bifactor models for both measures evidenced marginal-to-acceptable fit and were retained for further evaluation. Bifactor specific indices suggested that both measures exhibited a strong general factor but weak lower-order factors. Structural regressions revealed that most of the lower-order factors provided little utility in predicting relevant outcomes. Although additional research is needed to make definitive statements about the utility of PCL-5 and CAPS-5 subscales, study findings point to numerous weaknesses. As such, caution should be exercised when using or interpreting subscale scores in future research.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T06:27:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241229568
       
  • Reliability and Validity of a Multidimensional Measure of Subjective
           Community Well-Being

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: R. Noah Padgett, Matthew T. Lee, Renae Wilkinson, Heather Tsavaris, Tyler J. VanderWeele
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      An individual’s flourishing is sustained by and dependent on their community’s well-being. We provide one of the first studies of a measure of communal subjective well-being, focusing on individuals’ relationships with their community. Using two samples from the Greater Columbus, Ohio region, we provide evidence of the reliability and validity of the Subjective Community Well-being (SCWB) assessment. The five domains of the SCWB are Good Relationships (α = .92), Proficient Leadership (α = .93), Healthy Practices (α = .92), Satisfying Community (α = .88), and Strong Mission (α = .81). A community-based sample (N = 1,435) and an online sample of Columbus residents (N = 692) were scored on the SCWB and compared across domains. We found evidence that the SCWB scores differentiate between active and less active community members. We discuss the appropriate uses of the SCWB as a measure of well-being and provide recommendations for research that could profitably utilize the SCWB measure to examine community well-being.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-09T12:30:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911241229060
       
  • The Effect of Missing Item Data on the Relative Predictive Accuracy of
           Correctional Risk Assessment Tools

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bronwen Perley-Robertson, Kelly M. Babchishin, L. Maaike Helmus
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Missing data are pervasive in risk assessment but their impact on predictive accuracy has largely been unexplored. Common techniques for handling missing risk data include summing available items or proration; however, multiple imputation is a more defensible approach that has not been methodically tested against these simpler techniques. We compared the validity of these three missing data techniques across six conditions using STABLE-2007 (N = 4,286) and SARA-V2 (N = 455) assessments from men on community supervision in Canada. Condition 1 was the observed data (low missingness), and Conditions 2 to 6 were generated missing data conditions, whereby 1% to 50% of items per case were randomly deleted in 10% increments. Relative predictive accuracy was unaffected by missing data, and simpler techniques performed just as well as multiple imputation, but summed totals underestimated absolute risk. The current study therefore provides empirical justification for using proration when data are missing within a sample.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T10:38:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231225191
       
  • Development and Psychometric Validation of the Body Trust Scale

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: William Grunewald, Sydney N. Waitz-Kudla, Cheri A. Levinson, Tiffany A. Brown, April R. Smith
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Interoception (e.g., abilities to recognize/attend to internal sensations) is robustly associated with psychopathology. One form of interoception, body trust, is relevant for the development of disordered eating and suicidal thoughts/behaviors. However, measures of body trust are narrow, despite research suggesting body trust is multifaceted. The aim of this study was to develop a comprehensive measure of body trust: The Body Trust Scale (BTS). 479 U.S. adults completed self-report surveys containing the BTS and psychopathology measures. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed a three-factor structure: Comfort with One’s Body, Physical Attractiveness, and Comfort with Internal Sensations. Factors showed strong construct, convergent, and divergent validity, as well as moderate predictive validity for suicidal thoughts/non-suicidal self-injury. Furthermore, factors showed strong internal consistency, test–retest reliability, and were invariant across the gender binary. The BTS can be used in research and clinical settings to understand how specific facets of body trust relate to psychopathology.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T07:20:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231225200
       
  • The Behavioral, Emotional, and Social Skills Inventory: A Spanish
           Adaptation and Further Validation in Adult Population

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Álvaro Postigo, Covadonga González-Nuevo, Jaime García-Fernández, Eduardo García-Cueto, Christopher J. Soto, Christopher M. Napolitano, Brent W. Roberts, Marcelino Cuesta
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) skills encompass a broad range of interpersonal and intrapersonal abilities that are crucial for establishing and maintaining relationships, managing emotions, setting and pursuing goals, and exploring new learning opportunities. To address the lack of consensus regarding terminology, definition, and assessment of SEB skills, Soto et al. developed the Behavioral, Emotional, and Social Skills Inventory (BESSI), which consists of 192 items, 32 facets, and 5 domains. The objective of the current study was to adapt the BESSI to Spanish (referred to as BESSI-Sp) and enhance the overall understanding of the BESSI framework. A sample of 303 people was employed with a mean age of 30.35 years (SD = 14.73), ranging from 18 to 85 years. The results indicate that the BESSI-Sp demonstrates strong psychometric properties. Its facet- and domain-level structure aligns with the theoretical expectations and closely resembles the English-language source version. The facets exhibit high reliability (mean ω = .89), and the scores demonstrate adequate stability after 3 to 4 weeks (mean rICC = .77). The BESSI-Sp also displays evidence of convergent validity and integrates well with the Big Five framework, providing incremental validity for various outcomes. We discuss the implications of these findings for the assessment of SEB skills and future research in this field.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T07:11:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231225197
       
  • Are We Measuring ADHD or Anxiety' Examining the Factor Structure and
           Discriminant Validity of the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale in an Adult
           Anxiety Disorder Population

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Arij Alarachi, Colleen Merrifield, Karen Rowa, Randi E. McCabe
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Adults with clinical anxiety have significant symptom overlap and above average rates of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite this, ADHD remains a vastly under-detected disorder among this population, indicating the need for a screener with well-understood symptom dimensions and good discriminant validity. The current study compared competing models of ADHD as well as discriminant properties of self-reported ADHD symptoms as measured by the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1) in 618 adults with clinical anxiety. A three-factor correlated model of Inattention, Impulsivity, and Hyperactivity, with the movement of one item, talks excessively, to a factor of Impulsivity from Hyperactivity fit better than the one-factor, two-factor, and traditional three-factor models of ADHD. Discriminant properties of the screener were fair to good against measures of clinical anxiety and distress; however, some items within the Hyperactivity factor (e.g., difficulty relaxing; feeling driven by a motor) loaded more strongly onto factors of clinical anxiety than ADHD when measures were pooled together. These results suggest that clinicians making differential diagnoses between adult ADHD and anxiety or related disorders should look for evidence of ADHD beyond the overlapping symptoms, particularly for those within the Hyperactivity factor.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T09:27:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231225190
       
  • Uncovering Hidden Framings in Dark Triad Self-Ratings: What
           Frames-of-Reference Do People Use When Responding to Generic Dark Triad
           Items'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julian Schulze, Manuel Heinrich, Jan-Philipp Freudenstein, Philipp Schäpers, Stefan Krumm
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      In typical Dark Triad (DT) questionnaires, generic items oftentimes refer to “others” or “people” in general. Hence, respondents have to mentally aggregate their behavior across several kinds of “others” (e.g., work colleagues, family members, and friends). It remains unknown if individuals consider different kinds of interaction partners equally or if their self-reports contain “hidden” interaction partner-specific tendencies. To shed light on this issue, we assessed generic and contextualized DT items (referring to family, friends, work, and strangers; N = 814 from the general population). The correlated trait-correlated (method − 1) model was used to investigate preregistered research questions. On average, generic DT items showed the strongest association with work-contextualized DT items and the weakest association with family-contextualized DT items. However, the associations varied considerably across DT items and traits. In sum, our results suggest that hidden framings exist in some DT items, which may impact their ability to predict relevant criteria due to contextual (a)symmetries. The generalizability of the findings to other DT instruments, items, and participant groups should be examined in future research.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T11:33:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231220357
       
  • Stress Appraisal Measure: Investigating the Factor Structure and Validity
           in the French Language

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elise Grimm, Lea Francia, Stefan Agrigoroaei
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Stress Appraisal Measure (SAM) captures six different types of cognitive appraisals in anticipation of an upcoming stressful situation. The goal of this article was to examine the factorial structure and the validity of the scale in the French language while accounting for existing limitations in the literature. These include factorial structure instability and low internal consistency for specific subscales across multiple validation studies in other languages. In the first study (N = 425), the results from an exploratory factor analysis reliably suggested the removal of five items, the bridging of the threat and challenge subscales as one, and a new general five-factor structure. The new structure and its construct, convergent, and discriminant validity were confirmed in a second study (N = 308). We discuss the relevance of this five-factor scale for the studies focused on individual differences in stress and appraisals.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T12:50:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231223120
       
  • The Duration-Adjusted Reliable Change Index: Defining Clinically Relevant
           Symptom Changes of Varying Durations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marieke A. Helmich
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The time period over which relevant symptoms shifts unfold is not uniform across individuals. This article proposes an adaptation of the Reliable Change Index (RCI) to detect symptom changes of varying durations in individual patients’ time series: the Duration-Adjusted RCI (DARCI). The DARCI proportionally raises the RCI cut-off to account for its extension over additional time increments, resulting in different DARCI thresholds for different change durations. The method is illustrated with a simulation study of depressive symptom time series with varying degrees of discontinuity and overall mean change, and four empirical case examples from two clinical samples. The results suggest that the DARCI may be particularly useful for identifying symptom shifts that appear relatively abrupt, which can help indicate when a patient is showing significant improvement or deterioration. Its ease of use makes it suitable for application in clinical contexts and a promising method for exploring transitions in psychiatric populations.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T12:50:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231221808
       
  • Psychometric Properties and Validity of the Screen for Child Anxiety
           Related Emotional Disorders: Parent Version (SCARED-P) in an Early
           Childhood Sample

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Bethan Scoberg, Christopher Hobson, Stephanie van Goozen
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders: Parent Version (SCARED-P) was originally developed for use in middle childhood and adolescence. The present study examined the psychometric properties and validity of the SCARED-P in an early childhood sample (predominantly aged 4–7 years). The 41-item version of the SCARED-P was administered to the parents of 233 children (mean age = 6.31 years, SD = 1.08; females = 34.3%). Confirmatory factor analysis provided mixed support for the original five-factor model of the SCARED-P. The SCARED-P demonstrated good to excellent internal consistency (total α = .94, subscale α = .68–.89), and good construct validity with the Child Behavior Checklist, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, and the Developmental and Well-being Assessment. These findings indicate overall initial support for the SCARED-P’s utility as a measure of anxiety in early childhood, but further psychometric and validation studies are needed in larger community-based samples of young children.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T09:33:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231225203
       
  • Measuring Anxiety Among Latino Immigrant Populations: Within-Country and
           Between-Country Comparisons

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sumeyra Sahbaz, Ronald B. Cox, Pablo Montero-Zamora, Christopher P. Salas-Wright, Mildred M. Maldonado-Molina, Melissa M. Bates, Augusto Pérez-Gómez, Juliana Mejía-Trujillo, Saskia R. Vos, Carolina Scaramutti, Patrizia A. Perazzo, Maria Duque, Maria Fernanda Garcia, Eric C. Brown, Seth J. Schwartz
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Anxiety is the most prevalent mental health disorder among adults worldwide. Given its increased prevalence among migrants due to their marginalized position in the societies where they reside, psychometric evaluations of anxiety measures such as the Generalized Anxiety Disorder–7 (GAD-7) are needed for use with migrants. The present study is the first attempt to compare the structure of GAD-7 scores for (a) different Latino groups in the same country and (b) the same Latino group in two different countries. Using three samples of Mexican and Venezuelan migrants (total N = 933), we provide reliability and validity evidence of the GAD-7 for use with adult Latino migrants. Utilizing confirmatory factor analysis and item response theory, we demonstrate that the GAD-7 is internally consistent, possesses a strong single-factor structure, and generates scores with equivalent psychometric properties. GAD-7 is appropriate for use with Mexican and Venezuelan migrants across differing gender groups and education levels.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T11:29:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231223715
       
  • The Short Executive Function Scale

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Justin E. Karr
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study involved a psychometric evaluation of the Short Executive Function Scale (SEFS), a new 15-item self-report questionnaire measuring five constructs: Planning, Inhibition, Working Memory, Shifting, and Emotional Control. Participants included 717 U.S. undergraduate students (M = 18.9 years old, SD = 1.9; 78.8% cisgender female, 81.7% White) who completed the SEFS. A subset of 156 participants (M = 18.8 years old, SD = 0.9; 79.5% cisgender female, 83.3% White) completed the SEFS again at 2- to 3-month retest along with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult (BRIEF-A) and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-8). The five-factor model fit well (CFI = 0.941, RMSEA = 0.079) and each scale had acceptable internal consistency (ω range: .68–.81) and test–retest reliability (ICC range: .75–.89). Apart from Shifting, all SEFS scales had significantly larger convergent validity coefficients with their respective BRIEF-A scales (r range: −.25 to −.70) than discriminant validity coefficients with the PHQ-8 (r range: −.06 to −.28). These findings provide preliminary psychometric support for the SEFS.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-13T11:18:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231223122
       
  • Predicting Completion of Ecological Momentary Assessments Among
           Substance-Using Women Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Manshu Yang, Melissa R. Schick, Tami P. Sullivan, Nicole H. Weiss
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Noncompletion of ecological momentary assessment (EMA) surveys is a common issue and may yield bias in results if not properly handled. Using data observed at scheduled times as well as data retrieved later to fill missing responses, this study aims to investigate predictors of EMA completion, including demographic characteristics, time-related factors, and momentary experiences/behaviors. Data were from a 30-day EMA study including 145 women currently experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) and using substances. The average rate of EMA completion was initially 51.4% at the scheduled times and increased to 72.6% after incorporating data from later-retrieved surveys. Participants who were younger, had more children, or had lower mean levels of negative affect dysregulation showed lower completion rates. At the momentary survey level, more days into the study and afternoon/evening reports (vs. morning reports) were associated with lower completion; lower levels of negative affect dysregulation, less smoking or alcohol use, and experiencing IPV were linked to lower momentary completion. Implications of the results for handling missing data in EMA are discussed and have important ramifications for future research, practice, and theory.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T12:44:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231216948
       
  • Psychometric Evaluation of an Adapted Short-Form Spirituality Scale in a
           Sample of Predominantly White Adults in an Inpatient Substance Use
           Disorder Treatment Program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emily M. Britton, Radia Taisir, Alysha Cooper, Shannon Remers, Yelena Chorny, Onawa LaBelle, Brian Rush, James MacKillop, Mary Jean Costello
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Spirituality is an important aspect of treatment and recovery for substance use disorders (SUDs), but ambiguities in measurement can make it difficult to incorporate as part of routine care. We evaluated the psychometric properties of an adapted short-form version of the Spirituality Scale (the Spirituality Scale–Short-Form; SS-SF) for use in SUD treatment settings. Participants were adult patients (N = 1,388; Mage = 41.23 years, SDage = 11.55; 68% male; 86% White) who entered a large, clinically mixed inpatient SUD treatment program. Factor analysis supported the two-dimensional structure, with factors representing Self-Discovery and Transcendent Connection. Tests of measurement invariance demonstrated that the scale was invariant across age and gender subgroups. The SS-SF exhibited convergent and concurrent validity via associations with participation in spiritual activities, hopefulness, life satisfaction, 12-step participation, and depressive symptoms. Finally, scores on the SS-SF were significantly higher at discharge compared to admission, demonstrating short-term sensitivity to change. These findings support use of the SS-SF as a concise, psychometrically sound measure of spirituality in the context of substance use treatment.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-12-31T02:32:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231217478
       
  • Survey Uses May Influence Survey Responses

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melissa G. Wolf, Alexander J. Denison
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Traditional validation processes for psychological surveys tend to focus on analyzing item responses instead of the cognitive processes that participants use to generate these responses. When screening for invalid responses, researchers typically focus on participants who manipulate their answers for personal gain or respond carelessly. In this paper, we introduce a new invalid response process, discordant responding, that arises when participants disagree with the use of the survey and discuss similarities and differences between this response style and protective responding. Results show that nearly all participants reflect on the intended uses of an assessment when responding to items and may decline to respond or modify their responses if they are not comfortable with the way the results will be used. Incidentally, we also find that participants may misread survey instructions if they are not interactive. We introduce a short screener to detect invalid responses, the discordant response identifiers (DRI), which provides researchers with a simple validity tool to use when validating surveys. Finally, we provide recommendations about how researchers may use these findings to design surveys that reduce this response manipulation in the first place.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-12-31T02:27:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231213849
       
  • Further Evidence for a Dimensional Latent Structure of Health Anxiety:
           Taxometric Analyses of the Whiteley Index Based on Two German
           Representative Samples

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anne-Kathrin Bräscher, Elmar Brähler, Winfried Häuser, Michael Witthöft
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Health anxiety is an intricate part of illness anxiety and somatic symptom disorder. Based on convenience samples, two out of three available studies indicate that it is a dimensional rather than a categorical construct. Using two representative datasets, this study investigates whether previous results can be clarified. Conventional taxometric analyses as well as comparison curve fit indices (CCFI) profile analyses (MAMBAC and MAXSLOPE procedures) were calculated with two datasets of the German adult population assessing the Whiteley Index (WI-14, N = 2,072; WI-7, N = 2,498). Mean CCFIs indicated a dimensional structure for both the WI-7 (mean CCFI = 0.42, mean CCFI profile = 0.40) and the WI-14 (mean CCFI = 0.44, mean CCFI profile = 0.32). The results support and extend previous findings by strongly suggesting a dimensional distribution of health anxiety in the general population. Implications for research and practice comprise the adoption of a dimensional description of psychopathology as well as transdiagnostic treatment approaches.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T01:35:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231219802
       
  • The Development and Validation of a Measure of Mental Health, Help-Seeking
           Beliefs in Arabic-Speaking Refugees

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Natalie Mastrogiovanni, Yulisha Byrow, Angela Nickerson
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Despite reporting elevated rates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), refugees are less likely than other groups to seek psychological treatment. Relatively little attention has been paid to the role of negative help-seeking beliefs in influencing treatment uptake. The current study sought to develop and psychometrically validate a novel measure indexing negative help-seeking beliefs for refugees (Help-Seeking Beliefs Scale [HSBS]). In this study, 262 Arabic-speaking refugee participants completed an online survey consisting of the HSBS along with measures indexing similar constructs (self-stigma of PTSD and help-seeking, perceived stigma, negative help-seeking attitudes, and help-seeking intentions). Factor analysis revealed a three-factor structure aligning with key themes identified in the literature: (a) Fear of Negative Consequences, (b) Inappropriateness, and (c) Perceived Necessity. The scale demonstrated excellent internal consistency, convergent validity, and predicted reduced help-seeking intentions. Results support the utility of a novel measure capturing a prominent help-seeking barrier in a population with high psychopathology and low treatment uptake.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T01:32:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231220482
       
  • Investigating the PHQ-9 With Mokken Scale Analysis and Cognitive
           Interviews

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kristín Hulda Kristófersdóttir, Hafrún Kristjánsdóttir, Ragnhildur Lilja Asgeirsdottir, Thorlakur Karlsson, Vaka Vésteinsdóttir, Fanney Thorsdottir
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Scores on the Patient Health Questionnaire–9 (PHQ-9) are frequently used to assess depression both in research and in clinical practice. The aim was to examine the validity of the PHQ-9 sum score by using Mokken scale analysis (Study I) and cognitive interviews (Study II) on the Icelandic version of PHQ-9. A primary care sample of 618 individuals was used in Study I. The results indicate that the PHQ-9 items are not close enough to perfectly unidimensional for their sum score to accurately order people on the depression severity dimension. In Study II, the sample consisted of 53 individuals, with 28 having a history of depression and 25 not. The findings reveal a number of issues concerning respondents’ use of the PHQ-9. No systematic differences were found in the results of the two groups. The PHQ-9 sum score should thus be interpreted and used with great care. We provide scale revision recommendations to improve the quality of PHQ-9.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T01:29:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231216961
       
  • Examination of Acceptability, Feasibility, and Iatrogenic Effects of
           Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) of Suicidal Ideation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: L. M. M. Kivelä, F. Fiß, W. van der Does, N. Antypa
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) can be used to examine the dynamics of suicidal ideation in daily life. While the general acceptability and feasibility of EMA in suicide research has been established, further examination of potential iatrogenic effects (i.e., negative reactivity) and identifying those more likely to react negatively is needed. Participants (N = 82) with current suicidal ideation completed 21 days of EMA (4×/day) and filled in M = 78% (Med = 84%) of the EMA. No positive or negative affect reactivity was observed in EMA ratings over the study period. Retrospectively, most participants rated their experience as positive (69%); 22% indicated mood worsening, and 18% suicidal ideation reactivity. Those with more borderline personality traits, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and higher depressive, anxiety, and suicidal ideation symptoms, were more likely to report iatrogenic effects. In conclusion, while high compliance rates and lack of affect reactivity during EMA indicate that EMA is well tolerated in suicide research, a minority of participants may report subjective mood effects in retrospect.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T06:45:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231216053
       
  • Measuring Situational Cognitive Performance in the Wild: A Psychometric
           Evaluation of Three Brief Smartphone-Based Test Procedures

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Johanna Perzl, Elisabeth Maria Riedl, Joachim Thomas
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile devices provide new opportunities to draw conclusions about cognitive performance in everyday situations. To gain insights into cognitive performance patterns in healthy adult populations, we adapted three established cognitive tests for smartphone use: the Digit Symbol Substitution Task (DSST), Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART), and Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT). To increase their feasibility for ambulatory assessment, we identified the minimum measurement durations that provide reliable and valid state measures of cognitive performance. Over 2 weeks, 46 participants performed each test once per day at random times, along with self-reports (e.g., on concentration, mood, and mental demands). The validity and reliability of change are promising for the 30-second PVT and 90-second DSST and SART. The DSST and SART provide fruitful outcomes for ambulatory field studies linked to mood, stress, and mental demands. We provide digital versions of the adapted DSST and SART online for free.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-12-15T04:32:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231213845
       
  • Giving Meaning to the Dark Triad: Comparison of Different Factor
           Structures of the Dirty Dozen Through Eight Regions of the World

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Álvaro Postigo, Jaime García-Fernández, Marcelino Cuesta, Patricia Recio, Javier Barría-González, Luis Manuel Lozano
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The traits of the dark triad (narcissism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism) capture the individual differences in the aversive personality. The dark triad has shown significant relations with behaviors that affect people’s lives. One of the best-known instruments to assess the dark triad is the Dirty Dozen. However, controversy continues over the use of one general dark triad score or, conversely, three different scores. This study aimed to investigate the factor structure of the Dirty Dozen across eight global regions. There were 11,477 participants in 49 countries grouped into eight regions. Different factor structures were studied using confirmatory factor analyses. Both the three-dimensional models and the bifactor models (symmetrical or traditional and non-symmetrical or bifactor-[S – 1]) showed a good fit to the data. The bifactor-(S – 1) models (with psychopathy or Machiavellianism as the reference factors) show adequate fit to the data, supported by the coherence of the factorial loadings and the bifactor indices. Regarding measurement invariance for both models, configural, metric, and scalar invariance were satisfied. The results indicate that it is not clear whether a psychopathy or Machiavellianism reference factor predominates in the Dirty Dozen. For both models, templates are provided to obtain standardized scores for applied researchers in the eight studied world regions until future studies offer a greater amount of validity evidence for this instrument.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-11-14T08:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231209282
       
  • Development of the Hogan Personality Content Single-Items Inventory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dustin Wood, P. D. Harms, Ryne A. Sherman, Michael Boudreaux, Graham H. Lowman, Robert Hogan
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Hogan Personality Inventory (HPI) and Hogan Developmental Survey (HDS) are among the most widely used and extensively well-validated personality inventories for organizational applications; however, they are rarely used in basic research. We describe the Hogan Personality Content Single-Items (HPCS) inventory, an inventory designed to measure the 74 content subscales of the HPI and HDS via a single-item each. We provide evidence of the reliability and validity of the HPCS, including item-level retest reliability estimates, both self-other agreement and other-other (or observer) agreement, convergent correlations with the corresponding scales from the full HPI/HDS instruments, and analyze how similarly the HPCS and full HPI/HDS instruments relate to other variables. We discuss situations where administering the HPCS may have certain advantages and disadvantages relative to the full HPI and HDS. We also discuss how the current findings contribute to an emerging picture of best practices for the development and use of inventories consisting of single-item scales.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-11-14T08:28:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231207796
       
  • An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale
           for DSM-5 Among Veterans

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Daniel J. Lee, Michael L. Crowe, Frank W. Weathers, Michelle J. Bovin, Stephanie Ellickson, Denise M. Sloan, Paula Schnurr, Terence M. Keane, Brian P. Marx
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      We used item response theory (IRT) analysis to examine Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5) item performance using data from three large samples of veterans (total N = 808) using both binary and ordinal rating methods. Relative to binary ratings, ordinal ratings provided good coverage from well below to well above average within each symptom cluster. However, coverage varied by cluster, and item difficulties were unevenly distributed within each cluster, with numerous instances of redundancy. For both binary and ordinal scores, flashbacks, dissociative amnesia, and self-destructive behavior items showed a pattern of high difficulty but relatively poor discrimination. Results indicate that CAPS-5 ordinal ratings provide good severity coverage and that most items accurately differentiated between participants by severity. Observed uneven distribution and redundancy in item difficulty suggest there is opportunity to create an abbreviated version of the CAPS-5 for determining PTSD symptom severity, but not DSM-5 PTSD diagnosis, without sacrificing precision.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-11-14T08:10:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231202440
       
  • The Development of the Five-Factor Schizoid Inventory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Neil A. Meyer, Katherine E. Hein, Donald R. Lynam, Thomas A. Widiger, Stephanie N. Mullins-Sweatt
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The current study sought to provide evidence for a measure of schizoid personality disorder (SZD PD) traits using the Five-Factor Model framework of personality. In the first study, undergraduate participants (n = 496) completed the Five-Factor Schizoid Inventory (FFZI) and other self-report measures. The first half of the sample was used to develop the FFZI, while the second half was used to validate it. The FFZI demonstrated excellent internal consistency, convergent validity with measures of SZD PD and hypothesized IPIP-NEO facets, and discriminant validity with other PDs and non-hypothesized IPIP-NEO facets. The second study recruited MTurk participants (n = 181) and demonstrated preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the FFZI in an online, community sample. Ultimately, these data suggest that the FFZI is a useful measure of SZD PD and provide further evidence that SZD PD can be conceptualized as a maladaptive extension of introversion traits.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T07:05:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231209289
       
  • Development and Validation of the Fearlessness About Suicide Scale

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: William Grunewald, Natalie M. Perkins, Min Eun Jeon, E. David Klonsky, Thomas E. Joiner, April R. Smith
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Recent work has identified fearlessness about suicide, rather than fearlessness about death, as more theoretically relevant in the assessment of capability for suicide and thus a more appropriate construct of measurement. The aim of the current project was to develop and validate a scale specifically assessing fearlessness about suicide. Across two studies, support for a 7-item, single-factor structure of the Fearlessness About Suicide Scale (FSS) emerged. The FSS factor structure demonstrated a good fit in the first study and was replicated in the second study. Measurement invariance was examined across those identifying as men and women and found to be comparable. The FSS also demonstrated test–rest reliability and good convergent and divergent validity in community and undergraduate samples. Overall, findings indicate that the FSS has a replicable factor structure that generalizes across those identifying as men and women and may better assess components of capability for suicide than existing scales.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T06:52:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231200866
       
  • Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire: Norms for Adults in Higher
           Levels of Care

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Renee D. Rienecke, Philip S. Mehler, Alan Duffy, Daniel Le Grange, Carol B. Peterson, Dan V. Blalock
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Establishing normative data for questionnaires is essential for the accurate interpretation of scores, given that these norms can vary according to different subpopulations and treatment contexts. The purpose of this study was to establish norms for the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) among adults receiving higher levels of care (HLOCs) for the treatment of eating disorders. Participants were 2,283 people receiving treatment at the inpatient, residential, partial hospitalization, or intensive outpatient levels of care. The EDE-Q was completed at admission. Patients with anorexia nervosa—restricting subtype (AN-R) had the lowest EDE-Q Global scores when compared with all other eating disorder diagnoses. When compared with intensive outpatient care, only those in residential treatment had higher EDE-Q Global scores. This study is among the first to describe norms for the EDE-Q in a large sample of adults receiving various HLOCs. Programs utilizing the EDE-Q to assess treatment outcomes can use these findings to aid people in interpreting their scores.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-11-06T07:16:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231208386
       
  • Adequacy of the WHOQoL-BREF to Assess the Quality of Life of Victims of
           Armed Conflicts

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Claudia Morales-Valiente, Liu Mok, Alina Wong, Antonio L. Manzanero, Marta Guarch-Rubio, Marlen Simancas, José C. Celedón-Rivero, Wilson M. Salas-Picón
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      There is a deterioration in the quality of life (QoL) of survivor victims of warlike conflicts. Because there is a need to guarantee the effectiveness of assessment tools for these populations, we studied the adequacy of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQoL-BREF) to assess the QoL of 1,136 surviving victims of the armed conflict in Colombia. Although this questionnaire has yielded promising results, questions remain about its psychometric suitability for specific populations. We used model modification at the item level, comparisons of models with different factor structures, and dimensionality analysis to address the psychometric problems encountered. Dimensionality analysis using a bifactor model suggests that WHOQoL-BREF total scores might be a more appropriate way of reporting results when model fit adequacy is not reached. Conclusions are offered on the psychometric properties of the WHOQoL-BREF, the evaluation of special populations, and possible strategies to address future questionnaire modifications.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T11:36:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231201145
       
  • Age Effects on Subtest and Composite Scores of the Wechsler Abbreviated
           Scale of Intelligence–Second Edition

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joseph J. Ryan, Samuel T. Gontkovsky, David S. Kreiner
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      We evaluated age effects in the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence–Second Edition (WASI-II) standardization sample. This extends work completed using previous editions of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales. Of the four subtests, Vocabulary (VC) and Similarities (SI) were most resistant to aging. VC showed minimal variation regardless of age; SI peaked at 30 to 54 years followed by a decline. Block Design (BD) and Matrix Reasoning (MR) showed substantial drops from the younger to older groups. BD peaked at 17 to 44 years and then declined; MR peaked at 20 to 29 years and then consistently deteriorated. The WASI-II Verbal Comprehension Index peak at 30 to 44 years was followed by a maximum drop at 85 to 90 years. The Perceptual Reasoning Index peaked at 20 to 29 years, with a marked decline by 65 to 69 years. The Full Scale IQ was average until age 65 years followed by a decline. Minor changes in points of peak performance and subsequent decline were seen as a function of Full Scale IQ level. Results were consistent with crystallized and fluid intelligence theory.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T10:24:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231207785
       
  • Additional Validation of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-3
           (MMPI-3) Eating Concerns Scale

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Terran M. S. Sutphin, Adam D. Hicks, Ryan J. Marek, Kimberly S. Gorman, David M. McCord
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Maladaptive eating behaviors are typically associated with significant impairment in psychological functioning more broadly. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) family of instruments has traditionally been the most frequently used psychological assessment of psychopathology by clinical psychologists. The most recent version, the MMPI-3, features a new Eating Concerns (EAT) scale that screens for the presence of problematic eating behaviors. The goals of the current study were (a) to independently replicate validity correlations reported from the college sample during EAT scale development, (b) to evaluate the utility of EAT scale item-level correlations with other substantive MMPI-3 scales, and (c) to evaluate the ability of the EAT items to predict specific frequency counts of dysfunctional eating behaviors. The current study examined the MMPI-3 assessment of dysfunctional eating behaviors among 188 undergraduate participants. Results indicated that the EAT scale is meaningfully associated with core symptom dimensions of maladaptive eating, including binging, vomiting, restricting, and concerns about weight and shape. In addition, this study identified meaningfully distinct patterns of correlations with personality and psychopathology constructs, and specific behavioral frequencies, across the five individual EAT scale items. These results contribute to the enhanced utility of this important screening scale in clinical settings.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T10:22:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231207111
       
  • Change Score and Subscore Precision and Reliability of the
           Children’s Depression Inventory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Morgan G. Rosen, Joseph H. Grochowalski
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Child Depression Inventory (CDI) is often used to assess change in depression over time, but no studies estimate the reliability of CDI change scores nor its five subscores. Our study investigated the reliability of change scores for both the total score on the CDI as well as its five subscores. We examined CDI responses from 186 maltreated children and estimated change score reliability for relative (e.g., comparison) and absolute (e.g., diagnosis) purposes. We also conducted subscore utility analysis, which determines if subscores have adequate reliability and provide information beyond the total score. We found that the total change score had acceptable reliability of .70 for our sample for both relative and absolute interpretations. In addition, the total score was a better predictor of true subscore values than the observed subscores—suggesting subscores did not add value over the total score, and that the reliability of changes in subscores was too low to be useful for any purpose. In summary, we found that the total CDI change scores were useful for assessing change in studies that examine relative or absolute change, and we advise caution when interpreting CDI subscores based on our analysis.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T10:19:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231204832
       
  • Psychometric Properties and Factor Structure of the Multidimensional
           Behavioral Health Screen (MBHS) With a University Sample

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Brooke R. Leonelli, Christian A. L. Bean, Joel W. Hughes
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Multidimensional Behavioral Health Screen (MBHS) is a brief screening measure of behavioral health symptoms. Although the measure was first developed for primary care, it is likely to have clinical utility in other settings. This study examined the MBHS’s factor structure and psychometric properties with a university undergraduate and graduate student sample (n = 602, 58.6% female, 75.9% White, primarily aged 20–24) during the COVID-19 pandemic. MBHS subscale scores demonstrated internal consistency reliability and both convergent and discriminant relations with external, criterion variables. Confirmatory factor analyses supported a 7-subscale factor structure of the MBHS and did not find evidence of higher order factors. Clinical and theoretical implications, as well as future research directions, are discussed.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-27T10:02:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231205547
       
  • The Interpersonal Psychological Theory of Suicide in Italian University
           Students: Validation of the INQ-15 and the ACSS-FAD

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sara Magliocca, Daniele Romano, Thomas E. Joiner, Fabio Madeddu, Raffaella Calati, Patrizia Zeppegno, Carla Gramaglia
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      In the frame of the interpersonal psychological theory of suicide (IPTS), Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire (INQ-15) assesses thwarted belongingness (TB) and perceived burdensomeness (PB), related to suicidal ideation (SI); Acquired Capability for Suicide Scale–Fearlessness About Death (ACSS-FAD) measures this component which contributes to lethal self-harm. The objective was to evaluate the psychometric properties of INQ-15 and ACSS-FAD in a population of Italian university students. Since the Italian INQ-15 was already validated, we translated ACSS-FAD through a multistage procedure and administered both to 1,665 Italian university students. Factor analysis confirmed a two-factor-related model of INQ-15, one factor of ACSS-FAD, and good reliability for both. We proved the association between INQ-15 and current SI and between ACSS-FAD and lifetime suicidal planning and/or suicide attempt. The convergent and discriminant validities were in line with those of previous studies. Both tools are valid and reliable to assess the constructs associated with suicide outcomes according to IPTS.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-25T05:06:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231203971
       
  • Within-Person Test Score Distributions: How Typical Is
           “Normal”'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alison S. Buchholz, Gila Z. Reckess, Victor A. Del Bene, S. Marc Testa, Jeffrey L. Crawford, David J. Schretlen
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      We evaluated within-person variability across a cognitive test battery by analyzing the shape of the distribution of each individual’s scores within a battery of tests. We hypothesized that most healthy adults would produce test scores that are normally distributed around their own personal battery-wide, within-person (wp) mean. Using cross-sectional data from 327 neurologically healthy adults, we computed each person’s mean, standard deviation, skew, and kurtosis for 30 neuropsychological measures. Raw scores were converted to T-scores using three degrees of calibration: (a) none, (b) age, and (c) age, sex, race, education, and estimated premorbid IQ. Regardless of calibration, no participant showed abnormal within-person skew (wpskew) and only 10 (3.1%) to 16 (4.9%) showed wpkurtosis greater than 2. If replicated in other samples and measures, these findings could illuminate how healthy individuals are endowed with different cognitive abilities and provide the foundation for a new method of inference in clinical neuropsychology.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-25T05:02:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231201159
       
  • Development and Validation of a New Measurement Scale for Existential
           Loneliness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sohrab Hadeei
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This article deals with the development and initial validation of the Existential Loneliness Scale (ELS). An initial pool of 40 items, generated based on literature review, qualitative studies, and previously developed scales, was evaluated by the experts’ judgment, so 30 items were retained and then administered to an Iranian sample of 433 youth and adult participants aged 20 to 85 years. Participants also completed other measures relevant for construct validity: Existential Loneliness Questionnaire (ELQ), De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale (DJGLS-6), Existential Anxiety Questionnaire (EAQ), Meaning in Life Questionnaire (MLQ), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-13), and Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). Exploratory factor analysis and parallel analysis showed strong evidence of unidimensionality. This result was also supported by confirmatory factor analysis test. Finally, 19 items were kept, which were free from DIF by gender and by marital status. The scale had high internal consistency (α = .95 and ω = .95) and adequate test–retest reliability with a 1-month interval (r = .74). Examination of the ELS’ correlation with criterion measures indicated that the scale has good concurrent, discriminant, and convergent validity. Findings revealed the ELS as a reliable, valid, and suitable instrument to measure existential loneliness in the Iranian adult population.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-25T04:59:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231204831
       
  • Comparison Is the Thief of Joy' Introducing the Attitudes Towards
           Social Comparison Inventory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pascal Schlechter, Thomas Meyer, Nexhmedin Morina
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Social comparison has a significant impact on individuals’ motivation, affect, and behavior. However, we lack a scale that captures individual differences in attitudes toward social comparison. To address this gap, we developed the Attitudes Toward Social Comparison Inventory (ASCI) drawing on existing scales that tap into metacognitive beliefs about worrying, self-motives, beliefs about emotions, and the general comparative-processing model. We examined the psychometric properties of the ASCI in a longitudinal study (N = 1,084), and a second (N = 550) and third cross-sectional study (N = 306). Through exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, we identified a 12-item two-factor solution capturing positive and negative attitudes toward social comparison. The ASCI demonstrated measurement invariance across gender and time. The two factors were differentially and longitudinally associated with relevant constructs, including social comparison, metacognitive beliefs about worrying, depression, self-concept clarity, envy, and self-esteem. The ASCI facilitates comprehensive investigations of social comparison processes.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-25T04:56:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231203968
       
  • Exploring the Relationship Between Self-Compassion and Compassion for
           Others: The Role of Psychological Distress and Wellbeing

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Javier García-Campayo, Alberto Barceló-Soler, David Martínez-Rubio, Jaime Navarrete, Adrián Pérez-Aranda, Albert Feliu-Soler, Juan V. Luciano, Ruth Baer, Willem Kuyken, Jesus Montero-Marin
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      We addressed construct validity and explored the relationship between self-compassion and compassion for others using the two main current operationalizations of compassion (Neff’s and the Sussex-Oxford Compassion Scales, SOCSs). Relationships with psychological distress and wellbeing, and potential differences in the association between self-compassion and compassion for others by level of psychological distress and wellbeing were also explored. Participants (n = 811) completed the Spanish adaptations of the Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), the Compassion Scale (CS), the SOCSs (for the self/others), the Short Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (SWEMWBS), and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21). We fitted bifactor models to estimate the general factor of each construct for the different operationalizations, and calculated correlations between them. Relationships between self-compassion and compassion for others from the same operationalization were intermediate, while those between the same constructs from different operationalizations were large. Both constructs showed positive associations with wellbeing, while only self-compassion was associated with decreased psychological distress. Participants with good mental health showed higher associations between self-compassion and compassion for others than those with poorer mental health. Self-compassion and compassion for others appear to be dimensional constructs that can converge or diverge. When they converge, it is associated with better mental health.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-16T06:27:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231203966
       
  • Faking Good on Self-Reports Versus Informant-Reports of Emotional
           Intelligence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarah A. Walker, Carolyn MacCann
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Research demonstrates that people can fake on self-rated emotional intelligence scales. As yet, no studies have investigated whether informants (where a knowledgeable informant rates a target’s emotional intelligence) can also fake on emotional intelligence inventories. This study compares mean score differences for a simulated job selection versus a standard instructed set for both self-ratings and informant-ratings on the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire—Short Form (TEIQue-SF). In a 2 × 2 between-person design, participants (N = 81 community volunteers, 151 university students) completed the TEIQue-SF as either self-report or informant-report in one of two instruction conditions (answer honestly, job simulation). Both self-reports (d = 1.47) and informant-reports (d = 1.56) were significantly higher for job simulation than “answer honestly” instructions, indicating substantial faking. We conclude that people can fake emotional intelligence for both themselves (self-report) and on behalf of someone else (informant-report). We discuss the relevance of our findings for self- and informant-report assessment in applied contexts.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-14T11:17:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231203960
       
  • Psychometric Evaluation of the Affective Reactivity Index Among Children
           and Adolescents in China: A Multi-Method Assessment Approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Boqing Lu, Yuan Fang, Jimin Cai, Zhiyan Chen
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Affective Reactivity Index (ARI) is one of the most studied scales for assessing youth irritability, but little is known about its measurement performance in community populations. This study applied item response theory (IRT), network analysis, and classical test theory (CTT) to examine the psychometric properties of the ARI in a sample of n = 395 community-based children (Mage = 13.44, SD = 2.51) and n = 403 parents. In this sample, the ARI demonstrated good reliability, as well as convergent and concurrent validity. The one-factor structure was supported by both confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and network analysis. IRT analysis revealed that the ARI effectively distinguished between various levels of irritability within the community population. Network analysis identified “Loses temper easily,”“Gets angry frequently,” and “Often loses temper” are central aspects of irritability. The findings support the ARI as a brief, reliable, and valid instrument to assess irritability in community children and adolescents.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-10-14T10:29:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231199424
       
  • The Patient-Perceived Helpfulness of Measures Scale: Development and
           Validation of a Scale to Assess the Helpfulness of Using Measures in
           Psychological Treatment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gina Di Malta, Mick Cooper, Julian Bond, Brett Raymond-Barker, Marsha Oza, Regina Pauli
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      In response to the increase in Routine Outcome Monitoring and Clinical Feedback, the Patient-Perceived Helpfulness of Measures Scale (ppHMS) was developed to assess the helpfulness—as perceived by patients—of using measures in psychological treatment. Study 1: The construct of patient-perceived helpfulness of measures was explored using thematic analysis with 15 patients. Six helpful and three unhelpful themes were identified and informed item development. Study 2: 28 items were formulated and rated by experts. Ten items were taken forward for psychometric shortening in a sample of 76 patients. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) led to an adequately fitting six-item model with excellent internal consistency, and convergence with the Delighted-Terrible single item of product satisfaction and a single item of measure helpfulness. Study 3: In a stratified online sample of 514 U.K. psychotherapy patients, a five-item model constituted the best fit. The final ppHMS had excellent internal consistency (McDonald’s ω = .90), convergent validity with psychotherapy satisfaction (r = .5; p < .001), divergence from social desirability (r = .1), and metric and scalar invariance across measures. Study 4: Analyses were replicated and confirmed in a stratified U.S. sample (n = 602). The ppHMS is a reliable and valid scale that can be used to assess and compare patients’ perceptions of the helpfulness of different measures as part of their psychological treatment.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-09-28T10:56:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231195837
       
  • Interpartner Agreement on Intimate Partner Violence Reports: Evidence From
           a Community Sample of Different-Sex Couples

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marta Capinha, Daniel Rijo, Marlene Matos, Marco Pereira
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      An accurate assessment of intimate partner violence (IPV) is crucial to guide public policy and intervention. The Conflict Tactic Scales Revised (CTS-2) is one of the most widely used instruments to do so. Despite its good psychometric properties, research on interpartner agreement has pointed to low-to-moderate estimates, which generated some concerns about the validity of the results obtained through single-partner reports. This cross-sectional study introduces indexes that have not previously been used to assess interpartner agreement. Both partners’ reports on perpetration and victimization were analyzed in a community sample of 268 different-sex couples. Our results generally pointed to better agreement levels on IPV occurrence than frequency, suggesting that the proxy method (i.e., using a single-partner report) could be a reliable method for assessing IPV occurrence but not its frequency in this population. Findings are discussed as well as the advantages and constraints of different IPV assessment practices.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-09-21T12:04:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231196483
       
  • Measurement Invariance of the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory in Male
           and Female Million Veteran Program Enrollees Completing the Comprehensive
           Traumatic Brain Injury Evaluation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Erin D. Ozturk, Yichi Zhang, Mark H. C. Lai, McKenna S. Sakamoto, Catherine Chanfreau-Coffinier, Victoria C. Merritt
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated measurement invariance across males and females on the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI) in U.S. military veterans enrolled in the VA Million Veteran Program. Participants (N = 17,059; males: n = 15,450; females: n = 1,609) included Veterans who took part in the VA Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Screening and Evaluation Program and completed the NSI. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses investigated measurement invariance of the NSI 4-factor model. The configural (comparative fit index [CFI] = 0.948, root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA] = 0.060) and metric (CFI = 0.948, RMSEA = 0.058) invariance models showed acceptable fit. There was a minor violation of scalar invariance (Δχ2 = 232.50, p < .001); however, the degree of noninvariance was mild (ΔCFI = −0.002, [math]). Our results demonstrate measurement invariance across sex, suggesting that the NSI 4-factor model can be used to accurately assess symptoms in males and females following TBI. Findings highlight the importance of considering validity of measurement across study groups to increase confidence that a measure is interpreted similarly by respondents from different subgroups.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-09-15T04:59:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231198214
       
  • Validation of Self-Administered Visual and Verbal Episodic Memory Tasks in
           Healthy Controls and a Clinical Sample

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Darlene P. Floden, Olivia Hogue, Abagail F. Postle, Robyn M. Busch
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study evaluated the performance characteristics, construct validity, and reliability of two computerized, self-administered verbal and visual recognition memory tests based on the Remember-Know paradigm. Around 250 healthy control participants and 440 patients referred for neuropsychological assessment used an iPad to complete the Words and Faces recognition memory tests before or after concurrent neuropsychological testing. Performance accuracy was high but without ceiling effects. Education, but not age, was related to overall performance for both samples while the influence of gender and race differed across samples. In the clinical sample, overall performance was worse in those patients demonstrating memory impairment on clinical assessment. Words and Faces subtests demonstrated the strongest correlations with neuropsychological measures of verbal and nonverbal memory, respectively. Both showed moderate correlations with processing speed while Faces was also correlated with visuospatial skills. The memory tests showed good test–retest reliability over two testing sessions. These findings demonstrate acceptable psychometric properties in clinical and community samples and suggest that this computerized format is feasible for memory assessment in clinical contexts.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-09-15T04:54:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231195844
       
  • Empirical Investigation of Different Factor Structures for the Eating
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Paul E. Jenkins, Dan V. Blalock, Alan Duffy, Philip S. Mehler, Renee D. Rienecke
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Eating Disorder Examination–Questionnaire (EDE-Q) is a widely used self-report measure of eating pathology. Despite widespread use, investigations of its factor structure have proved inconclusive and rarely supported the “original” interpretation. The current study evaluates several proposed factor solutions of the EDE-Q using latent variable analysis in a sample of adult women with anorexia nervosa (AN). A total of 804 patients from a specialist treatment center in the United States participated in the study. Confirmatory factor analysis was conducted on 22 EDE-Q items assessing attitudinal features of eating pathology. Findings suggested that three full-item versions (none of which was the “original” interpretation) fit the data adequately, with a brief, seven-item version showing excellent fit. The study is one of the first to examine this within a sample of women with AN and provides an empirical foundation for how best to use the EDE-Q among clinical and research participants with AN. Findings suggest that the “original” factor structure lacks structural validity in women with AN. Its use should generally be discouraged, and future work on screening and treatment outcomes might consider the EDE-Q7.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-09-14T08:59:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231198207
       
  • Development of the Impact of Diagnosis Scale–Revised (IODS-R)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Samuel R. C. Arnold, Yunhe Huang, Lauren P. Lawson, Julianne M. Higgins, Ye In (Jane) Hwang, Amanda Richdale, Julian N. Trollor
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      No tools quantify the experience, psychological, and practical impact of receiving a diagnosis from a non-deficit perspective. Autism is increasingly late diagnosed in adulthood. The Impact of Diagnosis Scale (IODS) was initially developed for borderline personality disorder. We aimed to develop a revised version suitable for autistic adults and potentially other diagnostic groups. Following a trial of a preliminary revision, the researchers and autistic research advisors co-produced an expanded pool of 46 items, scored on 7-point Likert-type scale, within 6 hypothesized domains. Scale reduction processes were applied to data from 125 formally diagnosed autistic adults. Following iterative rounds of factor analysis using maximum likelihood estimation with Promax rotation, 22 items were retained across 4 domains to comprise the IODS-R. The IODS-R adds new understanding to the experience of receiving an autism diagnosis in adulthood. It may be useful for evaluating diagnostic services and other diagnostic groups.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T06:20:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231196486
       
  • A Multi-Trait Multi-Method Examination of Psychometric Instrument
           Performance in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michael A. Levine, Huan Chen, Ericka L. Wodka, Alyssa C. Deronda, Brian S. Caffo, Joshua B. Ewen
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Anecdotal evidence has suggested that rater-based measures (e.g., parent report) may have strong across-trait/within-individual covariance that detracts from trait-specific measurement precision; rater measurement-related bias may help explain poor correlation within Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) samples between rater-based and performance-based measures of the same trait. We used a multi-trait, multi-method approach to examine method-associated bias within an ASD sample (n = 83). We examined performance/rater-instrument pairs for attention, inhibition, working memory, motor coordination, and core ASD features. Rater-based scores showed an overall greater methodology bias (57% of variance in score explained by method), while performance-based scores showed a weaker methodology bias (22%). The degree of inter-individual variance explained by method alone substantiates an anecdotal concern associated with the use of rater measures in ASD.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T11:26:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231198205
       
  • A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Negative Alcohol-Related Consequences in
           the United States and Sweden: Measurement Invariance of the Rutgers
           Alcohol Problem Index

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Frank J. Schwebel, Dylan K. Richards, Claes Andersson, Mary E. Larimer
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Commensurate measures of alcohol-related consequences across countries and cultures are critical for addressing the global burden of hazardous alcohol use. The Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index (RAPI), developed and validated in the United States, is a popular measure of alcohol problems. This study examined measurement invariance of the RAPI across samples of U.S. and Swedish high school seniors. Latent mean differences in alcohol problems across countries and differences in associations between alcohol problems with alcohol use and protective behavioral strategies (PBS) were also examined. The RAPI was scalar invariant. Swedish students reported fewer problems than U.S. students (latent mean difference = −0.19, p = .047). In both samples, the RAPI was positively correlated with alcohol use frequency and quantity (ps < .001), and negatively correlated with PBS use (ps < .05). Overall, the RAPI demonstrated measurement invariance, and we found evidence for its validity across samples of U.S. and Swedish high school seniors.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T09:01:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231195834
       
  • A Systematic Review of Response Styles Among Latinx Populations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Camille Zolopa, Michelle Leon, Andrew Rasmussen
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Culture influences responses to psychological measurements in ways unrelated to target constructs, thus biasing test scores and potentially contributing to under- and over-diagnosis of mental health problems in populations for which measures have not yet been normed. We conducted a systematic review of publications addressing response style among Latinx population groups in North and South America. In a final corpus of 24 studies, Latinx/Latin American populations were generally found to exhibit higher levels of extreme response style (n = 17), acquiescent response style (n = 10), and socially desirable responding (n = 5). The few publications (n = 3) that investigated midpoint responding reported no differences. Seven publications (29%) attempted to adjust scores to mitigate response style bias, using both scale design and statistical techniques. Findings suggest that researchers and clinicians should directly assess culturally patterned response style as a construct, rather than inferring style indirectly using other measures. For clinicians, knowledge of response style represents another facet of case conceptualization.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-09-05T05:37:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231194969
       
  • WordSword: An Efficient Online Word Reading Assessment for Global English

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jana Chi-San Ho, Catherine McBride, Kelvin Fai Hong Lui, Marta Łockiewicz
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The development of efficient and reliable online assessments has become increasingly important in the digital era. We developed a 10-min online word reading assessment of global English based on the existing paper-and-pencil version of our English silent word reading test. The test includes two parts, namely, random word recognition and contextual word reading. A total of 889 participants (437 children and 392 adults; 62.7% female) took part in the study. They were from various regions including mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR, Poland, the United States, and the Philippines. Reliability and validity analyses on various demographics samples (by age and country/region of origin) demonstrated that the WordSword Test is highly reliable and valid (e.g., the correlation of this test with other English reading measures were above .80). Education level was positively correlated with test performance, while the correlations between age and test performance were not consistent. Ninety-seven children participants also took the paper-and-pencil version of the WordSword Test. The correlation between performances on the online and paper-and-pencil versions of the test was .879, one year apart. With more children and adults taking the WordSword Test, we ultimately hope to establish norms by area, grade level, and age.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-09-02T05:42:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231194971
       
  • The Unified Narcissism Scale–Revised: Expanding Measurement and
           Understanding of Narcissism Across Cultures

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Danushika Sivanathan, Boris Bizumic, Wangtianxi Li, Junwen Chen
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The study of narcissism has been hindered by conceptual, theoretical, and measurement in-consistencies. In this article, we report two studies that tested a novel unified conceptualization and theoretical approach to narcissism using the Unified Narcissism Scale–Revised. Study 1 revised the recently developed Unified Narcissism Scale to construct a preliminary 40-item measure in a sample of 395 American participants (Mage = 41). We confirmed the five-factor first-order model, the two-factor second-order model, and the one-factor third-order model. Study 2 considered the cross-cultural performance of the revised scale in the Chinese language in China (N = 326, Mage = 25.5 years) and in the English language in Sri Lanka (N = 354 Mage = 28.7 years) and constructed a final 35-item measure. In conducting these studies, we have demonstrated the cross-cultural importance of entitlement and self-esteem to the conceptualization of narcissism and suggest that the negative relationship between narcissism and agreeableness may be culture-specific to Western samples (as evidenced by the absence of this relationship in non-Western samples). In this article, we have constructed a measure of narcissism that has refined our understanding of the construct and created a tool to capture this understanding.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-08-08T08:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231191435
       
  • Brief Report: Does the Number of Response Options Matter for the BFI-2'
           Conceptual Replication and Extension

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrew Rakhshani, M. Brent Donnellan, Brent W. Roberts, Richard E. Lucas
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      We evaluated how the number of response options affects the psychometric properties of the Big Five Inventory-2 (BFI-2). Using two large samples collected from a market research company (Ns = 893 and 1,213), we tested how different response options of the BFI-2 influenced scale score distributions, internal consistency estimates, convergent validity correlations, and criterion validity correlations. Results suggest that score distributions were impacted by the number of response options such that ceiling and floor effects were more common when using two or three response options than when using more options. Estimates of Cronbach’s alpha were generally lower with fewer scale points as compared with more scale points, but these effects disappeared when ordinal alpha was used. There were no systematic effects of response options on convergent validity and criterion validity correlations. Given these results, there seems to be few psychometric reasons for deciding whether to administer personality items with five, six, or seven scale points.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T11:53:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231190098
       
  • Measuring the “Dark” Triad: Comparing the Five-Factor Model
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Leigha Rose, Donald R. Lynam, Joshua D. Miller
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The “Dark” Triad (DT) refers to three personality constructs with ties to socially aversive behaviors: psychopathy, narcissism, and Machiavellianism. These constructs are commonly assessed via omnibus self-report inventories such as the Short Dark Triad (SD3) or the Dirty Dozen. Alternatively, researchers wishing to measure “dark” traits can compile stand-alone measures of each construct. Recently, the Five Factor Model Antagonistic Triad Measure (FFM ATM) was developed, which measures the DT from the perspective of the widely used Five Factor Model of personality. Initial validation studies indicated that the FFM ATM addresses common concerns with other omnibus inventories (e.g., allows for multifaceted examination of DT constructs). The current study tested the FFM ATM in relation to these other methods of measuring the DT (i.e., omnibus inventories and combinations of single-construct measures). Across three tests of validity (i.e., nomological network analysis, intraclass correlations, and incremental validity analyses), the FFM ATM showed favorable results and outperformed other measures of the DT.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T11:51:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231190097
       
  • Psychometric Validation of the Compulsive Internet Use Scale in Spanish
           Adolescents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gema Aonso-Diego, Álvaro Postigo, Roberto Secades-Villa
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Despite problematic internet use being especially high among adolescents, there are no screening instruments in Spain specifically for adolescents that would facilitate early detection of this problem. The main goal of this study was to validate the Compulsive Internet Use Scale (CIUS) in the adolescent Spanish population as well as to analyze the discriminative capacity of CIUS based on sociodemographic characteristics, grade point average, and other addictive behaviors. Data were obtained from the ESTUDES, a representative survey of addictive behaviors of Spanish adolescents. The sample consisted of a total of 34,308 adolescents aged between 14 and 18 years old (Mage = 15.70; SD = 1.19; 51.7% females). Results indicated that the CIUS fit a unidimensional structure, exhibited measurement invariance with respect to sex and age, and demonstrated excellent reliability (ω = .94). Past-month tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis use, as well as past-year gambling and gaming, were related to CIUS scores. A standardized screening instrument that provides valid, reliable information on young people’s use of the Internet in Spain is a critical requirement for successful early detection and intervention in this population.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-07-22T06:08:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231188738
       
  • Cognitive Reserve Potential: Capturing Cognitive Resilience Capability in
           Adolescence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Federica Conte, Luca Rinaldi, Tiziano Gerosa, Sara Mondini, Giulio Costantini, Luisa Girelli
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Cognitive reserve (CR) represents the adaptive response of the cognitive system responsible for preserving normal functioning in the face of brain damage. Experiential factors such as education, occupation, and leisure activities influence the development of CR. Theoretically, such factors build up from childhood and across adulthood. Thus, appropriate tools to define and measure CR as early as adolescence are essential to understand its developmental processes. To this aim, we introduce the construct of “Cognitive Reserve Potential” (CRP) and its corresponding index of experiential factors tailored to youth. We investigated prototypical youth exposures potentially associated with the lifelong development of CR (e.g., sport practice, musical experiences, cultural activities, and relationships with peers and family). Principal component analysis and confirmatory factor analysis identified and replicated the CRP factor structure on two independent samples of Italian students: N = 585 (295 F) and N = 351 (201 F), ages 11 to 20. CRP was associated mainly with family socio-cultural status (i.e., socioeconomic status [SES], Home Possessions, and Books at Home). Results confirmed the strength of the factorial model and warranted the proposal of the CRP-questionnaire as an innovative tool for understanding CR evolutionary dynamics.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-07-03T04:48:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231183363
       
  • Measuring Intolerance of Uncertainty After Acquired Brain Injury: Factor
           Structure, Reliability, and Validity of the Intolerance of Uncertainty
           Scale–12

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrea Kusec, Fionnuala C. Murphy, Polly V. Peers, Tom Manly
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) is a risk factor for poor mental health. Acquired brain injury (ABI; for example, stroke, traumatic brain injury) often brings considerable uncertainty and increased mood disorder vulnerability. The Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale–Short Form (IUS-12) is a brief, well-validated IU measure in non-ABI samples, comprising two subscales, namely, Prospective Anxiety and Inhibitory Anxiety. Here, for the first time, we investigated its reliability and validity (N = 118), and factor structure (N = 176), in ABI. Both subscales had high test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs] of .75 and .86) and were significantly associated with mood disorder symptoms. The two-factor model was superior to a one-factor IU model fit. Some fit statistics were less than optimal (standardized root mean square residual [SRMR] = 0.06, root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA] = 0.09); hence, exploration of other factor structures in other ABI samples may be warranted. Nonetheless, the IUS-12 appears suitable in ABI.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-06-26T09:56:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231182693
       
  • Measurement Invariance in Longitudinal Bifactor Models: Review and
           Application Based on the p Factor

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sharon A. S. Neufeld, Michelle St Clair, Jeannette Brodbeck, Paul O. Wilkinson, Ian M. Goodyer, Peter B. Jones
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Bifactor models are increasingly being utilized to study latent constructs such as psychopathology and cognition, which change over the lifespan. Although longitudinal measurement invariance (MI) testing helps ensure valid interpretation of change in a construct over time, this is rarely and inconsistently performed in bifactor models. Our review of MI simulation literature revealed that only one study assessed MI in bifactor models under limited conditions. Recommendations for how to assess MI in bifactor models are suggested based on existing simulation studies of related models. Estimator choice and influence of missing data on MI are also discussed. An empirical example based on a model of the general psychopathology factor (p) elucidates our recommendations, with the present model of p being the first to exhibit residual MI across gender and time. Thus, changes in the ordered-categorical indicators can be attributed to changes in the latent factors. However, further work is needed to clarify MI guidelines for bifactor models, including considering the impact of model complexity and number of indicators. Nonetheless, using the guidelines justified herein to establish MI allows findings from bifactor models to be more confidently interpreted, increasing their comparability and utility.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-06-23T06:54:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231182687
       
  • Temporal Stability of the Personality Assessment Inventory: Investigating
           Potential Predictors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joseph Maffly-Kipp, Leslie C. Morey
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we explored the temporal stability of the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI), which has not been comprehensively reexamined since it was first published. Our three specific aims were to determine the utility of PAI indicators of basic protocol validity (inconsistent responses [ICN] and highly unusual/unlikely responses [INF]) in identifying suspect responding; calculate the stability coefficients for each PAI scale and subscale across 3-, 6-, and 9-week spans; and explore whether profile stability across four measurements could be prospectively predicted. We administered the PAI to a sample of undergraduates (N = 579) at four separate timepoints. ICN and INF effectively identified likely attriters and inconsistent responders. All PAI full scales and subscales evidenced good test–retest reliability, with some small exceptions. Finally, all PAI clinical scales were correlated with profile instability although many of these correlations were no longer significant when controlling for mean clinical elevation of the profile. We interpreted these results as evidence for the utility of PAI validity scales, the temporal reliability of the PAI, and the role of psychopathology in response variability over time. We also discussed some preliminary evidence that this variability can be prospectively predicted, suggesting that it in part reflects substantive changes rather than random error variance.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-06-23T06:43:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231182685
       
  • Psychometric Properties of Controlled Oral Word Association (COWA) Test
           and Associations With Education and Bilingualism in American Indian
           Adults: The Strong Heart Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Astrid M. Suchy-Dicey, Thao T. Vo, Kyra Oziel, Roxanna King, Celestina Barbosa-Leiker, Kristoffer Rhoads, Steven Verney, Dedra S Buchwald, Brian F. French
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Controlled Oral Word Association (COWA) test is used to assess phonemic fluency and executive function. Formal validation of test scores is important for accurate cognitive evaluation. However, there is a dearth of psychometric validation among American Indian adults. Given high burden of dementia risk and key contextual factors associated with cognitive assessments, this represents a critical oversight. In a large, longitudinal population-based cohort study of adult American Indians, we examined several validity inferences for COWA, including scoring, generalization, and extrapolation inferences, by investigation of factor structure, internal consistency, test–retest reliability, and differential test functioning. We found adequate unidimensional model fit, with high factor loadings. Internal consistency reliability and test–retest reliability were 0.88 and 0.77, respectively, for the full group. COWA scores were lowest among the oldest, lowest education, bilingual speakers; group effects for sex and bilingual status were small; age effect was medium; and education effect was largest. However, Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT) score effect was stronger than education effect, suggesting better contextualization may be needed. These results support interpretation of total COWA score, including across sex, age, or language use strata.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-06-20T12:12:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231180127
       
  • Standalone Performance Validity Tests May Be Differentially Related to
           Measures of Working Memory, Processing Speed, and Verbal Memory in
           Patients With Multiple Sclerosis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: John W. Lace, Victoria Sanborn, Rachel Galioto
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Cognitive functioning may account for minimal levels (i.e., 5%–14%) of variance of performance validity test (PVT) scores in clinical examinees. The present study extended this research twofold: (a) by determining the variance cognitive functioning explains within three distinct PVTs (b) in a sample of patients with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). Seventy-five pwMS (Mage = 48.50, 70.6% female, 80.9% White) completed the Victoria Symptom Validity Test (VSVT), Word Choice Test (WCT), Dot Counting Test (DCT), and three objective measures of working memory, processing speed, and verbal memory as part of clinical neuropsychological assessment. Regression analyses in credible groups (ns ranged from 54 to 63) indicated that cognitive functioning explained 24% to 38% of the variance in logarithmically transformed PVT variables. Variance from cognitive testing differed across PVTs: verbal memory significantly influenced both VSVT and WCT scores; working memory influenced VSVT and DCT scores; and processing speed influenced DCT scores. The WCT appeared least related to cognitive functioning of the included PVTs. Alternative plausible explanations, including the apparent domain/modality specificity hypothesis of PVTs versus the potential sensitivity of these PVTs to neurocognitive dysfunction in pwMS were discussed. Continued psychometric investigations into factors affecting performance validity, especially in multiple sclerosis, are warranted.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-06-12T05:31:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231178289
       
  • A Brief Measure of Positive and Negative Interpretation Biases:
           Development and Validation of the Ambiguous Social Scenarios Questionnaire
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Megan Baumgardner, Alaina K. LaGattuta, Kristy Benoit Allen
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Positive and negative interpretation biases have been conceptualized as distinct constructs related to anxiety and social anxiety, but the field lacks psychometrically sound self-report measures to assess positive and negative interpretations of social ambiguity. This study examined the psychometric properties of the Ambiguous Social Scenarios Questionnaire (ASSQ) in two samples of 2,188 and 454 undergraduates with varying levels of anxiety. Results supported a bifactor model with a general interpretation bias factor and specific factors assessing positive and negative interpretation biases. The ASSQ demonstrated measurement invariance across genders and levels of social anxiety, as well as convergent and incremental validity with two existing measures of interpretation bias. It also demonstrated concurrent validity with attentional control, intolerance of uncertainty, total anxiety, and social anxiety and discriminant validity with emotional awareness. Findings support the ASSQ as a brief, valid, and reliable measure of positive and negative interpretation biases toward ambiguous social situations.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-06-03T05:15:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231176275
       
  • Dynamic Risk Scales Degrade Over Time: Evidence for Reassessments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Seung C. Lee, Kelly M. Babchishin, Kimberly P. Mularczyk, R. Karl Hanson
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Risk tools containing dynamic (potentially changeable) factors are routinely used to evaluate the recidivism risk of justice-involved individuals. Although frequent reassessments are recommended, there is little research on how the predictive accuracy of dynamic risk assessments changes over time. This study examined the extent to which predictive accuracy decreases over time for the ACUTE-2007 and the STABLE-2007 sexual recidivism risk tools. We used two independent samples of men on community supervision (NStudy 1 = 795; NStudy 2 = 4,221). For all outcomes (sexual, violent, and any recidivism [including technical violations]), reassessments improved predictive accuracy, with the largest effects found for the most recent assessment (i.e., those closest in time prior to the recidivism event). Based on these results, we recommend that ACUTE-2007 assessments occur at least every 30 days and that the STABLE-2007 assessments occur every 6 months or after significant life changes (e.g., successful completion of treatment).
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T05:37:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231177227
       
  • Effects of Reference Group Instructions on Big Five Trait Scores

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Madeline R. Lenhausen, Wiebke Bleidorn, Christopher J. Hopwood
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      People responding to personality questionnaires rate themselves by comparing themselves to some reference group, but this reference group is typically not specified. In this study, we examined the differences between Big Five trait scores when people responded to trait questionnaires without a specified reference group, as is typical in personality assessment, and when they were asked to compare themselves to people in general, close others, people their age, people their same gender, their ideal self, or their past self. We found that personality scores tended to be more adaptive for between-person comparisons than for within-person comparisons. We also found that unprompted instructions produced mildly higher scores across all traits. There were few differences among between-person reference group conditions. Men rated themselves as slightly more agreeable when comparing themselves to other men. Implications for basic and applied personality assessment are discussed.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-05-30T05:01:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231175850
       
  • Examining Measurement Invariance in the Personality Inventory for DSM-5
           Brief Form Across Sexual and Gender Minority Status

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shayan Asadi, Tony J. Cunningham, Theresa A. Morgan, Mark Zimmerman, Craig Rodriguez-Seijas
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Personality Inventory for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, Brief Form (PID-5-BF) was developed with an assumption of invariance across sexual and gender minority (SGM) individuals. This assumption has yet to be tested empirically. Using multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, we examined measurement invariance in the PID-5-BF across the SGM status in clinical (N = 1,174; n = 254 SGM) and nonclinical (N = 1,456; n = 151 SGM) samples. Measurement invariance was supported for the PID-5-BF structure, item thresholds, and factor loadings, but not at the item intercept level. SGM individuals endorsed higher negative affectivity, antagonism, disinhibition, and psychoticism domains in both samples. In the clinical sample, adjusting for partial invariance decreased detachment and antagonism levels for SGM persons. In the nonclinical sample, adjusting for partial invariance reduced antagonism disparities in the SGM group, even rendering original group differences null. Our results support the use of the PID-5-BF in SGM populations but indicate that some measurement bias may drive observed disparities in maladaptive trait domains and, in turn, personality disorder diagnosis.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-05-30T04:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231176449
       
  • The Chinese Parenting Stress Scale for Preschoolers’ Parents:
           Development and Initial Validation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jinghui Zhao, Min Xie, Jingyi He, Meng-Cheng Wang
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Parenting stress is the experience of discomfort or distress that results from the demands associated with the role of parenting. Although there are numerous parenting stress scales, relatively few scales have been developed with consideration of the Chinese cultural context. This study aimed to develop and validate the Chinese Parenting Stress Scale (CPSS) with a multidimensional and hierarchical structure for Mainland Chinese preschoolers’ parents (N = 1,427, Mage = 35.63 years, SD = 4.69). In Study 1, a theoretical model and an initial 118 items were developed, drawing on prior research and existing measures of parenting stress. Exploratory factor analysis yielded 15 first-order factors with 60 items. In Study 2, confirmatory factor analyses supported a higher order solution consisting of 15 first-order factors covering four domains: Child Development (12 items), Difficult Child (16 items), Parent–Child Interaction (12 items), and Parent’s Readjustment to Life (20 items). Measurement invariance indicated no gender differences between parents for the scale scores. The convergent, discriminant, and criteria validity of the CPSS scores was supported by its association with related variables in the expected directions. Moreover, the CPSS scores added significant incremental variance in predicting somatization, anxiety, and child’s emotional symptoms more so than the Parenting Stress Index–Short Form-15. The CPSS total and subscale scores all had acceptable Cronbach’s αs in both samples. The overall findings support the CPSS as a psychometrically sound tool.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-05-26T09:36:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231176274
       
  • Negative Mood Dysregulation Loads Strongly Onto Common Factors With Many
           Forms of Psychopathology: Considerations for Assessing Nonspecific
           Symptoms

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kasey Stanton, Kennedy M. Balzen, Christine DeFluri, Peyton Brock, Holly F. Levin-Aspenson, Mark Zimmerman
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      There have been proposals to expand definitions for categorical disorders and dimensionally conceptualized syndromes (e.g., psychopathy) to include negative mood lability and dysregulation (NMD). Factor analytic results are often presented in support of these proposals, and we provide factor analytic demonstrations across clinically oriented samples showing that NMD indicators load strongly onto factors with a range of psychopathology. This is unsurprising from a transdiagnostic perspective but shows that factor analysis could potentially be used to justify expanding definitions for specific constructs even though NMD indicators show strong, nonspecific loadings on psychopathology factors ranging widely in nature. Expanding construct definitions and assessment approaches to emphasize NMD also may negatively impact discriminant validity. We agree that targeting NMD is essential for comprehensive assessment, but our demonstrative analyses highlight a need for using factor analysis and other statistical methods in a careful, theoretically driven manner when evaluating psychopathology structure and developing measures.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-05-26T09:34:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231174471
       
  • Development and Validation of a Broad and Fear-Adaptable Measure of Fear
           Approach and Application to Common Eating Disorder Fears

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Caroline Christian, Irina A. Vanzhula, Victoria Ciotti, Cheri A. Levinson
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Fear approach is a theorized mechanism of exposure treatment for anxiety-based disorders. However, there are no empirically established self-report instruments measuring the tendency to approach feared stimuli. Because clinical fears are heterogeneous, it is important to create a measure that is adaptable to person- or disorder-specific fears. The current study (N = 455) tests the development, factor structure, and psychometric properties of a self-report instrument of fear approach broadly and the adaptability of this measure to specific eating disorder fears (i.e., food, weight gain). Factor analyses identified a unidimensional, nine-item factor structure as the best fitting model. This measure had good convergent, divergent, and incremental validity and good internal consistency. The eating disorder adaptations retained good fit and strong psychometric properties. These results suggest that this measure is a valid, reliable, and adaptable measure of fear approach, which can be used in research and exposure therapy treatment for anxiety-based disorders.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T08:57:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231174469
       
  • The Social Media Use Scale: Development and Validation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alison B. Tuck, Renee J. Thompson
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Social media (SM) use has been primarily operationalized as frequency of use or as passive versus active use. We hypothesize that these constructs have shown mixed associations with psychological constructs because the factor structure underlying social media use (SMU) has not been fully identified. We conducted three studies with college students. In Study 1 (N = 176), we collected data about participants’ SMU, informing item generation. In Study 2 (N = 311), we tested two factor structures: (a) passive, active social, and active non-social and (b) a hypothesized four-factor structure. Neither confirmatory model produced acceptable fits, but an exploratory factor analysis suggested a four-factor model: belief-based, consumption-based, image-based, and comparison-based SMU. This four-factor structure was supported in Study 3 (N = 397), which was preregistered, via a confirmatory factor analysis. The subscale items showed good internal consistencies, and evidence is presented for convergent validity. These factors represent a novel classification of people’s SMU that can be measured with the Social Media Use Scale.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T08:54:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231173080
       
  • A Psychometric Evaluation of the Expanded Version of the Inventory of
           Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS-II) in Children and Adolescents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matti Cervin, Carla Martí Valls, Stefan Möller, Andreas Frick, Johannes Björkstrand, David Watson
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The expanded version of the Inventory of Depression and Anxiety Symptoms (IDAS-II) is a self-report measure of 18 empirically derived internalizing symptom dimensions. The measure has shown good psychometric properties in adults but has never been evaluated in children and adolescents. A Swedish version of the IDAS-II was administered to 633 children and adolescents (Mage =16.6 [SD = 2.0]) and 203 adults (Mage = 35.4 [SD = 12.1]). The model/data fit of the 18-factor structure was excellent in both samples and measurement invariance across age groups was supported. All scales showed good to excellent internal consistency and psychometric properties replicated in the younger youth sample (< 16 years). Among youth, good convergent validity was established for all scales and divergent validity for most scales. The IDAS-II was better at identifying youth with current mental health problems than an internationally recommended scale of internalizing symptoms. In conclusion, the IDAS-II shows promise as a measure of internalizing symptoms in youth.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-05-13T06:45:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231170841
       
  • Factor Structure and Measurement Invariance of the Suicide Status Form-IV

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicolas Oakey-Frost, Ross Divers, Emma H. Moscardini, Sarah Pardue-Bourgeois, Jessica Gerner, Anthony Robinson, Eathan Breaux, Kathleen A. Crapanzano, Matthew Calamia, David A. Jobes, Raymond P. Tucker
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Suicide Status Form-IV (SSF-IV) is the measure used in the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS). The SSF-IV Core Assessment measures various domains of suicide risk. Previous studies established a two-factor solution in small, homogeneous samples; no investigations have assessed measurement invariance. The current investigation sought to replicate previous factor analyses and used measurement invariance to identify differences in the Core Assessment by race and gender. Adults (N = 731) were referred for a CAMS consultation after exhibiting risk for suicide. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated good fit for both one- and two-factor solutions while the two-factor solution is potentially redundant. Configural, metric, and scalar invariance held across race and gender. Ordinal logistic regression models indicated that neither race nor gender significantly moderated the relationship between the Core Assessment total score and clinical outcomes. Findings support a measurement invariant, one-factor solution for the SSF-IV Core Assessment.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-05-04T05:32:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231170150
       
  • Predicting Lifetime Suicide Attempts in a Community Sample of Adolescents
           Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kristin Jankowsky, Diana Steger, Ulrich Schroeders
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Suicide is a major global health concern and a prominent cause of death in adolescents. Previous research on suicide prediction has mainly focused on clinical or adult samples. To prevent suicides at an early stage, however, it is important to screen for risk factors in a community sample of adolescents. We compared the accuracy of logistic regressions, elastic net regressions, and gradient boosting machines in predicting suicide attempts by 17-year-olds in the Millennium Cohort Study (N = 7,347), combining a large set of self- and other-reported variables from different categories. Both machine learning algorithms outperformed logistic regressions and achieved similar balanced accuracies (.76 when using data 3 years before the self-reported lifetime suicide attempts and .85 when using data from the same measurement wave). We identified essential variables that should be considered when screening for suicidal behavior. Finally, we discuss the usefulness of complex machine learning models in suicide prediction.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-04-24T09:55:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231167490
       
  • Category Switching Test: A Brief Amyloid-β-Sensitive Assessment Tool for
           Mild Cognitive Impairment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Liang Cui, Zhen Zhang, Yihan Guo, Yuehua Li, Fang Xie, Qihao Guo
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Category Switching Test (CaST) is a verbal fluency test with active semantic category switching. This study aimed to explore the association between CaST performance and brain amyloid-β (Aβ) burden in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and the neurofunctional mechanisms. A total of 112 participants with MCI underwent Florbetapir positron emission tomography, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, and a neuropsychological test battery. The high Aβ burden group had worse CaST performance than the low-burden group. CaST score and left middle temporal gyrus fractional amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) related inversely to the global Florbetapir standardized uptake value rate. Functional connectivity between the left middle temporal gyrus and frontal lobe decreased widely and correlated with CaST score in the high Aβ burden group. Thus, CaST score and left middle temporal gyrus fALFF were valuable in discriminating high Aβ burden. CaST might be useful in screening for MCI with high Aβ burden.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2023-04-21T05:42:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911231167537
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.192.15.251
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

        1 2 3 4 5        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 100)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 347)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 66)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 267)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 62)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 346)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 209)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 200)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 199)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)

        1 2 3 4 5        [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.192.15.251
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-