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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
New School Psychology Bulletin     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
O Que Nos Faz Pensar : Cadernos do Departamento de Filosofia da PUC-Rio     Open Access  
OA Autism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Online Readings in Psychology and Culture     Open Access  
Open Journal of Medical Psychology     Open Access  
Open Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Organisational and Social Dynamics: An International Journal of Psychoanalytic, Systemic and Group Relations Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Organizational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Orientación y Sociedad : Revista Internacional e Interdisciplinaria de Orientación Vocacional Ocupacional     Open Access  
Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto)     Open Access  
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Papeles del Psicólogo     Open Access  
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Peace and Conflict : Journal of Peace Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Pensamiento Psicologico     Open Access  
Pensando Familias     Open Access  
Pensando Psicología     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Perceptual and Motor Skills     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Persona     Open Access  
Persona : Jurnal Psikologi Indonesia     Open Access  
Persona Studies     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 148)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access  
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal  
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Phenomenology & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
physiopraxis     Hybrid Journal  
PiD - Psychotherapie im Dialog     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Poiésis     Open Access  
Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Porn Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
PPmP - Psychotherapie Psychosomatik Medizinische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Practice Innovations     Full-text available via subscription  
Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Problems of Psychology in the 21st Century     Open Access  
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Progress in Brain Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psic : Revista de Psicologia da Vetor Editora     Open Access  
Psico     Open Access  
Psicoanalisi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicobiettivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Psicogente     Open Access  
Psicol?gica Journal     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Prática     Open Access  
Psicologia da Educação     Open Access  
Psicologia della salute     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicología desde el Caribe     Open Access  
Psicologia di Comunità. Gruppi, ricerca-azione, modelli formativi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicologia e Saber Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Psicologia em Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia em Revista     Open Access  
Psicologia Ensino & Formação     Open Access  
Psicologia Hospitalar     Open Access  
Psicologia Iberoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia para América Latina     Open Access  
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicología, Conocimiento y Sociedad     Open Access  
Psicologia, Saúde e Doenças     Open Access  
Psicooncología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicoperspectivas     Open Access  
Psicoterapia e Scienze Umane     Full-text available via subscription  
Psikis : Jurnal Psikologi Islami     Open Access  
Psikohumaniora : Jurnal Penelitian Psikologi     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PsyCh Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
PSYCH up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psych. Pflege Heute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychê     Open Access  
Psyche: A Journal of Entomology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychiatrie et violence     Open Access  
Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychiatrische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 356)
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis, Self and Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychoanalytic Dialogues: The International Journal of Relational Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychoanalytic Inquiry: A Topical Journal for Mental Health Professionals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychodynamic Practice: Individuals, Groups and Organisations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Psychodynamic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologia : Advances de la Disciplina     Open Access  
Psychologica     Open Access  
Psychologica Belgica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 207)
Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Psychological Perspectives: A Semiannual Journal of Jungian Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychological Research on Urban Society     Open Access  
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 183)
Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247)
Psychological Science and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science and Education psyedu.ru     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science In the Public Interest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Psychological Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychological Thought     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie in Erziehung und Unterricht     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology     Open Access  
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology and Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal  
Psychology and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Psychology in Russia: State of the Art     Free   (Followers: 2)
Psychology in Society     Open Access  
Psychology Learning & Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychology of Language and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Psychology of Leaders and Leadership     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Psychology of Men and Masculinity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Well-Being : Theory, Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychology Research and Behavior Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology, Community & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Psychology, Health & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychomusicology : Music, Mind, and Brain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Psychopathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
psychopraxis. neuropraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychosomatic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychosomatic Medicine and General Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Psychotherapy in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
PsychTech & Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Psyecology - Bilingual Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psyke & Logos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psykhe (Santiago)     Open Access  
Quaderni di Gestalt     Full-text available via subscription  
Quaderns de Psicologia     Open Access  
Qualitative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Qualitative Research in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Quantitative Methods for Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Rehabilitation Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Religion, Brain & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
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Psychological Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 4.128
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 247  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0956-7976 - ISSN (Online) 1467-9280
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Cultures Crossing: The Power of Habit in Delaying Gratification

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kaichi Yanaoka, Laura E. Michaelson, Ryan Mori Guild, Grace Dostart, Jade Yonehiro, Satoru Saito, Yuko Munakata
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Resisting immediate temptations in favor of larger later rewards predicts academic success, socioemotional competence, and health. These links with delaying gratification appear from early childhood and have been explained by cognitive and social factors that help override tendencies toward immediate gratification. However, some tendencies may actually promote delaying gratification. We assessed children’s delaying gratification for different rewards across two cultures that differ in customs around waiting. Consistent with our preregistered prediction, results showed that children in Japan (n = 80) delayed gratification longer for food than for gifts, whereas children in the United States (n = 58) delayed longer for gifts than for food. This interaction may reflect cultural differences: Waiting to eat is emphasized more in Japan than in the United States, whereas waiting to open gifts is emphasized more in the United States than in Japan. These findings suggest that culturally specific habits support delaying gratification, providing a new way to understand why individuals delay gratification and why this behavior predicts life success.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-24T04:18:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976221074650
       
  • Lack of Belonging Predicts Depressive Symptomatology in College Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Janine M. Dutcher, James Lederman, Megha Jain, Stephen Price, Agam Kumar, Daniella K. Villalba, Michael J. Tumminia, Afsaneh Doryab, Kasey G. Creswell, Eve Riskin, Yasaman Sefdigar, Woosuk Seo, Jennifer Mankoff, Sheldon Cohen, Anind Dey, J. David Creswell
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Feeling a sense of belonging is a central human motivation that has consequences for mental health and well-being, yet surprisingly little research has examined how belonging shapes mental health among young adults. In three data sets from two universities (exploratory study: N = 157; Confirmatory Study 1: N = 121; Confirmatory Study 2: n = 188 in winter term, n = 172 in spring term), we found that lower levels of daily-assessed feelings of belonging early and across the academic term predicted higher depressive symptoms at the end of the term. Furthermore, these relationships held when models controlled for baseline depressive symptoms, sense of social fit, and other social factors (loneliness and frequency of social interactions). These results highlight the relationship between feelings of belonging and depressive symptoms over and above other social factors. This work underscores the importance of daily-assessed feelings of belonging in predicting subsequent depressive symptoms and has implications for early detection and mental health interventions among young adults.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T11:58:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211073135
       
  • Sources of Interference in Memory Across Development

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      Authors: Hyungwook Yim, Adam F. Osth, Vladimir M. Sloutsky, Simon J. Dennis
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Episodic memory involves remembering not only what happened but also where and when the event happened. This multicomponent nature introduces different sources of interference that stem from previous experience. However, it is unclear how the contributions of these sources change across development and what might cause the changes. To address these questions, we tested 4- to 5-year-olds (n = 103), 7- to 8-year-olds (n = 82), and adults (n = 70) using item- and source-recognition memory tasks with various manipulations (i.e., list length, list strength, word frequency), and we decomposed sources of interference using a computational model. We found that interference stemming from other items on the study list rapidly decreased with development, whereas interference from preexperimental contexts gradually decreased but remained the major source of interference. The model further quantified these changes, indicating that the ability to discriminate items undergoes rapid development, whereas the ability to discriminate contexts undergoes protracted development. These results elucidate fundamental aspects of memory development.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T04:41:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211073131
       
  • Little Support for Discrete Item Limits in Visual Working Memory

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Klaus Oberauer
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Some theorists argue that working memory is limited to a discrete number of items and that additional items are not encoded at all. Adam et al. (2017) presented evidence supporting this hypothesis: Participants reproduced visual features of up to six items in a self-chosen order. After the third or fourth response, error distributions were indistinguishable from guessing. I present four experiments with young adults (each N = 24) reexamining this finding. Experiment 1 presented items slowly and sequentially. Experiment 2 presented them simultaneously but longer than in the experiments of Adam et al. Experiments 3 and 4 exactly replicated one original experiment of Adam et al. All four experiments failed to replicate the evidence for guessing-like error distributions. Modeling data from individuals revealed a mixture of some who do and others who do not produce guessing-like distributions. This heterogeneity increases the credibility of an alternative to the item-limit hypothesis: Some individuals decide to guess on hard trials even when they have weak information in memory.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T11:41:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211068045
       
  • Mind Wandering Impedes Response Inhibition by Affecting the Triggering of
           the Inhibitory Process

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      Authors: Sumitash Jana, Adam R. Aron
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Mind wandering is a state in which our mental focus shifts toward task-unrelated thoughts. Although it is known that mind wandering has a detrimental effect on concurrent task performance (e.g., decreased accuracy), its effect on executive functions is poorly studied. Yet the latter question is relevant to many real-world situations, such as rapid stopping during driving. Here, we studied how mind wandering would affect the requirement to subsequently stop an incipient motor response. In healthy adults, we tested whether mind wandering affected stopping and, if so, which component of stopping was affected: the triggering of the inhibitory brake or the implementation of the brake following triggering. We observed that during mind wandering, stopping latency increased, as did the percentage of trials with failed triggering. Indeed, 67% of the variance of the increase in stopping latency was explained by increased trigger failures. Thus, mind wandering primarily affects stopping by affecting the triggering of the brake.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T12:58:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211055371
       
  • A Network Analysis of Children’s Emerging Place-Value Concepts

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      Authors: Corinne A. Bower, Kelly S. Mix, Lei Yuan, Linda B. Smith
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Examining how informal knowledge systems change after formal instruction is imperative to understanding learning processes and conceptual development and to implementing effective educational practices. We used network analyses to determine how the organization of informal knowledge about multidigit numbers in kindergartners (N = 279; mean age = 5.76 years, SD = 0.55; 135 females) supports and is transformed by a year of in-school formal instruction. The results show that in kindergarten, piecemeal knowledge about the surface properties of reading and writing multidigit numbers and the use of base-10 units to determine large quantities are strongly associated with each other and connected in a stringlike manner to other emerging skills. After a year of instruction, each skill becomes connected to the “hub” abilities of reading and writing multidigit numbers, which also become strongly connected to more advanced knowledge of base-10 principles. These findings provide new insights into how partial knowledge provides the backbone on which explicit principles are learned.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T01:50:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211070242
       
  • Human Echolocators Have Better Localization Off Axis

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      Authors: Lore Thaler, L. J. Norman, H. P. J. C. De Vos, D. Kish, M. Antoniou, C. J. Baker, M. C. J. Hornikx
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Here, we report novel empirical results from a psychophysical experiment in which we tested the echolocation abilities of nine blind adult human experts in click-based echolocation. We found that they had better acuity in localizing a target and used lower intensity emissions (i.e., mouth clicks) when a target was placed 45° off to the side compared with when it was placed at 0° (straight ahead). We provide a possible explanation of the behavioral result in terms of binaural-intensity signals, which appear to change more rapidly around 45°. The finding that echolocators have better echo-localization off axis is surprising, because for human source localization (i.e., regular spatial hearing), it is well known that performance is best when targets are straight ahead (0°) and decreases as targets move farther to the side. This may suggest that human echolocation and source hearing rely on different acoustic cues and that human spatial hearing has more facets than previously thought.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T01:41:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211068070
       
  • Growth-Mindset Intervention Delivered by Teachers Boosts Achievement in
           Early Adolescence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tenelle Porter, Diego Catalán Molina, Andrei Cimpian, Sylvia Roberts, Afiya Fredericks, Lisa S. Blackwell, Kali Trzesniewski
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      School underachievement is a persistent problem in the United States. Direct-to-student, computer-delivered growth-mindset interventions have shown promise as a way to improve achievement for students at risk of failing in school; however, these interventions benefit only students who happen to be in classrooms that support growth-mindset beliefs. Here, we tested a teacher-delivered growth-mindset intervention for U.S. adolescents in Grades 6 and 7 that was designed to both impart growth-mindset beliefs and create a supportive classroom environment where those beliefs could flourish (N = 1,996 students, N = 50 teachers). The intervention improved the grades of struggling students in the target class by 0.27 standard deviations, or 2.81 grade percentage points. The effects were largest for students whose teachers endorsed fixed mindsets before the intervention. This large-scale, randomized controlled trial demonstrates that growth-mindset interventions can produce gains when delivered by teachers.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T01:07:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211061109
       
  • Deception Cues During High-Risk Situations: 911 Homicide Calls

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      Authors: Patrick M. Markey, Erika Feeney, Brooke Berry, Lauren Hopkins, Isabel Creedon
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      During everyday interactions, cues tend to be weakly related to deception. However, there are theoretical reasons to suspect that such cues will be more prominent during high-risk interactions. The current study explored deception cues during one particular high-risk interaction—911 homicide calls placed by adults. In Sample 1, judges coded 911 homicide calls (n = 82) by Q-sorting 86 cues. Results indicated that deceptive callers tended to display emotional cues (e.g., self-dramatizing, moody, worried, emotional, nervous), appeared overwhelmed, and related narratives that lacked structure, clarity, and focus. Judges coded a separate sample of 911 calls (n = 64), and deception scores were computed using a template-matching approach based on the findings from Sample 1. Results indicated that deceptive 911 callers had higher deception scores than honest callers. The effect sizes yielded in this study highlight the relevance of deception cues during high-risk interactions and the usefulness of the person-centered Q-sort method.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T04:34:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976221077216
       
  • Vocal-Stress Diary: A Longitudinal Investigation of the Association of
           Everyday Work Stressors and Human Voice Features

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      Authors: Markus Langer, Cornelius J. König, Rudolf Siegel, Therese Fredenhagen, Alexander G. Schunck, Viviane Hähne, Tobias Baur
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The human voice conveys plenty of information about the speaker. A prevalent assumption is that stress-related changes in the human body affect speech production, thus affecting voice features. This suggests that voice data may be an easy-to-capture measure of everyday stress levels and can thus serve as a warning signal of stress-related health consequences. However, previous research is limited (i.e., has induced stress only through artificial tasks or has investigated only short-term or extreme stressors), leaving it open whether everyday work stressors are associated with voice features. Thus, our participants (111 adult working individuals) took part in a 1-week diary study (Sunday until Sunday), in which they provided voice messages and self-report data on daily work stressors. Results showed that work stressors were associated with voice features such as increased speech rate and voice intensity. We discuss theoretical, practical, and ethical implications regarding the voice as an indicator of psychological states.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T08:41:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211068110
       
  • Development of Visual Memory Capacity Following Early-Onset and Extended
           Blindness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Priti Gupta, Pragya Shah, Sharon Gilad Gutnick, Marin Vogelsang, Lukas Vogelsang, Kashish Tiwari, Tapan Gandhi, Suma Ganesh, Pawan Sinha
      First page: 847
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      It is unknown whether visual memory capacity can develop if onset of pattern vision is delayed for several years following birth. We had an opportunity to address this question through our work with an unusual population of 12 congenitally blind individuals ranging in age from 8 to 22 years. After providing them with sight surgery, we longitudinally evaluated their visual memory capacity using an image-memorization task. Our findings revealed poor visual memory capacity soon after surgery but significant improvement in subsequent months. Although there may be limits to this improvement, performance 1 year after surgery was found to be comparable with that of control participants with matched visual acuity. These findings provide evidence for plasticity of visual memory mechanisms into late childhood but do not rule out vulnerability to early deprivation. Our computational simulations suggest that a potential mechanism to account for changes in memory performance may be progressive representational elaboration in image encoding.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T07:43:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211056664
       
  • Grief Symptoms Promote Inflammation During Acute Stress Among Bereaved
           Spouses

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      Authors: Ryan L. Brown, Angie S. LeRoy, Michelle A. Chen, Robert Suchting, Lisa M. Jaremka, Jia Liu, Cobi Heijnen, Christopher P. Fagundes
      First page: 859
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The death of a spouse is associated with maladaptive immune alterations; grief severity may exacerbate this link. We investigated whether high grief symptoms were associated with an amplified inflammatory response to subsequent stress among 111 recently bereaved older adults. Participants completed a standardized psychological stressor and underwent a blood draw before, 45 min after, and 2 hr after the stressor. Those experiencing high grief symptoms (i.e., scoring> 25 on the Inventory of Complicated Grief) experienced a 45% increase in interleukin-6 (IL-6; a proinflammatory cytokine) per hour, whereas those experiencing low grief symptoms demonstrated a 26% increase. In other words, high grief was related to a 19% increase in IL-6 per hour relative to low grief. The grief levels of recently bereaved people were associated with the rate of change in IL-6 following a subsequent stressor, above and beyond depressive symptoms. This is the first study to demonstrate that high grief symptoms promote inflammation following acute stress.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T11:27:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211059502
       
  • Early Adolescents Demonstrate Peer-Network Homophily in Political
           Attitudes and Values

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      Authors: Benjamin Oosterhoff, Ashleigh Poppler, Cara A. Palmer
      First page: 874
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Research on political homophily has almost exclusively focused on adults, and little is known about whether political homophily is present early in life when political attitudes are forming and friendship networks are rapidly changing. We examined political homophily using a social network approach with rural middle school students (N = 213; mean age = 12.5 years; 57% female) from a remote U.S. community. Preregistered analyses indicated that early adolescents were more likely to spend time with people who shared similar political attitudes and values. These effects were most consistent for right-wing authoritarianism, patriotism, and anti-immigration attitudes. Our results show that political homophily is evident at an early age when young people are forming their political beliefs and making decisions about their friendships, suggesting that peer political-attitude socialization may emerge early in life.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T08:35:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211063912
       
  • Detecting Prejudice From Egalitarianism: Why Black Americans Don’t Trust
           White Egalitarians’ Claims

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      Authors: Michael Rosenblum, Drew S. Jacoby-Senghor, N. Derek Brown
      First page: 889
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Although White Americans increasingly express egalitarian views, how they express egalitarianism may reveal inegalitarian tendencies and sow mistrust with Black Americans. In the present experiments, Black perceivers inferred likability and trustworthiness and accurately inferred underlying racial attitudes and motivations from White writers’ declarations that they are nonprejudiced and egalitarian (Experiments 1 and 2). White writers believed that their egalitarianism seemed more inoffensive and indicative of allyship than was perceived by Black Americans (Experiment 1a). Linguistic analysis revealed that, when inferring racial attitudes and motivations, Black perceivers accurately attended to language emphasizing humanization, support for equal opportunity, personal responsibility, and the idea that equality already exists (Experiment 1b). We found causal evidence that these linguistic cues informed Black Americans’ perceptions of White egalitarians (Experiment 2). Suggesting societal costs of these perceptions, White egalitarians’ underlying racial beliefs negatively predicted Black participants’ actual trust and cooperation in an economic game (Experiment 3). Our experiments (N = 1,335 adults) showed that White Americans’ insistence that they are egalitarian itself perpetuates mistrust with Black Americans.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-04-28T07:42:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211054090
       
  • Anxiety-Related Frontocortical Activity Is Associated With Dampened
           Stressor Reactivity in the Real World

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      Authors: Juyoen Hur, Manuel Kuhn, Shannon E. Grogans, Allegra S. Anderson, Samiha Islam, Hyung Cho Kim, Rachael M. Tillman, Andrew S. Fox, Jason F. Smith, Kathryn A. DeYoung, Alexander J. Shackman
      First page: 906
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Negative affect is a fundamental dimension of human emotion. When extreme, it contributes to a variety of adverse outcomes, from physical and mental illness to divorce and premature death. Mechanistic work in animals and neuroimaging research in humans and monkeys have begun to reveal the broad contours of the neural circuits governing negative affect, but the relevance of these discoveries to everyday distress remains incompletely understood. Here, we used a combination of approaches—including neuroimaging assays of threat anticipation and emotional-face perception and more than 10,000 momentary assessments of emotional experience—to demonstrate that individuals who showed greater activation in a cingulo-opercular circuit during an anxiety-eliciting laboratory paradigm experienced lower levels of stressor-dependent distress in their daily lives (ns = 202–208 university students). Extended amygdala activation was not significantly related to momentary negative affect. These observations provide a framework for understanding the neurobiology of negative affect in the laboratory and in the real world.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T05:19:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211056635
       
  • Navigable Space and Traversable Edges Differentially Influence
           Reorientation in Sighted and Blind Mice

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      Authors: Marc E. Normandin, Maria C. Garza, Manuel Miguel Ramos-Alvarez, Joshua B. Julian, Tuoyo Eresanara, Nishanth Punjaala, Juan H. Vasquez, Matthew R. Lopez, Isabel A. Muzzio
      First page: 925
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Reorientation enables navigators to regain their bearings after becoming lost. Disoriented individuals primarily reorient themselves using the geometry of a layout, even when other informative cues, such as landmarks, are present. Yet the specific strategies that animals use to determine geometry are unclear. Moreover, because vision allows subjects to rapidly form precise representations of objects and background, it is unknown whether it has a deterministic role in the use of geometry. In this study, we tested sighted and congenitally blind mice (Ns = 8–11) in various settings in which global shape parameters were manipulated. Results indicated that the navigational affordances of the context—the traversable space—promote sampling of boundaries, which determines the effective use of geometric strategies in both sighted and blind mice. However, blind animals can also effectively reorient themselves using 3D edges by extensively patrolling the borders, even when the traversable space is not limited by these boundaries.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T05:37:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211055373
       
  • Can Feelings “Feel” Wrong' Similarities Between Counter-Normative
           Emotion Reports and Perceptual Errors

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      Authors: Ella Givon, Gal Udelsman-Danieli, Ophir Almagor, Tomer Fekete, Oren Shriki, Nachshon Meiran
      First page: 948
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      In popular belief, emotions are regarded as deeply subjective and thus as lacking truth value. Is this reflected at the behavioral or brain level' This work compared counter-normative emotion reports with perceptual-decision errors. Participants (university students; N = 29, 16, 40, and 60 in Experiments 1–4, respectively) were given trials comprising two tasks and were asked to (a) report their pleasant or unpleasant feelings in response to emotion-invoking pictures (emotion report) and (b) indicate the gender of faces (perceptual decision). Focusing on classical error markers, we found that the results of both tasks indicated (a) post-error slowing, (b) speed/accuracy trade-offs, (c) a heavier right tail of the reaction time distribution for errors or counter-normative responses relative to correct or normative responses, and (d) inconclusive evidence for error-related negativity in electroencephalograms. These results suggest that at both the behavioral and the brain levels, the experience of reporting counter-normative emotions is remarkably similar to that accompanying perceptual-decision errors.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T04:10:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211063915
       
  • “They’re Everywhere!”: Symbolically Threatening Groups Seem More
           Pervasive Than Nonthreatening Groups

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      Authors: Rebecca Ponce de Leon, Jacqueline R. Rifkin, Richard P. Larrick
      First page: 957
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      The meaning of places is socially constructed, often informed by the groups that seem pervasive there. For instance, the University of Pennsylvania is sometimes called “Jew-niversity of Pennsylvania,” and the city of Decatur, Georgia, is disparagingly nicknamed “Dyke-atur,” connoting the respective pervasiveness of Jewish students and gay residents. Because these pervasiveness perceptions meaningfully impact how people navigate the social world, it is critical to understand the factors that influence their formation. Across surveys, experiments, and archival data, six studies (N = 3,039 American adults) revealed the role of symbolic threat (i.e., perceived differences in values and worldviews). Specifically, holding constant important features of the group and context, we demonstrated that groups higher in symbolic threat are perceived as more populous in a place and more associated with that place than groups lower in symbolic threat. Ultimately, this work reveals that symbolic threat can both distort how people understand their surroundings and shape the meaning of places.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T07:56:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211060009
       
  • Taking a Disagreeing Perspective Improves the Accuracy of People’s
           Quantitative Estimates

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      Authors: Philippe P. F. M. Van de Calseyde, Emir Efendić
      First page: 971
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Many decisions rest on people’s ability to make estimates of unknown quantities. In these judgments, the aggregate estimate of a crowd of individuals is often more accurate than most individual estimates. Remarkably, similar principles apply when multiple estimates from the same person are aggregated, and a key challenge is to identify strategies that improve the accuracy of people’s aggregate estimates. Here, we present the following strategy: Combine people’s first estimate with their second estimate, made from the perspective of someone they often disagree with. In five preregistered experiments (N = 6,425 adults; N = 53,086 estimates) with populations from the United States and United Kingdom, we found that such a strategy produced accurate estimates (compared with situations in which people made a second guess or when second estimates were made from the perspective of someone they often agree with). These results suggest that disagreement, often highlighted for its negative impact, is a powerful tool in producing accurate judgments.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T04:50:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211061321
       
  • Resting (Tonic) Blood Pressure Is Associated With Sensitivity to Imagined
           and Acute Experiences of Social Pain: Evidence From Three Studies

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      Authors: Tristen K. Inagaki, Peter J. Gianaros
      First page: 984
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Social pain is a common experience that has potent implications for health. However, individuals differ in their sensitivity to social pain. Recent evidence suggests that sensitivity to social pain varies according to a biological factor that modulates sensitivity to physical pain: resting (tonic) blood pressure. The current studies extended this evidence by testing whether blood pressure relates to sensitivity to imagined (Study 1: N = 762, 51% female adults) and acute (Study 2, preregistered: N = 204, 57% female adults) experiences of social pain and whether associations extend to general emotional responding (Studies 1–3; Study 3: N = 162, 59% female adults). In line with prior evidence, results showed that higher resting blood pressure was associated with lower sensitivity to social pain. Moreover, associations regarding blood pressure and sensitivity to social pain did not appear to be explained by individual differences in general emotional responding. Findings appear to be compatible with the interpretation that social and physical pain share similar cardiovascular correlates and may be modulated by convergent interoceptive pathways.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T08:30:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211061107
       
  • Ready to Learn: Incidental Exposure Fosters Category Learning

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      Authors: Layla Unger, Vladimir M. Sloutsky
      First page: 999
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.
      Our knowledge of the world is populated with categories such as dogs, cups, and chairs. Such categories shape how we perceive, remember, and reason about their members. Much of our exposure to the entities we come to categorize occurs incidentally as we experience and interact with them in our everyday lives, with limited access to explicit teaching. This research investigated whether incidental exposure contributes to building category knowledge by rendering people “ready to learn”—allowing them to rapidly capitalize on brief access to explicit teaching. Across five experiments (N = 438 adults), we found that incidental exposure did produce a ready-to-learn effect, even when learners showed no evidence of robust category learning during exposure. Importantly, this readiness to learn occurred only when categories possessed a rich structure in which many features were correlated within categories. These findings offer a window into how our everyday experiences may contribute to building category knowledge.
      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T07:22:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976211061470
       
  • Corrigendum: What’s in a Name' Popular Names Are Less Common on
           Frontiers

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      First page: 1020
      Abstract: Psychological Science, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychological Science
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T02:53:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/09567976221100413
       
 
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