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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 364)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 356)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 351)
Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 342)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 340)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 269)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 262)
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 239)
Journal of Applied Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 231)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 204)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 200)
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 193)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 93)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 87)
Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 85)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Educational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Clinical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Neuropsychologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of Applied Sport Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Motivation and Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for the Psychology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developmental Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Neuropsychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Personality Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Psychological Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Psychological Science In the Public Interest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 19)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Development and Psychopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Research in Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Trauma & Dissociation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Anxiety Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Personality Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosomatic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Methodology: European Journal of Research Methods for the Behavioral and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Developmental Psychobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Humanistic Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Mathematical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethics & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Family Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Pediatric Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Multivariate Behavioral Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Neuropsychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Psychological Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Imagination, Cognition and Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Forum of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Group Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
New Ideas in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nonverbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Trauma Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Diagnostica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Analytical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Constructivist Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Phenomenological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Human Psychopharmacology Clinical and Experimental     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Black Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Forum der Psychoanalyse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Forum Psychotherapeutische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Japanese Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Russian & East European Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dialectica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Psicología     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Measurement Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychology and Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Mentálhigiéné es Pszichoszomatika     Full-text available via subscription  
Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.999
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 193  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0146-1672 - ISSN (Online) 1552-7433
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Personality Traits and Insurance Demand

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Thomas Schilling, Wiebke Bleidorn
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Personality traits drive people’s financial decisions and hence affect their lives. Yet, we know little about the relationship between personality traits and insurance decisions. Do Risk-Taking, the Big Five and Locus of Control predict a variety of personal insurance decisions' Using a sample of 14,624 German adults with the goal of identifying associations between personality and insurance demand, we found that personality traits predict demand for various insurance types. We also found that associations may be mediated by demographic variables and may depend on the statistical modeling approach (e.g., including nonlinear relationships or examining between- and within-person effects). These findings contribute to our understanding of the role of personality in insurance demand and highlight the need for further exploration of this relationship, as our results demonstrate that personality-insurance-demand-associations depend on the examined insurance type.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-06-24T08:46:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241260457
       
  • Unraveling Image and Justice Concerns: A Social Identity Account on
           Appraisals and Emotional Drivers of High-Status Transgressor Group
           Members’ Solidarity With Low-Status Groups

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hakan Çakmak, Ernestine H. Gordijn, Yasin Koc, Katherine E. Stroebe
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      High-status group members typically respond defensively when their ingroup members transgress against low-status groups. However, when they identify highly with transgressor groups, they sometimes also engage in solidarity with victimized low-status groups due to ingroup-focused motives. Yet, the response of low-identified transgressor group members, who can prioritize victims’ plight over ingroup interests, remains underexplored. To address this gap, we conducted three preregistered studies (Ntotal = 886) concerning education-based transgressions in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom, employing cross-sectional (Study 1) and experimental designs (Studies 2–3). Supporting previous research, we found that high-identifiers engage in nonradical solidarity driven by ingroup image concerns and image-related emotions. Low-identifiers, however, engage in both nonradical and radical solidarity through perceived injustice and justice-related emotions. Our findings provide insights into the roots of high-status group collective action on behalf of low-status groups against intergroup transgressions. Theoretical and societal implications were discussed.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-06-18T12:06:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241252871
       
  • Today’s Adolescents Are More Satisfied With Being Single: Findings From
           a German Cohort-Sequential Study Among 14- to 40-Year-Olds

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tita Gonzalez Avilés, Janina Larissa Bühler, Naemi D. Brandt, Franz J. Neyer
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      In Western societies, singlehood has become increasingly normative over historical time. But whether singles are more satisfied nowadays remains unclear. In this preregistered cohort-sequential study, we analyzed data from 2,936 German participants (M = 21.01 years, SD = 7.60 years) from different birth cohorts. Singlehood satisfaction and life satisfaction were reported annually at two different time periods (2008-2011 and 2018-2021). This design allowed us to compare earlier-born and later-born singles during adolescence (14-20 years), emerging adulthood (24-30 years), and established adulthood (34-40 years). Results from multilevel growth-curve models indicated that adolescent singles born in 2001 to 2003 (vs. 1991-1993) were more often single and more satisfied with singlehood. No cohort-related differences emerged among emerging and established adults. Younger age and lower neuroticism predicted higher satisfaction, regardless of birth cohort. The results highlight the importance of considering both societal and individual factors to understand singles’ satisfaction.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-06-11T06:51:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241257139
       
  • The Biased Enforcement of Rarely Followed Rules

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jordan Wylie, Katlyn Lee Milless, John Sciarappo, Ana Gantman
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      We examined whether the enforcement of phantom rules—frequently broken and rarely enforced codified rules—varies by the race of the rule breaker. First, we analyzed whether race affects when 311 calls, a nonemergency service, end in arrest in New York City. Across 10 years, we found that calls from census blocks of neighborhoods consisting of mostly White individuals were 65% less likely to escalate to arrest than those where White people were the numerical minority. Next, we experimentally manipulated transgressor race and found that participants (N = 393) who were high in social dominance orientation were more likely to route 311 calls to 911 when the transgressor was Black (vs. White). We also explored the subjective experience of phantom rule enforcement; People of color report they are more likely to be punished for violating phantom rules compared to White people. Overall, we find evidence of racism in the enforcement of phantom rules.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-06-05T11:13:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241252853
       
  • Many Mickles Make a Muckle: Evidence That Gender Stereotypes Reemerge
           Spontaneously Via Cultural Evolution

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      Authors: Carolyn J. Dallimore, Kenny Smith, Jacqui Hutchison, Gillian Slessor, Douglas Martin
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      We explore whether societal gender stereotypes re-emerge as social information is repeatedly passed from person to person. We examined whether peoples’ memories of personality attributes associated with female and male social targets became increasingly consistent with societal gender stereotypes as information was passed down social transmission chains. After passing through the memories of just four generations of participants, our initially gender-balanced micro-societies became rife with traditional gender stereotypes. While we found some evidence of the re-emergence of gender stereotypes in Experiment 1, we found the effects were stronger when targets appeared in a feminine-stereotyped occupational context (Experiment 2), and a masculine-stereotyped occupational context (Experiment 3); conversely, the re-emergence of gender stereotypes was attenuated when targets appeared in a single gender context (Experiment 4). The current findings demonstrate that gender schematic memory bias, if widely shared, might cause gender stereotypes to be maintained through cultural evolution.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-06-03T12:37:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241254695
       
  • Awareness and Calibration: The Role of Descriptive Norms and Social
           Desirability in Accurate IAT Score Predictions of Food Items vs. Social
           Groups

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      Authors: Alexandra Goedderz, Adam Hahn
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Extending research that people are able to predict the patterns of their social group biases on Implicit Association Tests (IATs), we let participants predict and complete IATs toward five different food item pairs and compared the results with the social-groups domain. Participants predicted the patterns of their IAT scores with similar accuracy in both domains, suggesting similar internal awareness (evidenced by comparable within-subjects correlations), even though food evaluations followed less descriptively-normative patterns. At the same time, participants were better-calibrated in communicating their evaluations in the domain of food than social groups (evidenced by higher between-subjects correlations). This discrepancy may partly stem from participants’ tendency to refrain from using harsh labels when predicting social group biases, despite their demonstrated awareness of them: IAT scores predicted as “moderate” or “strong” for food preferences tended to be labeled “mild” for social groups. Discussion centers on the importance of distinguishing between awareness and calibration.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-06-03T12:32:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241254447
       
  • Nuanced HEXACO: A Meta-Analysis of HEXACO Cross-Rater Agreement,
           Heritability, and Rank-Order Stability

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sam Henry, Will Baker, Denis Bratko, Patrick Jern, Christian Kandler, Joshua M. Tybur, Reinout E. de Vries, Laura W. Wesseldijk, Alexandra Zapko-Willmes, Tom Booth, René Mõttus
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Most Five-Factor Model (FFM) questionnaire items contain unique variance that is partly heritable, stable, and consensually observable, demonstrates consistent associations with age and sex, and predicts life outcomes beyond higher order factors. Extending these findings to the HEXACO model, we meta-analyzed single-item cross-rater agreement, heritability, and 2-year stability using samples from six countries. We analyzed raw item scores and their residual variance and adjusted the estimates for measurement unreliability. The median cross-rater agreement, heritability, and stability estimates were, respectively, .30, .30, and .57, for raw items and .10, .16, and .39, for item residuals. Adjusted for reliability, the respective medians were .46 and .25 for cross-rater agreement, .46 and .39 for heritability, and .87 and .94 for stability. These results are strikingly consistent with FFM-based findings, providing nondismissible evidence that single items index a partly unique level of the trait hierarchy—personality nuances—with trait properties comparable to those of higher-order traits.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-06-03T12:26:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241253637
       
  • Global Ecology and Geography of Gender Equality

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      Authors: Evert Van de Vliert, Esther S. Kluwer
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Proximal socio-economic drivers of gender equality tend to obscure its remote ecological origins. General systems theory predicts that the greater annual variability in daylength, temperature, and daily precipitation at higher latitudes requires greater psychosocial flexibility. We extend this prediction to gender equality as a likely consequence. Accordingly, for 87 pre-industrial societies after 1500 CE, we find more gender equality in more variable habitats, and that this link is mediated by greater subsistence flexibility—foraging rather than raising plants and animals. Mutatis mutandis, these ecological predictors of global gender equality replicate in 175 modern countries after 2000 CE. Gender equality was, and still is, lowest around the Equator, higher toward the North and South Poles, and invariant in east–west direction. The geographical positioning of gender equality in pre-industrial times can predict over 40% of the opposite north–south gradients of gender equality in the opposite Northern and Southern Hemispheres today.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T07:04:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241237383
       
  • Mental Contrasting Strategies Promote the Pursuit of Difficult Goals:
           Japanese Cultural Context

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Miki Toyama, Masato Nagamine, Li Tang
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      We examined whether mental contrasting inhibits the pursuit of difficult goals in an Eastern culture—Japan—rooted in self-improvement. Our pilot study found that, compared with American participants, Japanese participants did not perceive a difficult situation as a cue to abandon their goal and pursue alternative objectives. Studies 1a–1c found that mental contrasting encouraged Japanese participants to pursue difficult goals. When Japanese participants perceived their own goals as unattainable, they were more likely to pursue these goals if they mentally contrasted their desired future with the inhibiting reality than if they simply imagined their desired future. Study 2 showed that mental contrasting encouraged Japanese (but not American) participants to pursue difficult goals. Study 3 evidenced the causal effect of beliefs about difficulties on the impact of mental contrasting on motivation to pursue difficult goals. Culturally formed beliefs about difficulties underlie the effect of mental contrasting on difficult goal pursuit.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-05-10T07:01:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241247481
       
  • Mobilize Is a Verb: The Use of Verbs and Concrete Language Is Associated
           With Authors’ and Readers’ Perceptions of a Text’s Action
           Orientation and Persuasiveness

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      Authors: Magdalena Formanowicz, Marta Beneda, Marta Witkowska, Jan Nikadon, Caterina Suitner
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      In three studies, we investigated the role of linguistic features characterizing texts aiming to mobilize others. In Study 1 (N = 728), participants produced a leaflet either mobilizing others to engage in an action or expressing their thoughts about that action, and evaluated how action-oriented their text was. Mobilizing texts included more verbs and concrete words, and the presence of these linguistic characteristics was positively linked to participants’ evaluations of their messages as action-oriented. In Studies 2 and 3 (N = 557 and N = 556), independent groups of participants evaluated texts produced in Study 1. Readers’ perceptions of texts as action-oriented were associated with the same linguistic features as in Study 1 and further positively linked to perceived message effectiveness (Study 2) and behavioral intention (Study 3). The studies reveal how encoding and decoding of verbs and concrete words serve as distinct persuasive tools in calls to action.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-05-08T12:19:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241238418
       
  • On the Defensive: Identity, Language, and Partisan Reactions to Political
           Scandal

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pierce D. Ekstrom, Marti Hope Gonzales, Allison L. Williams, Elliot Weiner, Rafael Aguilera
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated how individuals judge politicians embroiled in scandal. Drawing on social identity and realistic group conflict theory, we predicted that beyond an overall ingroup bias, partisans would be particularly forgiving of in-party politicians who denied or justified their misconduct rather than apologize for it. By insisting that they did nothing wrong, these politicians defend the public image of their party and signal their commitment to partisan goals. We find qualified support for this prediction across three experiments. Participants did not respond negatively to in-party politicians who apologized but did react more positively to those who denied or justified wrongdoing (relative to silence). These accounts worked only for in-party politicians and were more effective for those whose misconduct furthered their party’s agenda or whose seat was high-status or pivotal for party goals. In intergroup contexts like politics, people may accept explanations for misconduct that they would otherwise find offensive.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-05-06T12:34:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241247084
       
  • Managers Can Support Employees in Working-Class Contexts by Promoting
           Growth Mindsets

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Inhyun Han, Peter Belmi, Melissa Thomas-Hunt, Catherine Summers
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      White-collar workplaces are critical “gateway” contexts. They play a crucial role in providing valuable opportunities and upward social mobility. Some groups are less likely, however, to feel they belong in these settings. For example, those with a college degree may feel relatively at ease. However, those without may be uncertain about whether they will be fully included. We examine one possibility for addressing these class-based belonging gaps. A growing education literature demonstrates the power of growth mindsets. We extend this research to the workplace and test its benefits. In two preregistered experiments (N = 1,777), we find that endorsing growth mindsets can support working-class (WK) individuals. When managers have a growth mindset, WK individuals report high sense of belonging. The effect occurred because managers with growth mindsets reduced identity threat. A preregistered survey of employees in the real world (N = 300) triangulated these findings. Sense of belonging was higher among those who believed their manager had a growth mindset. Furthermore, they reported greater job satisfaction and commitment. These findings have important implications for the growing conversation on addressing class divides.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T11:47:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241235625
       
  • Thank You for Changing: Gratitude Promotes Autonomous Motivation and
           Successful Partner Regulation

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      Authors: Natalie M. Sisson, Yoobin Park, Nickola C. Overall, Haeyoung Gideon Park, Matthew D. Johnson, Jennifer E. Stellar, Bonnie M. Le, Emily A. Impett
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Romantic partners often attempt to improve their relationship by changing each other’s traits and behaviors, but such partner regulation is often unsuccessful. We examined whether gratitude expressed by agents (i.e., partners requesting change) facilitates greater regulation success from targets (i.e., partners making change) by encouraging targets’ autonomous motivation. Across studies, including observational (Study 1, N = 111 couples), preregistered longitudinal (Study 2, N = 150 couples), and experimental (Study 3a, N = 431; Study 3b, N = 725) designs, agents’ gratitude for targets’ efforts was linked to greater targets’—and less consistently agents’—reported regulation success. These effects were consistently mediated by greater target autonomous motivation, and generally persisted when accounting for how agents communicated their change request and other positive responses to targets’ efforts (e.g., positivity and support). Gratitude for targets’ efforts appears to be an important tool for promoting change success.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T11:33:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241246211
       
  • The Privileges We Do and Do Not See: The Relative Salience of
           Interpersonal and Circumstantial Benefits

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      Authors: Julia M. Smith, Shai Davidai, Tom Gilovich
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      People attend more to disadvantages in their lives than to advantages, a phenomenon known as the Headwinds/Tailwinds Asymmetry. In seven studies (N = 1,526), we present an important caveat to this pattern: When people do notice and acknowledge their advantages, they mostly focus on the benefits they receive from other people (i.e., interpersonal benefits), as opposed to benefits they receive because of their demographics, personal traits, and life circumstances (i.e., circumstantial benefits). We demonstrate that people notice and remember others who helped them rather than hurt them and that they notice the help they receive from people more than from favorable, non-interpersonal factors. Finally, we find that the tendency to notice interpersonal advantages is related to a social norm requiring people to acknowledge helpful others (but not other advantages) and that changing the salience of this norm affects people’s likelihood of acknowledging the support they have received from others.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-26T06:41:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241247083
       
  • Target Happiness Attenuates Perceivers’ Moral Condemnation of
           Prejudiced People

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      Authors: Hope Rose, Christopher A. Sanders, Chloe Willett, Laura A. King
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Five experiments (combined N = 4,915) tested the prediction that the moral boost of happiness would persist for social targets with moral failings. In Studies 1 and 2, White and Black participants, respectively, judged happy (versus unhappy) racist targets more morally good. In Study 3, happy (versus unhappy) racist targets were judged more morally good and less (more) likely to engage in racist (good) behavior. Behavioral expectations explained the link between happiness and moral evaluations. Study 4 replicated Studies 1 to 3 in the context of sexism. In Study 5, happy (versus unhappy) targets who engaged in racially biased behavior were evaluated as more morally good, and this effect was explained by behavioral forecasts. Happiness boosts attributions of moral goodness for prejudiced people and does so via expectations for future behavior. Future directions are discussed.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-25T11:49:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241240160
       
  • Differential Behavioral Pathways Linking Personality to Leadership
           Emergence and Effectiveness in Groups

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      Authors: Tobias M. Härtel, Felix Hoch, Mitja D. Back
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      This study integrates leadership process models with process models of personality and behavioral personality science to examine the behavioral–perceptual pathways that explain interpersonal personality traits’ divergent relation to group leadership evaluations. We applied data from an online group interaction study (N = 364) alternately assigning participants as leaders conducting brief tasks. We used four variable types to build the pathways in multiple mediator models: (a) Self-reported personality traits, (b) video recordings of expressed interpersonal behaviors coded by 6 trained raters, (c) interpersonal impressions, and (d) mutual evaluations of leadership emergence/effectiveness. We find interpersonal big five traits to differently relate to the two leadership outcomes via the behavioral-perceptual pathways: Extraversion was more important to leadership emergence due to impressions of assertiveness evoked by task-focused behavior being strongly valued. Agreeableness/emotional stability were more important to leadership effectiveness due to impressions of trustworthiness/calmness evoked by member-focused/calm behavior being stronger valued.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T10:21:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241246388
       
  • Relationships on a Pedestal: The Associations Between Relationship
           Pedestal Beliefs, Fear of Being Single, and Life Satisfaction in Single
           and Coupled Individuals

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      Authors: Brittany E. Dennett, Yuthika U. Girme
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The fear of being single can put people at risk for worse personal and relational well-being. The current research moves beyond individual-deficit models by exploring whether endorsement of relationship pedestal beliefs—the belief that people need to be in a relationship to be truly happy—is associated with greater fear of being single. Across four studies (N = 641 single individuals and 256 coupled individuals), single individuals’ endorsement of relationship pedestal beliefs was associated with greater fear of being single, and greater fear of being single was associated with lower daily life satisfaction (Studies 1–4). Coupled individuals’ endorsement of relationship pedestal beliefs was also associated with greater fear of being single, and greater fear of being single was associated with lower daily life and relationship satisfaction (Study 4). These findings highlight how people’s endorsement of societal beliefs that place relationships on a pedestal may contribute to fears about singlehood.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T10:16:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241239122
       
  • Perceived Power Polarizes Moral Evaluations

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      Authors: Russell Roberts, Alex Koch
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      We show an interactive effect of perceiver-target similarity in ideological beliefs and target power on impressions of target morality. Consistent with prior research, perceivers rated targets with dissimilar ideologies as less moral than targets with similar ideologies, but this difference in ratings was magnified for powerful targets relative to less powerful targets. We argue that these results emerged because perceivers expected similar-ideology, powerful (vs. powerless) targets to help the self more, and expected dissimilar-ideology, powerful (vs. powerless) targets to hurt the self more. We establish this effect when people evaluate politicians (Study 1), groups, and individuals (Studies 2a-2b); demonstrate its predictive power over other kinds of interpersonal similarity; and show that it affects morality judgments uniquely when compared with other consequential dimensions of social evaluation. Finally, we manipulated power experimentally and showed the interaction when the difference between high- and low-power manipulations was controlled over just $1 (Studies 3-4).
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T12:55:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241245181
       
  • Be the Change You Want to See: Intergroup Helping Reduces InGroup Bias and
           Facilitates OutGroup Bias in Trading Behaviors

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      Authors: Makenzie J. O’Neil, Ryan S. Hampton, Michelle N. Shiota
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      This research investigated how an instance of intergroup helping affects intergroup attitudes and cooperative behavior. Past research demonstrates that helping behavior elicits prosociality, both reciprocally and toward uninvolved third parties. However, much of this research has either ignored group membership altogether or has assumed a shared group identity between benefactor and beneficiary. Where intergroup helping has been directly evaluated, more negative intergroup attitudes are often observed. The current study examined the effects of an instance of intergroup helping, introduced during a card game, on the beneficiary’s attitudes of closeness and cooperative trading behavior as well as those of ingroup and outgroup witnesses to the helping act. Results from this well-powered study (N = 1,249) indicate that although intergroup helping is less likely to impact feelings of closeness, intergroup cooperative trading increases for both the beneficiary and the intergroup observers. These findings add to the understanding of how helping impacts intergroup relations.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-17T12:28:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241242182
       
  • Weiner’s Attribution-Emotion-Action Model: Uncovering the Mediating Role
           of Self-Blame and the Moderating Effect of the Helper’s Responsibility
           for the Help Recipient’s Behavior

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      Authors: Elvin Yao, Jason T. Siegel
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Seven preregistered experimental studies investigated a potential mediator (self-blame) and moderator (the perceived responsibility of the helper for the help recipient’s behavior) of Weiner’s attribution-emotion-action model. When participants considered a nonchild close other experiencing depression, higher perceived controllability was related to lower sympathy, which correlated with less willingness to provide support; however, among parents considering their child experiencing depression, perceived controllability was either positively associated with sympathy (study 1) or did not influence sympathy (study 2). Offering an explanation, studies 3a/3b indicated a significantly weaker relationship between controllability and responsibility attributions when the target of help was the participant’s child. Study 4 investigated the underlying mechanism. Parents experienced self-blame when the cause was controllable, which lowered the association between controllability and responsibility attributions. Studies 5 and 6 revealed this pattern was not specific to the parent–child relationship but occurred whenever the potential helper felt responsible for the help recipient’s behavior.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-16T04:03:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241238132
       
  • Distributing Blame Among Multiple Entities When Autonomous Technologies
           Cause Harm

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      Authors: Ryan M. McManus, Catherine C. Mesick, Abraham M. Rutchick
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      As autonomous technology emerges, new variations in old questions arise. When autonomous technologies cause harm, who is to blame' The current studies compare reactions toward harms caused by human-controlled vehicles (HCVs) or human soldiers (HSs) to identical harms by autonomous vehicles (AVs) or autonomous robot soldiers. Drivers of HCVs, or HSs, were blamed more than mere users of AVs or HSs who outsourced their duties to ARSs. However, as human drivers/soldiers became less involved in (or were unaware of the preprogramming that led to) the harm, blame was redirected toward other entities (i.e., manufacturers and the tech company’s executives), showing the opposite pattern as human drivers/soldiers. Results were robust to how blame was measured (i.e., degrees of blame versus apportionment of total blame). Overall, this research furthers the blame literature, raising questions about why, how (much), and to whom blame is assigned when multiple agents are potentially culpable.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-13T09:13:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241238303
       
  • Intersectional Male-Centric and White-Centric Biases in Collective
           Concepts

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      Authors: April H. Bailey, Adina Williams, Aashna Poddar, Andrei Cimpian
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      In principle, the fundamental concepts person, woman, and man should apply equally to people of different genders and races/ethnicities. In reality, these concepts might prioritize certain groups over others. Based on interdisciplinary theories of androcentrism, we hypothesized that (a) person is more associated with men than women (person = man) and (b) woman is more associated with women than man is with men (i.e., women are more gendered: gender = woman). We applied natural language processing tools (specifically, word embeddings) to the linguistic output of millions of individuals (specifically, the Common Crawl corpus). We found the hypothesized person = man / gender = woman bias. This bias was stronger about Hispanic and White (vs. Asian) women and men. We also uncovered parallel biases favoring White individuals in the concepts person, woman, and man. Western society prioritizes men and White individuals as people and “others” women as people with gender, with implications for equity across policy- and decision-making contexts.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-13T09:05:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241232114
       
  • People Reject Free Money and Cheap Deals Because They Infer Phantom Costs

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      Authors: Andrew J. Vonasch, Reyhane Mofradidoost, Kurt Gray
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      If money is good, then shouldn’t more money always be better' Perhaps not. Traditional economic theories suggest that money is an ever-increasing incentivizer. If someone will accept a job for US$20/hr, they should be more likely to accept the same job for US$30/hr and especially for US$250/hr. However, 10 preregistered, high-powered studies (N = 4,205, in the United States and Iran) reveal how increasing incentives can backfire. Overly generous offers lead people to infer “phantom costs” that make them less likely to accept high job wages, cheap plane fares, and free money. We present a theory for understanding when and why people imagine these hidden drawbacks and show how phantom costs drive judgments, impact behavior, and intersect with individual differences. Phantom costs change how we should think about “economic rationality.” Economic exchanges are not merely about money, but instead are social interactions between people trying to perceive (and deceive) each others’ minds.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-08T11:11:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241235687
       
  • Taking Stock and Looking Forward to the Future of Pathogen Politics in
           Light of New Insights and Recommendations: COVID-19 Threat Was
           Meaningfully Associated With Support for Liberal Policies in the United
           States

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      Authors: Michael Edem Fiagbenu
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Infectious disease outbreaks are expected to predict support for conservative policies. However, earlier studies (January–June, 2020) reached conflicting findings regarding the association between COVID-19 threat and policy preferences in the United States. We revisit this issue by analyzing five nationally representative surveys conducted during the relatively severe periods of the pandemic (August 2020–December, 2020; total N = 82,753). Using Bayesian inference, we find strong evidence that subjective (e.g., fear of infection and pandemic outrage) but not objective (e.g., local cases and deaths) threat predicted support for liberal policies (e.g., immigration and universal health care). Meta-analyses revealed that the estimates depend on the type of subjective (.05 ≥ r ≤ .60) or objective (.00 ≥ r ≤ .14) COVID-19 threat. We propose an emotion-mediated dual-process model of pathogen management suggesting that infectious disease outbreaks activate both avoidance and caregiving motives that translate, respectively, into support for right-wing and left-wing policies.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-04T07:03:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241240903
       
  • Ostracism Experiences of Sexual Minorities: Investigating Targets’
           Experiences and Perceptions by Others

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      Authors: Christiane M. Büttner, Selma C. Rudert, Sven Kachel
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people face frequent discrimination, maltreatment, and violence for transgressing gender roles upheld in heteronormative societies. Ostracism (i.e., being excluded and ignored) is likely another, understudied form of discrimination against sexual minorities. In a multi-method approach using a nationally representative panel (N = 4104) and experience sampling data (N = 467, 14 days, k = 926 ostracism experiences), we find that LGB individuals report more ostracism experiences than straight individuals. In line with the idea that ostracism toward sexual minorities occurs as a function of gender role nonconformity, lesbians and gay men are rated by an independent rater sample as more likely to be ostracized (k = 10,760 ratings) when they are also rated as more lesbian/gay and less gender role conforming. Our findings speak in favor of ostracism as a discriminatory experience of LGB individuals that is driven by transgressions of heteronormativity.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-04-03T12:51:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241240675
       
  • Attitude Formation in More- and Less-Complex Social Environments

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      Authors: Hans Alves, Vincent Yzerbyt, Christian Unkelbach
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      We investigate how the complexity of the social environment (more vs. less groups) influences attitude formation. We hypothesize that facing a larger number of groups renders learning processes about these groups noisier and more regressive, which has two important implications. First, more-complex social environments should lead perceivers to underestimate actual group differences. Second, because most people usually behave positively, more-complex social environments produce negatively biased attitudes and cause perceivers to overestimate the frequency of “negative” individuals among groups. We tested these predictions in five attitude formation experiments (N=2,414). Participants’ attitudes and learned base rates of positive and negative group members proved more regressive in complex social environments, that is, with multiple groups, compared with less-complex environments, that is, with fewer groups. In a predominantly positive social environment, this regression caused participants to form more negative group attitudes and more strongly overestimate negative individuals’ prevalence among groups.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T08:35:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241235387
       
  • Does Conceptual Abstraction Moderate Whether Past Moral Deeds Motivate
           Consistency or Compensatory Behavior' A Registered Replication and
           Extension of Conway and Peetz (2012)

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      Authors: Jareef Martuza, Olivia Kim
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      A long-standing debate in psychology concerns whether doing something good or bad leads to more of the same or the opposite. Conway and Peetz proposed that conceptual abstraction moderates if past moral deeds lead to consistent or compensatory behavior. Although cited 384 times across disciplines, we did not find any direct replications. It was also unclear how increases or decreases from one’s baseline prosociality might underlie the effect. A large-scale experiment (N = 5,091) in the registered report format tested Conway and Peetz’s original hypothesis. The hypothesized interaction was not replicated: conceptual abstraction did not moderate the effect of recalling moral vs. immoral behavior on prosocial intentions. Our results show that recalling moral behavior led to higher prosocial intentions than recalling either immoral or neutral behavior, irrespective of recalling from the recent or distant past. Thus, the current research found no evidence for compensatory moral behavior, only for positive moral consistency.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-28T06:42:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241238420
       
  • On the Role of Police Shootings, Recognition of Systemic Racism, and
           Empathy on White Americans’ Support for Police Reform

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      Authors: Diane-Jo Bart-Plange, Sophie Trawalter
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The police kill Black Americans at disproportionate rates. Despite this, White Americans remain mixed on support for policing-related policy reform. We examined whether bearing witness to police violence leads to support for policy reforms. Across three studies (N = 943), White participants either viewed a news video about an unarmed Black man killed at the hands of police or in a car accident due to a collision with another driver. Participants lower but not higher in symbolic racism reported more empathy after viewing a police shooting (vs. car accident) news video (Studies 1–3). Empathy predicted policing-related policy reform support (Studies 1–3) and mediated the relationship between condition and policy reform support (Studies 1 and 3), among those lower in symbolic racism (Studies 1–2). Results suggest that empathy for Black victims of police violence predicts policy support but only among those who recognize that such violence is systemic in nature.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-28T06:35:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241237286
       
  • Investigating How High Perceived Economic Inequality Exacerbates
           Intergroup Competition, Zero-Sum Beliefs, and Perceived Intergroup
           Prejudice

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      Authors: Jaclyn A. Lisnek, Nava Caluori, Jazmin L. Brown-Iannuzzi, Shigehiro Oishi
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Rising economic inequality is associated with more prejudice. Little empirical data, however, investigate how inequality affects individuals’ psychological processing and, in turn, exacerbates perceptions of prejudice in people’s geographic area. We hypothesized that higher perceived economic inequality triggers beliefs that unequal economies are zero-sum and leads to beliefs that people are in competition for limited resources, which may ultimately exacerbate perceived prejudice. Through nine experiments (Studies 1-5 in the manuscript and three additional studies in the Supplement), we provide evidence that higher perceived inequality increases perceived prejudice against a wide range of outgroups. Furthermore, zero-sum beliefs and perceived competition serially mediate this relationship (Studies 2 and 3). In Study 4, we investigate nuance in this hypothesized model by testing whether higher perceived economic inequality exacerbates perceived racial/ethnic prejudice among a large, diverse sample and find a similar pattern of results. Finally (Study 5), we demonstrate that assuaging competition beliefs mitigates perceived prejudice.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-28T06:21:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241234787
       
  • “Not Now, I Am Too Stressed”: Stress and Physical Intimacy in
           Early Marriage

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      Authors: Alyssa M. Sucrese, Lisa A. Neff, Marci E. J. Gleason
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Stressful events can disrupt couples’ emotional connection, yet prior research is mixed regarding whether stress also disrupts couples’ physical intimacy. This study considered whether stress must reach a critical threshold before hindering couples’ sexual activity and physical affection (i.e., a curvilinear association). Couples (N = 144 couples plus four additional wives) completed two 14-day daily diary tasks during the early years of marriage. Multilevel modeling revealed a within-person curvilinear association between daily stress and sexual activity. Contrary to expectations, the likelihood of sexual activity declined as stress increased from low to moderate, then leveled off as stress continued to increase. For physical affection, a linear effect emerged. On days of greater stress, women, but not men, reported less affection. Further analyses suggested that women’s stress is more influential than men’s stress for couple’s physical intimacy. Findings highlight the nuanced ways in which stress is linked to a vital component of satisfying relationships.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-26T05:57:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241239134
       
  • Economic Inequality Reduces Preferences for Competent Leaders

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      Authors: Feiteng Long, Zi Ye, Guohua Liu
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      It is well-documented that economic inequality can harm political stability and social cohesion. In six experiments (total N = 1,907) conducted in China and the United Kingdom, we tested our primary hypothesis that high (vs. low) economic inequality leads to voters’ reduced preferences for competent political leaders. Across studies, this prediction was consistently supported by experimental evidence, regardless of the voter’s social status. We also found that high (vs. low) economic inequality indirectly diminished preferences for competent political leaders through heightened perceptions that politicians were less inclined to care about the populace in a highly (vs. lowly) unequal societal context. In essence, our findings underscore the idea that economic inequality curtails voters’ preferences for competent political leaders by amplifying their concerns about politicians’ indifference to the populace. It also stresses the need for policies and practices to address economic inequality and maintain the vitality of democracy.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-23T04:56:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241235381
       
  • Impacts of Unethical Behavior on Self-Esteem: A Contingent Dual-Process
           Model

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      Authors: Yuan Liang, Lingling Huang, Li Liu, Xuyun Tan, Deyun Ren
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Previous studies have reported mixed findings on how and why unethical behavior affects self-esteem. To address this issue, a contingent dual-process model is proposed and tested. The model postulates a negative impact of unethical behavior on self-esteem through decreased morality, a positive effect through increased competence, and the relative strength of these two paths depending on system-justifying motives. Studies using unethical behavior for self-interest (Studies 1 and 2), involving ingroup interest (Study 3), and measuring (Studies 1 and 3) and manipulating general system justification (Study 2) provide support for the model. By identifying the effects of system-justifying motives and linking the two competing paths, the model reconciles inconsistencies in previous research regarding how self-esteem is influenced by unethical behavior and reveals the underlying mechanism of this association. Accordingly, the current research constructs a motivational and superordinate framework to clarify the dynamic consequences of unethical behavior.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-20T10:04:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241236983
       
  • Nostalgia, Ritual Engagement, and Meaning in Life

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      Authors: Yige Yin, Tonglin Jiang, Tim Wildschut, Constantine Sedikides
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Rituals are pervasive and beneficial. Little is known, however, about causes or antecedents of ritual engagement. We hypothesized that nostalgia—a sentimental longing for one’s past—promotes ritual engagement, which in turn augments meaning in life. We tested this hypothesis in five methodologically diverse studies. In Study 1 (N = 311), nostalgia was positively associated with ritual engagement. In Study 2 (N = 188), nostalgia promoted ritual engagement, and in Study 3 (N = 296), it did so over engagement in a neutral task. In Study 4 (N = 252), nostalgia predicted later ritual engagement but not vice versa, convergent with Studies 2 and 3. Furthermore, nostalgia prospectively predicted meaning in life through specific ritualistic behaviors during a traditional festival. Finally, in Study 5 (N = 166), experimentally manipulated ritual engagement augmented meaning in life. As hypothesized, nostalgia advances ritual engagement, contributing to a meaningful life.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-20T09:56:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241235740
       
  • Setting Appropriateness and Romantic Relationship Initiation Success

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      Authors: Katie N. Adams, Omri Gillath
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Does the setting in which a relationship initiation attempt occurs matter to its success' Identical initiations could yield differential success if enacted in different settings. Data from five independent samples highlight the role settings play in the perception of (hypothetical) relationship initiation attempts and (expectations of) their success. Study 1a sourced a wide variety of settings for real-world relationship initiations. A separate sample rated the identified settings on initiation appropriateness (Study 1b). Study 2 tested the appropriateness and associated outcomes of initiation settings while varying aspects of the interpersonal context (initiator attractiveness, Study 2a; initiator familiarity, Study 2b; sexual nature of proposition, Study 2c). Irrespective of initiator attractiveness, familiarity, or type of proposal, perceptions of initiations’ success were impacted by the settings’ appropriateness. This work is the first to empirically test whether perceptions and outcomes of initiation attempts differ as a function of the setting in which they occur.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-19T05:57:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241235739
       
  • Prototypes of Victims of Workplace Harassment

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      Authors: Ignazio Ziano, Evan Polman
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      What do people think of when they think of workplace harassment' In 13 pre-registered studies with French, British, and U.S. American adult participants (N = 3,892), we conducted a multi-method investigation into people’s social prototypes of victims of workplace harassment. We found people imagined such victims in physically, socially, psychologically, and economically different ways compared with non-victims: for example, as less attractive, more introverted, and paid less. In addition, we found ambiguous harassment leveled against a prototypical (vs. non-prototypical) victim was more likely to be classified as harassment, and perceived to cause the victim more psychological pain. As such, both lay-people and professionals wanted to punish harassers of victims who “fit the prototype” more. Notably, providing people with instructions to ignore a victim’s personal description and instead assess the harassment behavior did not reduce the prototype effect.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-16T11:04:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241235388
       
  • Volitional Change in Pathological Traits: Can People Change Their
           Maladaptive Traits'

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      Authors: Sierra M. Rufino, Nathan W. Hudson, Julia L. Briskin
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Research suggests people want to change their normative personality traits—and they can volitionally do so. However, studies have not yet addressed volitional change in pathological personality. Consequently, the current study examined (a) people’s desires to change pathological traits, (b) whether these change goals predict subsequent trait change, (c) whether this withstands controlling normative traits, and (d) the extent to which pathological trait change predicts relevant outcomes. College students (N = 463) self-reported their pathological traits weekly for up to 16 weeks. People with elevated pathological traits generally desired to decrease these traits. Furthermore, goals to change negative affectivity and disinhibition predicted corresponding trait change. Thus, people want to reduce their pathological traits—and they may be able to do so for some traits.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-16T09:01:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241235737
       
  • On Creating Deeper Relationship Bonds: Felt Understanding Enhances
           Relationship Identification

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      Authors: Emilie Auger, Sabrina Thai, Carolyn Birnie-Porter, John E. Lydon
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Relational experiences play a critical role in shaping how individuals see themselves. In four studies (N=945) using person-perception, longitudinal, and experimental designs, we demonstrate that feeling understood changes individuals’ self-concept by increasing the centrality of a specific relationship (relationship identification). Study 1 showed that participants perceived an individual to be more identified with their relationship when their partner was high (vs. low) in understanding. Study 2 extended these results by examining individuals in romantic relationships longitudinally. The results of Studies 1 and 2 were distinct for understanding compared to acceptance and caring. Studies 3 and 4 manipulated felt understanding. Recalling many versus few understanding instances (Study 3) and imagining a close other being low versus high in understanding (Study 4) led individuals to feel less understood, which reduced identification in their friendships and romantic relationships. Furthermore, Study 4 suggests that coherence may be one mechanism through which felt understanding increases relationship identification.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-13T07:38:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241233419
       
  • When What Is Beautiful Is Not Good: The Role of Trait Self-Control in
           Resisting Eye Candy

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      Authors: Michelle R. vanDellen, William M. Schiavone, Julian W. C. Wright, Jerica X. Bornstein
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      People are drawn to and like others who are physically attractive. In the present research, we investigated the influence of trait self-control on individuals’ interest in relationships with physically attractive others. We hypothesized that high (vs. low) self-control individuals would approach relationships by considering information beyond appearance about potential partners, including partners’ self-control. We additionally explored the influence of other traits (e.g., Big 5, self-esteem, and attachment styles) on relationship interest. Across studies, we consistently found that individuals with higher self-control avoided pursuing relationships with attractive individuals who display low self-control. In Study 3, we observed a similar pattern for three other traits: conscientiousness, extraversion, and positivity embracement. These results suggest perceivers’ self-control shapes relationship interest, particularly when attractive individuals possess less desirable qualities. The findings extend past research that attractiveness increases interest in others and highlights the potential for trait self-control to direct relationship interest during initial interactions.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-12T05:25:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241235386
       
  • Populism, Economic Distress, Cultural Backlash, and Identity Threat:
           Integrating Patterns and Testing Cross-National Validity

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      Authors: Efisio Manunta, Maja Becker, Vivian L. Vignoles, Paul Bertin, Eleonora Crapolicchio, Camila Contreras, Alin Gavreliuc, Roberto González, Claudia Manzi, Thomas Salanova, Matthew J. Easterbrook
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Populism is on the rise across liberal democracies. The sociopsychological underpinnings of this increasing endorsement of populist ideology should be uncovered. In an online cross-sectional survey study among adult samples from five countries (Chile, France, Italy, Romania, and the United Kingdom; N = 9,105), we aimed to replicate an economic distress pattern in which relative deprivation and identity threat are associated with populism. We further tested a cultural backlash pattern—including perceived anomie, collective narcissism, and identity threat as predictors of populism. Multigroup structural equation models supported both economic distress and cultural backlash paths as predictors of populist thin ideology endorsement. In both paths, identity threat to belonging played a significant role as partial mediator. Furthermore, an integrative model showed that the two patterns were not mutually exclusive. These findings emphasize the implication of identity threat to belonging as an explanatory mediator and demonstrate the cross-national generalizability of these patterns.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-12T05:21:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241231727
       
  • Evaluating the Structure of Subjective Well-Being: Evidence From Three
           Large-Scale, Long-Term, National Longitudinal Studies

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      Authors: Michael A. Busseri
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      To inform the tripartite structure of subjective well-being (SWB), national longitudinal studies from the United States, Germany, and Australia were used to estimate random-intercept cross-lagged panel models (RI-CLPM) in which between- and within-individual variation in life satisfaction (LS), positive affect (PA), and negative affect (NA) was examined over periods of up to two decades. The RI-CLPMs incorporated a hierarchical conceptualization in which LS, PA, and NA are indicators of a latent SWB factor and a causal systems conceptualization in which PA and NA are inputs to LS. Results from all three samples indicated substantial loadings from LS, PA, and NA on latent SWB factors between and within individuals. Cross-lagged effects were observed among all three SWB components, rather than unidirectional from PA and NA to LS. The present findings provide valuable new insights concerning the tripartite structure of SWB between and within individuals over extended periods of time.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-05T07:20:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241233433
       
  • Exploring Asymmetries in Self-Concept Change After Discrepant Feedback

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      Authors: Franziska Brotzeller, Mario Gollwitzer
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Receiving self-relevant feedback that is discrepant from one’s self-concept can lead to self-concept change. However, it is currently unclear whether positive or negative feedback has a larger effect on self-concept change. Across four studies (total N = 1,438), we demonstrate that intentions for self-concept change (Study 1) as well as actual self-concept change (Studies 2, 3, and 4) are larger (a) for larger discrepancies between self-concept and feedback and (b) for negative compared to positive discrepancies. Exploring these effects further in Study 4, we find no evidence that the opportunity for improvement influences whether self-concept change is positively or negatively biased. In sum, the present research provides consistent evidence for a negativity bias in self-concept change, investigates a theoretical explanation, and discusses alternative explanatory approaches.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-05T07:13:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241232738
       
  • Following Prejudiced Behavior, Confrontation Restores Local Anti-Bias
           Social Norms

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      Authors: Anna Haoyang Li, Elisabeth S. Noland, Margo J. Monteith
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Does confronting, or calling out prejudiced statements or behaviors, signal anti-bias norms' The current studies (N = 1,308) examined this question by assessing observers’ perceptions of descriptive and injunctive anti-bias local norms after a prejudiced comment was confronted. Studies 1 and 2 revealed a restorative function of confrontation: Confrontation of bias expressed toward Mexican people strengthened non-Mexican participants’ perceptions of descriptive anti-bias local norms compared to leaving bias unconfronted and restored the perception of injunctive anti-bias local norms to baseline level (i.e., when no bias had occurred). Study 3 demonstrated that the norm-signaling function of confrontation is applicable to anti-Black bias among both Black and White participants. Moreover, observing confrontation of anti-Black bias boosted participants’ sense that their identity would be safe in the environment, mediated by their perceptions of anti-bias descriptive and injunctive norms. Together, these findings indicate that confrontation effectively transforms norms in the face of bias.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-03-05T07:00:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241229006
       
  • Personality Trait Change Across a Major Global Stressor

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      Authors: Kalista M. Kyle, Brett Q. Ford, Emily C. Willroth
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The current research examined three related questions in a 21-month longitudinal study of a diverse sample of U.S. participants (N = 504): (a) How did Big Five traits change during the COVID-19 pandemic' (b) What factors were associated with individual differences in trait change' and (c) How was Big Five trait change associated with downstream well-being, mental health, and physical health' On average, across the 21-month study period, conscientiousness increased slightly, and extraversion decreased slightly. Individual trajectories varied around these average trajectories, and although few factors predicted these individual differences, greater increases in conscientiousness, extraversion, and agreeableness, and greater decreases in neuroticism were associated better well-being and fewer mental and physical health symptoms. The present research provides evidence that traits can change in the context of a major global stressor and that socially desirable patterns of trait change are associated with better health.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T04:01:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241228624
       
  • Values in Context: The (Dis)connections Between Moral Foundations and
           Moral Conviction

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      Authors: Paul E. Teas, Brittany E. Hanson, Ana Leal, Lindsay M. Novak, Linda J. Skitka
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Moral foundations theory (MFT) argues that liberals and conservatives form different moral positions because liberals emphasize the values of harm and fairness, whereas conservatives emphasize the values of group loyalty, authority, and purity. In five studies (total N = 3,327), we investigated whether political orientation moderated the relationship between the perceived relevance of each moral foundation and moral conviction (i.e., the extent to which one perceives their attitude as based on morality) across four issues. Political differences in this relationship emerged but were inconsistent across issues and did not always align with the predictions of MFT or several other theoretical explanations. Our findings together with previous research indicate that MFT may do a better job predicting attitude position than it does predicting whether people perceive that their attitudes are moral convictions, and that some foundations may reflect conventional rather than moral values (e.g., authority).
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T12:39:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231224992
       
  • Perceived Relational Support Is Associated With Everyday Positive, But Not
           Negative, Affectivity in a U.S. Sample

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      Authors: Virginia Ulichney, Helen Schmidt, Chelsea Helion
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Research suggests that perceived social support bolsters emotional well-being. We tested whether perceived support from friends, family, and spouses/partners was associated with reduced negative and greater positive affectivity (i.e., everyday affective baseline), and whether perceived strain in these relationships had opposite effects, accounting for age and relevant covariates. Using data from the third waves of the Midlife in the United States survey and National Study of Daily Experience (n = 1,124), we found negative affectivity was not tied to relational support nor strain, but instead was associated positively with neuroticism and negatively with conscientiousness. In contrast, positive affectivity was related positively to support from friends and family, conscientiousness, and extroversion, and negatively to strain among partners and neuroticism. Exploratory analyses within second-wave Midlife in Japan data (n = 657) suggest patterns for future cross-cultural study. Some relationship dynamics may vary, but perceived support might enhance emotional well-being by bolstering positive, rather than mitigating negative, emotionality.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T12:33:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231224991
       
  • Small Sample Size and Group Homogeneity: A Crucial Ingredient to
           Inter-Group Bias

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      Authors: Johannes Ziegler, Klaus Fiedler
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Applying a recently developed framework for the study of sample-based person impressions to the level of group impressions resulted in convergent evidence for a highly robust judgment process. How stimulus traits mapped on the resulting group impressions was subject to two distinct moderators, diagnosticity of traits, and the amplifying impact of early sample truncation. Three indices of diagnosticity—negative valence, extremity, and distance to other traits in a density framework—determined participants’ decision to truncate trait sampling early and hence the final group judgments. When trait samples were negative and extreme and when the distance between high-density traits was small, early truncation of the trait samples fostered high group homogeneity and polarized impressions. Granting that mental representations of in-groups and out-groups rely on systematically different samples, our sampling approach can account for various inter-group biases: out-group homogeneity, out-group polarization and (because negative traits are more diagnostic) out-group derogation.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T12:26:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231223335
       
  • Secrecy in Everyday Life

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      Authors: Valentina Bianchi, Katharine H. Greenaway, Ella K. Moeck, Michael L. Slepian, Elise K. Kalokerinos
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Secrecy is common, yet we know little about how it plays out in daily life. Most existing research on secrecy is based on methods involving retrospection over long periods of time, failing to capture secrecy “in the wild.” Filling this gap, we conducted two studies using intensive longitudinal designs to present the first picture of secrecy in everyday life. We investigated momentary contextual factors and individual differences as predictors of mind-wandering to and concealing secrets. Contextual factors more consistently predicted secrecy experiences than person-level factors. Feeling more negative about a secret predicted a greater likelihood of mind-wandering to the secret. Interacting with the secret target was linked with a greater likelihood of secret concealment. Individual differences were not consistently associated with mind-wandering to secrets. We conclude that daily experiences with secrets may be better predicted by momentary feelings rather than individual differences such as personality traits.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T11:49:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672241226560
       
  • Personality and Well-Being Across and Within Relationship Status

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      Authors: Elaine Hoan, Geoff MacDonald
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Trends of increasing singlehood call for understanding of well-being correlates across and within relationship status. While personality is a major predictor of well-being, descriptive trait profiles of singles have not been developed. In the present research (N = 1,811; 53% men; Mage = 29), single and partnered individuals completed measures of personality and well-being, including life, relationship status, and sexual satisfaction. Results revealed effects whereby single individuals were lower in extraversion and conscientiousness but higher in neuroticism. Additional facet analyses showed that singles were lower across all extraversion facets, but specifically lower in productiveness (conscientiousness facet) and higher in depression (neuroticism facet). Largely, personality was associated with well-being similarly for single and partnered people. Furthermore, relationship status accounted for variance in well-being above and beyond personality traits. Our results suggest individual differences in personality could play an important role in understanding well-being’s link with relationship status.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T11:44:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231225571
       
  • How Do Invested Partners Become Invested' A Prospective Investigation of
           Fledgling Relationship Development

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      Authors: Samantha Joel, Laura Machia
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Investment—the feeling that one has put considerable resources into a relationship—is theorized to play a key role in relationship persistence. Yet, the development of investment is not well-understood. We recruited 256 individuals in new dating relationships and surveyed them each week for up to 25 weeks. This design allows us to test underlying theoretical assumptions about how people become invested in new dating partners. Some assumptions, such as the idea that investment increases over time, were confirmed. Other assumptions were not supported: Feelings of investment were quite high after only a few weeks of dating and were not strongly shaped by concrete relationship milestones. Rather, feelings of investment were strongly linked to other subjective indicators of relationship development, such as feeling attached to the partner and believing that the relationship had a good future. We discuss the implications of these findings for existing models of investment.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T11:42:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231224351
       
  • Longitudinal Changes in Chinese Prosociality

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      Authors: Sijing Chen, Shasha Yang
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents three studies using data from the World Values Survey, 128 published studies, and China Family Panel Studies to comprehensively examine the longitudinal dynamics of Chinese prosociality, encompassing prosocial attitudes, tendencies, and behaviors, with the overarching goal of shedding light on the evolving nature of prosociality in the Chinese context. These studies reveal a consistent pattern, illustrating a decline followed by a resurgence in all three aspects, with a nadir around 2014. In addition, the study investigates the intricate relationship between economic inequality, prosocial behavior, and prosocial attitudes. The findings suggest that while economic inequality significantly relates to prosocial behavior, it does not entirely explain its fluctuations. Prosocial attitudes partially mediate the connection between economic inequality and prosocial behavior. These insights suggest that addressing inequality could contribute to a more conducive social environment for societal-level prosociality. However, further research is imperative to explore additional determinants of prosociality shifts.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T07:34:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231225367
       
  • Need Support and Need Thwarting: A Meta-Analysis of Autonomy, Competence,
           

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      Authors: Joshua L. Howard, Gavin R. Slemp, Xiao Wang
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      In this meta-analysis, we review the nomological networks of six need-supportive and need-thwarting categories, as defined by self-determination theory (SDT), and as they apply to students in educational contexts. We conducted a synthesis of 8693 correlations from 637 samples (N = 388,912). A total of 72 covariates were examined, resulting in 183 meta-analytic effects reported. Results indicate that teachers and parents who experience psychological need satisfaction and well-being are seen as more supportive. Supportive teacher behaviors correlated positively with a range of desired student outcomes, including performance, engagement, and well-being. Thwarting behaviors tended to display the opposite pattern. Our results are consistent with the theoretical expectations of SDT, yet questions remain concerning the incremental validity of these constructs. We highlight the need for further research on (a) factors that cause teachers to provide support and (b) the specific behaviors within each category to distinguish these categories and increase practical utility.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T07:32:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231225364
       
  • Prepare to Compare: Effects of an Intervention Involving Upward and
           Downward Social Comparisons on Goal Pursuit in Daily Life

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      Authors: Kathi Diel, Wilhelm Hofmann, Sonja Grelle, Lea Boecker, Malte Friese
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      In a preregistered ecological momentary intervention study, we alternately instructed participants to adopt an upward and downward comparison focus. In all, 349 participants reported 8,137 social comparison situations across 6 days and three comparison conditions (baseline, upward, downward). For each comparison, participants reported social comparison direction, motivation, effort intentions, and emotions in five daily reports and one daily end-of-day summary. As predicted, an upward comparison focus resulted in more self-improvement motivation (pushing) and more negative emotions, whereas days with a downward comparison focus resulted in decreased motivation (coasting) but more positive emotions (vs. baseline). However, at the end of the day, people experienced lower goal approach on upward but higher goal approach on downward comparison days. Hence, engaging in strategic upward comparison was motivating in the short term but resulted in surprisingly opposite effects at the end of the day. We offer possible explanations from cognitive and motivational perspectives.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T12:55:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231219378
       
  • Nostalgia and Health: A Longitudinal Network Analysis of Different
           Nostalgic Experiences

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      Authors: Kuan-Ju Huang, Raphael Uricher
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The study examines the long-term dynamics of the relationship between nostalgia and health using a population-based longitudinal sample in the Netherlands (N = 958). We identified five types of nostalgia—Home, Peers and shared experiences, Emotional security, Innocence, and Leisure and media—and explored their relationships with health using network analyses. We found bidirectional relationships between nostalgia and health over a 1-year interval. Self-rated health and mental health negatively predicted nostalgia centered on Peers and shared experiences, Emotional security, and Innocence. Nostalgia, especially Emotional security and Innocence, negatively predicted self-rated health and mental health. The effects were further moderated by age. Cross-lagged relationships from nostalgia to health were found in younger but not older adults, while relationships from health to nostalgia were found primarily among older adults. In sum, we demonstrate the importance of considering age and type of nostalgia when exploring long-term relationships between nostalgia and health.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T11:02:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231226373
       
  • Order Matters When Using Two-Sided Messages to Influence Morally Based
           Attitudes

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      Authors: Mengran Xu, Richard E. Petty
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Contrary to common beliefs, sometimes downplaying or even undermining one’s case can enhance impact, especially for people with strong attitudes. Across four studies (N = 1,548), we demonstrate that the placement of the undermining information within a two-sided message matters. By manipulating message order within a two-sided message, Study 1 showed that the relative effectiveness of two- over one-sided messages for people with a moral attitude primarily occurred when the two-sided message acknowledged the recipient’s side at the end rather than at the beginning of the message. Studies 2A/B showed that this effect was associated with positive source perceptions, such that placing the acknowledgment at the end results in people with a higher moral basis perceiving the source as more thoughtful and sincere. Furthermore, this inference process was more likely to occur when motivation to think was relatively high. Study 3, a preregistered experiment, replicated these findings using a different topic.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T01:28:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231223308
       
  • Did Descriptive and Prescriptive Norms About Gender Equality at Home
           Change During the COVID-19 Pandemic' A Cross-National Investigation

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      Authors: Franziska Magdalena Saxler, Angela R. Dorrough, Laura Froehlich, Katharina Block, Alyssa Croft, Loes Meeussen, Maria Olsson, Toni Schmader, Carolin Schuster, Sanne van Grootel, Colette Van Laar, Ciara Atkinson, Tessa Benson-Greenwald, Andreea Birneanu, Vladimira Cavojova, Sapna Cheryan, Albert Lee Kai Chung, Ivan Danyliuk, Ilan Dar-Nimrod, Soledad de Lemus, Amanda Diekman, Léïla Eisner, Lucía Estevan-Reina, Denisa Fedáková, Alin Gavreliuc, Dana Gavreliuc, Adriana Germano, Tabea Hässler, Levke Henningsen, Keiko Ishii, Eva Kundtová Klocová, Inna Kozytska, Clara Kulich, Christina Lapytskaia Aidy, Wilson López López, James Morandini, TamilSelvan Ramis, Carolin Scheifele, Jennifer Steele, Melanie C. Steffens, Laura María Velásquez Díaz, Mar Venegas, Sarah E. Martiny
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Using data from 15 countries, this article investigates whether descriptive and prescriptive gender norms concerning housework and child care (domestic work) changed after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Results of a total of 8,343 participants (M = 19.95, SD = 1.68) from two comparable student samples suggest that descriptive norms about unpaid domestic work have been affected by the pandemic, with individuals seeing mothers’ relative to fathers’ share of housework and child care as even larger. Moderation analyses revealed that the effect of the pandemic on descriptive norms about child care decreased with countries’ increasing levels of gender equality; countries with stronger gender inequality showed a larger difference between pre- and post-pandemic. This study documents a shift in descriptive norms and discusses implications for gender equality—emphasizing the importance of addressing the additional challenges that mothers face during health-related crises.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T01:24:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231219719
       
  • Defend, Deny, Distance, and Dismantle: A New Measure of Advantaged
           Identity Management

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      Authors: Eric Shuman, Martijn van Zomeren, Tamar Saguy, Eric Knowles, Eran Halperin
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The experience of privilege can trigger psychological conflict among advantaged group members. Nonetheless, little work has explored strategies that advantaged group members use to manage their identities as privileged actors. Building on Knowles et al.’s framework and theories of intergroup relations, we address the conceptualization and measurement of advantaged group identity-management strategies. We aim to refine theorizing and validate a measure of these strategies across three contexts (U.S.’s White-Black relations, Israel’s Jewish-Arab/Palestinian relations, and U.S.’s gender relations). This process yielded two novel conceptual and empirical contributions. First, we add a strategy—defend—in which advantaged-group members overtly justify inequality. Second, we discover that distancing has two facets (distancing from inequality and from identity). Across six studies, we find support for our proposed factor structure, measurement invariance, and construct validity. We discuss how advantaged groups contend with privilege and offer a tool for studying these strategies across domains and contexts.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T01:16:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231216769
       
  • The SAFE Model: State Authenticity as a Function of Three Types of Fit

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      Authors: Audrey Aday, Yingchi Guo, Smriti Mehta, Serena Chen, William Hall, Friedrich M. Götz, Constantine Sedikides, Toni Schmader
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The SAFE model asserts that state authenticity stems from three types of fit to the environment. Across two studies of university students, we validated instruments measuring self-concept, goal, and social fit as unique predictors of state authenticity. In Study 1 (N = 969), relationships between fit and state authenticity were robust to controlling for conceptually similar and distinct variables. Using experience sampling methodology, Study 2 (N = 269) provided evidence that fit and authenticity co-vary at the state (i.e., within-person) level, controlling for between-person effects. Momentary variation in each fit type predicted greater state authenticity, willingness to return to the situation, and state attachment to one’s university. Each fit type was also predicted by distinct contextual features (e.g., location, activity, company). Supporting a theorized link to cognitive fluency, situations eliciting self-concept fit elicited higher working memory capacity and lower emotional burnout. We discuss the implications of fit in educational contexts.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-28T01:21:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231223597
       
  • Children Value Animals More Than Adults Do: A Conceptual Replication and
           Extension

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      Authors: Mariola Paruzel-Czachura, Maximilian Maier, Roksana Warmuz, Matti Wilks, Lucius Caviola
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Recent psychological research finds that U.S. American children have a weaker tendency than U.S. American adults to value humans more than animals. We aimed to conceptually replicate and extend this finding in a preregistered study (N = 412). We investigated whether 6- to 9-year-old Polish children (Study 1a) are less likely to prioritize humans over animals than Polish adults are (Studies 1b and 1c). We presented participants with moral dilemmas where they had to prioritize either humans or animals (dogs or chimpanzees) in situations that involved harming (i.e., a trolley problem) or benefiting (i.e., giving a snack). We found that Polish children prioritized humans over animals less than Polish adults did. This was the case both in dilemmas that involved preventing harm and in dilemmas that involved providing snacks. Both children and adults prioritized humans over chimpanzees more than humans over dogs.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T12:03:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231219391
       
  • Liking Predicts Judgments of Authenticity in Real-Time Interactions More
           Robustly Than Personality States or Affect

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      Authors: Grace N. Rivera, Jinhyung Kim, Nicholas J. Kelley, Joshua Hicks, Rebecca J. Schlegel
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      We conducted three studies involving small group interactions (N = 622) that examined whether Big Five personality states, affect, and/or liking predict judgments of others’ authenticity. Study 1 (n = 119) revealed that neither self-rated personality states nor affect predicted other-rated authenticity. Instead, other-rated liking was the only predictor of other-rated authenticity. Study 2 (n = 281) revealed that other-rated personality states and affect were significant predictors of other-rated authenticity, but other-rated liking was a more important factor in predicting other-rated authenticity than specific behaviors or affect. Based on these results, Study 3 (n = 222) examined whether experimental manipulation of likability had a causal effect on other-ratings of authenticity. Likable actors were indeed judged as more authentic. Together, this suggests that we judge people we like as more authentic and that likability may be more important than the “objective” content of behavior.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-09T12:00:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231218758
       
  • Defensiveness Toward IAT Feedback Predicts Willingness to Engage in
           Anti-Bias Behaviors

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      Authors: Nicole Lofaro, Louis H. Irving, Kate A. Ratliff
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      People who are more defensive about their feedback on the Race-Attitudes Implicit Association Test (IAT) are less willing to engage in anti-bias behaviors. Extending on this work, we statistically clarified defensiveness constructs to predict willingness to engage in anti-bias behaviors among people who received pro-White versus no-bias IAT feedback. We replicated the finding that U.S. Americans are generally defensive toward pro-White IAT feedback, and that more defensiveness predicts less willingness to engage in anti-bias behaviors. However, people who believed their pro-White IAT feedback was an inaccurate reflection of their “true attitudes” were more willing to engage in anti-bias behaviors compared with people who received no-bias IAT feedback. These results better illuminate the defensiveness construct suggesting that receiving self-threatening feedback about bias may motivate people’s willingness to engage in anti-bias behaviors in different ways depending on how people respond to that feedback.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T12:05:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231219948
       
  • Effort Expenditure Increases Risk-Taking for Improbable Rewards

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      Authors: Huiping Jiang, Ya Zheng
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Previous studies have found that exerting effort can lead people to engage in risk-taking behaviors. While effort can be either cognitive or physical, risk-taking can take place in either a risky context with known outcome probabilities or an ambiguous context with unknown outcome probabilities. The goal of the current research is to investigate how effort type and decision context influence risk-taking after effort exertion. Across three experiments, we find evidence that investing effort increases risk-taking at a short timescale. Importantly, this effect is particularly noticeable when the chance of winning is low, rather than when it is uncertain. Furthermore, the increase in risk-taking happens regardless of whether the effort is cognitive or physical. These findings suggest the existence of a cost-invariant but decision context-variant mechanism for the risk-taking after-effect of effort expenditure, which helps to bring the negative emotions caused by effort exertion back to a state of emotional homeostasis.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T06:52:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01461672231218746
       
 
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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted by number of followers
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 364)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 356)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 351)
Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 342)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 340)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 269)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 262)
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 239)
Journal of Applied Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 231)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 212)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 204)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 200)
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 193)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 93)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 87)
Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 85)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Journal of Experimental Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Mind     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 57)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Educational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Clinical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Neuropsychologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Journal of Applied Sport Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Neuropsychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Journal of Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Traumatic Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Motivation and Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for the Psychology of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Developmental Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Evidence-Based Communication Assessment and Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Neuropsychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Journal of Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Personality Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Psychological Trauma     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Psychological Science In the Public Interest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology     Partially Free   (Followers: 19)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Development and Psychopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Research in Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Trauma & Dissociation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Psychotherapy & Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Anxiety Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social and Personal Relationships     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Personality Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Gay & Lesbian Psychotherapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Psychosomatic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Methodology: European Journal of Research Methods for the Behavioral and Social Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Developmental Psychobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Humanistic Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Mathematical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethics & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Family Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Metaphor and Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Pediatric Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Multivariate Behavioral Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Neuropsychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
European Journal of Psychological Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Imagination, Cognition and Personality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Forum of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Group Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
New Ideas in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista de Psicología Social, International Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Group Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Nonverbal Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Trauma Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Diagnostica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Analytical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Constructivist Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Phenomenological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Human Psychopharmacology Clinical and Experimental     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Intensive Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Black Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Forum der Psychoanalyse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Forum Psychotherapeutische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Japanese Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Russian & East European Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dialectica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Estudios de Psicología     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Measurement Interdisciplinary Research and Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychology and Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Mentálhigiéné es Pszichoszomatika     Full-text available via subscription  
Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Rational-Emotive & Cognitive-Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal  

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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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