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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Revista Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Costarricense de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Cultura Teológica     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios e Investigación en Psicología y Educación     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología : Segunda Epoca     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Electrónica de Metodología Aplicada     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Wímb Lu     Open Access  
Revue de psychoéducation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée / European Review of Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revue québécoise de psychologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia     Open Access  
Roeper Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Rorschachiana     Hybrid Journal  
RUDN Journal of Psychology and Pedagogics     Open Access  
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Satir International Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
School Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Seeing and Perceiving     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexual Abuse A Journal of Research and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Offending : Theory, Research, and Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Simmel Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 3)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Issues and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Psychological and Personality Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Somnologie - Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Suma Psicologica     Open Access  
Tajdida : Jurnal Pemikiran dan Gerakan Muhammadiyah     Open Access  
Teaching of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Terapia Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tesis Psicologica     Open Access  
TESTFÓRUM     Open Access  
The Arts in Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Brown University Psychopharmacology Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Clinical Neuropsychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The International Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series B : Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Sport Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Therapeutic Communities : The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Thinking & Reasoning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tobacco Use Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transactional Analysis Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Undecidable Unconscious : A Journal of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Universal Journal of Psychology     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Vinculo - Revista do NESME     Open Access  
VIVESIANA     Open Access  
Voices : The Art and Science of Psychotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Yaşam Becerileri Psikoloji Dergisi / Life Skills Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Arbeits - und Organisationspsychologie A&O     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Differentielle und Diagnostische Psychologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Erziehungswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gesundheitspsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Neuropsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Pädagogische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie, Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie / Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Psychological Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.274
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 20  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0033-2917 - ISSN (Online) 1469-8978
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [353 journals]
  • Neurocognitive correlates of metabolic dysregulation in individuals with
           mood disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Maksyutynska; Kateryna, Stogios, Nicolette, Prasad, Femin, Gill, Jashan, Hamza, Zaineb, De, Riddhita, Smith, Emily, Horta, Angelina, Goldstein, Benjamin I., Korczak, Daphne, Graff-Guerrero, Ariel, Hahn, Margaret K., Agarwal, Sri Mahavir
      Pages: 1245 - 1271
      Abstract: Individuals with mood disorders are predisposed to metabolic dysfunction, while those with metabolic dysregulation such as diabetes and obesity experience more severe depressive symptoms. Both metabolic dysfunction and mood disorders are independently associated with cognitive deficits. Therefore, given their close association, this study aimed to explore the association between metabolic dysfunction in individuals with mood disorders in relation to cognitive outcomes. A comprehensive search comprised of these three domains was carried out; a random-effects meta-analysis pooling mean cognitive outcomes was conducted (PROSPERO ID: CRD42022295765). Sixty-three studies were included in this review; 26 were synthesized in a quantitative meta-analysis. Comorbid metabolic dysregulation was associated with significantly lower global cognition among individuals with mood disorders. These trends were significant within each mood disorder subgroup, including major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and self-report depression/depressive symptoms. Type 2 diabetes was associated with the lowest cognitive performance in individuals with mood disorders, followed by peripheral insulin resistance, body mass index ⩾25 kg/m2, and metabolic syndrome. Significant reduction in scores was also observed among individual cognitive domains (in descending order) of working memory, attention, executive function, processing speed, verbal memory, and visual memory. These findings demonstrate the detrimental effects of comorbid metabolic dysfunction in individuals with mood disorders. Further research is required to understand the underlying mechanisms connecting mood disorders, metabolism, and cognition.
      PubDate: 2024-03-07
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291724000345
       
  • Weight change in people with depression and the risk of dementia: a
           nationwide cohort study

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      Authors: Kim; Hyewon, Jung, Jin Hyung, Han, Kyungdo, Jeon, Hong Jin
      Pages: 1284 - 1293
      Abstract: BackgroundDepression is a risk factor for dementia and weight change can appear as a symptom of depression. However, the association between weight change after the diagnosis of depression and the risk of dementia is poorly established. This study aimed to investigate the association between weight change before and after a diagnosis of depression with the subsequent risk of dementia.MethodsThe National Health Insurance Sharing Service database was used. 1 308 730 patients aged ⩾40 years diagnosed with depression were identified to be eligible. Weight changes after their depression diagnosis were categorized and subsequent incidence of dementia was followed up.ResultsDuring an average follow-up period of 5.2 years (s.d., 2.0 years), 69 373 subjects were newly diagnosed with all-cause dementia (56 351 were Alzheimer's disease and 6877 were vascular dementia). Regarding all outcomes, compared to those with a minimal weight change (−5 to 5%), all groups with weight gain or loss showed increased risks of dementia after adjusting potential risk factors for dementia, in all analysis models with a dose–response relationship, showing a U-shaped association.ConclusionsWeight change as a symptom of depression could be a predictor for the future development of dementia.
      PubDate: 2024-01-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003124
       
  • The mental health of Australians bereaved during the first two years of
           the COVID-19 pandemic: a latent class analysis

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      Authors: Maccallum; F., Breen, L. J., Phillips, J. L., Agar, M. R., Hosie, A., Tieman, J., DiGiacomo, M., Luckett, T., Philip, J., Ivynian, S., Chang, S., Dadich, A., Grossman, C. H., Gilmore, I., Harlum, J., Kinchin, I., Glasgow, N., Lobb, E. A.
      Pages: 1361 - 1372
      Abstract: BackgroundThe COVID-19 pandemic disrupted many areas of life, including culturally accepted practices at end-of-life care, funeral rites, and access to social, community, and professional support. This survey investigated the mental health outcomes of Australians bereaved during this time to determine how these factors might have impacted bereavement outcomes.MethodsAn online survey indexing pandemic and bereavement experiences, levels of grief, depression, anxiety, and health, work, and social impairment. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to identify groups of individuals who shared similar symptom patterns. Multinomial regressions identified pandemic-related, loss-related, and sociodemographic correlates of class membership.Results1911 Australian adults completed the survey. The LCA identified four classes: low symptoms (46.8%), grief (17.3%), depression/anxiety (17.7%), and grief/depression/anxiety (18.2%). The latter group reported the highest levels of health, work, and social impairment. The death of a child or partner and an inability to care for the deceased due to COVID-19 public health measures were correlated with grief symptoms (with or without depression and anxiety). Preparedness for the person's death and levels of pandemic-related loneliness and social isolation differentiated all four classes. Unemployment was associated with depression/anxiety (with or without grief).ConclusionsCOVID-19 had profound impacts for the way we lived and died, with effects that are likely to ricochet through society into the foreseeable future. These lessons learned must inform policymakers and healthcare professionals to improve bereavement care and ensure preparedness during and following future predicted pandemics to prevent negative impacts.
      PubDate: 2024-01-05
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003227
       
  • Reward anticipation-related neural activation following cued reinforcement
           in adults with psychotic psychopathology and biological relatives

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      Authors: Demro; Caroline, Lahud, Elijah, Burton, Philip C., Purcell, John R., Simon, Joe J., Sponheim, Scott R.
      Pages: 1441 - 1451
      Abstract: BackgroundSchizophrenia is associated with hypoactivation of reward sensitive brain areas during reward anticipation. However, it is unclear whether these neural functions are similarly impaired in other disorders with psychotic symptomatology or individuals with genetic liability for psychosis. If abnormalities in reward sensitive brain areas are shared across individuals with psychotic psychopathology and people with heightened genetic liability for psychosis, there may be a common neural basis for symptoms of diminished pleasure and motivation.MethodsWe compared performance and neural activity in 123 people with a history of psychosis (PwP), 81 of their first-degree biological relatives, and 49 controls during a modified Monetary Incentive Delay task during fMRI.ResultsPwP exhibited hypoactivation of the striatum and anterior insula (AI) during cueing of potential future rewards with each diagnostic group showing hypoactivations during reward anticipation compared to controls. Despite normative task performance, relatives demonstrated caudate activation intermediate between controls and PwP, nucleus accumbens activation more similar to PwP than controls, but putamen activation on par with controls. Across diagnostic groups of PwP there was less functional connectivity between bilateral caudate and several regions of the salience network (medial frontal gyrus, anterior cingulate, AI) during reward anticipation.ConclusionsFindings implicate less activation and connectivity in reward processing brain regions across a spectrum of disorders involving psychotic psychopathology. Specifically, aberrations in striatal and insular activity during reward anticipation seen in schizophrenia are partially shared with other forms of psychotic psychopathology and associated with genetic liability for psychosis.
      PubDate: 2024-01-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003343
       
  • 24-Hour warning signs for adolescent suicide attempts

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      Authors: King; Cheryl A., Gipson Allen, Polly Y., Ahamed, Sheikh Iqbal, Webb, Michael, Casper, T. Charles, Brent, David, Grupp-Phelan, Jacqueline, Rogers, T. Alexander, Arango, Alejandra, Al-Dajani, Nadia, McGuire, Taylor C., Bagge, Courtney L.
      Pages: 1272 - 1283
      Abstract: BackgroundLittle is known about when youth may be at greatest risk for attempting suicide, which is critically important information for the parents, caregivers, and professionals who care for youth at risk. This study used adolescent and parent reports, and a case-crossover, within-subject design to identify 24-hour warning signs (WS) for suicide attempts.MethodsAdolescents (N = 1094, ages 13 to 18) with one or more suicide risk factors were enrolled and invited to complete bi-weekly, 8–10 item text message surveys for 18 months. Adolescents who reported a suicide attempt (survey item) were invited to participate in an interview regarding their thoughts, feelings/emotions, and behaviors/events during the 24-hours prior to their attempt (case period) and a prior 24-hour period (control period). Their parents participated in an interview regarding the adolescents’ behaviors/events during these same periods. Adolescent or adolescent and parent interviews were completed for 105 adolescents (81.9% female; 66.7% White, 19.0% Black, 14.3% other).ResultsBoth parent and adolescent reports of suicidal communications and withdrawal from social and other activities differentiated case and control periods. Adolescent reports also identified feelings (self-hate, emotional pain, rush of feelings, lower levels of rage toward others), cognitions (suicidal rumination, perceived burdensomeness, anger/hostility), and serious conflict with parents as WS in multi-variable models.ConclusionsThis study identified 24-hour WS in the domains of cognitions, feelings, and behaviors/events, providing an evidence base for the dissemination of information about signs of proximal risk for adolescent suicide attempts.
      PubDate: 2023-11-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003112
       
  • Mental health and service use of parents with and without borderline
           intellectual functioning

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      Authors: Rudra; Sonya, McManus, Sally, Hassiotis, Angela, Ali, Afia
      Pages: 1294 - 1308
      Abstract: BackgroundPeople with borderline intellectual functioning (BIF) encounter greater social adversities than the general population and have an increased prevalence of mental illness. However, little is known about the socio-demographic characteristics and mental health of parents with BIF.MethodsA secondary data analysis of the Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey 2014 was conducted. Logistic regression models were fitted to compare differences in socio-demographic, mental health and service-use characteristics between parents and non-parents with and without BIF, and to investigate if the relationship between parent status and mental health outcomes was modified by BIF status, sex, and employment.ResultsData from 6872 participants was analyzed; 69.1% were parents. BIF parents had higher odds of common mental disorder, severe mental illness, post-traumatic stress disorder, self-harm/suicide and were more likely to see their General Practitioner (GP) and to receive mental health treatment than non-BIF parents. BIF parents did not have a higher prevalence of mental health problems than BIF non-parents. Being a parent, after adjusting for BIF status and other confounders, was associated with increased odds of having a common mental disorder, visits to see a GP and treatment for mental health. Female parents had higher odds of treatment for mental health problems.ConclusionsBeing a parent is associated with elevated rates of common mental disorders. There is a higher burden of mental health problems and service use in people with BIF. A greater provision of specialist support services including ascertainment is indicated for this group.
      PubDate: 2023-10-25
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003136
       
  • Intergenerational transmission of ADHD behaviors: genetic and
           environmental pathways

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      Authors: Kleppesto; Thomas H., Eilertsen, Espen Moen, van Bergen, Elsje, Sunde, Hans Fredrik, Zietsch, Brendan, Nordmo, Magnus, Eftedal, Nikolai Haahjem, Havdahl, Alexandra, Ystrom, Eivind, Torvik, Fartein Ask
      Pages: 1309 - 1317
      Abstract: BackgroundWe investigate if covariation between parental and child attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) behaviors can be explained by environmental and/or genetic transmission.MethodsWe employed a large children-of-twins-and-siblings sample (N = 22 276 parents and 11 566 8-year-old children) of the Norwegian Mother, Father and Child Cohort Study. This enabled us to disentangle intergenerational influences via parental genes and parental behaviors (i.e. genetic and environmental transmission, respectively). Fathers reported on their own symptoms and mothers on their own and their child's symptoms.ResultsChild ADHD behaviors correlated with their mother's (0.24) and father's (0.10) ADHD behaviors. These correlations were largely due to additive genetic transmission. Variation in children's ADHD behaviors was explained by genetic factors active in both generations (11%) and genetic factors specific to the children (46%), giving a total heritability of 57%. There were small effects of parental ADHD behaviors (2% environmental transmission) and gene–environment correlation (3%). The remaining variability in ADHD behaviors was due to individual-specific environmental factors.ConclusionsThe intergenerational resemblance of ADHD behaviors is primarily due to genetic transmission, with little evidence for parental ADHD behaviors causing children's ADHD behaviors. This contradicts theories proposing environmental explanations of intergenerational transmission of ADHD, such as parenting theories or psychological life-history theory.
      PubDate: 2023-11-03
      DOI: 10.1017/S003329172300315X
       
  • Gray matter atrophy is constrained by normal structural brain network
           architecture in depression

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      Authors: Han; Shaoqiang, Fang, Keke, Zheng, Ruiping, Li, Shuying, Zhou, Bingqian, Sheng, Wei, Wen, Baohong, Liu, Liang, Wei, Yarui, Chen, Yuan, Chen, Huafu, Cui, Qian, Cheng, Jingliang, Zhang, Yong
      Pages: 1318 - 1328
      Abstract: BackgroundThere is growing evidence that gray matter atrophy is constrained by normal brain network (or connectome) architecture in neuropsychiatric disorders. However, whether this finding holds true in individuals with depression remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the association between gray matter atrophy and normal connectome architecture at individual level in depression.MethodsIn this study, 297 patients with depression and 256 healthy controls (HCs) from two independent Chinese dataset were included: a discovery dataset (105 never-treated first-episode patients and matched 130 HCs) and a replication dataset (106 patients and matched 126 HCs). For each patient, individualized regional atrophy was assessed using normative model and brain regions whose structural connectome profiles in HCs most resembled the atrophy patterns were identified as putative epicenters using a backfoward stepwise regression analysis.ResultsIn general, the structural connectome architecture of the identified disease epicenters significantly explained 44% (±16%) variance of gray matter atrophy. While patients with depression demonstrated tremendous interindividual variations in the number and distribution of disease epicenters, several disease epicenters with higher participation coefficient than randomly selected regions, including the hippocampus, thalamus, and medial frontal gyrus were significantly shared by depression. Other brain regions with strong structural connections to the disease epicenters exhibited greater vulnerability. In addition, the association between connectome and gray matter atrophy uncovered two distinct subgroups with different ages of onset.ConclusionsThese results suggest that gray matter atrophy is constrained by structural brain connectome and elucidate the possible pathological progression in depression.
      PubDate: 2023-11-10
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003161
       
  • Long-term diagnostic stability, predictors of diagnostic change, and time
           until diagnostic change of first-episode psychosis: a 21-year follow-up
           study

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      Authors: Peralta; David, Janda, Lucía, García de Jalón, Elena, Moreno-Izco, Lucía, Sánchez-Torres, Ana M., Cuesta, Manuel J., Peralta, Victor, ,
      Pages: 1329 - 1338
      Abstract: BackgroundAlthough diagnostic instability in first-episode psychosis (FEP) is of major concern, little is known about its determinants. This very long-term follow-up study aimed to examine the diagnostic stability of FEP diagnoses, the baseline predictors of diagnostic change and the timing of diagnostic change.MethodsThis was a longitudinal and naturalistic study of 243 subjects with FEP who were assessed at baseline and reassessed after a mean follow-up of 21 years. The diagnostic stability of DSM-5 psychotic disorders was examined using prospective and retrospective consistencies, logistic regression was used to establish the predictors of diagnostic change, and survival analysis was used to compare time to diagnostic change across diagnostic categories.ResultsThe overall diagnostic stability was 47.7%. Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were the most stable diagnoses, with other categories having low stability. Predictors of diagnostic change to schizophrenia included a family history of schizophrenia, obstetric complications, developmental delay, poor premorbid functioning in several domains, long duration of untreated continuous psychosis, spontaneous dyskinesia, lack of psychosocial stressors, longer duration of index admission, and poor early treatment response. Most of these variables also predicted diagnostic change to bipolar disorder but in the opposite direction and with lesser effect sizes. There were no significant differences between specific diagnoses regarding time to diagnostic change. At 10-year follow-up, around 80% of the diagnoses had changed.ConclusionsFEP diagnoses other than schizophrenia or bipolar disorder should be considered as provisional. Considering baseline predictors of diagnostic change may help to enhance diagnostic accuracy and guide therapeutic interventions.
      PubDate: 2023-11-21
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003173
       
  • Difficulties during delivery, brain ventricle enlargement and cognitive
           impairment in first episode psychosis

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      Authors: Costas-Carrera; Ana, Verdolini, Norma, Garcia-Rizo, Clemente, Mezquida, Gisela, Janssen, Joost, Valli, Isabel, Corripio, Iluminada, Sanchez-Torres, Ana M., Bioque, Miquel, Lobo, Antonio, Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana, Rapado-Castro, Marta, Vieta, Eduard, De la Serna, Helena, Mane, Anna, Roldan, Alexandra, Crossley, Nicolas, Penades, Rafael, Cuesta, Manuel J., Parellada, Mara, Bernardo, Miquel, ,
      Pages: 1339 - 1349
      Abstract: BackgroundPatients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) display clinical, cognitive, and structural brain abnormalities at illness onset. Ventricular enlargement has been identified in schizophrenia since the initial development of neuroimaging techniques. Obstetric abnormalities have been associated with an increased risk of developing psychosis but also with cognitive impairment and brain structure abnormalities. Difficulties during delivery are associated with a higher risk of birth asphyxia leading to brain structural abnormalities, such as ventriculomegaly, which has been related to cognitive disturbances.MethodsWe examined differences in ventricular size between 142 FEP patients and 123 healthy control participants using magnetic resonance imaging. Obstetric complications were evaluated using the Lewis–Murray scale. We examined the impact of obstetric difficulties during delivery on ventricle size as well as the possible relationship between ventricle size and cognitive impairment in both groups.ResultsFEP patients displayed significantly larger third ventricle size compared with healthy controls. Third ventricle enlargement was associated with diagnosis (higher volume in patients), with difficulties during delivery (higher volume in subjects with difficulties), and was highest in patients with difficulties during delivery. Verbal memory was significantly associated with third ventricle to brain ratio.ConclusionsOur results suggest that difficulties during delivery might be significant contributors to the ventricular enlargement historically described in schizophrenia. Thus, obstetric complications may contribute to the development of psychosis through changes in brain architecture.
      PubDate: 2023-11-28
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003185
       
  • Pretreatment cognitive performance is associated with differential
           self-harm outcomes in 6 v. 12-months of dialectical behavior therapy for
           borderline personality disorder

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      Authors: Traynor; Jenna M., McMain, Shelley, Chapman, Alexander L., Kuo, Janice, Labrish, Cathy, Ruocco, Anthony C.
      Pages: 1350 - 1360
      Abstract: BackgroundRecent findings suggest that brief dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder is effective for reducing self-harm, but it remains unknown which patients are likely to improve in brief v. 12 months of DBT. Research is needed to identify patient characteristics that moderate outcomes. Here, we characterized changes in cognition across brief DBT (DBT-6) v. a standard 12-month course (DBT-12) and examined whether cognition predicted self-harm outcomes in each arm.MethodsIn this secondary analysis of 240 participants in the FASTER study (NCT02387736), cognitive measures were administered at pre-treatment, after 6 months, and at 12 months. Self-harm was assessed from pre-treatment to 2-year follow-up. Multilevel models characterized changes in cognition across treatment. Generalized estimating equations examined whether pre-treatment cognitive performance predicted self-harm outcomes in each arm.ResultsCognitive performance improved in both arms after 6 months of treatment, with no between-arm differences at 12-months. Pre-treatment inhibitory control was associated with different self-harm outcomes in DBT-6 v. DBT-12. For participants with average inhibitory control, self-harm outcomes were significantly better when assigned to DBT-12, relative to DBT-6, at 9–18 months after initiating treatment. In contrast, participants with poor inhibitory control showed better self-harm outcomes when assigned to brief DBT-6 v. DBT-12, at 12–24 months after initiating treatment.ConclusionsThis work represents an initial step toward an improved understanding of patient profiles that are best suited to briefer v. standard 12 months of DBT, but observed effects should be replicated in a waitlist-controlled study to confirm that they were treatment-specific.
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003197
       
  • Metabolic syndrome after childhood trauma: a 9-year longitudinal analysis

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      Authors: Souama; Camille, Milaneschi, Yuri, Lamers, Femke, Vinkers, Christiaan H., Giltay, Erik J., Liemburg, Edith J., Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.
      Pages: 1373 - 1381
      Abstract: BackgroundChildhood trauma (CT) has been cross-sectionally associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS), a group of biological risk factors for cardiometabolic disease. Longitudinal studies, while rare, would clarify the development of cardiometabolic dysregulations over time. Therefore, we longitudinally investigated the association of CT with the 9-year course of MetS components.MethodsParticipants (N = 2958) from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety were assessed four times across 9 years. The CT interview retrospectively assessed childhood emotional neglect and physical, emotional, and sexual abuse. Metabolic outcomes encompassed continuous MetS components (waist circumference, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, blood pressure [BP], and glucose) and count of clinically elevated MetS components. Mixed-effects models estimated sociodemographic- and lifestyle-adjusted longitudinal associations of CT with metabolic outcomes over time. Time interactions evaluated change in these associations.ResultsCT was reported by 49% of participants. CT was consistently associated with increased waist (b = 0.32, s.e. = 0.10, p = 0.001), glucose (b = 0.02, s.e. = 0.01, p < 0.001), and count of MetS components (b = 0.04, s.e. = 0.01, p < 0.001); and decreased HDL cholesterol (b = −0.01, s.e.
      PubDate: 2023-11-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003264
       
  • Examining psychotic experiences in two generations – findings from a
           rural household-based cohort study; the Lolland-Falster Health Study

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      Authors: Rimvall; Martin Køster, Simonsen, Erik, Zhang, Jiawei, Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic, Hastrup, Lene Halling, Jeppesen, Pia, Austin, Stephen F., Koch, Susanne Vinkel
      Pages: 1382 - 1390
      Abstract: BackgroundPsychotic disorders are highly heritable, yet the evidence is less clear for subclinical psychosis expression, such as psychotic experiences (PEs). We examined if PEs in parents were associated with PEs in offspring.MethodsAs part of the Danish general population Lolland-Falster Health Study, families with youths aged 11–17 years were included. Both children and parents reported PEs according to the Psychotic Like Experiences Questionnaire, counting only ‘definite’ PEs. Parents additionally reported depressive symptoms, anxiety, and mental wellbeing. The associations between parental and child PEs were estimated using generalized estimating equations with an exchangeable correlation structure to account for the clustering of observations within families, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics.ResultsAltogether, 984 youths (mean age 14.3 years [s.d. 2.0]), 700 mothers, and 496 fathers from 766 households completed PEs-questionnaires. Offspring of parents with PEs were at an increased risk of reporting PEs themselves (mothers: adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 2.42, 95% CI 1.73–3.38; fathers: aRR 2.25, 95% CI 1.42–3.59). Other maternal problems (depression, anxiety, and poor mental well-being), but not paternal problems, were also associated with offspring PEs. In multivariate models adjusting for parental problems, PEs, but not other parental problems, were robustly associated with offspring PEs (mothers: aRR 2.25, 95% CI 1.60–3.19; fathers: aRR 2.44, 95% CI 1.50–3.96).ConclusionsThe current findings add novel evidence suggesting that specific psychosis vulnerability in families is expressed at the lower end of the psychosis continuum, underlining the importance of assessing youths’ needs based on psychosis vulnerability broadly within the family systems.
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003276
       
  • The risk and development of work disability among individuals with
           gambling disorder: a longitudinal case–cohort study in Sweden

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      Authors: Månsson; Viktor, Pettersson, Emma, Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor, Guterstam, Joar, Berman, Anne H., Jayaram-Lindström, Nitya, Molero, Yasmina
      Pages: 1391 - 1402
      Abstract: BackgroundThis longitudinal register study aimed to investigate the association between gambling disorder (GD) and work disability and to map work disability in subgroups of individuals with GD, three years before and three years after diagnosis.MethodsWe included individuals aged 19–62 with GD between 2005 and 2018 (n = 2830; 71.1% men, mean age: 35.1) and a matched comparison cohort (n = 28 300). Work disability was operationalized as the aggregated net days of sickness absence and disability pension. Generalized estimating equation models were used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of long-term work disability (>90 days of work disability/year). Secondly, we conducted Group-based Trajectory Models on days of work disability.ResultsIndividuals with GD showed a four-year increased risk of long-term work disability compared to the matched cohort, peaking at the time of diagnosis (AOR = 1.89; CI 1.67–2.13). Four trajectory groups of work disability days were identified: constant low (60.3%, 5.6–11.2 days), low and increasing (11.4%, 11.8–152.5 days), medium–high and decreasing (11.1%, 65.1–110 days), and constant high (17.1%, 264–331 days). Individuals who were females, older, with prior psychiatric diagnosis, and had been dispensed a psychotropic medication, particularly antidepressants, were more likely to be assigned to groups other than the constant low.ConclusionIndividuals with GD have an increased risk of work disability which may add financial and social pressure and is an additional incentive for earlier detection and prevention of GD.
      PubDate: 2023-11-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003288
       
  • Disentangling potential causal effects of educational duration on
           well-being, and mental and physical health outcomes

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      Authors: van de Weijer; Margot P., Demange, Perline A., Pelt, Dirk H.M., Bartels, Meike, Nivard, Michel G.
      Pages: 1403 - 1418
      Abstract: BackgroundExtensive research has focused on the potential benefits of education on various mental and physical health outcomes. However, whether the associations reflect a causal effect is harder to establish.MethodsTo examine associations between educational duration and specific aspects of well-being, anxiety and mood disorders, and cardiovascular health in a sample of European Ancestry UK Biobank participants born in England and Wales, we apply four different causal inference methods (a natural policy experiment leveraging the minimum school-leaving age, a sibling-control design, Mendelian randomization [MR], and within-family MR), and assess if the methods converge on the same conclusion.ResultsA comparison of results across the four methods reveals that associations between educational duration and these outcomes appears predominantly to be the result of confounding or bias rather than a true causal effect of education on well-being and health outcomes. Although we do consistently find no associations between educational duration and happiness, family satisfaction, work satisfaction, meaning in life, anxiety, and bipolar disorder, we do not find consistent significant associations across all methods for the other phenotypes (health satisfaction, depression, financial satisfaction, friendship satisfaction, neuroticism, and cardiovascular outcomes).ConclusionsWe discuss inconsistencies in results across methods considering their respective limitations and biases, and additionally discuss the generalizability of our findings in light of the sample and phenotype limitations. Overall, this study strengthens the idea that triangulation across different methods is necessary to enhance our understanding of the causal consequences of educational duration.
      PubDate: 2023-11-15
      DOI: 10.1017/S003329172300329X
       
  • Independent and joint contributions of physical disability and chronic
           pain to incident opioid use disorder and opioid overdose among Medicaid
           patients

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      Authors: Hoffman; Katherine L., Milazzo, Floriana, Williams, Nicholas T., Samples, Hillary, Olfson, Mark, Diaz, Ivan, Doan, Lisa, Cerda, Magdalena, Crystal, Stephen, Rudolph, Kara E.
      Pages: 1419 - 1430
      Abstract: BackgroundChronic pain has been extensively explored as a risk factor for opioid misuse, resulting in increased focus on opioid prescribing practices for individuals with such conditions. Physical disability sometimes co-occurs with chronic pain but may also represent an independent risk factor for opioid misuse. However, previous research has not disentangled whether disability contributes to risk independent of chronic pain.MethodsHere, we estimate the independent and joint adjusted associations between having a physical disability and co-occurring chronic pain condition at time of Medicaid enrollment on subsequent 18-month risk of incident opioid use disorder (OUD) and non-fatal, unintentional opioid overdose among non-elderly, adult Medicaid beneficiaries (2016–2019).ResultsWe find robust evidence that having a physical disability approximately doubles the risk of incident OUD or opioid overdose, and physical disability co-occurring with chronic pain increases the risks approximately sixfold as compared to having neither chronic pain nor disability. In absolute numbers, those with neither a physical disability nor chronic pain condition have a 1.8% adjusted risk of incident OUD over 18 months of follow-up, those with physical disability alone have an 2.9% incident risk, those with chronic pain alone have a 3.6% incident risk, and those with co-occurring physical disability and chronic pain have a 11.1% incident risk.ConclusionsThese findings suggest that those with a physical disability should receive increased attention from the medical and healthcare communities to reduce their risk of opioid misuse and attendant negative outcomes.
      PubDate: 2023-11-17
      DOI: 10.1017/S003329172300332X
       
  • Clinical, behavioral, and electrophysiological profiles along a continuum
           of suicide risk: evidence from an implicit association task

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      Authors: Lamontagne; Steven J., Gilbert, Jessica R., Zabala, Paloma K., Waldman, Laura R., Zarate, Carlos A., Ballard, Elizabeth D.
      Pages: 1431 - 1440
      Abstract: BackgroundAn urgent need exists to identify neural correlates associated with differing levels of suicide risk and develop novel, rapid-acting therapeutics to modulate activity within these neural networks.MethodsElectrophysiological correlates of suicide were evaluated using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in 75 adults with differing levels of suicide risk. During MEG scanning, participants completed a modified Life-Death Implicit Association Task. MEG data were source-localized in the gamma (30–58 Hz) frequency, a proxy measure of excitation-inhibition balance. Dynamic causal modeling was used to evaluate differences in connectivity estimates between risk groups. A proof-of-concept, open-label, pilot study of five high risk participants examined changes in gamma power after administration of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg), an NMDAR antagonist with rapid anti-suicide ideation effects.ResultsImplicit self-associations with death were stronger in the highest suicide risk group relative to all other groups, which did not differ from each other. Higher gamma power for self-death compared to self-life associations was found in the orbitofrontal cortex for the highest risk group and the insula and posterior cingulate cortex for the lowest risk group. Connectivity estimates between these regions differentiated the highest risk group from the full sample. Implicit associations with death were not affected by ketamine, but enhanced gamma power was found for self-death associations in the left insula post-ketamine compared to baseline.ConclusionsDifferential implicit cognitive processing of life and death appears to be linked to suicide risk, highlighting the need for objective measures of suicidal states. Pharmacotherapies that modulate gamma activity, particularly in the insula, may help mitigate risk.Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02543983, NCT00397111.
      PubDate: 2023-11-24
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003331
       
  • Clinical outcomes, medical costs, and medication usage patterns of
           different somatic symptom disorders and functional somatic syndromes: a
           population-based study in Taiwan

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      Authors: Wu; Chi-Shin, Chen, Tzu-Ting, Liao, Shih-Cheng, Huang, Wei-Chia, Huang, Wei-Lieh
      Pages: 1452 - 1460
      Abstract: BackgroundSomatic symptom disorders (SSD) and functional somatic syndromes (FSS) are often regarded as similar diagnostic constructs; however, whether they exhibit similar clinical outcomes, medical costs, and medication usage patterns has not been examined in nationwide data. Therefore, this study focused on analyzing SSD and four types of FSS (fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia).MethodsThis population-based matched cohort study utilized Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI) claims database to investigate the impact of SSD/FSS. The study included 2 615 477 newly diagnosed patients with SSD/FSS and matched comparisons from the NHI beneficiary registry. Healthcare utilization, mortality, medical expenditure, and medication usage were assessed as outcome measures. Statistical analysis involved Cox regression models for hazard ratios, generalized linear models for comparing differences, and adjustment for covariates.ResultsAll SSD/FSS showed significantly higher adjusted hazard ratios for psychiatric hospitalization and all-cause hospitalization compared to the control group. All SSD/FSS exhibited significantly higher adjusted hazard ratios for suicide, and SSD was particularly high. All-cause mortality was significantly higher in all SSD/FSS. Medical costs were significantly higher for all SSD/FSS compared to controls. The usage duration of all psychiatric medications and analgesics was significantly higher in SSD/FSS compared to the control group.ConclusionAll SSD/FSS shared similar clinical outcomes and medical costs. The high hazard ratio for suicide in SSD deserves clinical attention.
      PubDate: 2023-11-20
      DOI: 10.1017/S0033291723003355
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Revista Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Costarricense de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Cultura Teológica     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios e Investigación en Psicología y Educación     Open Access  
Revista de Investigacion Psicologica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica     Open Access  
Revista de Psicodidáctica (English ed.)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Revista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología : Segunda Epoca     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones     Open Access  
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Electrónica de Metodología Aplicada     Open Access  
Revista Laborativa     Open Access  
Revista Latinoamericana de Psicología     Open Access  
Revista Psicológica Herediana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Wímb Lu     Open Access  
Revue de psychoéducation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée / European Review of Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Revue québécoise de psychologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia     Open Access  
Roeper Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Rorschachiana     Hybrid Journal  
RUDN Journal of Psychology and Pedagogics     Open Access  
SA Journal of Industrial Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Satir International Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scandinavian Psychoanalytic Review     Hybrid Journal  
School Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
School Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Scientonomy : Journal for the Science of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Seeing and Perceiving     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Sexual Abuse A Journal of Research and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Sexual Offending : Theory, Research, and Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Simmel Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Sleep Medicine : X     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 3)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Social Inclusion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Issues and Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Psychological and Personality Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Social Psychology Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Social Science Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Society and Security Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Socio-analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Somnologie - Schlafforschung und Schlafmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Spanish Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
SSM - Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia z Kognitywistyki i Filozofii Umysłu     Open Access  
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Suma Psicologica     Open Access  
Tajdida : Jurnal Pemikiran dan Gerakan Muhammadiyah     Open Access  
Teaching of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Terapia Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tesis Psicologica     Open Access  
TESTFÓRUM     Open Access  
The Arts in Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
The Brown University Psychopharmacology Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Clinical Neuropsychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The International Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series B : Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
The Psychoanalytic Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
The Sport Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Themenzentrierte Interaktion     Hybrid Journal  
Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Therapeutic Communities : The International Journal of Therapeutic Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Thérapie familiale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Thinking & Reasoning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Tobacco Use Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Torture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Transactional Analysis Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Trauma, Violence, & Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Undecidable Unconscious : A Journal of Deconstruction and Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Universal Journal of Psychology     Open Access  
Unoesc & Ciência - ACHS     Open Access  
Vinculo - Revista do NESME     Open Access  
VIVESIANA     Open Access  
Voices : The Art and Science of Psychotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wege zum Menschen : Zeitschrift für Seelsorge und Beratung, heilendes und soziales Handeln     Hybrid Journal  
Wellbeing, Space & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Western Undergraduate Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Cognitive Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Yaşam Becerileri Psikoloji Dergisi / Life Skills Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Arbeits - und Organisationspsychologie A&O     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Differentielle und Diagnostische Psychologie     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Erziehungswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gesundheitspsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Zeitschrift für Individualpsychologie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Neuropsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Pädagogische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychiatrie, Psychologie und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Psychologie / Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Psychosomatische Medizin und Psychotherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Sportpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)

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