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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access  
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 364)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 48)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 190)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 84)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 268)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 155)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 129)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 159)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 75)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access  
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Assessment
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.519
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1073-1911 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3489
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • The Inventory of Complicated Grief—A Systematic Psychometric Review and
           Conceptual Replication Study of the Structural Validity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alexander Schakowski, Justus Tönnies, Hans-Christoph Friederich, Mechthild Hartmann, Markus W. Haun
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Inventory of Complicated Grief (ICG) is a commonly used self-report measure in psycho-oncology, best supportive care, and palliative medicine. However, existing validation studies yielded conflicting results regarding the structural validity. This study provides a psychometric review and conceptual replication of the ICG latent structure to test the hypothesis that existing studies overfit unreliable sources of variance, which overshadow the unidimensionality of the ICG. All proposed latent models identified in the psychometric review were tested in a series of confirmatory and exploratory structural equation models. Specifically, at least five to six latent intercorrelated factors were necessary to reach acceptable model fit. However, a general CG factor accounted for most variance and ICG sum scores showed predictable associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms, which suggests that the ICG is essentially unidimensional. There are indications that other measures of pathological grief show similar inconsistencies. Overall, potentially emerging subfacets of the ICG should not be interpreted as distinct “symptom clusters.” If time constraints are an issue as is often the case in clinical research, complicated grief may just be measured by a reduced item set without a significant loss of information or complexity.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T11:11:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221100980
       
  • Screening for Pregnancy-Related Anxiety: Evaluation of the
           Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Scale–Screener Using Rasch Methodology

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rachel Dryer, Robyn Brunton, Chris Krägeloh, Oleg Medvedev
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Pregnancy-related anxiety has been linked to many maternal and child-related negative outcomes. However, there is an absence of free, well-validated screeners for this condition. The Pregnancy-related Anxiety Scale–Screener (PrAS-Screener) was evaluated using robust Rasch methodology. This study also aimed to develop a shorter version to meet the need of settings governed by professional guidelines stipulating the use of brief instruments. Data from 400 pregnant women (Mage = 27.82, SD = 5.38) were subjected to Rasch analyses and the resulting Rasch models confirmed in a second sample (N = 400, Mage = 26.29, SD = 4.95). After minor modifications, the original 15-item PrAS-Screener demonstrated good fit, unidimensionality, excellent targeting, invariance, and internal consistency. After removal of items with content overlap, an 11-item version was developed, with this version showing good fit, unidimensionality, reasonable targeting, and sound internal consistency. The PrAS-Screeners show promise as psychometrically sound clinical scales for screening pregnancy-related anxiety.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T09:00:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221103309
       
  • Cross-Cultural Measurement Invariance of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire
           Across Nine Adolescent Samples

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Andrew Rasmussen, Michelle Leon, Ask Elklit
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Trauma researchers often make claims about the severity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) across populations, and yet cross-cultural measurement invariance (MI) is rarely assessed. Nine youth samples with Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ) responses were grouped based on sampling strategy used into two sets: representative (Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, and Lithuania, n = 1,457), and convenience (Greenland, India, Kenya, Malaysia, and Uganda, n = 2,036). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to gauge whether configural, metric, scalar, and residual invariance of different models held between national samples within the two sets. Configural invariance held for most PTSD models in convenience samples, not in representative samples. Metric invariance was less common, and scalar and residual in general did not hold. Cultural similarity between samples seemed to be associated with invariance. Findings suggest that although PTSD symptoms may cluster similarly across culturally distal groups, comparisons of the severity of symptoms using the HTQ across adolescent samples are not likely valid.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T12:56:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221101912
       
  • Measurement Invariance of the Pathological Narcissism Inventory and
           Multimethod Examination of Narcissistic Presentations in Community and
           Clinical Samples

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rossella Di Pierro, Giulio Costantini, Erika Fanti, Marco Di Sarno, Emanuele Preti, Fabio Madeddu, John F. Clarkin, Eve Caligor, Chiara De Panfilis
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Pathological Narcissism Inventory (PNI) is extensively used in recent empirical literature on pathological narcissism. However, most studies using the PNI are community-based, and no studies have used the PNI to investigate narcissistic presentations in personality disordered patients. This study investigates measurement invariance of the PNI in community participants and patients with personality disorders, and examines differences of narcissistic presentations in these samples through a multimethod approach. Results show that the PNI can be used reliably to measure and compare traits of pathological narcissism in community participants and patients with personality disorders. Personality disordered patients show higher traits reflecting vulnerable narcissism and overt manifestations of grandiose narcissism, compared with controls. Finally, network analysis indicates that traits of grandiose fantasies and entitlement rage have a central role in defining manifestations of PNI pathological narcissism, regardless of the presence of an underlying personality disorder. Research and clinical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T12:48:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221101367
       
  • The Effect of Computerized Adaptive Testing on Motivation and Anxiety: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hanif Akhtar, Silfiasari, Boglarka Vekety, Kristof Kovacs
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Although many studies have been carried out on the psychometric aspects of computerized adaptive testing (CAT), its psychological aspects are less researched. Early studies claimed that CAT can be more motivating and induce less anxiety than traditional fixed-item tests (FIT). The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to gain a comprehensive understanding of the effects of CAT on motivation and anxiety in comparison to traditional fixed-item testing. Seven databases were examined. Articles were eligible if they employed an empirical study containing a direct comparison between CAT and FIT. Meta-analytical results showed no overall effect of test type on anxiety and motivation when comparing CAT with FIT (k = 11, g+ = 0.06, p = .28). However, easier CAT had positive effect compared with FIT (k = 2, g+ = .22, p < .001). Certain modifications in CAT administration can provide positive psychological effects for test-takers.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T12:47:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221100995
       
  • The Exponentially Weighted Moving Average Procedure for Detecting Changes
           in Intensive Longitudinal Data in Psychological Research in Real-Time: A
           Tutorial Showcasing Potential Applications

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Arnout C. Smit, Evelien Schat, Eva Ceulemans
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Affect, behavior, and severity of psychopathological symptoms do not remain static throughout the life of an individual, but rather they change over time. Since the rise of the smartphone, longitudinal data can be obtained at higher frequencies than ever before, providing new opportunities for investigating these person-specific changes in real-time. Since 2019, researchers have started using the exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) procedure, as a statistically sound method to reach this goal. Real-time, person-specific change detection could allow (a) researchers to adapt assessment intensity and strategy when a change occurs to obtain the most useful data at the most useful time and (b) clinicians to provide care to patients during periods in which this is most needed. The current paper provides a tutorial on how to use the EWMA procedure in psychology, as well as demonstrates its added value in a range of potential applications.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-23T05:02:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221086985
       
  • Impact of Measurement Variability on Study Inference in Partner Violence
           Prevention Trials in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cari Jo Clark, Irina Bergenfeld, Yuk Fai Cheong, Nadine J. Kaslow, Kathryn M. Yount
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      In lower- and middle-income countries (LMICs), studies of interventions to reduce intimate partner violence (IPV) are expanding, yet measurement equivalence of the IPV construct—the primary outcome in these investigations—has not been established. We assessed the measurement equivalence of physical and sexual IPV item sets used in recent trials in LMICs and tested the impact of noninvariance on study inference. With data from four intervention trials (N = 3,545) completed before 2020, we used multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis to assess invariance across arms, over time, and across studies. We also calculated average treatment effects adjusting for covariate imbalance to assess concordance with published results. Most items functioned equivalently within studies at baseline and end line. Some evidence of longitudinal noninvariance was observed in at least one study arm in three studies, but did not meaningfully affect latent means or effect-size estimates. Evidence of partial invariance across studies at baseline and strict invariance over time was observed. Common measures of physical and sexual IPV were valid for measuring intervention impact in these samples. The study highlights the need for harmonized use of the tested scale, content validity assessments, and routine measurement equivalence testing to ensure valid inferences about intervention effectiveness.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T10:30:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221095599
       
  • The Proposed Specifiers for Conduct Disorder (PSCD) Scale: Factor
           Structure and Validation of the Self-Report Version in a Forensic Sample
           of Belgian Youth

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Olivier F. Colins, Athina Bisback, Cedric Reculé, Blair D. Batky, Laura López-Romero, Robert D. Hare, Randall T. Salekin
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This is the first study to test the psychometric properties of the self-report version of the Proposed Specifiers for Conduct Disorder (PSCD) in detained youth. The PSCD is a measure of the broad psychopathy construct, with grandiose-manipulative, callous-unemotional, daring-impulsive, and conduct disorder (CD) components. Participants (227 males) completed the PSCD along with other measures, including a diagnostic interview to assess Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) CD. Results support the PSCD’s proposed hierarchical four-factor structure. Correlations with an alternate measure of psychopathy and symptoms of CD support the convergent validity of PSCD scores. PSCD scores showed positive associations with criterion variables of emotional and regulatory functioning, aggression, substance use, and school problems. Finally, PSCD scores were unrelated to anxiety and depression, supporting the PSCD’s discriminant validity. Findings indicate that the PSCD is a promising measure for assessing psychopathic traits in detained male adolescents, though its incremental validity is in need of further scrutiny.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T10:28:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221094256
       
  • Optimizing the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation: An Item Response Theory
           Approach Among U.S. Military Personnel

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthew C. Podlogar, Peter M. Gutierrez, Augustine Osman
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSS) is one of the most used and empirically supported suicide risk assessment measures for behavioral health clinicians and researchers. However, the 19-item BSS is a relatively long measure and can take 5 to 10 minutes to administer. This study used Item Response Theory (IRT) techniques across two samples of mostly U.S. military service members to first identify (n1 = 1,899) and then validate (n2 = 757) an optimized set of the most informative BSS items. Results indicated that Items 1, 2, 4, 6, and 15 provided a similar-shaped test information curve across the same range of the latent trait as the full-length BSS and showed reliable item functioning across participant characteristics. The sum score of these five items showed a linear score linkage with the full-scale score, ρ > 0.87, and was equally as sensitive as the full scale for prospectively predicting near-term suicidal behavior at 74% with a cut score ≥1 (equivalent to full-scale score ≥6). Results are consistent with those from civilian samples. In time- or length-limited assessments, using these five BSS items may improve administration efficiency over the full BSS, while maintaining classification sensitivity.This study suggests that summing Items 1, 2, 4, 6, and 15 of the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSS) is an acceptable approach for shortening the full-length measure.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T09:56:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221092420
       
  • Assessing Dysfunctional Expectations in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder:
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Philipp Herzog, Tim Kaiser, Winfried Rief, Eva-Lotta Brakemeier, Tobias Kube
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Dysfunctional expectations are a particularly important subset of cognitions that influence the development and maintenance of various mental disorders. This study aimed to develop and validate a scale to assess dysfunctional expectations in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the “Posttraumatic Expectations Scale” (PTES). In a cross-sectional study, 70 PTSD patients completed the PTES, the Posttraumatic Cognitions Inventory (PTCI), as well as measures of the severity of symptoms of PTSD and depression. The results show that the PTES has excellent internal consistency and correlates significantly with the PTCI and PTSD symptom severity. A regression analysis revealed that the PTES explained variance of PTSD symptom severity above the PTCI, supporting the incremental validity of the PTES. While the original version of the PTES comprises 81 items, short scales were constructed using the BISCUIT (best items scales that are cross-validated, unit-weighted, informative and transparent) method. The current findings provide preliminary psychometric evidence suggesting that the PTES is an internally consistent and valid novel self-report measure in patients with PTSD. However, conclusions about the psychometric properties of the PTES are limited because of the absence of criterion-related validity, factor structure evidence, variability over time/response to intervention, and test–retest reliability. Future research should use the PTES in large-scale longitudinal studies to address these aspects to further validate the scale.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T08:34:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221089038
       
  • The Flexible Regulation of Emotional Expression Scale for Youth (FREE-Y):
           Adaptation and Validation Across a Varied Sample of Children and
           Adolescents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ann-Christin Haag, Christine B. Cha, Jennie G. Noll, Dylan G. Gee, Chad E. Shenk, Hannah M. C. Schreier, Christine M. Heim, Idan Shalev, Emma J. Rose, Alana Jorgensen, George A. Bonanno
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Flexible self-regulation has been shown to be an adaptive ability. This study adapted and validated the adult Flexible Regulation of Emotional Expression (FREE) Scale for use with youth (FREE-Y) in community and maltreatment samples. The FREE-Y measures the ability to flexibly enhance and suppress emotion expression across an array of hypothetical social scenarios. Participants (N = 654, 8–19 years) were included from three studies. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) confirmed a theoretically appropriate higher order factor structure. Using multiple-group CFAs, measurement invariance was achieved across maltreatment status, age, and gender. Reliabilities were adequate and construct validity was demonstrated through associations with measures of emotion regulation, psychopathology, IQ, and executive functioning. Group comparisons indicated lower Suppression and Flexibility scores for maltreated versus comparison participants. Findings suggest that the FREE-Y is a valid measure of expressive regulation ability in youth that can be applied across a range of populations.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T09:13:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221090465
       
  • The Predictive Validity of Consensual and Unique Facets of Neuroticism,
           Conscientiousness, and Agreeableness in Five Personality Inventories

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      Authors: Shereen Khoo, Sara M. Stasik-O’Brien, Stephanie Ellickson-Larew, Kasey Stanton, Lee Anna Clark, David Watson
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Consensual facet structures help to unify a highly fractured personality literature, but mask information obtained from unique personality facets assessed by individual personality inventories. The current study identifies the consensual and unique facets of neuroticism, conscientiousness, and agreeableness based on analyses of five widely used personality inventories (Disinhibition Inventory-I [DIS-I], Faceted Inventory for the Five-Factor model [FI-FFM], HEXACO Personality Inventory—Revised [HEXACO-PI-R], NEO Personality Inventory-3 [NEO-PI-3], and Temperament and Affectivity Inventory [TAI]) in a community sample (N = 440). Factor analyses revealed that neuroticism consisted of three consensual facets (distress/depression, anger, and sentimental anxiety) and four unique facets (shyness, regret/self-doubt, lassitude, and distractibility); conscientiousness consisted solely of four consensual facets (achievement striving, order, attentiveness, and responsibility); and agreeableness consisted solely of four consensual facets (prosociality, anger, venturesomeness, and trust). Regression analyses indicated that unique neuroticism facets predicted significant incremental variance across a range of psychological disorders. These results have significant implications for how neuroticism, conscientiousness, and agreeableness should be modeled at the lower order level in psychopathology research.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T06:45:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221089037
       
  • Evaluating the Reliability and Validity of the Famous Faces Doppelgangers
           Test, a Novel Measure of Familiar Face Recognition

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      Authors: Emilia Pozo, Laura T. Germine, Luke Scheuer, Roger W. Strong
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Face recognition assessments that use images of celebrities require not only face recognition ability but also pop-culture knowledge and successful recall of identifying information. Here, we introduce a task designed to measure face recognition more specifically: the Famous Faces Doppelgangers Test (FFDT). Participants (N = 57,407) identified 40 celebrities paired with lookalike doppelgangers, allowing face recognition ability to be assessed without requiring information recall. In addition, participants reported whether they were familiar with each celebrity, allowing poor face recognition ability to be differentiated from low pop-culture knowledge. FFDT performance was reliable (rxx = .80), similar across participants of different racial and ethnic groups, and more highly correlated with memory for faces (r = .50) and self-reported face recognition ability (r = .48) than processing speed ability (r = .10). Thus, the FFDT is a reliable, valid, and specific measure of the ability to identify familiar faces, making it a promising new tool for assessing face recognition ability.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T06:40:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221087746
       
  • Assessing Somatic Symptoms With the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15)
           in Syrian Refugees

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      Authors: Pascal Schlechter, Jens H. Hellmann, Nexhmedin Morina
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Somatic symptoms are common among Syrian refugees. To quantify somatic symptom load, sum score models derived from the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-15) have been frequently applied without psychometric justification. Across two studies (total N = 776), we (a) tested different PHQ-15 factor solutions in Syrian refugees, (b) investigated measurement invariance (MI) of the factor solutions compared with German residents, and (c) scrutinized whether sum score models adequately represent the data and differ in associations with external validators compared with factor scores. One-factor, three-factor, four-factor, and a reduced one-factor solution all displayed acceptable to good model fit. The four-factor solution showed the best fit, enabling differential symptom analyses. Sum score models often had poor model fit, necessitating independent investigations before applying them. For all factor solutions, (partial) strict MI between residents and refugees could be established. All scoring methods displayed high and comparable associations with functional impairment, depressive, and anxiety symptoms.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-22T06:39:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221086986
       
  • Measurement Invariance and Application of an Alcohol-Related Consequence
           Scale for American Indian Adolescents

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      Authors: Silvi C. Goldstein, Nichea S. Spillane, Melissa R. Schick, Joseph S. Rossi
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      American Indian (AI) adolescents experience disproportionate alcohol-related consequences. The present study evaluated the psychometric properties and application of the American Drug and Alcohol Survey (ADAS™) alcohol-related consequence scale for AI adolescents through a secondary analysis of a large population-based sample of adolescents living on or near AI reservations. We found support for the ADAS alcohol-related consequence scale as a one-factor model, invariant discretely across race, sex assigned at birth, and age, and with good internal consistency. Evidence for construct validity was found through significant positive correlations between frequency of past 12 months of drinking, frequency of past 12 months of intoxication, and lifetime alcohol-related consequences. AI adolescents were significantly more likely to report more alcohol-related consequences than their non-Hispanic White peers. Race significantly interacted with frequency of drinking in predicting alcohol-related consequences such that these associations were stronger for AI adolescents. However, race did not significantly interact with frequency of intoxication in predicting alcohol-related consequences. Results from this study demonstrate the utility of the ADAS alcohol-related consequence scale for use across demographic groups with little risk of measurement bias.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T11:41:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221089201
       
  • Multimodal Virtual Reality-Based Assessment of Adult ADHD: A Feasibility
           Study in Healthy Subjects

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      Authors: Annika Wiebe, Kyra Kannen, Mengtong Li, Behrem Aslan, David Anders, Benjamin Selaskowski, Ulrich Ettinger, Silke Lux, Alexandra Philipsen, Niclas Braun
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Neuropsychological assessments are often surprisingly inaccurate in mapping clinically-reported attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, presumably due to their low ecological validity. Virtual reality (VR) might offer a potential solution for this problem, given its capability to generate standardized and yet highly realistic virtual environments. As the first adaptation of existing virtual classroom scenarios to an adult population, we developed a Virtual Seminar Room (VSR) for multimodal characterization of ADHD symptoms. To test its feasibility, N = 35 healthy participants were immersed into the VSR via a head-mounted display and carried out a VR-embedded continuous performance task (CPT) under varying levels of distractions in two experimental blocks (24 min each). CPT performance, electroencephalography (EEG) measures, and head movements (actigraphy) were simultaneously recorded and analyzed offline. Although CPT performance remained constant throughout the task, head movements increased significantly from Block 1 to Block 2. In addition, EEG theta (4–7 Hz) and beta (13–30 Hz) power was higher during Block 1 than Block 2, and during distractor-present than distractor-absent phases. Moreover, P300 amplitudes were higher during Block 1 than Block 2, and P300 latencies were prolonged in distractor-absent compared with distractor-present phases. Although the paradigm awaits further improvements, this study confirms the general feasibility of the VSR and provides a first step toward a multimodal, ecologically valid, and reliable VR-based adult ADHD assessment.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T11:39:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221089193
       
  • Examination of the Generalizability of Underreporting Detected by the
           MMPI-2-RF in a Correctional Sample

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      Authors: Megan A. Keen, Tayla T. C. Lee, Kelsey Pscheid, Johnathan D. Forbey
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      It is relatively unclear if underreporting (UR) detected by Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory–2–Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) L-r (Uncommon Virtues) and K-r (Adjustment Validity) scale scores generalizes to score distortion on criterion measures differently based on test-takers having scored highly on L-r, K-r, or both. Thus, this study reanalyzed the correctional sample of 632 men previously presented by Forbey and colleagues and defined UR groups as high scores on L-r alone (n = 89), K-r alone (n = 45), or both (n = 29). Groups were compared on selected MMPI-2-RF and criterion scales assessing internalizing, externalizing, and thought dysfunction difficulties using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests. Results suggested that UR generalized to score distortion on collateral measures, with K-r outperforming L-r in the prediction of this generalizability on all but measures of specific externalizing difficulties. However, having elevations on both L-r and K-r resulted in the strongest pattern of generalizability.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T11:37:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221089036
       
  • The Psychometric Assessment of Empathy: Development and Validation of the
           Perth Empathy Scale

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      Authors: Jack D. Brett, Rodrigo Becerra, Murray T. Maybery, David A. Preece
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Empathy, the ability to infer and share others’ affective states, plays a vital role in social interactions. However, no existing scale comprehensively assesses empathy’s cognitive and affective components across positive and negative emotional valence domains. This article explores the latent structure of the empathy construct and attempts to remedy past measurement limitations by developing and validating a new 20-item self-report measure, the Perth Empathy Scale (PES). In Study 1 (N = 316), factor analyses revealed a coherent empathy construct comprised of cognitive and valence-specific affective components. Study 2 (N = 331) replicated this factor structure, showed measurement invariance between males and females, and highlighted the importance of assessing negative and positive emotions in empathy. The PES showed convergent and discriminant validity from comparisons with alexithymia and other empathy measures. Overall, this article empirically establishes a conceptually clear structure of the multidimensional empathy construct, which the PES reliably and validly measures.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T11:35:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221086987
       
  • Forecasting Stalking Recidivism Using the Guidelines for Stalking
           Assessment and Management (SAM)

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      Authors: Sarah H. Coupland, Jennifer E. Storey, P. Randall Kropp, Stephen D. Hart
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      We examined the long-term risk for stalking recidivism and the predictive validity of ratings made using the Guidelines for Stalking Assessment and Management (SAM) in 100 stalking offenders from a forensic clinic. Overall, 45 offenders were convicted of, charged with, or the subject of police investigation for stalking-related offenses during a potential time at risk that averaged 13.47 years. Survival analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model indicated that a composite score of the presence of SAM risk factors was significantly predictive of recidivism and had significant incremental validity relative to total scores on two scales commonly used in violence risk assessment, the Screening Version of the Hare Psychopathy Checklist–Revised (PCL:SV) and the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG). Overall ratings of risk made using the SAM, however, were not significantly predictive of recidivism. We discuss the potential uses of the SAM in stalking risk assessment and provide recommendations for future research.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T11:33:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221086050
       
  • Validation of a Spanish Translation of the Faceted Inventory of the
           Five-Factor Model in Two Mexican University Student Samples

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      Authors: Nadia S. Corral-Frías, Alejandro Corona-Espinosa, David Watson
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The validity, and thus utility, of psychological instruments requires continued evaluation of their underlying psychometric properties across contexts. Measurement tools have been developed over the past few decades to assess personality constructs developed through various theoretical frameworks. The Big Five has been a particular focus of such inquiry; however, few studies have validated a Spanish version for use in Mexico. Using two separate Mexican college student samples (Sample 1: n = 289, Sample 2: n = 309) we tested factorial structure, reliability, and validity of a Spanish translation of the Faceted Inventory of the Five-Factor Model (FI-FFM; Watson, Nus, & Wu). An exploratory factor analysis showed a similar structure to the original FI-FFM, albeit with some exceptions primarily within the Extraversion and Agreeableness domains. Furthermore, the FI-FFM scales were internally consistent and highly stable over time (average interval = 5 months). Finally, the scales showed strong convergent and discriminant validity and the facet scales displayed validity in predicting outcomes.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T10:57:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221083906
       
  • Ecological and Convergent Validity of Experimentally and Dynamically
           Assessed Capacity for Social Contingency Detection Using the Perceptual
           Crossing Experiment in Adolescence

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      Authors: Karlijn S. F. M. Hermans, Olivia J. Kirtley, Zuzana Kasanova, Robin Achterhof, Noëmi Hagemann, Anu P. Hiekkaranta, Aleksandra Lecei, Leonardo Zapata-Fonseca, Ginette Lafit, Ruben Fossion, Tom Froese, Inez Myin-Germeys
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Perceptual Crossing Experiment (PCE) captures the capacity for social contingency detection using real-time social interaction dynamics but has not been externally validated. We tested ecological and convergent validity of the PCE in a sample of 208 adolescents from the general population, aged 11 to 19 years. We expected associations between PCE performance and (a) quantity and quality of social interaction in daily life, using Experience Sampling Methodology (ESM; ecological validity) and (b) self-reported social skills using a questionnaire (convergent validity). We also expected PCE performance to better explain variance in ESM social measures than self-reported social skills. Multilevel analyses showed that only self-reported social skills were positively associated with social experience of company in daily life. These initial results do not support ecological and convergent validity of the PCE. However, fueled by novel insights regarding the complexity of capturing social dynamics, we identified promising methodological advances for future validation efforts.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-04-02T10:56:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221083613
       
  • The DADYS-Screen: Development and Evaluation of a Screening Tool for
           Affective Dysregulation in Children

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      Authors: Christiane Otto, Anne Kaman, Claus Barkmann, Manfred Döpfner, Anja Görtz-Dorten, Claudia Ginsberg, Sara Zaplana Labarga, Anne-Katrin Treier, Veit Roessner, Charlotte Hanisch, Michael Koelch, Tobias Banaschewski, Ulrike Ravens-Sieberer
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Affective dysregulation (AD) in children is characterized by persistent irritability and severe temper outbursts. This study developed and evaluated a screening questionnaire for AD in children. The development included the generation of an initial item pool from existing instruments, a Delphi rating of experts, focus groups with experts and parents, and psychometric analyses of clinical and population-based samples. Based on data of a large community-based study, the final screening questionnaire was developed (n = 771; 49.7 % female; age M = 10.02 years; SD = 1.34) and evaluated (n = 8,974; 48.7 % female; age M = 10.00 years; SD = 1.38) with methods from classical test theory and item response theory. The developed DADYS-Screen (Diagnostic Tool for Affective Dysregulation in Children—Screening Questionnaire) includes 12 items with good psychometric properties and scale characteristics including a good fit to a one-factorial model in comparison to the baseline model, although only a “mediocre” fit according to the root mean square error of approximation (RMSEA). Results could be confirmed using a second and larger data set. Overall, the DADYS-Screen is able to identify children with AD, although it needs further investigation using clinical data.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T09:09:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221082709
       
  • How Caregivers Support Children’s Emotion Regulation: Construct
           Validation of the Parental Assistance With Child Emotion Regulation
           (PACER) Questionnaire

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      Authors: Vincent O. Mancini, Brody J. Heritage, David Preece, Emily M. Cohodes, James J. Gross, Dylan G. Gee, Amy Finlay-Jones
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Caregivers play a crucial role in supporting the development of their children’s emotion regulation. This study validated the Parental Assistance with Child Emotion Regulation (PACER) Questionnaire in a sample of 491 caregivers (M = 32.89 years) of young children ≤ 5 years. Exploratory structural equation modeling provided evidence of the instrument’s ability to assess parental support for 10 distinct emotion regulation strategies that match the intended design of the instrument. Latent profile analysis revealed three distinct caregiver profiles characterized by above-average support for strategies that previously have been shown to be predictive of adaptive outcomes, maladaptive outcomes, or mixed-outcomes, respectively. Results add to existing literature that suggests the PACER is a valid and reliable assessment of caregiver-implemented support of emotion regulation strategies for children ≤ 5 years old. Evidence of distinct caregiver profiles highlights opportunities for prevention and intervention efforts to bolster extrinsic support for adaptive emotion regulation strategies. This instrument may be well-suited to capturing changes throughout the early developmental period, in addition to monitoring caregiver-facing interventions promoting optimal emotion regulation in children.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T06:31:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221082708
       
  • The Bifactor Structure of the Emotion Expression Scale for Children in a
           Sample of School-Aged Portuguese Children

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      Authors: Brígida Caiado, Maria Cristina Canavarro, Helena Moreira
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The Emotion Expression Scale for Children (EESC) is a 16-item self-report questionnaire assessing children’s difficulties in emotion expression (i.e., poor emotion awareness and reluctance to express emotions). Considering the inconsistent findings regarding its factorial structure and dimensionality, this study aims to explore the factor structure and psychometric properties of the EESC in a sample of 286 Portuguese children (8–12 years). Three competing models were analyzed through confirmatory factor analysis (correlated two-factor model, one-factor model, and bifactor model). The bifactor model provided a better fit than the competing models, and the results suggested a strong general factor of “difficulties in emotion expression.” The validity of the EESC was also indicated by its positive correlations with variables assessing child anxiety, depression, and behavioral avoidance and its negative correlation with mindfulness skills. The EESC is a valid measure of children’s difficulties in emotion expression and the use of its total score is recommended.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T06:28:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221082038
       
  • Bereavement in the Aftermath of Suicide, Overdose, and Sudden-Natural
           Death: Evaluating a New Measure of Needs

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      Authors: Jamison S. Bottomley, Melissa A. Smigelsky
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Bereavement has been associated with a number of adverse outcomes, including mortality, particularly among those who experience the sudden loss of a close other. With rising rates of sudden death in the United States, fueled by an alarming increase in fatal overdose deaths, identifying bereavement-related needs among the sudden-death bereaved is essential. The present study investigated the factor structure, internal reliability, and validity of the Sudden Bereavement Needs Inventory (SBNI) in a sample of sudden loss survivors (i.e., fatal overdose, suicide, and sudden-natural loss; N = 403). Confirmatory factor analysis supported a six-factor structure, with items reflecting pragmatic, informational, spiritual, relational, meaning, and emotional needs. SBNI factors showed adequate internal consistency, with significant associations between SBNI scores, loss characteristics, and mental health outcomes (e.g., prolonged grief symptoms, meaning-making, posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD] symptoms, and anxiety), supporting the scale’s validity and highlighting the potential applicability of the instrument in both research and clinical contexts. Future research should examine test–retest reliability of the SBNI, particularly through the lens of understanding whether and how bereavement needs change over time.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T06:26:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221081139
       
  • Differential Item Functioning of the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory
           Across Race/Ethnicity and Gender Among a Sample of Justice-Involved Youth:
           An Item Response Theory Analysis

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      Authors: James V. Ray
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Research is yet to examine whether the items of the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory (YPI) function equally well across race/ethnicity and gender. The current study applies an item response theory analysis to detect differential item functioning (DIF) of the YPI subscale across White, Black, and Hispanic youth and males and females among a sample of justice-involved youth. Significant DIF was detected for several items between Black youth and White youth and Black youth and Hispanic youth. Few incidences of DIF emerged between White and Hispanic youth and between males and females. The findings suggest that subscales of the YPI provide more information for White and Hispanic youth compared with Black youth. They also suggest that while there was significant DIF in the difficulty of items, the direction of DIF did not substantially favor one group or another. Thus, the findings suggest that the YPI produces comparable estimates of psychopathic traits for females and males and for White and Hispanic youth. However, the results raise concerns about comparing YPI subscale scores between White and Black youth and Hispanic and Black youth. The findings have important implications for the use of the YPI subscales among diverse samples.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-03-05T06:06:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221077230
       
  • Would the Real Loneliness Please Stand Up' The Validity of Loneliness
           Scores and the Reliability of Single-Item Scores

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      Authors: Marcus Mund, Marlies Maes, Pia M. Drewke, Antonia Gutzeit, Isabel Jaki, Pamela Qualter
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Several measures that assess loneliness have been developed for adults. Across three studies, we investigated psychometric features of scores of different versions of the Rasch-Type Loneliness Scale, the University of California Los Angeles Loneliness Scale, and three single-item measures. In Study 1 (N = 697 self-ratings, N = 282 informant-ratings of 160 targets) and Study 2 (N = 1,216 individuals from 608 couples), we investigated convergent validity, self-informant agreement, and nomological nets of the item scores using correlates related to demographic aspects, personality, satisfaction, and network characteristics. In Study 3 (N = 411), we estimated a reliability of [math] for scores of three single-item measures of loneliness. Overall, scores of all measures and their nomological nets were highly correlated within and across studies, indicating that the scores of the included measures are all reliable and valid. Recommendations for choosing a loneliness measure are discussed.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-03-05T06:00:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221077227
       
  • Measuring Memory Lapses and Their Impact on Daily Life: Results From Two
           Daily Diary Studies

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      Authors: Jacqueline Mogle, Jennifer R. Turner, Laura A. Rabin, Martin J. Sliwinski, Ruixue Zhaoyang, Nikki L. Hill
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Memory lapses (e.g., forgetting a medication) are common for most people, yet past methods of assessment relied upon retrospective reports from long recall windows. Recently, researchers have incorporated daily diary methods to capture memory lapse frequency closer to the experience in real-world environments. This study describes the utility of the Daily Memory Lapses Checklist using data from two 14-day diary studies (Combined Sample = 467; 66% women). Frequency and impact (i.e., irritation and interference) of prospective and retrospective memory lapses were assessed at both individual- and daily levels. Across studies, memory lapses occurred on more than one-third of assessment days. Retrospective lapses were reported more frequently than prospective; however, both lapses had a similar impact. The Daily Memory Lapses Checklist represents a flexible measure that separates the occurrence of a memory lapse from its impact on daily life: metrics that will enhance our understanding of daily experiences of cognitive functioning.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T06:31:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221077962
       
  • Using the Child Sheehan Disability Scale to Differentiate Severity Level
           in Youth With Anxiety Disorders and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

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      Authors: Stephen P. H. Whiteside, Bradley C. Riemann, Denis M. McCarthy
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The current study extends the psychometric support for the Child Sheehan Disability Scale (CSDS) as a measure of impairment associated with childhood anxiety disorders, including obsessive compulsive disorder. The CSDS was completed by 1,481 predominately Caucasian youth (55.4% female) ages 8 to 17 (M = 12.68, SD = 2.78) from primarily two-parent households and a parent across community, outpatient, intensive outpatient treatment, and residential settings. The results replicated and extended the previously found strong convergent validity, discriminant validity, and treatment sensitivity with a revised parent-report item in the larger sample. Moreover, the CSDS successfully differentiated between patients receiving treatment of different levels of intensity. These data were used to develop preliminary qualitative descriptors associating individual scores with a likely level of indicated treatment to enhance the clinical applicability of the CSDS. This study establishes the CSDS as one of the briefest and most rigorously evaluated measures of impairment associated with child anxiety. However, the performance of the CSDS must be examined in more representative samples before being applied to diverse populations.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-21T12:57:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221077232
       
  • An Examination of the Latent Constructs in Risk Tools for Individuals Who
           Sexually Offend: Applying Multidimensional Item Response Theory to the
           Static-2002R

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      Authors: Sébastien Brouillette-Alarie, Seung C. Lee, Nicholas Longpré, Kelly M. Babchishin
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Multidimensional item response theory (MIRT) was used to study the construct validity of the Static-2002R, an actuarial scale for the assessment of reoffending among adult men who sexually offended. Using a sample of 2,569 individuals with a history of sexual crime, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) extracted three factors: Persistence/Paraphilia, General Criminality, and Youthful Stranger Aggression. MIRT confirmed the factor structure identified in the EFA model and provided item-level data on discrimination and difficulty. All Static-2002R items showed moderate to very high discrimination and covered a wide range of risk levels (i.e., difficulty). MIRT analyses attested to the construct validity of the scale, as no items were identified as problematic and the resulting factor structure was consistent with that of earlier studies. Considering the stability of results pertaining to the factor structure of the Static-2002R and the advantages of dimensional scoring, we recommend the integration of dimensional scores in the scale.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T09:54:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221076373
       
  • Validation of the German Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory and Construction
           of a Brief Form Using Ant Colony Optimization

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      Authors: Emanuel Jauk, Gabriel Olaru, Eva Schürch, Mitja D. Back, Carolyn C. Morf
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Narcissism is a multifaceted construct commonly conceptualized as comprising grandiose and vulnerable aspects in a two-factor model. While the manifold correlates of these aspects imposed a challenge for research on the structure of narcissism, recent models converge in a three-factor structure of agentic-extraverted, antagonistic, and neurotic aspects, capturing variance in different conceptualizations and correlates of narcissism. We construct and validate a German adaptation of the Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory (FFNI), a measure assessing these aspects based on the Five-Factor Model. In eight samples (N = 2,921), we found the German FFNI to align with both, two- and three-factor models. The factors display good criterion validity with other narcissism measures, (non-)clinical personality dimensions, interpersonal styles, and (mal-)adaptive adjustment. Neurotic and antagonistic narcissism discriminated between individuals with/without mental disorder diagnoses, and displayed a characteristic profile in incarcerated offenders. Since the FFNI is comprehensive but long, we constructed a 30-item brief form (FFNI-BF) optimizing the internal structure and external validity using ant colony optimization. The FFNI-BF displayed good psychometric characteristics and similar, in certain aspects even advantageous criterion validity. We conclude that the German FFNI validly measures key aspects of narcissism, and the FFNI-BF captures these in a concise manner.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-18T09:53:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221075761
       
  • Associations Between MMPI-3 Scale Scores and the DSM-5 AMPD and ICD-11
           Dimensional Personality Traits

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      Authors: Tiffany A. Brown, Martin Sellbom
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The current study aimed to examine the associations between Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-3 (MMPI-3) scales and the dimensional personality traits contained within the ICD-11 Personality Disorder diagnosis and DSM-5 Alternative Model for Personality Disorders (AMPD) models. The sample consisted of 489 undergraduate students, with dimensional personality traits operationalized via the Comprehensive Assessment of Traits relevant to Personality Disorder (CAT-PD). A priori hypotheses were generated for which MMPI-3 scales would be most associated with each personality trait domain, as well as individual CAT-PD scales. Zero-order correlations and regression analyses were used to examine associations between a set of hypothesized MMPI-3 scale scores and CAT-PD scale scores. The results showed a pattern of meaningful correlations supporting the majority of hypotheses. Moreover, most hypothesized scales also incremented one another in regression models predicting hypothesized PD scale scores. These findings indicate that the MMPI-3 is well situated to aid clinicians in the assessment of personality trait dysfunction from a dimensional perspective.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-11T06:20:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911221075724
       
  • Psychometric Evaluation of a New Digitally Animated Child Self-Report
           Assessment Instrument: The Interactive Child Distress Screener

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      Authors: Kirsty Zieschank, Michael J. Ireland, Jamin Day, Sonja March
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The present study aimed to provide the first psychometric evaluation of the newly developed, digitally animated assessment instrument: the Interactive Child Distress Screener (ICDS). The latent factor structure of the novel ICDS was first established using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) on 15 pairs of animated items using a community sample (N = 266) of child–parent dyads. EFA results support a two-factor structure representing two broad domains of internalizing and externalizing difficulties (r = .52) and comprised 12 items. The reliability of the factors was strong with ordinal alpha and omega coefficients above .84 and .87, respectively, for each of the subscales. Convergent validity for the overall sample was supported with established child and parent-reported measures of internalizing and externalizing problems; however, the ICDS factors demonstrated convergence greater in magnitude with other child-reported measures such as the Me and My School Survey. Satisfaction and utility ratings by children indicated that the digital format was highly acceptable.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T07:24:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211072907
       
  • Development and Initial Validation of the Neglectful Experiences and
           Deprivation Scale

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      Authors: Nadia Bounoua, Leah Church, Naomi Sadeh
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Socioemotional deprivation, or the absence of developmentally expected social experiences, has been linked to long-lasting health and psychological outcomes. To date, current measures of socioemotional deprivation fail to capture the cumulative impact of neglectful experiences across multiple social relationships and developmental periods. The current study developed and validated the Neglectful Experiences and Deprivation Scale (NEADS) on a sample of 547 stress-exposed adults (M/SDage=27.77/6.54 years old; 56.5% male). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses in independent samples revealed a three-factor solution as the best fitting model: Caregiver Deprivation (four items; e.g., abandonment), Peer Deprivation (four items; e.g., physical isolation), Romantic Partner Deprivation (four items; e.g., emotionally unavailable). Indicators of construct validity and internal consistency support the selected three-factor model. Results provide strong preliminary evidence of the validity of the NEADS for assaying the severity, developmental timing, and psychological impact of socioemotional deprivation across the lifespan.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-02-05T07:22:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211072906
       
  • The Placement of Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms Within a Five-Factor Model
           of Maladaptive Personality

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      Authors: Samuel E. Cooper, Christopher Hunt, Sara M. Stasik-O’Brien, Hannah Berg, Shmuel Lissek, David Watson, Robert F. Krueger
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Dimensional models of obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms, as seen in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), are instrumental in explaining the heterogeneity observed in this condition and for informing cutting-edge assessments. Prior structural work in this area finds that OC symptoms cross-load under both Negative Affectivity and Psychoticism traits within the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5) Alternative Model of Personality Disorder (AMPD). However, tests of OC symptoms in conjunction with assessments of the full AMPD structure and its 25 lower-level facets representing narrower symptom content are lacking. We applied joint exploratory factor analysis to an AMPD measure (Personality Inventory for DSM-5; PID-5) and OC symptom data from two separate samples (total N = 1,506) to locate OC symptoms within AMPD space. OC symptoms cross-loaded on Negative Affectivity, Psychoticism, and on the low end of Disinhibition. We also report exploratory analyses of OC symptom subscales with PID-5 variables. Results are discussed in the context OC symptoms’ location in PID-5 space, implications for assessment, and placement of OCD within the Hierarchical Taxonomy of Psychopathology.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-31T10:59:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211070623
       
  • The Dimensionality of Reading Self-Concept: Examining Its Stability Using
           Local Structural Equation Models

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      Authors: Geetanjali Basarkod, Herbert W. Marsh, Baljinder K. Sahdra, Philip D. Parker, Jiesi Guo, Theresa Dicke, Oliver Lüdtke
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      For results from large-scale surveys to inform policy and practice appropriately, all participants must interpret and respond to items similarly. While organizers of surveys assessing student outcomes often ensure this for achievement measures, doing so for psychological questionnaires is also critical. We demonstrate this by examining the dimensionality of reading self-concept—a crucial psychological construct for several outcomes—across reading achievement levels. We use Programme for International Student Assessment 2018 data (N = 529,966) and local structural equation models (LSEMs) to do so. Results reveal that reading self-concept dimensions (assessed through reading competence and difficulty) vary across reading achievement levels. Students with low reading achievement show differentiated responses to the two item sets (high competence–high difficulty). In contrast, students with high reading achievement have reconciled responses (high competence–low difficulty). Our results highlight the value of LSEMs in examining factor structure generalizability of constructs in large-scale surveys and call for greater cognitive testing during item development.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-15T10:13:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211069675
       
  • Memory Binding Test and Its Associations With Hippocampal Volume Across
           the Cognitive Continuum Preceding Dementia

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      Authors: Hana Markova, Adela Fendrych Mazancova, Dylan J. Jester, Katerina Cechova, Veronika Matuskova, Tomas Nikolai, Zuzana Nedelska, Miroslav Uller, Ross Andel, Jan Laczó, Jakub Hort, Martin Vyhnalek
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Innovative memory paradigms have been introduced to capture subtle memory changes in early Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We aimed to examine the associations between different indexes of the challenging Memory Binding Test (MBT) and hippocampal volume (HV) in a sample of individuals with subjective cognitive decline (SCD; n = 50), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) due to AD (n = 31), and cognitively normal (CN) older adults (n = 29) recruited from the Czech Brain Aging Study, in contrast to traditional verbal memory tests. Both MBT free and cued recall scores in immediate and delayed recall conditions were associated with lower HV in both SCD and aMCI due to AD, whereas in traditional verbal memory tests only delayed recall scores were associated with lower HV. In SCD, the associations with lower HV in the immediate recall covered specific cued recall indexes only. In conclusion, the MBT is a promising test for detecting subtle hippocampal-associated memory decline during the predementia continuum.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T11:20:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211069676
       
  • Utility of Diffusion Modeling of Cogstate Brief Battery Test Performance
           in Detecting Mild Cognitive Impairment

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      Authors: Kyler Mulhauser, Bruno Giordani, Voyko Kavcic, L. D. Nicolas May, Arijit Bhaumik, Sarah Shair, Kristen Votruba
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Cognitive testing data are essential to the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and computerized cognitive testing, such as the Cogstate Brief Battery, has proven helpful in efficiently identifying harbingers of dementia. This study provides a side-by-side comparison of traditional Cogstate outcomes and diffusion modeling of these outcomes in predicting MCI diagnosis. Participants included 257 older adults (160 = normal cognition; 97 = MCI). Results showed that both traditional Cogstate and diffusion modeling analyses predicted MCI diagnosis with acceptable accuracy. Cogstate measures of recognition learning and working memory accuracy and diffusion modeling variable of decision-making efficiency (drift rate) and nondecisional time were most predictive of MCI. While participants with normal cognition demonstrated a change in response caution (boundary separation) when transitioning tasks, participants with MCI did not evidence this change.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T07:30:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211069089
       
  • Ecological Momentary Assessment: A Meta-Analysis on Designs, Samples, and
           Compliance Across Research Fields

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      Authors: Cornelia Wrzus, Andreas B. Neubauer
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Ecological Momentary Assessments (i.e., EMA, repeated assessments in daily life) are widespread in many fields of psychology and related disciplines. Yet, little knowledge exists on how differences in study designs and samples predict study compliance and dropout—two central parameters of data quality in (micro-)longitudinal research. The current meta-analysis included k = 477 articles (496 samples, total N = 677,536). For each article, we coded the design, sample characteristics, compliance, and dropout rate. The results showed that on average EMA studies scheduled six assessments per day, lasted for 7 days, and obtained a compliance of 79%. Studies with more assessments per day scheduled fewer assessment days, yet, the number of assessments did not predict compliance or dropout rates. Compliance was significantly higher in studies providing financial incentives. Otherwise, design or sample characteristics had little effects. We discuss the implications of the findings for planning, reporting, and reviewing EMA studies.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T07:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211067538
       
  • Questionnaire Measures of Empathy in Children: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Philippa Neary
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Children’s unique developmental and contextual needs make it challenging to measure empathy validly and reliably. This scoping review is the first to collate currently available information about self-report, other-report, and performance-based questionnaire measures of empathy for children aged up to 11 years. Following the guidelines for Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR; Tricco et al., 2018), a literature search using PsycINFO, Scopus, and Google Scholar identified 24 relevant measures of empathy in children, with publication years spanning 1958 to 2019. Questionnaires could broadly be classified into four groups, according to the extent to which they were developed with children’s developmental needs and contexts in mind, and were based on contemporary theory and research findings. There was a distinction between performance-based measures, which elicited children’s empathy-related responses to novel content and therefore assessed situational state empathy, and self- and other-report measures, which rated children’s general empathic tendencies and thus assessed dispositional trait empathy. Results highlighted the importance of researchers having clarity on their definition of empathy and choosing measures consistent with this, and the merit of utilizing a multimodal assessment approach.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T07:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211069677
       
  • Validation of the Five-Factor Model Antagonistic Triad Measure

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      Authors: Leigha Rose, Joshua D. Miller, Donald R. Lynam
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      The personality constructs psychopathy, narcissism, and Machiavellianism, collectively described as the Dark Triad (DT), all reference socially aversive behavioral tendencies. Each construct is theorized to have features that differentiate it from others. Unfortunately, existing measures of the DT suffer from several problems. The present study compared newly developed measures of psychopathy (Super-Short Form of the Elemental Psychopathy Assessment), narcissism (Super-Short Form of the Five-Factor Narcissism Inventory), and Machiavellianism (Super-Short Form of the Five-Factor Machiavellianism Inventory [FFMI-SSF] based on the Five-Factor Model of personality)—collectively referred to as the Five-Factor Model Antagonistic Triad Measure—to existing DT inventories using a sample of undergraduate students (N = 516). As predicted, FFMI-SSF showed better divergence from measures of psychopathy and better convergence with the expert Five-Factor Model (FFM) Machiavellianism profile than did existing Machiavellianism measures. Results also demonstrated that the factors within each FFM assessment manifested differentiated correlational profiles, underscoring the utility of the multifaceted assessment of these three constructs. In addition, the use of the FFM as the basis for the new DT measures provides a pathway for the integration of DT research into the larger field of basic and clinical personality science.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-11T07:08:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211068083
       
  • Measurement Invariance of Alabama Parenting Questionnaire Across Age,
           Gender, Clinical Status, and Informant

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      Authors: Ionut Stelian Florean, Anca Dobrean, Robert Balazsi, Adrian Roșan, Costina Ruxandra Păsărelu, Elena Predescu, Florina Rad
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to investigate the measurement invariance of the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (for both long [APQ-lg] and short [APQ-9] forms) across age, gender, clinical status, and informant (i.e., parent vs. child reports). The sample was composed of adolescents (community sample: N = 1,746; clinical sample: N = 166) and parents (N = 149). The analyses were conducted in R. Measurement invariance was assessed via multi-group confirmatory factor analysis, equivalence test, and subsampling approach. The original model of APQ-lg (five factors) showed a significantly better fit than other concurrent models (five concurrent models were specified, based on prior literature). For APQ-lg, we found measurement invariance across gender and partial measurement invariance across age, clinical status, and informant. For APQ-9, we confirmed the measurement invariance across gender and clinical status, while across age and informant partial measurement invariance was attested. Overall, our study indicated that APQ-lg and APQ-9 are two valid tools for measuring parenting practices with some caveats.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T06:58:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211068178
       
  • Developing and Validating a Facial Emotion Recognition Task With Graded
           Intensity

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      Authors: Trevor F. Williams, Niko Vehabovic, Leonard J. Simms
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Facial emotion recognition (FER) tasks are often digitally altered to vary expression intensity; however, such tasks have unknown psychometric properties. In these studies, an FER task was developed and validated—the Graded Emotional Face Task (GEFT)—which provided an opportunity to examine the psychometric properties of such tasks. Facial expressions were altered to produce five intensity levels for six emotions (e.g., 40% anger). In Study 1, 224 undergraduates viewed subsets of these faces and labeled the expressions. An item selection algorithm was used to maximize internal consistency and balance gender and ethnicity. In Study 2, 219 undergraduates completed the final GEFT and a multimethod battery of validity measures. Finally, in Study 3, 407 undergraduates oversampled for borderline personality disorder (BPD) completed the GEFT and a self-report BPD measure. Broad FER scales (e.g., overall anger) demonstrated evidence of reliability and validity; however, more specific subscales (e.g., 40% anger) had more variable psychometric properties. Notably, ceiling/floor effects appeared to decrease both internal consistency and limit external validity correlations. The findings are discussed from the perspective of measurement issues in the social cognition literature.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T06:53:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211068084
       
  • Comparing the Ability of MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF Validity Scales to Detect
           Feigning: A Meta-Analysis

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      Authors: Maria Aparcero, Emilie H. Picard, Alicia Nijdam-Jones, Barry Rosenfeld
      Abstract: Assessment, Ahead of Print.
      Several meta-analyses of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) have examined these instruments’ ability to detect symptom exaggeration or feigning. However, limited research has directly compared whether the scales across these two instruments are equally effective. This study used a moderated meta-analysis to compare 109 MMPI-2 and 41 MMPI-2-RF feigning studies, 83 (56.46%) of which were not included in previous meta-analyses. Although there were differences between the two test versions, with most MMPI-2 validity scales generating larger effect sizes than the corresponding MMPI-2-RF scales, these differences were not significant after controlling for study design and type of symptoms being feigned. Additional analyses showed that the F and Fp-r scales generated the largest effect sizes in identifying feigned psychiatric symptoms, while the FBS and RBS were better at detecting exaggerated medical symptoms. The findings indicate that the MMPI-2 validity scales and their MMPI-2-RF counterparts were similarly effective in differentiating genuine responders from those exaggerating or feigning psychiatric and medical symptoms. These results provide reassurance for the use of both the MMPI-2 and MMPI-2-RF in settings where symptom exaggeration or feigning is likely. Findings are discussed in the context of the recently released MMPI-3.
      Citation: Assessment
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T06:50:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10731911211067535
       
 
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