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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
New School Psychology Bulletin     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
O Que Nos Faz Pensar : Cadernos do Departamento de Filosofia da PUC-Rio     Open Access  
OA Autism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Online Readings in Psychology and Culture     Open Access  
Open Journal of Medical Psychology     Open Access  
Open Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Organisational and Social Dynamics: An International Journal of Psychoanalytic, Systemic and Group Relations Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Organizational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Orientación y Sociedad : Revista Internacional e Interdisciplinaria de Orientación Vocacional Ocupacional     Open Access  
Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto)     Open Access  
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Papeles del Psicólogo     Open Access  
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Peace and Conflict : Journal of Peace Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Pensamiento Psicologico     Open Access  
Pensando Familias     Open Access  
Pensando Psicología     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Perceptual and Motor Skills     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Persona     Open Access  
Persona : Jurnal Psikologi Indonesia     Open Access  
Persona Studies     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 148)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access  
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal  
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Phenomenology & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
physiopraxis     Hybrid Journal  
PiD - Psychotherapie im Dialog     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Poiésis     Open Access  
Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Porn Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
PPmP - Psychotherapie Psychosomatik Medizinische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Practice Innovations     Full-text available via subscription  
Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Problems of Psychology in the 21st Century     Open Access  
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Progress in Brain Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psic : Revista de Psicologia da Vetor Editora     Open Access  
Psico     Open Access  
Psicoanalisi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicobiettivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Psicogente     Open Access  
Psicol?gica Journal     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Prática     Open Access  
Psicologia da Educação     Open Access  
Psicologia della salute     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicología desde el Caribe     Open Access  
Psicologia di Comunità. Gruppi, ricerca-azione, modelli formativi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicologia e Saber Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Psicologia em Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia em Revista     Open Access  
Psicologia Ensino & Formação     Open Access  
Psicologia Hospitalar     Open Access  
Psicologia Iberoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia para América Latina     Open Access  
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicología, Conocimiento y Sociedad     Open Access  
Psicologia, Saúde e Doenças     Open Access  
Psicooncología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicoperspectivas     Open Access  
Psicoterapia e Scienze Umane     Full-text available via subscription  
Psikis : Jurnal Psikologi Islami     Open Access  
Psikohumaniora : Jurnal Penelitian Psikologi     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PsyCh Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
PSYCH up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psych. Pflege Heute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychê     Open Access  
Psyche: A Journal of Entomology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychiatrie et violence     Open Access  
Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychiatrische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356)
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis, Self and Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychoanalytic Dialogues: The International Journal of Relational Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychoanalytic Inquiry: A Topical Journal for Mental Health Professionals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychodynamic Practice: Individuals, Groups and Organisations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Psychodynamic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologia : Advances de la Disciplina     Open Access  
Psychologica     Open Access  
Psychologica Belgica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 207)
Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Psychological Perspectives: A Semiannual Journal of Jungian Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychological Research on Urban Society     Open Access  
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 183)
Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247)
Psychological Science and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science and Education psyedu.ru     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science In the Public Interest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Psychological Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychological Thought     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie in Erziehung und Unterricht     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology     Open Access  
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology and Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal  
Psychology and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Psychology in Russia: State of the Art     Free   (Followers: 2)
Psychology in Society     Open Access  
Psychology Learning & Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychology of Language and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Psychology of Leaders and Leadership     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Psychology of Men and Masculinity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Well-Being : Theory, Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychology Research and Behavior Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology, Community & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Psychology, Health & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychomusicology : Music, Mind, and Brain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Psychopathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
psychopraxis. neuropraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychosomatic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychosomatic Medicine and General Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Psychotherapy in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
PsychTech & Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Psyecology - Bilingual Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psyke & Logos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psykhe (Santiago)     Open Access  
Quaderni di Gestalt     Full-text available via subscription  
Quaderns de Psicologia     Open Access  
Qualitative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Qualitative Research in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Quantitative Methods for Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Rehabilitation Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Religion, Brain & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

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Psychology of Women Quarterly
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.217
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0361-6843 - ISSN (Online) 1471-6402
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Practitioner’s Digest

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Volume 46, Issue 2, Page NP1-NP6, June 2022.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T10:03:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221100630
      Issue No: Vol. 46, No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Managing Intersectional Invisibility and Hypervisibility during the
           Transition to College Among First-Generation Women of Color

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Arianna Jackson, Brionna Colson-Fearon, H. Shellae Versey
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      In the current study, we examined the transition to college for first-generation women of color. Previous studies of first-year college experiences among groups with minoritized statuses have primarily focused on first-generation students or students of color separately, with little consideration of women within these groups generally, and first-generation women of color specifically. Drawing from work in Black feminist scholarship, we explored the transition to college from the perspective of first-generation women of color college students, examining the resources, strengths, and challenges experienced during this transition. Fourteen self-identified first-generation women of color students participated in semi-structured interviews. Respondents were asked a series of open-ended questions about their first-year college experiences, including family dynamics, social support, and mental health. Using thematic analysis, we identified five major themes—Identity, Imposter Phenomenon, Mixed Formal Support, Complicated Family Support, and Friendship, Social, and Emotional Support. Our findings suggest that first-generation women of color college students encounter unique challenges that warrant further investigation. Furthermore, we recommend structural programming (e.g., diversity initiatives), university policies (e.g., need-blind admissions), and increased faculty and staff diversity as strategies that will benefit all students and provide support for first-generation women of color college students.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T07:11:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221106087
       
  • Understanding Evaluations of Kamala Harris in 2020: Political Ideology
           Qualifies Perceived Communality Effects when Communal Cues are Present

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      Authors: Hayley A. Liebenow, Kathryn L. Boucher, Brittany S. Cassidy
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Women of color (vs. White women) are underrepresented in the United States government. Identifying factors that affect evaluations of these women is important to understand their underrepresentation. Deviating from communal expectations contributes to backlash against women. Being perceived as prioritizing communality thus appears key for women to receive support. Little work, however, has examined this relation in actual politicians and how perceiver political ideology may affect it. We examined how gendered trait inferences and political ideology affected evaluations of Kamala Harris, the first woman of color elected to the executive branch, before the 2020 election. People perceived Harris as more agentic than communal (Studies 1–2). Communal trait inferences and having a more liberal political ideology each positively related to evaluations of Harris. More liberal relative to more conservative perceivers had weaker positive communality effects when evaluating her expected success (Studies 1–2) and when a description conveyed Harris’s communality (vs. agency; Study 2). These findings highlight communality effects on evaluations of Harris and suggest a context under which she was likely more supported by co-partisans. Moreover, these studies identify potential sources of bias toward female candidates of color, illustrating a need for gendered trait inferences to be thoroughly considered in campaign strategies. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ’s website at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/suppl/10.1177/03616843221104383.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T04:07:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221104383
       
  • ‘I Can Construct it in My Own Way’: A Critical Qualitative Examination
           of Gender Self-Categorisation Processes

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      Authors: Emma F. Jackson, Veronica Sheanoda, Kay Bussey
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Gender self-categorisation is used to communicate a gender group membership in daily life and is recognised across research as an important facet of an individual’s identity. However, understandings of the psychological processes associated with gender self-categorisation have, historically, been restricted by binary, cisgender assumptions. This study qualitatively examined the processes associated with gender self-categorisation in a sample of transgender (binary and nonbinary, n = 15) individuals alongside a negative case analysis of one cisgender woman. Reflexive thematic analysis was used to construct a map of components which interacted to inform participants’ gender self-categorisation. Participants reported that their self-categorisation was reciprocally informed by their internal sense of gendered self, their gendered attributes and by other people’s perceptions. Further, participants’ knowledge and understanding of gender in the world more broadly provided context for this reciprocal process. The process of gender self-categorisation mapped in this study has important implications for researchers regarding theory and methods, for educators and parents regarding how children might be taught about gender and for clinicians regarding how to talk with clients about gender outside of a diagnostic framework.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T09:46:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221102787
       
  • Using Photovoice to Teach an Undergraduate Psychology of Women Course: An
           Intersectional-Feminist Approach

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      Authors: Ashley MacPherson, Alison Patev, Sarah Ghose, Morgan Reid, Sahar Sabet, Claire Williams, Natalie Dautovich
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T04:49:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221106081
       
  • When “Good People” Sexually Harass: The Role of Power and Moral
           Licensing on Sexual Harassment Perceptions and Intentions

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      Authors: Tuyen K. Dinh, Laurel Mikalouski, Margaret S. Stockdale
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      History has shown that people who embody responsibility-focused power have been credibly accused of sexual harassment. Drawing from power-approach and moral licensing theories, we present two complementary studies examining how responsibility-focused power triggers moral licensing, which, in turn, decreases perceptions of sexual harassment (Study 1) and increases intentions to engage in sexual harassment (Study 2). In Study 1, 365 participants read a scenario of a man embodying responsibility-focused power, self-focused power, or low power (control) and then read a case about the man’s alleged sexual harassment against a subordinate. Findings illustrated that moral crediting mediated the effect of power construal on false accusation judgments. In Study 2, 250 participants were primed to experience responsibility-focused power or low power. Responsibility-focused power increased sexual harassment intentions through effects on communal feelings and moral crediting. Based on these findings, we develop a new theoretical perspective on why sexual harassment occurs and why people deny perceiving it. We provide practical recommendations to organizational leaders for developing interventions, such as training, that may disrupt effects of power and moral licensing on sexual harassment intentions. We also encourage public discourse on the harms of harassment that supposed “good people” commit.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T01:17:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221099199
       
  • Initial Construction and Validation of the Identity Shifting for Black
           Women Scale

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      Authors: Danielle D. Dickens, Naomi M. Hall, Natalie N. Watson-Singleton, Cheyane Mitchell, Zharia Thomas
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we aimed to develop and validate the Identity Shifting for Black Women Scale (ISBWS), which assesses the process of altering one’s speech, perceptions, behaviors, and appearance to navigate experiences of discrimination and to enhance intraracial relationships. In Study 1, data from 356 Black women in the United States were used for exploratory factor analysis. Exploratory factor analysis results supported a 15-item, two-factor solution that captured the following domains: (a) Navigating Gendered Racial Oppressive Contexts and (b) Enhancing Intraracial Relationships. In Study 2, confirmatory factor analyses were performed with data from 289 United States Black women. Confirmatory factor analyses tested a unidimensional correlated traits model, a two-factor correlated traits model, and a bifactor model. The bifactor model provided optimal fit, and internal consistency estimates for scores on the ISBWS subscales were good. The ISBWS’ construct validity was supported given its association with related measures of shifting and gendered racial microaggressions. The ISBWS also accounted for additional variance in Black women’s anxiety symptoms over and above an existing shifting measure. Our findings support the added value of the ISBWS in understanding Black women’s multifaceted experiences and can be used to inform interventions aimed to maximize the benefits and reduce the costs of shifting among Black women.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T02:16:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221089330
       
  • Decolonizing Purity Culture: Gendered Racism and White Idealization in
           Evangelical Christianity

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      Authors: Madison Natarajan, Kerrie G. Wilkins-Yel, Anushka Sista, Aashika Anantharaman, Natalie Seils
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Purity culture is a phenomenon promulgated by evangelical Christianity that teaches strict adherence to sexual abstinence prior to heterosexual marriage. Extant research illuminated the ways these teachings have harmed women by normalizing the oppression of their bodies, restricting sexual agency, teaching a shame response to pleasure, and perpetuating rape culture. Notably, these studies have centered white women’s experiences, and to date, there is a dearth of literature examining how these teachings uniquely impact Women of Color. There remains a paucity of research about the ways in which purity culture has perpetuated colonial and Eurocentric values that have systematically oppressed Women of Color. Framed by critical race feminism and intersectionality, we examined the lived experiences of nine Women of Color impacted by evangelical purity culture, revealing the nuanced ways in which gendered racism and white idealization influenced participants’ alliance to and embodiment of their intersecting racialized and gendered identities. With the insights gleaned from this study, we encourage readers to (a) raise their consciousness about the insidious mechanisms through which purity culture and the religious right operate and (b) actively dismantle forms of internalized oppression through radical acts of healing, and systematically through disrupting the perpetuation of purity culture rhetoric.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T05:34:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221091116
       
  • Book Review: Women in the Budapest School of Psychoanalysis: Girls of
           Tomorrow

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      Authors: Katalin Szőke
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T02:42:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221098338
       
  • The Gendered Consequences of Risk-Taking at Work: Are Women Averse to Risk
           or to Poor Consequences'

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      Authors: Thekla Morgenroth, Michelle K. Ryan, Cordelia Fine
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Women are seen as more risk-avoidant in the workplace, and some have argued that this contributes to occupational gender gaps. Across two correlational and three experimental studies (total N = 2280), we examined the role of consequences of workplace risk-taking in determining the likelihood of taking future risks at work. We found no evidence for overall gender differences in initial risk-taking, and women and men anticipated similar consequences for risks with which they have no experience. However, this stands in contrast to the consequences of risk-taking they have experienced. Here, men reported on average more positive consequences, even for those risks that are more normative for women, translating into a higher likelihood of taking the same risks again. When faced with the same consequences, women and men were equally likely to take the same risks again. Our findings challenge the simple assumption that women are averse to workplace risks and suggest that if and when women do avoid risks, it is because their risk-taking leads to less rewarding consequences. Workplace gender equality initiatives should therefore tackle any inequities of consequences rather than encouraging women to “lean in” and take more risks. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ’s website at https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/suppl/10.1177/03616843221084048.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T02:08:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221084048
       
  • Social Network Changes and Disclosure Responses After Sexual Assault

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      Authors: Anna E. Jaffe, Jessica A. Blayney, Macey R. Schallert, Madison E. Edwards, Emily R. Dworkin
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Social support after sexual assault is important for recovery, but violence and recovery may also challenge relationships. We examined functional and structural social support changes following sexual assault and their association with mental health. College women (N = 544) with and without a sexual assault history completed a cross-sectional survey assessing current and past egocentric social networks. Functional support (perceived global support, assault disclosure, and perceived helpfulness of responses) and structural support (network density, size, and retention) were examined. Multilevel models revealed that, relative to non-survivors, survivors reported smaller, less dense past networks, but similarly sized current networks. Survivors retained less of their networks than non-survivors, and network members who provided unhelpful responses to disclosure were less likely to be retained. Structural equation modeling revealed that, among survivors, perceived unhelpful responses to disclosure and a greater loss of network members were associated with worse mental health. Findings suggest that survivors may experience a restructuring of social networks following sexual assault, especially when network members respond in unhelpful ways to disclosure. Although survivors appeared to build new relationships, this restructuring was associated with more mental health problems. It is possible that interventions to improve post-assault social network retention may facilitate recovery.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T07:11:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221085213
       
  • Heterosexual Young Adults’ Experience With and Perceptions of the Orgasm
           Gap: A Mixed Methods Approach

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      Authors: Grace M. Wetzel, Diana T. Sanchez
      First page: 131
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The “orgasm gap” refers to the finding that cisgender men, on average, have more orgasms than cisgender women during heterosexual partnered sex. In the current research, we replicated evidence for several orgasm discrepancies across sexual contexts and assessed men’s and women’s perceptions of the orgasm gap. Our sample consisted of 276 heterosexual, cisgender, sexually active undergraduate students (56.52% women; Mage = 18.84). We assessed participants’ self-reported orgasm frequencies with a familiar partner, with a new partner, and during masturbation, as well as participants’ perceptions of their partners’ orgasm frequencies. We found evidence for orgasm discrepancies between young men and women within contexts and for women across contexts. Additionally, men perceived the size of the orgasm gap to be smaller than women perceived it to be. We used qualitative analyses to assess participants’ perceptions of driving forces behind the orgasm gap and their responses could be grouped into five overarching themes: Sociocultural Influence, Women’s Orgasm Difficulty, Biology, Men’s Fault, and Interpersonal Communication. This qualitative data can inform education and advocacy efforts focused on improving orgasm outcomes for young women, particularly by disproving prominent biological justifications for orgasm difference and addressing relevant sociocultural concerns. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ’s website at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/suppl/10.1177/03616843221076410.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T01:17:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221076410
       
  • Friends-Based Protective Strategies and Unwanted Sexual Experiences: A
           Daily Diary Examination of First Year College Women

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      Authors: Jessica A. Blayney, Tiffany Jenzer, Anna E. Jaffe, Quinn Carroll, Jennifer P. Read
      First page: 162
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Risk for unwanted sexual experiences can emerge in social contexts—the same contexts that early college women navigate with their friends. Though friends naturally engage in prevention strategies, less is known about how capable guardianship influences risk. Using multilevel structural equation modeling, the present study examined guardianship at the person- and situation-level. First year college women (N = 132) completed eight weekends of daily surveys. We examined whether guardianship (e.g., more friends present, greater proportion of female friends, no intoxicated friends) would reduce unwanted sexual experience risk and if this relation was mediated by friends-based strategy use. An alternative model was also tested with the same predictors, but unwanted sexual experiences as the mediator and friends-based strategy use as the outcome. Over half (58%) of extended weekend nights with friends involved drinking or using drugs. Friends-based strategies were used on 29% of nights. Across models, being with one or more intoxicated friends was associated with friends-based strategy use and an unwanted sexual experience, but only at the situation-level. Parents, educators, and policy makers can encourage college women to draw on their social networks to enhance safety. Interventions could incorporate more universal strategies for responding to risk in social contexts.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T01:15:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221085219
       
  • “We Were Loving Warriors!”: A Content Analysis of Black Women’s
           Resistance Within Psychological Science

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      Authors: shola shodiya-zeumault, Michelle Aiello, Cassandra L. Hinger, Cirleen DeBlaere
      First page: 176
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Though findings are mixed, collective action engagement has been shown to be positively associated with greater academic success, social support, political efficacy, and well-being with racially marginalized individuals. Despite these findings, however, investigations of collective action engagement with Black American adult women within psychological science are scarce. Consistent with Black feminist thought, the construct of resistance may provide a necessary expansion to include all the ways that Black women actively work to transform their communities toward justice, beyond collective action. To ascertain the breadth and scope of psychological research related to Black women’s resistance (i.e., collective action engagement) to interpersonal discrimination and structural oppression, in this systematic review and content analysis we sought to identify participants’ and scholars’ definitions of resistance, as well as thematic dimensions and specific strategies of resistance. Additionally, we sought to determine the outcomes of resistance that have been assessed and the degree to which psychological health and well-being have been examined as an outcome of resistance within the literature. Findings from the analysis suggest the need for future examinations of the specific influence of Black American women’s collective action engagement and resistance to oppression on their well-being. Additionally, the findings of this review may have important implications for Black women’s well-being and as such, we discuss resistance work as a therapeutic intervention that can be encouraged by therapists, healers, community leaders, and educators.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-01-12T05:45:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843211064181
       
  • “I’m a Strong Independent Black Woman”: The Strong Black Woman
           Schema and Mental Health in College-Aged Black Women

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      Authors: Stephanie Castelin, Grace White
      First page: 196
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The Strong Black Woman Schema (SBWS) is a cultural expectation for Black women to unfailingly display signs of strength and caretaker qualities, while suppressing their emotions. Although this schema is a purported source of strength for Black women, quantitative explorations of its psychological impact have been limited. In the present study, we examined associations between endorsement of the SBWS and several indicators of mental health and resilience in Black women. We analyzed responses from 212 college-aged, Black women assessing psychological distress, suicidal behaviors, resilience, and SBWS endorsement. Findings indicated that endorsement of the SBWS was positively related to both psychological distress and self-reported suicidal behaviors. In addition, the SBWS’ link to suicidal behaviors was mediated by psychological distress. Lastly, results from moderated mediation analysis supported a buffering effect of resilience. That is, when resilience was high, the association between psychological distress and suicidal behaviors, as well as the conditional indirect effects of the SBWS, was lessened. Implications of these findings suggest that prevalent endorsement of SBWS within Black communities may be harmful to Black women’s mental health. We call for additional research and provide recommendations on how the media, mental health professionals, and community leaders can mitigate its negative effects.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-02-17T06:59:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843211067501
       
  • Not All the Same: Examining Asian American Women’s Self-Objectification
           Processes Using a Latent Class and Cultural-Specific Approach

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      Authors: Jennifer King, Derek Iwamoto
      First page: 209
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Past research has shown that Asian American women are subject to distinct forms of sexism and racism that can influence culture-specific appearance evaluations. However, no studies have examined within-group differences in self-objectification processes. To address this gap, we used latent class analysis. Our study had three aims: (a) identify subgroups (e.g., latent classes) of Asian American women (N = 554) based upon their general and group-specific self-objectification processes, (b) examine the racial objectification predictors (e.g., general racism, gendered racial microaggressions, and racial identity) of latent class membership, and (c) examine the relation between the classes and disordered eating and depression. Results of the latent class analysis yielded four classes: (a) High Self-Objectification class (37.2%), (b) Moderate Self-Objectification class (40.1%), (c) Body Conscious class (7.3%), and (d) Appearance Acceptance class (15.5%). The High Self-Objectification class reported significantly higher rates of disordered eating and depression. Women were more likely to be in the High Self-Objectification class if they experienced higher levels of gendered racial microaggressions and racial dissonance. Results can advance the literature by demonstrating significant within-group variability in self-objectification processes among Asian American Women and offer valuable clinical implications for targeting high-risk groups.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T09:38:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221081525
       
  • A Test of Objectification Theory with Sexual Minority Women

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      Authors: Bonnie Moradi, Elliot Tebbe
      First page: 226
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      With this study, we aimed to advance objectification theory research with sexual minority women by examining the understudied roles of appearance anxiety and interoceptive awareness concomitantly with other key variables, including sexual objectification experiences, internalization of cultural appearance standards, body surveillance, and body shame. We also examined depressive symptoms as a criterion variable in addition to eating disorder symptoms. Survey data from 201 sexual minority women were analyzed. Manifest variable path analysis of the hypothesized model explained 35% and 27% of the variance in eating disorder and depressive symptoms, respectively. Results revealed a distinct pattern of cross-sectional direct and indirect relations for eating disorder and depressive symptoms. Specifically, body shame was a key unique correlate of eating disorder symptoms and linked internalization of cultural appearance standards and body surveillance with eating disorder symptoms. Appearance anxiety was a key unique correlate of depressive symptoms and linked internalization of cultural appearance standards and body surveillance with depressive symptoms. Sexual objectification experiences and interoceptive awareness generally did not yield significant unique direct or indirect relations in the model. These findings suggest distinct and complementary points of intervention to mitigate eating disorder and depressive symptoms for sexual minority women.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T10:10:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843211052525
       
  • Book Review

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      Authors: Susan L. McCammon
      First page: 241
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-03-31T09:58:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221082919
       
  • Book Review

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      Authors: Marilyn R. Sanders
      First page: 242
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T07:22:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221079730
       
  • Book Review: Review of Sexual Boundary Violations in Psychotherapy

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      Authors: Nathan Bitecofer, Ronald F. Levant
      First page: 243
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-04-01T12:08:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843221078198
       
  • Book Review: Beating depression and bipolar disorder without drugs: A
           memoir of survival in a male-dominated world

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      Authors: Fred H. Previc
      First page: 244
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T05:25:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843211070337
       
  • Book Review: She speaks her anger: Myths and conversations of Gimi women

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      Authors: ■■■ ■■■
      First page: 245
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T01:04:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843211069111
       
 
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