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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Revista Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Costarricense de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Cultura Teológica     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios e Investigación en Psicología y Educación     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología : Segunda Epoca     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Electrónica de Metodología Aplicada     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Wímb Lu     Open Access  
Revue de psychoéducation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée / European Review of Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revue québécoise de psychologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia     Open Access  
Roeper Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Rorschachiana     Hybrid Journal  
RUDN Journal of Psychology and Pedagogics     Open Access  
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Satir International Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
School Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Seeing and Perceiving     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexual Abuse A Journal of Research and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Offending : Theory, Research, and Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Simmel Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 3)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Issues and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Psychological and Personality Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Somnologie - Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Suma Psicologica     Open Access  
Tajdida : Jurnal Pemikiran dan Gerakan Muhammadiyah     Open Access  
Teaching of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Terapia Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tesis Psicologica     Open Access  
TESTFÓRUM     Open Access  
The Arts in Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Brown University Psychopharmacology Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Clinical Neuropsychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The International Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series B : Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Sport Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Therapeutic Communities : The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Thinking & Reasoning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tobacco Use Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transactional Analysis Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Undecidable Unconscious : A Journal of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Universal Journal of Psychology     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Vinculo - Revista do NESME     Open Access  
VIVESIANA     Open Access  
Voices : The Art and Science of Psychotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Yaşam Becerileri Psikoloji Dergisi / Life Skills Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Arbeits - und Organisationspsychologie A&O     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Differentielle und Diagnostische Psychologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Erziehungswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gesundheitspsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Neuropsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Pädagogische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie, Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie / Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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Similar Journals
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Psychology of Music
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.711
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 25  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0305-7356 - ISSN (Online) 1741-3087
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Beyond musical training: Individual influences on the perception of the
           speech-to-song illusion

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      Authors: Eline A Smit, Tamara V Rathcke
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      When a spoken phrase is repeated several times, listeners often report a perceptual illusion during which speech is transformed into song. The speech-to-song (STS) illusion is often attributed to prosodic elements of speech, though listeners can vary greatly in their STS experience. While previous research established robust links between music aptitude and STS, the present study asks whether other cognitive traits may also influence STS. Individual (in)sensitivity to nonverbal aspects of speech, specifically speech prosody, has been previously linked to autistic traits and emotional intelligence. We test whether the presence of autistic traits, the level of emotional intelligence and musical training, as well as syntactic complexity influence the likelihood, speed, and strength of STS among native British English listeners. The results provide evidence for the involvement of some but not all studied traits. We found sentence complexity to be interacting with a composite score of musical training, and emotional intelligence for the likelihood of STS, whereas sentence complexity influenced the strength of the transformation. These results suggest that individual listener variability may interact with the linguistic parameters of sentences in STS. Crucially, sensitivity to prosody through emotional intelligence or by the presence of autistic traits does not mediate the transformation.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-06-19T12:19:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241256652
       
  • How do adolescents engage with music in spare time' Leisure patterns and
           their relation with socio-demographic characteristics, well-being, and
           risk behaviors

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      Authors: Ivana Stepanović Ilić, Zora Krnjaić, Marina Videnović, Ksenija Krstić
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      This research focuses on four types of adolescents’ leisure pursuits related to music: listening to music; following music topics in the media; and extracurricular activities and hobbies related to music. Our main goal was not only to identify behavioral patterns representing adolescents’ engagement with music in leisure time but also to establish their relationship with relevant socio-demographic variables and indicators of well-being and risk behaviors. The sample comprised 1,358 secondary school students (aged 15 and 17). Five behavioral patterns were identified by principal component analysis. Three represent preferences for listening to music and are labeled rebellious, sophisticated, and energetic music preferences, whereas the fourth, following music, represents adolescents’ interest in music-related topics via media and preferences for pop and, to a lesser extent, folk music. The fifth factor, music-making, describes an active commitment to music as an extracurricular activity or hobby. The regression analysis was used to relate extracted leisure patterns not only with adolescents’ gender, age, and attendance at specific schools but also with the parameters of well-being and risk behaviors. The results are discussed in light of previous research in music psychology, leisure studies, and positive psychology. Major implications are related to music as a protective factor in a sensitive period of adolescence and adults’ responsibility not only to cherish but also to cultivate youth’s interest in it.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-06-18T11:11:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241254458
       
  • Musical mood induction: The relative influences of music type and the
           importance of music preference

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      Authors: Elizabeth J Vella, Cristin McDonough, Hannah Goldstein
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of music type on mood and the influence of music preference for predicting mood induction. Ninety undergraduate participants (Mage = 22.19 years, SD = 6) completed a music preference inventory prior to listening to heavy metal and classical music stimuli, presented in counterbalanced order. Participants completed the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale inventory to measure baseline mood and then re-completed the inventory after each music stimulus presentation. Multivariate analysis of variance on repeated measures evaluated the effects of music type on mood, whereas multiple regression analysis tested the influence of preference on mood following music exposure. Heavy metal music induced a state of high arousal/negative mood via increases in hostility, whereas classical music induced a state of low arousal/positive mood via increases in serenity. Preferences for heavy metal music predicted significant reductions in negative affect and hostility following heavy metal music, coupled with increases in serenity, joviality, and positive affect. Likewise, classical music preference predicted significant increases in joviality and PA following classical music listening. The results of the current study demonstrate how differential music exposures influence mood and reveal the importance of listener preferences for predicting mood change.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-06-18T11:07:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241254361
       
  • Synaesthesia is linked to differences in music preference and musical
           sophistication and a distinctive pattern of sound-color associations

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      Authors: Jamie Ward, Stacy Maciel, Romke Rouw, Julia Simner, Nicholas Root
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Synaesthesia has often been linked to an artistic or creative temperament, but the nature of this link (and, hence, the possible underpinning mechanisms) are poorly understood. This study focusses primarily on people with synaesthesia who have visual experiences, including color, that are induced by music. We determine how this impacts their musical preferences and musical sophistication using previously validated self-report measures and contrast them against non-synaesthetes and synaesthetes with non-musical types. Our data show that people with music-color synaesthesia gravitate toward certain genres (e.g., Reflective and Complex) and show more active engagement with music relative to controls and other synaesthetes. However, synaesthesia as a whole is also linked to greater musical sophistication (e.g., perceptual abilities). A second study examines in detail the nature of associations from musical notes to colors in synaesthetes relative to non-synaesthetes. Synaesthetes have a distinctive way of associating colors with notes: They are more consistent over time, show a more sensitive pitch-luminance correspondence, and have a distinctive color palette (e.g., more browns, fewer greens). These indicative features can be used to determine the presence of this form of synaesthesia.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-06-10T07:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241250020
       
  • The effect of differentiated video presentations of choral performances on
           aesthetic responses of undergraduate choral and instrumental ensemble
           musicians

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      Authors: Charles R Robinson, Daniel J Keown
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Research examining affective response to media modalities including film, television, gaming, video streaming, and virtual reality is expanding. This study examined aesthetic responses to choral performances presented in two contrasting video formats (stationary and produced). Volunteer undergraduate students (N = 94) enrolled in ensembles (choral, n = 45; instrumental, n = 49) indicated their aesthetic responses to choral performances of Ēriks Ešenvalds’ “Only in Sleep” by manipulating a Continuous Response Digital Interface (CRDI) dial. Participants viewed video performances of two ensembles, one of which was digitally altered to allow for use of the same audio content for both videos. CRDI data were used to create temporal line graphs depicting participant responses to each video and indicated similar shapes with more intense aesthetic response to the produced video. Statistical analysis of cumulative mean responses to each performance found a main effect of video format (stationary vs. produced) and a video format × presentation order interaction. Initial exposure to each video garnered a more intense response than that of the second video, and the produced video elicited greater magnitude than the stationary perspective video. Findings support further examination of video and other media, studying differentiated impact on aesthetic response to music performances.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-05-24T12:04:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241250316
       
  • The effect of chord duration on the relative salience of chord-type and
           voicing changes

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      Authors: Ivan Jimenez, Tuire Kuusi, Juha Ojala, Peter Harrison
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the effect of chord duration on the relative salience of chord-type and voicing changes. Participants (N = 111) with varying levels of musical training were presented with sequences of five block chords on the piano and asked to indicate which chord sounded most different. Each sequence consisted of three identical chords and two oddballs, one with a voicing change and one with a chord-type change. All possible chord-type pairings between standard and oddball formed of major, minor, dominant seventh, major seventh, and minor seventh chords were tested. In addition, each sequence of five chords was tested using three chord duration conditions (500, 1,000, and 1,500 ms), and the durations were pseudo-randomized throughout the experiment. Chord-type changes became more salient with longer durations and this effect could be seen for all participants regardless of their levels of musical training. However, with higher level of musical training, chord-type changes became more salient across all duration conditions. Leman’s model of tonal contextuality suggests that the effect of duration in our experiment could be explained by sensory mechanisms related to echoic memory. The potential contribution of other factors to the effect of duration is discussed.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-05-24T12:02:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241247533
       
  • Opening up openings: Zooming in on improvisation in the Theater of Home

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      Authors: Robert L Burke, Maria Sappho, Ross Birrell, Raymond MacDonald, Tia DeNora
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents a qualitative analysis of the opening section of an online improvisation session. The session, which was organized by the Glasgow Improvisers Orchestra, included an international group of musicians. It took place during the global COVID-19 pandemic where the participants were experiencing lockdown conditions. Phenomenological reflexive analysis and video elicitation techniques were utilized to develop a number of key themes related to the multimodal improvisation strategies identified as emergent in the session. The results highlight how technical, physical, and psychological constraints of online practice can facilitate new creative insights and approaches to improvisation. Particular emphasis is placed upon how an improvisation begins and the role of distributed and collaborative creativity within the overall process. The importance of the domestic environment, what we term The Theater of Home, is central to these new ideas, as is how particular scenarios/items function as psychological and creative boundary objects. The spontaneous multimodal integration of text, visual, and audio material within the domestic and virtual environment can be seen to support a new type of creative collaboration and one that draws out features of social improvisation.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-05-15T01:08:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241247528
       
  • The association between music performance skills and cognitive improvement
           in a musical instrument training program for older adults

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      Authors: Marcelo Kakihara, Xueyan Wang, Shoko Iwasaki, Takahiro Soshi, Masatoshi Yamashita, Kaoru Sekiyama
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Recent studies have reported positive effects of music training on older adults’ executive functions. However, it is not completely known whether these outcomes were due to improvement in music performance skills or due to other components of training, such as social interaction and music listening. Here, we investigated the effect of a 10-week melodica training program on a group of healthy older adults in Japan and the relationship between their early music performance and improvements in executive functions. Participants were divided into an experimental and a passive control group; both completed a battery of executive function measures before and after the intervention. The experimental group also completed a music performance evaluation developed for the current study. We found a significant improvement in an executive function composite index for the intervention group as compared with the control group. Moreover, individual musical performance was the only factor to predict cognitive improvement. Our results suggest that musical instrument training has a positive impact on older adults’ cognition which is not solely attributed to social interaction or music listening. Further research should consider the potential of examining individual differences in music performance skills inside the experimental group to understand the effects of instrument training programs.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-05-15T01:06:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241248086
       
  • Cultivating meaning and self-transcendence to increase positive emotions
           and decrease anxiety in music performance

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      Authors: Elsa Perdomo-Guevara, Nicola Dibben
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents the findings of an intervention aimed at promoting positive emotions in music performance, as positive emotions are intrinsically valuable and can have associated benefits. The intervention sought to help participants conceive performance in more meaningful, self-transcendent terms. This study investigated whether the intervention helped performers to change their approach to performance; whether an increase in meaningfulness and self-transcendence led to more positive performance-related emotions; and whether an increase in positive emotions resulted in higher perceived quality of the performance. Comparison of self-report measures pre- and post-intervention indicated that after the intervention, participants approached performance in a more meaningful, self-transcendent manner. Specifically, they were more focused on the value of music, privilege of performing, and benefits for the audience. They also reported more rewarding performance experiences: they reported more joy, engagement, and self-confidence; more inspiration and connection with their audiences; and less anxiety. In addition, they reported being able to give better performances. None of these changes were found with a randomly assigned wait list control group. We conclude that an intervention designed to change performers’ conceptions of the meaningfulness of performing can have beneficial impacts on the quality of that experience.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T09:32:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241246052
       
  • Concurrent musical pitch height biases judgment of visual brightness

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      Authors: You Jeong Hong, Ahyeon Choi, Chae-Eun Lee, WooJae Cho, Sumin Yoon, Kyogu Lee
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      The integration of music sounds with concurrent visual scenes or objects is a occurrence in our daily lives, attracting the attention of researchers investigating how music influences our perceptions of simultaneous visuals. This study specifically investigates the role of musical pitch height in shaping our judgments of visual brightness during concurrent music–visual events. Participants were presented with pitch-modified versions of a wide range of emotional music pieces alongside various visual stimuli. The results demonstrate that lower-pitched music tends to elicit darker judgments of visual objects than higher-pitched music, when the actual visual brightness level remains constant. These findings suggest the influence of musical pitch height on introducing biases in our evaluations of visual brightness within the context of concurrent music-visual experiences, contributing to the advancement of our theoretical understanding of the complex audiovisual integration involving music in our everyday lives.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-05-08T11:16:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231216950
       
  • Children’s and adolescents’ engagement with music and the potential
           for (digital) empowerment processes: A text-mining-supported scoping
           review

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      Authors: Kathrin Smolarczyk, Lisa Birnbaum, Alexander Christ, Stephan Kröner
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Extracurricular and out-of-school engagement with music is often associated with positive effects for musical goals while also holding potential for developmental and empowerment processes. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the importance and the potential of digital technologies for facilitating musical engagement. The emergence of digitally transformed musicking has added complexity to the already multifaceted and complex field of research on non-formal musical engagement. Thus, the aims of this text-mining-supported scoping review are (1) to map and describe the underlying research topics in the field of children’s and adolescents’ musical engagement, (2) to explore potential for empowerment processes, and (3) to identify the extent to which digital aspects emerge. Based on N = 624 articles, a topic-modeling procedure yielded k = 10 topics covering cognitive, emotional and attitudinal, youth cultural and digital aspects. Among these, one predominantly digital topic comprised studies on the production and consumption of music. Implications for the potential for empowerment can be drawn from studies that focus on youth cultural aspects, such as hip-hop culture and digital aspects. Limitations and implications for further research are discussed, including how to transfer these findings and how new technologies can further enhance music-making and creation.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-04-26T11:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241241535
       
  • Unraveling the interplay of emotions in art and music: An event-related
           potential investigation

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      Authors: Francesco De Benedetto, Eleonora Ghiraldini, Nausicaa Capizzi, Alice Mado Proverbio
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      The study examined the impact of music’s emotional content on the aesthetic experience of visual artworks during combined stimulation. The hypothesis posited that incongruity of emotional states induced by music would impede accurate comprehension of emotional aspect of artworks. A total of 18 university students were presented with 192 paintings and 20 emotionally congruent or incongruent musical excerpts. Both paintings and music were validated as belonging to four emotional categories with different valence (positive vs negative) and arousal (high vs low). ERP data showed that visual N170 and auditory N400 were modulated by stimuli emotional valence and that negative visual stimuli attracted more attention than positive ones (larger P300). The multimodal LP was modulated by the stimulus emotional congruence, with larger responses to positive than negative congruent pairs. During multimodal artistic simulation, the most active brain areas were the left middle frontal gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, right precuneus, and right middle temporal gyrus. Taken together, these results suggest that visual stimuli with negative valence attract more attention than positive ones and that congruent pairs are more pleasant than incongruent. Also, these findings suggest that the neural basis of the emergence of aesthetic sensations may be similar for both auditory and visual emotional processing.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T06:08:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241245997
       
  • Spiralling Engagement Experiences of Creativity (SEEC): A process of
           research-led arts creation for facilitating experiences of flourishing in
           participants’ lives

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      Authors: Julie Ballantyne, Eve Klein
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Research in the area of Positive Psychology typically investigates positive psychological interventions and their impact on the lives of participants, positive psychology as an approach to enhance the lives of participants, or investigations of particular populations in search of evidence of flourishing. This paper presents a research process of embodied, creative engagement to facilitate the exploration of research phenomena within community contexts. Entitled Spiralling Engagement Experiences of Creativity (SEEC), the process adapts concepts from Poetic Inquiry as the basis for exploring a phenomenon and extending participants’ engagement with that phenomenon through the facilitation of creative activities. This pilot study focused on the phenomenon of flourishing, using preliminary participant conversations to generate poetry/lyrics that tell individual, personal stories. Participants repeatedly engaged with their own positive personal stories to create an artwork that they could use to remind themselves of ways to interpret their lives. The benefit of this research process is that it prioritises participants making sense of their own lives in creative ways while exploring a phenomenon of interest. The SEEC process has the potential for use in varied contexts where the intersection of a deliberate research and arts-making framework would be helpful for exploring a phenomenon of inquiry.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T12:28:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241232363
       
  • Music-making facilitates acculturation and reduces acculturative stress:
           Evidence from a survey of migrants living in Germany

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      Authors: Jasmin Chantah, Emily Frankenberg, Zora Kasanda, Stephan Bongard
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Beneficial effects of music on wellbeing and group cohesion are well established. Furthermore, participation in music groups has been shown to be associated with increased orientation to the host culture, while orientation to culture of origin appears to remain unaffected. In order to gain insight into the effects of music activities on acculturative stress in adult migrants, a group of musically active migrants to Germany (n = 80) was compared with migrants who had never played a musical instrument (n = 86). We saw that music group members (n = 42) reported lower levels of acculturative stress and a stronger orientation to mainstream culture compared to participants who are not actively making music. The association between music group membership and acculturative stress was mediated by orientation to host culture. Solo-musicians (n = 38) did not differ from group-musicians and musically non-active subjects. We found no differences in orientation to the culture of origin between the study groups. The findings suggest that (group) music making can support acculturation processes in migrants.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-04-20T03:47:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241243333
       
  • Personal strength and coping during the COVID-19 pandemic: A study of
           cultural workers in the music sector

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      Authors: Beate Elstad, Erik Døving, Dag Jansson
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how cultural workers in the music sector coped with the COVID-19-induced lockdown, and how coping is associated with growth in personal strength during the pandemic. We conducted an online survey 1 year into the pandemic among members of Creo, Norway’s largest trade union in the music sector. Respondents (N = 658) were to a large degree engaged in fight coping. Furthermore, seeking and giving social support, adopting new digital technologies, rotating job plans, as well as generating and maintaining professional skills were positively related to increased personal strength. We observed notable differences between occupational groups. Musicians chose skill nurturing, music educators engaged in technology adoption, and backstage workers reported flight coping to a larger degree than the other occupational groups. Surprisingly, self-employed and temporary employed workers reported a lower degree of innovation in terms of initiating and participating in new digital concepts and technology adoption compared to those with permanent employment. Finally, temporary or self-employed workers reported a higher degree of flight and freeze coping than permanently employed workers.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-04-11T04:12:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241239337
       
  • Charity begins with prosocial music: Musical differences in intertemporal
           prosocial discounting and generosity

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      Authors: Mei Hong, Dapeng Liang, Teng Lu
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      It has been demonstrated that exposure to music with prosocial lyrics can increase the accessibility of prosocial thoughts, leading to greater empathy and fostering helping behaviors. However, existing studies have largely neglected the intertemporal nature of altruism, limiting their scope of interpretation. The present research investigates the effects of attentively listening to music with prosocial lyrics (Study 1) and playing prosocial background music (Study 2) on intertemporal charitable donations. Both studies indicated that relative to neutral music, listening to songs with prosocial lyrics enhanced intertemporal donation behavior. Interpersonal empathy served a mediating role in this effect. These findings align with the General Learning Model, highlighting the significance of the empathy pathway in elucidating how media exposure impacts intertemporal altruism.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-04-10T10:10:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241238004
       
  • The Aversive Musical Experience Scale (AMES): Measuring individual
           differences in the intensity of music-evoked aversion

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      Authors: Jonna K. Vuoskoski, Henna-Riikka Peltola
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Strongly disliked music has the capacity to evoke strong negative emotions and physical sensations—at least in some listeners. Although previous (qualitative) studies on disliked music have provided valuable descriptions of listeners’ experiences, more generalizable approaches are needed for understanding individual differences in the intensity of music-evoked aversive experiences. This study set out to explore these individual differences by developing a standardized questionnaire to measure the intensity of aversive musical experiences, the Aversive Musical Experience Scale (AMES). Furthermore, we explored the hypothesized predictors and potential underlying mechanisms (such as emotional contagion and a general sensitivity to sounds) by measuring trait emotional contagion, misophonia, tendency to experience autonomous sensory meridian responses (ASMR) and frissons, and personality. Based on the results of exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, a final 18-item version of AMES was constructed, comprising three subscales: Sensations, Social, and Features. Misophonia and emotional contagion emerged as the strongest predictors of global AMES and its subscales. Furthermore, the personality traits of neuroticism, agreeableness, and openness to experience, as well as age and musical expertise emerged as significant predictors of at least one of the scales. The implications and limitations of the findings are discussed with respect to sound-sensitivity, music-induced emotions, and personality theory.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-04-05T05:17:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241239336
       
  • The effects of a mindfulness meditation program on enhancing musical
           perception of time: A pilot study

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      Authors: Berke Ankaç, Hakkı Cengiz Eren, Erkan Sülün
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Mindfulness meditation practices have garnered a lot of popularity in recent years. Various psychological benefits of mindfulness meditation have been documented in a myriad of literature. In this pilot study, we evaluated the effectiveness of a short-term mindfulness training program on time-based musical perceptions of pre-service music teachers. Here, time-based perception entails the accurate perception of pattern, meter, and tempo. A one-group pretest–posttest design was implemented as a model. Pre-service music teachers (n = 8) completed the rhythm, rhythm-to-melody, and tempo subscales of the modular-PROMS before and after undergoing an 8-week-long mindfulness training program. Whereas significant enhancements of rhythm and rhythm-to-melody perceptions were observed, a similar kind of enhancement was not detected with respect to tempo perception.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-04-04T03:33:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241239876
       
  • “There’s no one as honest as those in pain”: The language of Tom
           Petty’s song lyrics

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      Authors: Seth C Kalichman, Joshua M Smyth
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Tom Petty’s songs are among the most recognized and influential in rock music. One aspect of Petty’s songs that contributes to his popularity is his use of language in his lyrics. The current study performed two sets of analyses: (a) to examine linguistic features of Petty’s song lyrics over the course of his songwriting career; and (b) to investigate similarities and differences between Petty’s lyrics and the earlier and contemporaneous lyrics of an artist widely assumed to have influenced him, Bob Dylan. Results of analyses using a standard textual program, Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC), showed that Petty reduced his references to social relations and reduced his focus on future time orientations over his songwriting career. There were also rises and declines in expressions of authenticity as well as increases in analytical thinking. In analyses comparing Petty to Dylan using a time-lagged approach, Petty’s songs remained shorter in number of words than Dylan’s songs and there was an increase in indicators of analytical thinking in Petty’s later work reaching levels that are characteristic of Dylan’s songs. Further research is needed to trace the influences on prolific songwriting and other aspects of music beyond lyrical expression.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-03-20T04:01:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241235645
       
  • Music performance anxiety can be facilitating or debilitating: Emotion
           accompaniment makes the difference

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      Authors: Emily Murphy, Molly F McGillivray, Peter D MacIntyre
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Music performance anxiety (MPA) is most often defined as a negative experience that is harmful to successful performance, but potential facilitating effects of MPA often are acknowledged. The distinction between facilitating and debilitating effects often is attributed to various cognitive frameworks based on the quantity of anxiety, where smaller amounts may be helpful and larger amounts harmful. The hypothesis underlying the present study holds that the difference between facilitating and debilitating MPA is more a matter of quality than quantity, specifically the qualities associated with the other positive and negative emotions that accompany MPA. A web survey recruited 114 musicians to test for differences in MPA and accompanying emotions by responding to descriptions of four specific musical contexts. Results show that between roughly one-quarter and one-half of the musicians in the study viewed MPA as facilitating, depending on context. Respondents endorsing the facilitating quality of MPA (compared with the debilitating group) showed significantly higher levels of positive emotion accompanied by lower levels of both MPA and negative emotion in three of four contexts. Results are interpreted as supporting the hypothesis that emotions accompanying MPA shape the quality of its effect on musical performance.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-03-20T03:57:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241230442
       
  • Very low association between multidimensional musical environment exposure
           and musical perception skills among children: Evidence from a large
           multilevel cross-sectional study

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      Authors: Hugo Cogo-Moreira, Anders Nordahl-Hansen
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to explore whether music perception is correlated with the load of exposure to musical activities in daily life, such as attending musical events, playing an instrument, attending music classes (at school or for a social project), and the time children spend listening to music using a non-experimental design. We are reusing data from the studies by Barros et al. and Cogo-Moreira & Lamont, from a random school-based sample (multilevel design) including 1,006 children from first to fifth grade in 14 schools in São Paulo, Brazil. Data were collected using the “M-factor”, a new paradigm to assess music perception, and a questionnaire to track children’s self-reported musical activities related to their individual daily lives in different environments (home and school). At the within-participants level, self-reported exposure to music activity accounted for only 5.3% of the variance in music perception after adjusting for age and sex. Hence, the magnitude of the association between music exposure and music perception skills was small when both music exposure and music perception skills were evaluated under continuous scores and using a heterogeneous population.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-03-14T04:06:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241235665
       
  • Participatory online music creation as a crisis response: A qualitative
           case study

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      Authors: Yingjie Zheng, Hui Zhang
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Online participatory music creation provided an opportunity to build the public’s psychological resilience during the COVID-19 lockdown measures that led to widespread negative emotions on a societal level. This study explored how online participation in music creation as a crisis response contributes to the public’s mental health. The study employed a qualitative method that combines network ethnography and multimodal performance discourse analysis to conduct participatory observation and content analysis of people’s activities related to the song “Wuhan Ya” (the Wuhan Kids) and its participatory creation. The results showed that “Wuhan Ya” and its creation process demonstrated a music phenomenon centered on local identity and characterized by collective participation. The study proposed a theoretical framework to explain how this music phenomenon promotes mental health. In the context of song creation and dissemination, the public’s psychological resilience to crises is bolstered by engaging in emotional contagion, behavioral responses, and social support processes.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-03-13T07:26:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241235647
       
  • Music consumption and uses in Japan

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      Authors: Keegan Kok, Adrian C North, Takeshi Hamamura, Kongmeng Liew
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      This research investigates the relationship between music consumption and cultural dimensions within a Japanese context. Since Japan is the second largest music market globally, it is surprising that there is little focus on those factors often examined in cross-cultural research that might mean Western findings do not extrapolate well. A questionnaire using established measures of tightness–looseness, relational mobility, and ideal affect was used to test three main research questions. RQ1 was that there should be a relationship between cultural dimensions and musical taste, and this was fully supported. RQ2 was that cultural dimensions should relate to participants’ goals of music consumption, and this was largely supported. RQ3 was that there should be a relationship between socioeconomic status and musical taste, but this was not supported. The findings also supported several more specific research questions concerning how specific uses of music ought to relate to specific cultural dimensions. The findings of the study help us better understand the way music is consumed in relation to specific cultural dimensions in the context of Japan and beyond. It also extends the literature concerning music and cross-cultural psychology where prior research has not considered these dimensions within the context of music consumption.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-03-13T07:23:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241234071
       
  • How Australian singers experienced disruption to choir participation
           caused by pandemic lockdowns: A thematic analysis

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      Authors: Belinda Densley, Katrina Andrews, Trudi Flynn
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Benefits of group singing participation have been well established and group singing through social prescription has attracted recent research attention. This study offers a unique participant perspective on the benefits of regular singing group engagement by exploring what happened when access was lost through COVID-19 lockdowns. Sixty adult singers, including five facilitators, who ceased singing during lockdown submitted responses to an online qualitative survey. The respondents had all participated regularly in group singing for at least 5 years. Multi-faceted experiences of loss associated with mood, emotional regulation, access to shared joy and social connection were described by participants. Dissatisfaction with online singing alternatives and challenges of navigating a face-to-face return to group singing were emphasized. The research also describes the specific experience of singing group facilitators who described feelings of anguish related to not being able to resource their groups with singing and negative impacts on their personal and professional identities. In exploring what is lost to facilitators and group members due to pandemic intervention, this study highlights the value and experience of group singing involvement outside of the COVID-19 context.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-03-13T07:17:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241234052
       
  • The characteristics of music video experiences and their relationship to
           future listening outcomes

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      Authors: Johanna N Dasovich-Wilson, Marc Thompson, Suvi Saarikallio
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Music videos are a popular method of consuming music; however, the characteristics of these experiences and their effects on music perception are poorly understood. An online survey (N = 155) was designed using theoretical insight from Dasovich-Wilson et al.’s (2022) Intention Attention Reaction and Retention (IARR) framework. The survey consisted of two parts: the first explored the key characteristics of music video experiences, and the second explored their effects on subsequent listening outcomes. Separate principal component analyses (PCAs) were performed on each part to differentiate between the experience itself (Experience components) and the effects on subsequent listens (Retention outcomes). Relationships between Experience components and Retention outcomes were explored using correlation and regression analyses. The results suggest that music video experiences characterized by performance gestures and narratives have the strongest influence on music perception. These findings shed light on how extramusical information from music videos influences mechanisms related to visual imagery and personal associations.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-03-06T12:19:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231220943
       
  • College music students during COVID-19: Examining the moderating effect of
           access to resources and stability of living on the relationship between
           perceived social support and mental health

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      Authors: Brian McGoldrick, Aaron Bradetich, Kris Chesky
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between perceived social support (PSS) and general mental health in collegiate music students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, perception of access to academic resources and stability of living was analyzed as a moderator in the relationship between PSS and general mental health. Participants completed a survey that included the Mental Health Inventory-5 (MHI-5), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), and questions adapted from the “access to necessary resources” and “stability of living” section of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) COVID Survey. In the final sample, PSS explained a statistically significant amount of the variance in general mental health. Moderation analysis was conducted using PSS as the predictor variable, mental health as the criterion variable, and access to resources and stability of living as a composite variable as the moderator. The interaction between PSS and the composite variable was statistically significant. Access to resources and stability of living proved a positive moderator between PSS and general mental health. PSS positively predicted general mental health in collegiate music students during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, access to resources and stability of living (composite variable) were positive moderators, with a higher perception of both creating a stronger positive relationship between PSS and general mental health.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-03-04T08:11:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241230447
       
  • The effectiveness of Chinese instrumental music embedded with binaural
           beats in relieving anxiety related to academic stress among
           undergraduates: A randomized controlled trial

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      Authors: Chu Hui Pang, Yeow Hing Bradley Lam, Jia Lin Cherie Chia, Soo Inn Fidessa Ng, Samuel Shengmiao Wong, Peter Kay Chai Tay
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      The study aimed to determine the effectiveness of binaural beat (BB) Chinese music, with dynamic theta- to delta-frequency progression, in relieving anxiety among Singapore undergraduates. It also examined whether the binaural effects differ between students with high and normal trait anxiety. This was a randomized controlled trial with 151 undergraduates assigned to listen to a single 30 min episode of BB Chinese music, Chinese music, or audiobook. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) measured stress, while the state subscale of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S) and root mean square of successive R–R interval differences (RMSSD) were outcome measures for anxiety. Results indicated that mean STAI-S and PSS reductions were not statistically significant between groups. No significant difference in mean change of RMSSD was detected when the BB Chinese music group was compared with the Chinese music or audiobook groups. However, students with high baseline trait anxiety experienced a greater, marginally significant reduction in STAI-S scores and an increase in RMSSD than those with normal trait anxiety after BB exposure. BB Chinese instrumental music may not have anxiolytic effects on healthy undergraduate populations, as evidence for an anxiolytic effect was observed only among students with high baseline trait anxiety, warranting further research on this population.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-02-28T04:20:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241231769
       
  • Undergraduate jazz majors’ music identities: A multiple case study

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      Authors: Daniel Healy, Daniel J. Albert
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      The past few decades have seen formal jazz degrees become more established in university music programs in the United States. As these universities strive to provide an exemplary education experience for jazz degree majors, it is especially important to thoughtfully inquire into the personal and environmental elements that led students to pursue a jazz degree. The purpose of this multiple case study is to examine the identities of four undergraduate jazz performance majors and the factors that guided their selection of major upon matriculation. Data collection included six interviews with each participant, reflective practice journals, and university small group jazz rehearsal field notes. The theoretical framework of music performer identity as framed by Davidson was used as the basis for this study. Cross-case themes that emerged as part of this theoretical framework include (1) the importance of aural music learning; (2) environments that promoted creative music-making; (3) the crucial importance of jazz recordings; (4) music as a social or communal activity; (5) attraction toward musical experimentation and variation. Study results suggest that both universities and K–12 music programs can actively prepare and engage students who are interested in jazz.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-02-27T03:31:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356241229439
       
  • Music engagement for stress and anxiety in adults during the COVID-19
           pandemic: A systematic review

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      Authors: Katherine Zhang, Rina A Tabuchi, Kevin Zhang, Rachael Finnerty
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused heightened mental distress globally. The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the impact of music engagement on stress and anxiety in adults during COVID-19. Thirteen articles were included, encompassing 9,893 adults and reporting on seven forms of music engagement: music listening, singing, playing an instrument, watching music videos or virtual performances, dancing to music, composing, and externally-facilitated music interventions. The majority of articles concluded a beneficial impact of music on stress and anxiety among adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. Of the seven studies that investigated stress, four (57.1%) reported that music had a positive impact on stress and, of the nine studies that investigated anxiety, six (66.7%) reported a positive impact on anxiety. A higher proportion of externally-facilitated music studies reported reductions in stress and anxiety compared to studies with participant-facilitated music interventions. Our systematic review demonstrates the potential feasibility of music to improve mental health outcomes during times of heightened psychological distress. However, given the limited quality of included articles and the high proportion of observational studies, further research is required to better elucidate the effect of music on stress and anxiety among adults during the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-02-27T03:24:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231225670
       
  • Analysis of triadic interaction between parents, their preterm infants,
           and a sonorous object

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      Authors: María Jánez-Álvarez, Iván Moreno-Llanos, Cristina Santacatalina-Pulido, Yinay José De León-Barrios, Eduardo García-Laredo, María Jesús Del Olmo-Barros, Cintia Rodríguez-Garrido
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      In the period between birth and approximately 9 months, adults introduce infants to triadic (adult–infant–object) communication. The objective of this study is to explore how early triadic interactions arise and develop in moderate–late preterm infants. We observed and analyzed seven preterm infants at 2, 3, and 4 months of age in triadic interactions with a caregiver and a sonorous object. In the first 2 months of the infant’s life, the responsibility for the interaction rests with the adult. As time went by, parents used a wider range of semiotic systems to communicate with the child, about and through the object. The results demonstrated the presence of triadic interactions in a preterm population beginning in the third month of life. Interaction is structured with the object, its sound, rhythm, and pauses. The parents’ use of pauses was adjusted to the child’s availability. These pauses became longer and more communicative over time, which allowed more participation on the part of the infants. Communication is facilitated by the rhythmic components of the triadic interaction (time/pauses/structure of the interaction sequence).
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T08:15:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231225673
       
  • Self-efficacy and music performance: A meta-analysis

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      Authors: Michael S Zelenak
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      While self-efficacy is known to play an important role in music performance, the magnitudes of reported effect sizes are inconsistent. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to estimate the population effect size for (a) the relationship between self-efficacy and achievement, (b) the relationship between self-efficacy and music performance anxiety (MPA), and (c) the influence of self-efficacy interventions. A literature search identified 220 self-efficacy studies with 46 meeting the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity among findings required the use of a random-effects model. The results revealed a medium positive effect size between self-efficacy and achievement. Moderator analysis based on age identified a significant difference between secondary school and collegiate participants, while a comparison of instrumentalists and vocalists failed to reject the null. The relationship between self-efficacy and MPA exhibited a medium negative effect size with a significant difference between secondary school and collegiate participants. Self-efficacy interventions demonstrated a substantial impact on self-efficacy beliefs. Multiple contrasts identified differences in intervention effectiveness between K-12, collegiate, and older adult participants. The absence of vocal studies limited comparisons between instrumentalists and vocalists. This study establishes benchmarks for understanding self-efficacy’s role in music performance and makes recommendations for future research to improve achievement and the well-being of musicians.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T07:22:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231222432
       
  • Student-perceived social interactions in university musical ensembles
           predicted group identification

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      Authors: Yu Sun, Shangpeng Li, Zheng Li
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Group identification is a key process in the development of an individual’s social identity. This study examined whether student-perceived social interactions in university ensembles could shape their group identification. The sample included 517 university students from 7 ensembles of 2 universities in China. Student-perceived teacher–student relationships, peer relationships, cooperation, and equity in university ensembles were measured by the revised College and University Classroom Environment Inventory. Students’ group identification was measured by the questionnaire for identification with art-based groups. Data were collected and further analyzed by structural equation modeling via Amos 23. The results showed that students’ perceptions of teacher–student relationships, peer relationships, and cooperation had positive effects on their identification with the university ensemble, but the teacher’s differential treatment had negative effects on their group identification.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T05:03:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231223207
       
  • Tones shape notes: The realization of lexical tones in Chaozhou songs

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      Authors: Xi Zhang
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      In tone languages where pitch is used to distinguish word meanings, questions arise about how tonal pitch is preserved in singing. While most studies focus on tone-melody matching by examining pitch changes between tones/notes, the pitch change of tones realized within individual notes is less investigated. This article explores how singers realized tones when singing in Chaozhou, a Southern Chinese language with a complex tonal system. It used a Chaozhou song containing 10 tonal patterns to collect data from 34 Chaozhou singers. Results show that tones are realized to varying degrees when sung, and pitch range, pitch level, and neighboring pitch of tones appear to be influential factors. Vocal training affected the realization of falling tones /53/ and /42/ by reducing the pitch fall and also affected rising tone /23/ with a larger pitch change being found for non-professional singers than for professionals. However, the singers’ experience of singing in Chaozhou did not greatly affect the tone realization. An effect of the metrical structure was only found for tones /53/ and /42/. In addition, tone sandhi affects tones /53/ and /21/. The analysis also hints at the potential effect of melodic intervals on the pitch change of tones when sung.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-02-08T04:57:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231221958
       
  • Borderline personality disorder symptoms relationship with music use:
           Investigating the role of music preferences and functions of music

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      Authors: Karolina Kowalewska, Rafał Lawendowski, Karol Karasiewicz
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      Music preferences are molded with numerous personality variables, yet, this relation, as assumed in the study, may be mediated by functions of music expressing the psychological needs of the listener. Not many studies are devoted to the music preferences of listeners with personality disorders, whereas, none investigate this topic among people with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). A correlational study that was conducted among 549 individuals (274 displayed BPD symptoms). The main goal was to examine the extent to which the severity of BPD symptoms directly interacts with the following: (a) music preferences and (b) music function formation, and whether the functions of music can explain the mechanism through which BPD symptoms interact with music preference formation. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), we demonstrated that the severity of BPD-spectrum symptoms is closely related to types of music preferred. In addition, BPD symptoms severity is substantially linked to the perception of the social relatedness and self-awareness functions of music, whereas emotional function seems to be independent of the BPD symptoms aggravation. Finally, the functions of music can partly act as a mediator in shaping the mechanism of forming music preferences based on personality predispositions. Further music preference analyses among individuals with BPD is highly warranted.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T12:21:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231222293
       
  • The potential of group music education for developing empathy: An
           empirical study

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      Authors: Laura Cuervo, Emilia Campayo
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the effect on students’ empathy of using group music activities based on composition and improvisation strategies. The research was carried out over a 9-month period using a pre–posttest control group quasi-experimental design. Sixty-three students took part in the study: 32 in the experimental group and 31 in the control group. The Interpersonal Reactivity Index scale was used to provide a multidimensional approach to measure empathy. The scale’s cognitive components, perspective taking and fantasy, and its emotional components, empathic concern and personal distress, were adopted in the study. The research design used was quasi-experimental, as it was not possible to randomize the sample. Results show significant differences in empathy and cooperation skills between secondary students after implementing the music composition and improvisation activities in the experimental group. These students enhanced their ability to break with routine and place themselves in an imaginary situation that they associated with their musical creations. Moreover, helping them to understand others through the translation of personal emotions and moods into musical sequences contributed to the development of consideration of others’ viewpoints and helped to reduce confrontation in the classroom. This way, musical activities in groups based on creative strategies had potential to improve students’ empathy.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T09:17:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231183873
       
  • Calling the tune in maladaptive daydreaming: The impact of music on the
           experience of compulsive fantasizing

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      Authors: Eli Somer
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to shed light on the role of music in maladaptive daydreaming (MD), a psychological condition characterized by excessive, immersive daydreaming that interferes with well-being and functioning. Forty-one individuals with probable MD participated in asynchronous in-depth email interviews. A thematic analysis yielded three themes describing the role of music in MD. Two homogeneous themes pertained to outlier experiences: Music necessary and Music not desired. The third theme, Music enhances the MD experience, encompassed most of the data retrieved in this study and was further divided into five subthemes: Music avoided in “low energy” daydreaming scenes, Music as white noise, Music enhances MD creativity, Music as an MD trigger compromises the sense of agency; and Music as a powerful immerser that sets MD’s emotional “soundtrack.” This study adds to the sparse knowledge of complex visual narratives and identifies the essential role of music in inducing and formatting MD. The results led to the conclusion that music might be instrumental in MD by distancing the person from the external reality, triggering complex visual storylines, deepening the altered state of consciousness, and intensifying the vividness of the daydreamed plot by invoking an emotional response. Furthermore, hypothesis-driven controlled research was recommended.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T07:17:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231222290
       
  • Predictors of work engagement in professional musicians during the
           COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Mădălina Dana Rucsanda, Cristina Radu-Giurgiu, Alexandra Belibou, Ana-Maria Cazan
      Abstract: Psychology of Music, Ahead of Print.
      While the coronavirus disease (COVID)-19 crisis is impacting many areas of society, some professions are more affected by the COVID-19 pandemic than others, especially by the feeling of insecurity about future working conditions. The present research was conducted during the pandemic and assesses the extent to which musicians’ desire to develop professionally, their work engagement and their motivation to study further in the context of job insecurity, intolerance to uncertainty, and emotion regulation were affected. A cross-sectional design was used. The participants were 167 Romanian professional musicians. The results show that cognitive reappraisal and achievement-striving moderate the relationship between qualitative job insecurity and work engagement, more specifically: cognitive reappraisal and achievement-striving are moderators and buffer the negative relationship between qualitative job insecurity and work engagement. Given that the current context is marked by uncertainty, future studies could investigate the effect that intervention for managing emotions can have on increasing well-being and work engagement.
      Citation: Psychology of Music
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T07:12:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03057356231211812
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Revista Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Costarricense de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Cultura Teológica     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios e Investigación en Psicología y Educación     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología : Segunda Epoca     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Electrónica de Metodología Aplicada     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Wímb Lu     Open Access  
Revue de psychoéducation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée / European Review of Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revue québécoise de psychologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia     Open Access  
Roeper Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Rorschachiana     Hybrid Journal  
RUDN Journal of Psychology and Pedagogics     Open Access  
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Satir International Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
School Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Seeing and Perceiving     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexual Abuse A Journal of Research and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Offending : Theory, Research, and Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Simmel Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 3)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Issues and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Psychological and Personality Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Somnologie - Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Suma Psicologica     Open Access  
Tajdida : Jurnal Pemikiran dan Gerakan Muhammadiyah     Open Access  
Teaching of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Terapia Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tesis Psicologica     Open Access  
TESTFÓRUM     Open Access  
The Arts in Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Brown University Psychopharmacology Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Clinical Neuropsychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The International Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series B : Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Sport Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Therapeutic Communities : The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Thinking & Reasoning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tobacco Use Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transactional Analysis Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Undecidable Unconscious : A Journal of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Universal Journal of Psychology     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Vinculo - Revista do NESME     Open Access  
VIVESIANA     Open Access  
Voices : The Art and Science of Psychotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Yaşam Becerileri Psikoloji Dergisi / Life Skills Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Arbeits - und Organisationspsychologie A&O     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Differentielle und Diagnostische Psychologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Erziehungswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gesundheitspsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Neuropsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Pädagogische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie, Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie / Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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