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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lamella     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Evolution, Mind and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediation Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Family Trauma, Child Custody & Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Creativity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Psychosocial Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Play in Adulthood     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychology and Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Performance and Mindfulness     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School & Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jungian Journal for Scholarly Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
KULA : knowldge creation, dissemination, and preservation studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Service Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
JCPP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Know and Share Psychology     Open Access  
Methods in Psychology     Open Access  
Gadjah Mada Journal of Professional Psychology     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Katharsis     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
Human Arenas : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Psychology, Culture, and Meaning     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cognitive Enhancement     Hybrid Journal  
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Dhammathas Academic Journal     Open Access  
INSAN Jurnal Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Heroism Science     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Psychology     Open Access  
Gogoa     Open Access  
Journal of Global Engagement and Transformation     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Journal of Cognitive Systems     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi Terapan     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Jurnal Educatio : Jurnal Pendidikan Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal  
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Musiktherapeutische Umschau : Forschung und Praxis der Musiktherapie     Hybrid Journal  

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Psychological Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 4.128
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 341  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0956-7976 - ISSN (Online) 1467-9280
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Task Termination Triggers Spontaneous Removal of Information From Visual
           Working Memory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hiroyuki Tsubomi, Keisuke Fukuda, Atsushi Kikumoto, Ulrich Mayr, Edward K. Vogel
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Working memory (WM) is a goal-directed memory system that actively maintains a limited amount of task-relevant information to serve the current goal. By this definition, WM maintenance should be terminated after the goal is accomplished, spontaneously removing no-longer-relevant information from WM. Past studies have failed to provide direct evidence of spontaneous removal of WM content by allowing participants to engage in a strategic reallocation of WM resources to competing information within WM. By contrast, we provide direct neural and behavioral evidence that visual WM content can be largely removed less than 1 s after it becomes obsolete, in the absence of a strategic allocation of resources (total N = 442 adults). These results demonstrate that visual WM is intrinsically a goal-directed system, and spontaneous removal provides a means for capacity-limited WM to keep up with ever-changing demands in a dynamic environment.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-06-24T06:22:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241246709
       
  • Sensitivity to the Instrumental Value of Choice Increases Across
           Development

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      Authors: Kate Nussenbaum, Perri L. Katzman, Hanxiao Lu, Samuel Zorowitz, Catherine A. Hartley
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Across development, people tend to demonstrate a preference for contexts in which they have the opportunity to make choices. However, it is not clear how children, adolescents, and adults learn to calibrate this preference based on the costs and benefits of agentic choice. Here, in both a primary, in-person, reinforcement-learning experiment (N = 92; age range = 10–25 years) and a preregistered online replication study (N = 150; age range = 8–25 years), we found that participants overvalued agentic choice but also calibrated their agency decisions to the reward structure of the environment, increasingly selecting agentic choice when choice had greater instrumental value. Regression analyses and computational modeling of participant choices revealed that participants’ bias toward agentic choice—reflecting its intrinsic value—remained consistent across age, whereas sensitivity to the instrumental value of agentic choice increased from childhood to early adulthood.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-06-20T07:11:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241256961
       
  • The Basic Units of Working Memory Manipulation Are Boolean Maps, Not
           Objects

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      Authors: Huichao Ji, Kaiyue Wang, Garry Kong, Xiaodan Zhang, Wenzhen He, Xiaowei Ding
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Determining the manipulation unit of working memory is one of the fundamental questions in understanding how working memory functions. The prevalent object-based theory in cognitive research predicts that memory manipulation is performed on the level of objects. Here we show instead that the basic units of working memory manipulation are Boolean maps, a data structure describing what can be perceived in an instant. We developed four new manipulation tasks (with data from 80 adults) and showed that manipulation times only increased when the number of Boolean maps manipulated increased. Increasing the number of orientations manipulated did not induce longer manipulation times, consistent with a key prediction of the Boolean map theory. Our results show that Boolean maps are the manipulation unit of working memory.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-06-18T07:45:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241257443
       
  • Risky-Choice Framing Effects Result Partly From Mismatched Option
           Descriptions in Gains and Losses

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      Authors: Michael L. DeKay, Shiyu Dou
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Textbook psychology holds that people usually prefer a certain option over a risky one when options are framed as gains but prefer the opposite when options are framed as losses. However, this pattern can be amplified, eliminated, or reversed depending on whether option descriptions include only positive information (e.g., “200 people will be saved”), only negative information (e.g., “400 people will not be saved”), or both. Previous studies suggest that framing effects arise only when option descriptions are mismatched across frames. Using online and student samples (Ns = 906 and 521), we investigated 81 framing-effect variants created from matched and mismatched pairs of 18 option descriptions (nine in each frame). Description valence or gist explained substantial variation in risk preferences (prospect theory does not predict such variation), but a considerable framing effect remained in our balanced design. Risky-choice framing effects appear to be partly—but not completely—the result of mismatched comparisons.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-06-18T07:12:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241249183
       
  • Cutting Through the Noise: Auditory Scenes and Their Effects on Visual
           Object Processing

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      Authors: Jamal R. Williams, Viola S. Störmer
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the intuitive feeling that our visual experience is coherent and comprehensive, the world is full of ambiguous and indeterminate information. Here we explore how the visual system might take advantage of ambient sounds to resolve this ambiguity. Young adults (ns = 20–30) were tasked with identifying an object slowly fading in through visual noise while a task-irrelevant sound played. We found that participants demanded more visual information when the auditory object was incongruent with the visual object compared to when it was not. Auditory scenes, which are only probabilistically related to specific objects, produced similar facilitation even for unheard objects (e.g., a bench). Notably, these effects traverse categorical and specific auditory and visual-processing domains as participants performed across-category and within-category visual tasks, underscoring cross-modal integration across multiple levels of perceptual processing. To summarize, our study reveals the importance of audiovisual interactions to support meaningful perceptual experiences in naturalistic settings.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-06-18T06:28:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241237737
       
  • The Causes and Consequences of Drifting Expectations

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      Authors: William J. Villano, Noah I. Kraus, T. Rick Reneau, Brittany A. Jaso, A. Ross Otto, Aaron S. Heller
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Awaiting news of uncertain outcomes is distressing because the news might be disappointing. To prevent such disappointments, people often “brace for the worst,” pessimistically lowering expectations before news arrives to decrease the possibility of surprising disappointment (a negative prediction error, or PE). Computational decision-making research commonly assumes that expectations do not drift within trials, yet it is unclear whether expectations pessimistically drift in real-world, high-stakes settings, what factors influence expectation drift, and whether it effectively buffers emotional responses to goal-relevant outcomes. Moreover, individuals learn from PEs to accurately anticipate future outcomes, but it is unknown whether expectation drift also impedes PE-based learning. In a sample of students awaiting exam grades (N = 625), we found that expectations often drift and tend to drift pessimistically. We demonstrate that bracing is preferentially modulated by uncertainty; it transiently buffers the initial emotional impact of negative PEs but impairs PE-based learning, counterintuitively sustaining uncertainty into the future.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-06-18T04:54:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241235930
       
  • When and Why Antiegalitarianism Affects Resistance to Supporting
           Black-Owned Businesses

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      Authors: Steven Shepherd, Rowena Crabbe, Tanya L. Chartrand, Gavan J. Fitzsimons, Aaron C. Kay
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding how initiatives to support Black-owned businesses are received, and why, has important social and economic implications. To address this, we designed three experiments to investigate the role of antiegalitarian versus egalitarian ideologies among White American adults. In Study 1 (N = 199), antiegalitarianism (vs. egalitarianism) predicted viewing initiatives supporting a Black-owned business as less fair, but only when the business was competing with other (presumably White-owned) businesses. In Study 2 (N = 801), antiegalitarianism predicted applying survival-of-the-fittest market beliefs, particularly to Black-owned businesses. Antiegalitarianism also predicted viewing initiatives supporting Black-owned businesses as less fair than initiatives that targeted other (presumably White-owned) businesses, especially for tangible (vs. symbolic) support that directly impacts the success of a business. In Study 3 (N = 590), antiegalitarianism predicted rejecting a program investing in Black-owned businesses. These insights demonstrate how antiegalitarian ideology can have the effect of maintaining race-based inequality, hindering programs designed to reduce that inequality.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-06-18T04:47:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241237700
       
  • Ambivalent Sexism and Tolerance of Violence Against Women in India

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      Authors: Nikhil K. Sengupta, Matthew D. Hammond, Chris K. Deak, Ragini Saira Malhotra
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      We examined associations between sexist beliefs and tolerance of violence against women in India using a nationally representative probability sample of adults (n = 133,398). Research consistently indicates that hostile sexism fosters tolerance of violence against women. However, benevolent sexism is sometimes associated with higher tolerance and sometimes with lower tolerance of violence. We proposed that this inconsistency could be resolved by considering the source of violence: Is violence perpetrated by outsiders or intimate partners' Results of a multigroup structural equation model showed that endorsement of hostile sexism was related to greater tolerance of violence regardless of the source. In contrast, endorsement of benevolent sexism was associated with lower tolerance of violence from outsiders but was simultaneously associated with higher tolerance of spousal violence. These opposing processes indicate that although benevolent sexism promises women protection from violence, the very same ideology legitimizes spousal violence, thereby reinforcing men’s power within intimate relationships.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-06-13T04:08:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241254312
       
  • Promoting Erroneous Divergent Opinions Increases the Wisdom of Crowds

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      Authors: Federico Barrera-Lemarchand, Pablo Balenzuela, Bahador Bahrami, Ophelia Deroy, Joaquin Navajas
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The aggregation of many lay judgments generates surprisingly accurate estimates. This phenomenon, called the “wisdom of crowds,” has been demonstrated in domains such as medical decision-making and financial forecasting. Previous research identified two factors driving this effect: the accuracy of individual assessments and the diversity of opinions. Most available strategies to enhance the wisdom of crowds have focused on improving individual accuracy while neglecting the potential of increasing opinion diversity. Here, we study a complementary approach to reduce collective error by promoting erroneous divergent opinions. This strategy proposes to anchor half of the crowd to a small value and the other half to a large value before eliciting and averaging all estimates. Consistent with our mathematical modeling, four experiments (N = 1,362 adults) demonstrated that this method is effective for estimation and forecasting tasks. Beyond the practical implications, these findings offer new theoretical insights into the epistemic value of collective decision-making.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-06-12T06:55:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241252138
       
  • Proenvironmental Behavior Increases Subjective Well-Being: Evidence From
           an Experience-Sampling Study and a Randomized Experiment

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      Authors: Michael Prinzing
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Two preregistered studies investigated whether engaging in proenvironmental behavior increases a person’s well-being. A 10-day experience-sampling study (7,161 observations from 181 adults in 14 countries, primarily the United States) revealed positive within-person and between-person associations, and a randomized controlled experiment (N = 545 U.S. undergraduates) found that incorporating proenvironmental behavior into individuals’ daily activities increased their experiences of happiness and meaning in life. Indeed, the effect was comparable to incorporating activities selected specifically to elicit such positive states, though these results may be affected by demand characteristics. The studies also offered some tentative preliminary evidence about why such an effect might emerge. There was some support for the hypothesis that proenvironmental behavior affects well-being by creating a “warm glow.” But overall the findings align more closely with the hypothesis that proenvironmental behavior helps to satisfy individuals’ basic psychological needs.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T05:16:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241251766
       
  • Preregistered Replication and Extension of “Moral Hypocrisy: Social
           Groups and the Flexibility of Virtue”

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      Authors: Claire E. Robertson, Madison Akles, Jay J. Van Bavel
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The tendency for people to consider themselves morally good while behaving selfishly is known as moral hypocrisy. Influential work by Valdesolo and DeSteno (2007) found evidence for intergroup moral hypocrisy such that people were more forgiving of transgressions when they were committed by an in-group member than an out-group member. We conducted two experiments to examine moral hypocrisy and group membership in an online paradigm with Prolific workers from the United States: a direct replication of the original work with minimal groups (N = 610; nationally representative) and a conceptual replication with political groups (N = 606; 50% Democrats and 50% Republicans). Although the results did not replicate the original findings, we observed evidence of in-group favoritism in minimal groups and out-group derogation in political groups. The current research finds mixed evidence of intergroup moral hypocrisy and has implications for understanding the contextual dependencies of intergroup bias and partisanship.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-05-14T06:24:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241246552
       
  • People Have Systematically Different Ownership Intuitions in Seemingly
           Simple Cases

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      Authors: Xiuyuan Zhang, Paul Bloom, Julian Jara-Ettinger
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Our understanding of ownership influences how we interact with objects and with each other. Here, we studied people’s intuitions about ownership transfer using a set of simple, parametrically varied events. We found that people (N = 120 U.S. adults) had similar intuitions about ownership for some events but sharply opposing intuitions for others (Experiment 1). People (N = 120 U.S. adults) were unaware of these conflicts and overestimated ownership consensus (Experiment 2). Moreover, differences in people’s ownership intuitions predicted their intuitions about the acceptability of using, altering, controlling, and destroying the owned object (N = 130 U.S. adults; Experiment 3), even when ownership was not explicitly mentioned (N = 130 U.S. adults; Experiment 4). Subject-level analyses suggest that these disagreements reflect at least two underlying intuitive theories, one in which intentions are central to ownership and another in which physical possession is prioritized.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-05-14T06:03:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241240424
       
  • Autistic Traits Modulate Social Synchronizations Between School-Aged
           Children: Insights From Three fNIRS Hyperscanning Experiments

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      Authors: Xin Zhou, Xuancu Hong, Patrick C. M. Wong
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The current study investigated how autistic traits modulate peer interactions using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) hyperscanning. Across three experiments, we tested the effect of copresence, joint activity, and a tangible goal during cooperative interactions on interbrain coherence (IBC) in school-aged children between 9 and 11 years old. Twenty-three dyads of children watched a video alone or together in Experiment 1, engaged in joint or self-paced book reading in Experiment 2, and pretended to play a Jenga game or played for real in Experiment 3. We found that all three formats of social interactions increased IBC in the frontotemporoparietal networks, which have been reported to support social interaction. Further, our results revealed the shared and unique interbrain connections that were predictive of the lower and higher parent-reported autism-spectrum quotient scores, which indicated child autistic traits. Results from a convergence of three experiments provide the first evidence to date that IBC is modulated by child autistic traits.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-05-14T04:59:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241237699
       
  • Not Everybody Has an Inner Voice: Behavioral Consequences of Anendophasia

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      Authors: Johanne S. K. Nedergaard, Gary Lupyan
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      It is commonly assumed that inner speech—the experience of thought as occurring in a natural language—is a human universal. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the experience of inner speech in adults varies from near constant to nonexistent. We propose a name for a lack of the experience of inner speech—anendophasia—and report four studies examining some of its behavioral consequences. We found that adults who reported low levels of inner speech (N = 46) had lower performance on a verbal working memory task and more difficulty performing rhyme judgments compared with adults who reported high levels of inner speech (N = 47). Task-switching performance—previously linked to endogenous verbal cueing—and categorical effects on perceptual judgments were unrelated to differences in inner speech.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T05:39:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241243004
       
  • Neural Signatures of Evidence Accumulation Encode Subjective Perceptual
           Confidence Independent of Performance

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      Authors: Wei Dou, Lleymi J. Martinez Arango, Olenka Graham Castaneda, Leopoldo Arellano, Emily Mcintyre, Claire Yballa, Jason Samaha
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Confidence is an adaptive computation when environmental feedback is absent, yet there is little consensus regarding how perceptual confidence is computed in the brain. Difficulty arises because confidence correlates with other factors, such as accuracy, response time (RT), or evidence quality. We investigated whether neural signatures of evidence accumulation during a perceptual choice predict subjective confidence independently of these factors. Using motion stimuli, a central-parietal positive-going electroencephalogram component (CPP) behaves as an accumulating decision variable that predicts evidence quality, RT, accuracy, and confidence (Experiment 1, N = 25 adults). When we psychophysically varied confidence while holding accuracy constant (Experiment 2, N = 25 adults), the CPP still predicted confidence. Statistically controlling for RT, accuracy, and evidence quality (Experiment 3, N = 24 adults), the CPP still explained unique variance in confidence. The results indicate that a predecision neural signature of evidence accumulation, the CPP, encodes subjective perceptual confidence in decision-making independent of task performance.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-05-09T03:39:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241246561
       
  • Adolescents’ Perceptions of Household Chaos Predict Their Adult Mental
           Health: A Twin-Difference Longitudinal Cohort Study

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      Authors: Sophie von Stumm
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study tested whether adolescents who perceived less household chaos in their family’s home than their same-aged, same-sex sibling achieved more favorable developmental outcomes in young adulthood, independent of parent-reported household chaos and family-level confounding. Data came from 4,732 families from the Twins Early Development Study, a longitudinal, U.K.-population representative cohort study of families with twins born in 1994 through 1996 in England and Wales. Adolescents who reported experiencing greater household chaos than their sibling at the age of 16 years suffered significantly poorer mental-health outcomes at the age of 23 years, independent of family-level confounding. Mental-health predictions from perceived household chaos at earlier ages were not significant, and neither were predictions for other developmental outcomes in young adulthood, including socioeconomic status indicators, sexual risk taking, cannabis use, and conflict with the law. The findings suggest that altering children’s subjective perceptions of their rearing environments may help improve their adult mental health.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-05-08T03:00:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241242105
       
  • Divergent and Convergent Creativity Are Different Kinds of Foraging

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      Authors: Soran Malaie, Michael J. Spivey, Tyler Marghetis
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      According to accounts of neural reuse and embodied cognition, higher-level cognitive abilities recycle evolutionarily ancient mechanisms for perception and action. Here, building on these accounts, we investigate whether creativity builds on our capacity to forage in space (“creativity as strategic foraging”). We report systematic connections between specific forms of creative thinking—divergent and convergent—and corresponding strategies for searching in space. U.S. American adults completed two tasks designed to measure creativity. Before each creativity trial, participants completed an unrelated search of a city map. Between subjects, we manipulated the search pattern, with some participants seeking multiple, dispersed spatial locations and others repeatedly converging on the same location. Participants who searched divergently in space were better at divergent thinking but worse at convergent thinking; this pattern reversed for participants who had converged repeatedly on a single location. These results demonstrate a targeted link between foraging and creativity, thus advancing our understanding of the origins and mechanisms of high-level cognition.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-05-07T03:15:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241245695
       
  • Drawing Generalizable Conclusions From Multilevel Models: Commentary on

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      Authors: Joshua L. Fiechter
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In a recently published article, Van de Calseyde and Efendić (2022) argue that inner-crowd wisdom (i.e., the reduction in error afforded by aggregating two estimates from a given person relative to a single initial estimate from that person) is enhanced when people are instructed to adopt the perspective of someone with whom they disagree prior to making a second estimate. Here, I present a reanalysis of Van de Calseyde and Efendić’s data and argue that evidence supporting their primary claim spuriously arises from anticonservative multilevel models. Specifically, Van de Calseyde and Efendić assess their data via random-intercept models and fail to account for item-level effects of experimental condition. Such an approach generally allows analysts to reap the enhanced statistical power of multilevel models without implementing appropriate checks on that power; in this case, underestimation of item-level variance appears to have driven an illusory benefit of perspective taking.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-05-03T05:33:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241245411
       
  • Do We Become More Lonely With Age' A Coordinated Data Analysis of Nine
           Longitudinal Studies

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      Authors: Eileen K. Graham, Emorie D. Beck, Kathryn Jackson, Tomiko Yoneda, Chloe McGhee, Lily Pieramici, Olivia E. Atherton, Jing Luo, Emily C. Willroth, Andrew Steptoe, Daniel K. Mroczek, Anthony D. Ong
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Loneliness is a pervasive experience with adverse impacts on health and well-being. Despite its significance, notable gaps impede a full understanding of how loneliness changes across the adult life span and what factors influence these changes. To address this, we conducted a coordinated data analysis of nine longitudinal studies encompassing 128,118 participants ages 13 to 103 from over 20 countries. Using harmonized variables and models, we examined loneliness trajectories and predictors. Analyses revealed that loneliness follows a U-shaped curve, decreasing from young adulthood to midlife and increasing in older adulthood. These patterns were consistent across studies. Several baseline factors (i.e., sex, marital status, physical function, education) were linked to loneliness levels, but few moderated the loneliness trajectories. These findings highlight the dynamic nature of loneliness and underscore the need for targeted interventions to reduce social disparities throughout adulthood.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-30T03:00:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241242037
       
  • Visual Preference for Socially Relevant Spatial Relations in Humans and
           Monkeys

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      Authors: Nicolas Goupil, Holly Rayson, Émilie Serraille, Alice Massera, Pier Francesco Ferrari, Jean-Rémy Hochmann, Liuba Papeo
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      As a powerful social signal, a body, face, or gaze facing toward oneself holds an individual’s attention. We asked whether, going beyond an egocentric stance, facingness between others has a similar effect and why. In a preferential-looking time paradigm, human adults showed spontaneous preference to look at two bodies facing toward (vs. away from) each other (Experiment 1a, N = 24). Moreover, facing dyads were rated higher on social semantic dimensions, showing that facingness adds social value to stimuli (Experiment 1b, N = 138). The same visual preference was found in juvenile macaque monkeys (Experiment 2, N = 21). Finally, on the human development timescale, this preference emerged by 5 years, although young infants by 7 months of age already discriminate visual scenes on the basis of body positioning (Experiment 3, N = 120). We discuss how the preference for facing dyads—shared by human adults, young children, and macaques—can signal a new milestone in social cognition development, supporting processing and learning from third-party social interactions.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T03:46:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241242995
       
  • Variety Is the Spice of Life: Diverse Social Networks Are Associated With
           Social Cohesion and Well-Being

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      Authors: Miguel R. Ramos, Danying Li, Matthew R. Bennett, Unaysah Mogra, Douglas S. Massey, Miles Hewstone
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Both homophily and heterophily are observed in humans. Homophily reinforces homogeneous social networks, and heterophily creates new experiences and collaborations. However, at the extremes, high levels of homophily can cultivate prejudice toward out-groups, whereas high levels of heterophily can weaken in-group support. Using data from 24,726 adults (M = 46 years; selected from 10,398 English neighborhoods) and the composition of their social networks based on age, ethnicity, income, and education, we tested the hypothesis that a middle ground between homophily and heterophily could be the most beneficial for individuals. We found that network homophily, mediated by perceived social cohesion, is associated with higher levels of subjective well-being but that there are diminishing returns, because at a certain point increasing network homophily is associated with lower social cohesion and, in turn, lower subjective well-being. Our results suggest that building diverse social networks provides benefits that cannot be attained by homogeneous networks.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-25T03:48:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241243370
       
  • How the Listener’s Attention Dynamically Switches Between Different
           Speakers During a Natural Conversation

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      Authors: Bohan Dai, Yu Zhai, Yuhang Long, Chunming Lu
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The neural mechanisms underpinning the dynamic switching of a listener’s attention between speakers are not well understood. Here we addressed this issue in a natural conversation involving 21 triadic adult groups. Results showed that when the listener’s attention dynamically switched between speakers, neural synchronization with the to-be-attended speaker was significantly enhanced, whereas that with the to-be-ignored speaker was significantly suppressed. Along with attention switching, semantic distances between sentences significantly increased in the to-be-ignored speech. Moreover, neural synchronization negatively correlated with the increase in semantic distance but not with acoustic change of the to-be-ignored speech. However, no difference in neural synchronization was found between the listener and the two speakers during the phase of sustained attention. These findings support the attenuation model of attention, indicating that both speech signals are processed beyond the basic physical level. Additionally, shifting attention imposes a cognitive burden, as demonstrated by the opposite fluctuations of interpersonal neural synchronization.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T09:03:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241243367
       
  • Once and Again: Repeated Viewing Affects Judgments of Spontaneity and
           Preparation

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      Authors: Kristin Donnelly, William H. Ryan, Leif D. Nelson
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Reality is fleeting, and any moment can only be experienced once. Rewatching a video, however, allows people to repeatedly observe the exact same moment. We propose that people may fail to fully distinguish between merely observing behavior again (through replay) from that behavior being performed again in the exact same way. Using an assortment of stimuli that included auditions, commercials, and potential trial evidence, we demonstrated through nine experiments (N = 10,412 adults in the United States) that rewatching makes a recorded behavior appear more rehearsed and less spontaneous, as if the actors were simply precisely repeating their actions. These findings contribute to an emerging literature showing that incidental video features, like perspective or slow motion, can meaningfully change evaluations. Replay may inadvertently shape judgments in both mundane and consequential contexts. To understand how a video will influence its viewer, one will need to consider not only its content, but also how often it is viewed.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T08:49:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241242462
       
  • The Formation of Negative Attitudes Toward Novel Groups

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      Authors: Johanna Woitzel, Hans Alves
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      People perceive out-groups, minorities, and novel groups more negatively than in-groups, majorities, and familiar groups. Previous research has argued that such intergroup biases may be caused by the order in which people typically encounter social groups. Groups that are relatively novel to perceivers (e.g., out-groups, minorities) are primarily associated with distinct attributes that differentiate them from familiar groups. Because distinct attributes are typically negative, attitudes toward novel groups are negatively biased. Five experiments (N = 2,615 adults) confirmed the generalizability of the novel groups’ disadvantage to different aspects of attitude formation (i.e., evaluations, memory, stereotyping), to cases with more than two groups, and to cases in which groups were majority/minority or in-groups/out-groups. Our findings revealed a remarkably robust influence of learning order in the formation of group attitudes, and they imply that people often perceive novel groups more negatively than they actually are.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T04:45:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241239932
       
  • Exploring the Semantic-Inconsistency Effect in Scenes Using a Continuous
           Measure of Linguistic-Semantic Similarity

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      Authors: Claudia Damiano, Maarten Leemans, Johan Wagemans
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Viewers use contextual information to visually explore complex scenes. Object recognition is facilitated by exploiting object–scene relations (which objects are expected in a given scene) and object–object relations (which objects are expected because of the occurrence of other objects). Semantically inconsistent objects deviate from these expectations, so they tend to capture viewers’ attention (the semantic-inconsistency effect). Some objects fit the identity of a scene more or less than others, yet semantic inconsistencies have hitherto been operationalized as binary (consistent vs. inconsistent). In an eye-tracking experiment (N = 21 adults), we study the semantic-inconsistency effect in a continuous manner by using the linguistic-semantic similarity of an object to the scene category and to other objects in the scene. We found that both highly consistent and highly inconsistent objects are viewed more than other objects (U-shaped relationship), revealing that the (in)consistency effect is more than a simple binary classification.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T04:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241238217
       
  • The Impact of Relocation Patterns on Psychological Stress

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      Authors: Chuan-Zhong Deng, Hsiang-Chieh Lee, Lu-Yen A. Chen, Sue-Huei Chen
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated how relocation patterns affect disaster survivors’ psychological stress on the diverse durations and spaces of relocation. It analyzed a 10-year data set of 1,236 families affected by 2009’s Typhoon Morakot in Taiwan, identifying six relocation patterns through dynamic time warping (DTW). A hierarchical linear model was utilized, revealing the discernible impacts of environmental factors, sociocultural factors, and family-level socioeconomic factors on psychological stress. The study revealed that survivors who quickly found stable residences after the disaster initially experienced lower stress levels, but in the long term, their stress increased. Conversely, those with unstable residences experienced higher initial stress but lower long-term stress. Comparing similar patterns, we found that survivors who had more time for preparation and who sought opportunities, coped, or adapted to secondary stressors before long-distance relocation faced lower stress levels. These findings suggest that relocation patterns have a greater impact on the psychosocial stress of disaster survivors than time or relocation distance.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-22T05:59:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976241239915
       
  • Caricaturing Shapes in Visual Memory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zekun Sun, Subin Han, Chaz Firestone
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      When representing high-level stimuli, such as faces and animals, we tend to emphasize salient features—such as a face’s prominent cheekbones or a bird’s pointed beak. Such mental caricaturing leaves traces in memory, which exaggerates these distinctive qualities. How broadly does this phenomenon extend' Here, in six experiments (N = 700 adults), we explored how memory automatically caricatures basic units of visual processing—simple geometric shapes—even without task-related demands to do so. Participants saw a novel shape and then immediately adjusted a copy of that shape to match what they had seen. Surprisingly, participants reconstructed shapes in exaggerated form, amplifying curvature, enlarging salient parts, and so on. Follow-up experiments generalized this bias to new parameters, ruled out strategic responding, and amplified the effects in serial transmission. Thus, even the most basic stimuli we encounter are remembered as caricatures of themselves.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2024-04-22T05:12:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976231225091
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 42)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Forensic Science International : Mind and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lamella     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Evolution, Mind and Behaviour     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Current Research in Ecological and Social Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mediation Theory and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Applied Positive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Family Trauma, Child Custody & Child Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Creativity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Psychosocial Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Play in Adulthood     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychosexual Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Psychology and Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Performance and Mindfulness     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of School & Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jungian Journal for Scholarly Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gestalt Theory. An International Multidisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
KULA : knowldge creation, dissemination, and preservation studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Threat Assessment and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Service Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
JCPP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Focus on Exceptional Children     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Know and Share Psychology     Open Access  
Methods in Psychology     Open Access  
Gadjah Mada Journal of Professional Psychology     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Katharsis     Open Access  
Journal of Theoretical Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
Human Arenas : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Psychology, Culture, and Meaning     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cognitive Enhancement     Hybrid Journal  
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal  
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Dhammathas Academic Journal     Open Access  
INSAN Jurnal Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Heroism Science     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Psychology     Open Access  
Gogoa     Open Access  
Journal of Global Engagement and Transformation     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Journal of Cognitive Systems     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Psikologi Terapan     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Jurnal Educatio : Jurnal Pendidikan Indonesia     Open Access  
Journal of Technology in Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal  
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Musiktherapeutische Umschau : Forschung und Praxis der Musiktherapie     Hybrid Journal  

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