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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
New School Psychology Bulletin     Open Access  
Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
O Que Nos Faz Pensar : Cadernos do Departamento de Filosofia da PUC-Rio     Open Access  
OA Autism     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Online Readings in Psychology and Culture     Open Access  
Open Journal of Medical Psychology     Open Access  
Open Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Organisational and Social Dynamics: An International Journal of Psychoanalytic, Systemic and Group Relations Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Organizational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Orientación y Sociedad : Revista Internacional e Interdisciplinaria de Orientación Vocacional Ocupacional     Open Access  
Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto)     Open Access  
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Papeles del Psicólogo     Open Access  
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Peace and Conflict : Journal of Peace Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Pensamiento Psicologico     Open Access  
Pensando Familias     Open Access  
Pensando Psicología     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Perceptual and Motor Skills     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Persona     Open Access  
Persona : Jurnal Psikologi Indonesia     Open Access  
Persona Studies     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 148)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access  
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal  
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Phenomenology & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
physiopraxis     Hybrid Journal  
PiD - Psychotherapie im Dialog     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Poiésis     Open Access  
Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Porn Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
PPmP - Psychotherapie Psychosomatik Medizinische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Practice Innovations     Full-text available via subscription  
Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Problems of Psychology in the 21st Century     Open Access  
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Progress in Brain Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psic : Revista de Psicologia da Vetor Editora     Open Access  
Psico     Open Access  
Psicoanalisi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicobiettivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Psicogente     Open Access  
Psicol?gica Journal     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Prática     Open Access  
Psicologia da Educação     Open Access  
Psicologia della salute     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicología desde el Caribe     Open Access  
Psicologia di Comunità. Gruppi, ricerca-azione, modelli formativi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicologia e Saber Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Psicologia em Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia em Revista     Open Access  
Psicologia Ensino & Formação     Open Access  
Psicologia Hospitalar     Open Access  
Psicologia Iberoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia para América Latina     Open Access  
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicología, Conocimiento y Sociedad     Open Access  
Psicologia, Saúde e Doenças     Open Access  
Psicooncología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicoperspectivas     Open Access  
Psicoterapia e Scienze Umane     Full-text available via subscription  
Psikis : Jurnal Psikologi Islami     Open Access  
Psikohumaniora : Jurnal Penelitian Psikologi     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PsyCh Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
PSYCH up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psych. Pflege Heute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychê     Open Access  
Psyche: A Journal of Entomology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychiatrie et violence     Open Access  
Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychiatrische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 357)
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis, Self and Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychoanalytic Dialogues: The International Journal of Relational Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychoanalytic Inquiry: A Topical Journal for Mental Health Professionals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychodynamic Practice: Individuals, Groups and Organisations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Psychodynamic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologia : Advances de la Disciplina     Open Access  
Psychologica     Open Access  
Psychologica Belgica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 207)
Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Psychological Perspectives: A Semiannual Journal of Jungian Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychological Research on Urban Society     Open Access  
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 183)
Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 247)
Psychological Science and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science and Education psyedu.ru     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science In the Public Interest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Psychological Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychological Thought     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie in Erziehung und Unterricht     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology     Open Access  
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology and Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal  
Psychology and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Psychology in Russia: State of the Art     Free   (Followers: 2)
Psychology in Society     Open Access  
Psychology Learning & Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychology of Language and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Psychology of Leaders and Leadership     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Psychology of Men and Masculinity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Well-Being : Theory, Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychology Research and Behavior Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology, Community & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Psychology, Health & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychomusicology : Music, Mind, and Brain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Psychopathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
psychopraxis. neuropraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychosomatic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychosomatic Medicine and General Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Psychotherapy in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
PsychTech & Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Psyecology - Bilingual Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psyke & Logos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psykhe (Santiago)     Open Access  
Quaderni di Gestalt     Full-text available via subscription  
Quaderns de Psicologia     Open Access  
Qualitative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Qualitative Research in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Quantitative Methods for Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Rehabilitation Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Religion, Brain & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Research in Psychology and Behavioral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Pain
Number of Followers: 60  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0304-3959 - ISSN (Online) 1872-6623
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • The yin and yang of pragmatic clinical trials of behavioral interventions
           for chronic pain: balancing design features to maximize impact

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Keefe; Francis J.; Jensen, Mark P.; Williams, Amanda C. de C.; George, Steven Z.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Time course prevalence of post-COVID pain symptoms of musculoskeletal
           origin in patients who had survived severe acute respiratory syndrome
           coronavirus 2 infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fernández-de-las-Peñas; César; Navarro-Santana, Marcos; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars
      Abstract: imageThe aim of this review or meta-analysis is to synthesize the prevalence of post-coronavirus disease (COVID) pain symptoms of musculoskeletal origin in hospitalized or nonhospitalized patients recovered from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science databases, as well as medRxiv and bioRxiv preprint servers were searched up to May 1, 2021. Studies or preprints reporting data on post-COVID pain symptoms such as myalgias, arthralgias, or chest pain after SARS-CoV-2 infection and collected by personal, telephonic, or electronical interview were included. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale. Random-effects models were used for meta-analytical pooled prevalence of each post-COVID musculoskeletal pain symptom. Data synthesis was categorized at onset or hospital admission and at 30, 60, and 90, and ≥180 days after. From a total of 12,123 studies identified, 27 peer-reviewed studies and 6 preprints were included. The sample included 14,639 hospitalized and 11,070 nonhospitalized COVID-19 patients. The methodological quality of almost 70% studies was fair. The overall prevalence of post-COVID myalgia, joint pain, and chest pain ranged from 5.65% to 18.15%, 4.6% to 12.1%, and 7.8% to 23.6%, respectively, at different follow-up periods during the first year postinfection. Time trend analysis showed a decrease prevalence of musculoskeletal post-COVID pain from the symptom's onset to 30 days after, an increase 60 days after, but with a second decrease ≥180 days after. This meta-analysis has shown that almost 10% of individuals infected by SARS-CoV-2 will suffer from musculoskeletal post-COVID pain symptomatology at some time during the first year after the infection.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Potential role of blood biomarkers in patients with fibromyalgia: a
           systematic review with meta-analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kumbhare; Dinesh; Hassan, Samah; Diep, Dion; Duarte, Felipe C. K.; Hung, Jasper; Damodara, Sreekant; West, Daniel W.D.; Selvaganapathy, P. Ravi
      Abstract: imageFibromyalgia (FM) is a complex chronic pain condition. Its symptoms are nonspecific, and to date, no objective test exists to confirm FM diagnosis. Potential objective measures include the circulating levels of blood biomarkers. This systematic review and meta-analysis aim to review studies assessing blood biomarkers' levels in patients with FM compared with healthy controls. We systematically searched the PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases. Fifty-four studies reporting the levels of biomarkers in blood in patients with FM were included. Data were extracted, and the methodological quality was assessed independently by 2 authors. The methodological quality of 9 studies (17%) was low. The results of most studies were not directly comparable given differences in methods and investigated target immune mediators. Thus, data from 40 studies only were meta-analyzed using a random-effects model. The meta-analysis showed that patients with FM had significantly lower levels of interleukin-1 β and higher levels of IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon gamma, C-reactive protein, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor compared with healthy controls. Nevertheless, this systematic literature review and meta-analysis could not support the notion that these blood biomarkers are specific biomarkers of FM. Our literature review, however, revealed that these same individual biomarkers may have the potential role of identifying underlying pathologies or other conditions that often coexist with FM. Future research is needed to evaluate the potential clinical value for these biomarkers while controlling for the various confounding variables.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Can perioperative psychological interventions decrease the risk of
           postsurgical pain and disability' A systematic review and
           meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nadinda; Putu G.; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri M.L.; Peters, Madelon L.
      Abstract: imageMany patients experience pain after surgery. Psychological factors such as emotion and cognition are shown to be associated with the development of acute and chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP). Therefore, the question arises whether targeting these psychological factors can reduce negative postsurgical outcomes. The aim of the current review was to investigate the efficacy of perioperative psychological interventions in reducing (sub)acute postsurgical pain and CPSP and disability in adults. Randomized controlled trials were identified through 4 databases (Web of Science, PsychINFO, PubMed, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature [CINAHL]). The outcomes of interest were (sub)acute (ie, within 3 months after surgery) and chronic (>3 months after surgery) pain and disability. After screening, 21 studies were included in the final analyses. It was found that psychological interventions significantly reduced (sub)acute pain (d = −0.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] [−0.48 to −0.04]) and disability (d = −0.43, 95% CI [−0.84 to −0.03]) as well as CPSP (d = −0.33, 95% CI [−0.61 to −0.06]) and disability (d = −0.43, 95% CI [−0.68 to −0.18]). In addition, interventions delivered after surgery and interventions delivered by a psychologist tended to be more effective than interventions delivered before surgery and interventions delivered by another healthcare provider. Furthermore, the current review points to the need for more research to determine which specific type of intervention may be most beneficial for surgical patients. Finally, the current review identified that research in this domain has concerns regarding bias in missing outcome data due to withdrawal and drop out.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Nerve pathology and neuropathic pain after whiplash injury: a systematic
           review and meta-analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fundaun; Joel; Kolski, Melissa; Baskozos, Georgios; Dilley, Andrew; Sterling, Michele; Schmid, Annina B.
      Abstract: imageThere is no clear understanding of the mechanisms causing persistent pain in patients with whiplash-associated disorder (WAD). The aim of this systematic review was to assess the evidence for nerve pathology and neuropathic pain in patients with WAD. EMBASE, PubMed, CINAHL (EBSCO), and MEDLINE were searched from inception to September 1, 2020. Study quality and risk of bias were assessed using the Newcastle–Ottawa Quality Assessment Scales. Fifty-four studies reporting on 390,644 patients and 918 controls were included. Clinical questionnaires suggested symptoms of predominant neuropathic characteristic in 34% of patients (range 25%-75%). The mean prevalence of nerve pathology detected with neurological examination was 13% (0%-100%) and 32% (10%-100%) with electrodiagnostic testing. Patients independent of WAD severity (Quebec Task Force grades I-IV) demonstrated significantly impaired sensory detection thresholds of the index finger compared with controls, including mechanical (SMD 0.65 [0.30; 1.00] P < 0.005), current (SMD 0.82 [0.25; 1.39] P = 0.0165), cold (SMD −0.43 [−0.73; −0.13] P = 0.0204), and warm detection (SMD 0.84 [0.25; 1.42] P = 0.0200). Patients with WAD had significantly heightened nerve mechanosensitivity compared with controls on median nerve pressure pain thresholds (SMD −1.10 [−1.50; −0.70], P < 0.0001) and neurodynamic tests (SMD 1.68 [0.92; 2.44], P = 0.0004). Similar sensory dysfunction and nerve mechanosensitivity was seen in WAD grade II, which contradicts its traditional definition of absent nerve involvement. Our findings strongly suggest a subset of patients with WAD demonstrate signs of peripheral nerve pathology and neuropathic pain. Although there was heterogeneity among some studies, typical WAD classifications may need to be reconsidered and include detailed clinical assessments for nerve integrity.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Pain persistence and the pain modulatory system: an evolutionary mismatch
           perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Büchel; Christian
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Brain structure, psychosocial, and physical health in acute and chronic
           back pain: a UK Biobank study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tagliaferri; Scott D.; Fitzgibbon, Bernadette M.; Owen, Patrick J.; Miller, Clint T.; Bowe, Steven J.; Belavy, Daniel L.
      Abstract: imageBrain structure, psychosocial, and physical factors underpin back pain conditions; however, less is known about how these factors differ based on pain duration and location. We examined, cross-sectionally, 11,106 individuals from the UK Biobank who (1) were pain-free (n = 5616), (2) had acute back pain (n = 1746), (3) had chronic localised back pain (CBP; n = 1872), or (4) had chronic back pain and additional chronic pain sites (CWP; n = 1872). We found differences in structural brain measures in the chronic pain groups alone. Both CBP and CWP groups had lower primary somatosensory cortex {CBP mean difference (MD) (95% confidence interval [CI]): −250 (−393, −107) mm3, P < 0.001; CWP: −170 (−313, −27)mm3, P = 0.011} and higher caudate gray matter volumes (CBP: 127 [38,216]mm3, P = 0.001; CWP: 122 [33,210]mm3, P = 0.002) compared with pain-free controls. The CBP group also had a lower primary motor cortex volume (−215 [−382, −50]mm3, P = 0.005), whereas the CWP group had a lower amygdala gray matter volume (−27 [−52, −3]mm3, P = 0.021) compared with pain-free controls. Differences in gray matter volumes in some regions may be moderated by sex and body mass index. Psychosocial factors and body mass index differed between all groups and affected those with widespread pain the most (all, P < 0.001), whereas grip strength was only compromised in individuals with widespread pain (−1.0 [−1.4, −0.5] kg, P < 0.001) compared with pain-free controls. Longitudinal research is necessary to confirm these interactions to determine the process of pain development in relation to assessed variables and covariates. However, our results suggest that categorised pain duration and the number of pain sites warrant consideration when assessing markers of brain structure, psychosocial, and physical health.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Exploring sex differences in alpha brain activity as a potential
           neuromarker associated with neuropathic pain

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      Authors: Fauchon; Camille; Kim, Junseok A.; El-Sayed, Rima; Osborne, Natalie R.; Rogachov, Anton; Cheng, Joshua C.; Hemington, Kasey S.; Bosma, Rachael L.; Dunkley, Benjamin T.; Oh, Jiwon; Bhatia, Anuj; Inman, Robert D.; Davis, Karen D.
      Abstract: imageAlpha oscillatory activity (8-13 Hz) is the dominant rhythm in the awake brain and is known to play an important role in pain states. Previous studies have identified alpha band slowing and increased power in the dynamic pain connectome (DPC) of people with chronic neuropathic pain. However, a link between alpha-band abnormalities and sex differences in brain organization in healthy individuals and those with chronic pain is not known. Here, we used resting-state magnetoencephalography to test the hypothesis that peak alpha frequency (PAF) abnormalities are general features across chronic central and peripheral conditions causing neuropathic pain but exhibit sex-specific differences in networks of the DPC (ascending nociceptive pathway [ANP], default mode network, salience network [SN], and subgenual anterior cingulate cortex). We found that neuropathic pain (N = 25 men and 25 women) was associated with increased PAF power in the DPC compared with 50 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, whereas slower PAF in nodes of the SN (temporoparietal junction) and the ANP (posterior insula) was associated with higher trait pain intensity. In the neuropathic pain group, women exhibited lower PAF power in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and faster PAF in the ANP and SN than men. The within-sex analyses indicated that women had neuropathic pain-related increased PAF power in the ANP, SN, and default mode network, whereas men with neuropathic pain had increased PAF power restricted to the ANP. These findings highlight neuropathic pain-related and sex-specific abnormalities in alpha oscillations across the DPC that could underlie aberrant neuronal communication in nociceptive processing and modulation.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, comparative
           study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of newly developed diclofenac
           patches in patients with cancer pain

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yamaguchi; Shigeki; Terahara, Takaaki; Okawa, Koji; Inakura, Hiroshi
      Abstract: imageThis phase III multicenter randomized double-blind placebo-controlled comparative study evaluated the efficacy and safety of diclofenac sodium patches for the treatment of cancer pain. The study consisted of a 2-week to 4-week open-label dose-titration phase and a 4-week double-blind phase. In the double-blind phase, patients who were expected to continue treatment of cancer pain with nonopioid analgesics alone were randomized to the diclofenac sodium patch or placebo group. Once-daily diclofenac sodium patches were started at 150 mg/day (2 patches) and could be increased up to 225 mg/day (3 patches). The primary efficacy endpoint was the time to insufficient analgesic response. Statistical analysis of the double-blind phase included data from 120 patients of the diclofenac sodium patch group and 118 patients of the placebo group. Time to insufficient analgesic response was significantly longer with diclofenac sodium patches than with placebo (P = 0.0016). The hazard ratio for insufficient response for diclofenac sodium patch vs placebo was 0.459 (95% confidence interval, 0.275-0.768). Regarding sleep quality during the double-blind phase, the proportion of patients with “very good sleep” or “good sleep” in the diclofenac sodium patch and placebo groups was 90.8% and 88.1% at the start of the double-blind phase and 81.4% and 78.6% at the final assessment, respectively. The incidence of adverse events was 60.8% (73/120) in the diclofenac sodium patch group and 60.2% (71/118) in the placebo group. Once-daily diclofenac sodium patches are effective in treating cancer pain and are well tolerated.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Observing treatment outcomes in other patients can elicit augmented
           placebo effects on pain treatment: a double-blinded randomized clinical
           trial with patients with chronic low back pain

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      Authors: Schwartz; Marie; Fischer, Laura-Marie; Bläute, Corinna; Stork, Jan; Colloca, Luana; Zöllner, Christian; Klinger, Regine
      Abstract: imageClinical research on social observational learning (SoL) as an underlying mechanism for inducing expectancy and eliciting analgesic placebo effects is lacking. This double-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial investigated the influence of SoL on medication-augmenting placebo effects in 44 patients with chronic low back pain. Our hypothesis was that observing positive drug effects on pain and mobility in another patient could increase pain reduction and functional capacity. To test this, we compared the effects of observing positive treatment outcomes in a sham patient (the social learning group [SoLG]) vs hearing the same sham patient report neutral effects (the control group). In the SoLG, the sham patient told peers about pain reduction due to amitriptyline and demonstrated his improved mobility by bending forwards and sideways while he told the control group only that he was taking amitriptyline. The primary outcome was a reduction in clinical low back pain self-ratings. The secondary outcome was perceptions of pain-related disability. The exploratory outcome was mood and coping statements. Data collection occurred before and after the intervention and 2 weeks later. After the intervention, pain decreased in both groups (F [1, 41] = 7.16, P < 0.05, d = 0.83), with no difference between groups. However, the SoLG showed a significantly larger decrease in perceived disability (F [1, 41] = 5, P < 0.05, d = 0.63). The direct observation of patient with chronic low back pain of positive treatment outcomes in the sham patient seems to have enhanced the treatment effects while indirect verbal reports of reduced pain did not.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Resting-state occipital alpha power is associated with treatment outcome
           in patients with chronic migraine

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      Authors: Pan; Li-Ling Hope; Chen, Wei-Ta; Wang, Yen-Feng; Chen, Shih-Pin; Lai, Kuan-Lin; Liu, Hung-Yu; Hsiao, Fu-Jung; Wang, Shuu-Jiun
      Abstract: imagePreventive treatment is crucial for patients with chronic migraine (CM). This study explored the association between resting-state cortical oscillations and 3-month treatment outcome in patients with CM. Treatment-naïve patients with CM were recruited with their demographic data, psychosocial data, and headache profiles as well as the healthy controls (HCs). Resting-state cortical activities were recorded using an electroencephalogram and analysed using source-based and electrode-based spectral power method. The regions of interest were the bilateral primary somatosensory (S1) and visual (V1) cortices. After 3-month treatment with flunarizine, patients with CM were categorized into responders and nonresponders. Demographic, clinical, and electroencephalogram data from 72 patients with CM and 50 HCs were analysed. Elevated anxiety, depression, and stress were observed in patients with CM. Theta power in bilateral S1 and alpha and gamma powers in the right S1 increased in patients with CM. Nonresponders (n = 34) exhibited larger alpha powers in bilateral V1 than those in responders (n = 38). Alpha powers also exhibited significant correlations with changes of monthly headache days. Notably, in responders and nonresponders, occipital alpha powers did not differ at baseline and in the third month. In conclusion, patients with CM who were not responsive to preventive treatment were associated with augmented resting-state occipital alpha activity. Moreover, changes in migraine attack frequency were associated with baseline occipital alpha power. However, the prognostic feature of visual alpha oscillation seems to be inherent because it is not altered by flunarizine treatment. These findings may be useful for developing personalised migraine treatment plans.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Disruption of working memory and contralateral delay activity by
           nociceptive stimuli is modulated by task demands

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      Authors: Wagenaar-Tison; Alice; Deldar, Zoha; Northon, Stéphane; Brisson, Benoit; Blanchette, Isabelle; Piché, Mathieu
      Abstract: imageTop–down processes allow the selection and prioritization of information by limiting attentional capture by distractors, and these mechanisms depend on task demands such as working memory (WM) load. However, bottom–up processes give salient stimuli a stronger neuronal representation and provoke attentional capture. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of salient nociceptive stimuli on WM while manipulating task demands. Twenty-one healthy participants performed a change detection task during which they had to determine whether 2 successive visual arrays were different or the same. Task demands were modulated by manipulating the WM load (set size included 2 or 4 objects to recall) and by the correspondence between the 2 successive visual arrays (change vs no change). Innocuous stimuli (control) or nociceptive stimuli (distractors) were delivered during the delay period between the 2 visual arrays. Contralateral delay activity and laser-evoked potentials were recorded to examine neural markers of visual WM and nociceptive processes. Nociceptive stimuli decreased WM performance depending on task demands (all P < 0.05). Moreover, compared with control stimuli, nociceptive stimuli abolished the increase in contralateral delay activity amplitude for set size 4 vs set size 2 (P = 0.04). Consistent with these results, laser-evoked potential amplitude was not decreased when task demands were high (P = 0.5). These findings indicate that WM may shield cognition from nociceptive stimuli, but nociceptive stimuli disrupt WM and alter task performance when cognitive resources become insufficient to process all task-relevant information.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 mediates headache-related cephalic
           allodynia in a mouse model of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis

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      Authors: Dalenogare; Diéssica P.; Theisen, Maria C.; Peres, Diulle S.; Fialho, Maria F.P.; Andrighetto, Nathaly; Barros, Laura; Landini, Lorenzo; Titiz, Mustafa; De Logu, Francesco; Oliveira, Sara M.; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Nassini, Romina; Trevisan, Gabriela
      Abstract: imagePrimary headache conditions are frequently associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), but the mechanism that triggers or worsens headaches in patients with MS is poorly understood. We previously showed that the proalgesic transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) mediates hind paw mechanical and cold allodynia in a relapsing–remitting experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (RR-EAE) model in mice. Here, we investigated the development of periorbital mechanical allodynia (PMA) in RR-EAE, a hallmark of headache, and if TRPA1 contributed to this response. RR-EAE induction by injection of the myelin oligodendrocyte peptide fragment35-55 (MOG35-55) and Quillaja A adjuvant (Quil A) in C57BL/6J female mice elicited a delayed and sustained PMA. The PMA at day 35 after induction was reduced by the calcitonin gene–related peptide receptor antagonist (olcegepant) and the serotonin 5-HT1B/D receptor agonist (sumatriptan), 2 known antimigraine agents. Genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of TRPA1 attenuated PMA associated with RR-EAE. The levels of oxidative stress biomarkers (4-hydroxynonenal and hydrogen peroxide, known TRPA1 endogenous agonists) and superoxide dismutase and NADPH oxidase activities were increased in the trigeminal ganglion of RR-EAE mice. Besides, the treatment with antioxidants (apocynin or α-lipoic acid) attenuated PMA. Thus, the results of this study indicate that TRPA1, presumably activated by endogenous agonists, evokes PMA in a mouse model of relapsing–remitting MS.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Analgesic effect of ivabradine against inflammatory pain mediated by
           hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide–gated cation channels
           expressed on primary afferent terminals in the spinal dorsal horn

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      Authors: Ohashi; Nobuko; Uta, Daisuke; Ohashi, Masayuki; Baba, Hiroshi
      Abstract: imageIvabradine, a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide–gated cation (HCN) channel blocker and clinically approved bradycardic agent, has analgesic effects against neuropathic pain. Although the expression of HCN channels in the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) is augmented under inflammatory pain, spinal responses to centrally and peripherally applied ivabradine remain poorly understood. We investigated the spinal action and cellular mechanisms underlying the drug's analgesic effects against inflammatory pain using inflammatory pain model rats. Intraperitoneal and intrathecal injections of ivabradine inhibited mechanical allodynia (6 rats/dose; P < 0.05), and immunohistochemical staining showed that ivabradine suppresses the phosphorylated extracellular signal–regulated kinase activation in the SDH (6 rats/group, P < 0.01). In vitro whole-cell patch-clamp and in vivo extracellular recordings showed that direct application of ivabradine to the spinal cord decreases the mean miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents' frequency (13 rats; P < 0.01), and direct and peripheral application of ivabradine suppresses the spinal response to mechanical stimulation–evoked firing (8 rats/group, P < 0.01). Moreover, ivabradine reduces the amplitudes of monosynaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents evoked by Aδ-fiber and C-fiber stimulation (6 rats; P < 0.01) and induces a stronger inhibition of those evoked by C-fiber stimulation. These phenomena were inhibited by forskolin, an activator of HCN channels. In conclusion, spinal responses mediated by HCN channels on primary afferent terminals are suppressed by central and peripheral administration of ivabradine; the drug also exhibits analgesic effects against inflammatory pain. In addition, ivabradine preferentially acts on C-fiber terminals of SDH neurons and induces a stronger inhibition of neuronal excitability in inflammatory pain.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Prevalence and treatment of neuropathic pain diagnoses among U.S. nursing
           home residents

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      Authors: Mbrah; Attah K.; Nunes, Anthony P.; Hume, Anne L.; Zhao, Danni; Jesdale, Bill M.; Bova, Carol; Lapane, Kate L.
      Abstract: imageNeuropathic pain is a common condition experienced by older adults. Prevalence estimates of neuropathic pain and descriptive data of pharmacologic management among nursing home residents are unavailable. We estimated the prevalence of neuropathic pain diagnoses and described the use of pain medications among nursing home residents with possible neuropathic pain. Using the Minimum Data Set 3.0 linked to Medicare claims for residents living in a nursing home on November 30, 2016, we included 473,815 residents. ICD-10 codes were used to identify neuropathic pain diagnoses. Identification of prescription analgesics/adjuvants was based on claims for the supply of medications that overlapped with the index date over a 3-month look-back period. The prevalence of neuropathic pain was 14.6%. Among those with neuropathic pain, 19.7% had diabetic neuropathy, 27.3% had back and neck pain with neuropathic involvement, and 25.1% had hereditary or idiopathic neuropathy. Among residents with neuropathic pain, 49.9% received anticonvulsants, 28.6% received antidepressants, 19.0% received opioids, and 28.2% had no claims for analgesics or adjuvants. Resident characteristics associated with lack of medications included advanced age, dependency in activities of daily living, cognitive impairment, and diagnoses of comorbid conditions. A diagnosis of neuropathic pain is common among nursing home residents, yet many lack pharmacologic treatment for their pain. Future epidemiologic studies can help develop a more standard approach to identifying and managing neuropathic pain among nursing home residents.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Association of sensory phenotype with quality of life, functionality, and
           emotional well-being in patients suffering from neuropathic pain

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      Authors: Gierthmühlen; Janne; Böhmer, Johann; Attal, Nadine; Bouhassira, Didier; Freynhagen, Rainer; Haanpää, Maija; Hansson, Per; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Kennedy, Jeffrey; Maier, Christoph; Rice, Andrew S.C.; Sachau, Juliane; Segerdahl, Märta; Sindrup, Sören; Tölle, Thomas; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Ventzel, Lise; Vollert, Jan; Baron, Ralf
      Abstract: imageNeuropathic pain highly affects quality of life, well-being, and function. It has recently been shown based on cluster analysis studies that most patients with neuropathic pain may be categorized into 1 of 3 sensory phenotypes: sensory loss, mechanical hyperalgesia, and thermal hyperalgesia. If these phenotypes reflect underlying pathophysiological mechanisms, they may be more relevant for patient management than underlying neurological diagnosis or pain intensity. The aim of this study was thus to examine the impact of these sensory phenotypes on mental health, functionality, and quality of life. Data of 433 patients from the IMI/EuroPain network database were analyzed, and results of HADS-D/A, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Euro Quality of Life 5D/-VAS, Brief Pain Inventory, and Graded Chronic Pain Scale between the sensory phenotypes were compared using multiple regression analysis. There was no difference in chronic pain grade, pain intensity, depression, or anxiety scores between phenotypes. Pain interference (Brief Pain Inventory) was higher (P = 0.002); self-reported health state lower (Euro Quality of Life 5D VAS, P = 0.02); and problems regarding mobility (P = 0.008), usual activities (P = 0.004), and self-care (P = 0.039) more prominent (EQ5-D) in the sensory loss compared with the thermal hyperalgesia phenotype. Patients with sensory loss also showed higher pain catastrophizing scores (P = 0.006 and 0.022, respectively) compared with the 2 other groups. Sensory phenotype is associated with the impact of neuropathic pain conditions on well-being, daily functionality, and quality of life but is less associated with pain intensity. These results suggest that the somatosensory phenotype should be considered for personalized pain management.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Pain Course: a randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of
           an internet-delivered pain management program

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      Authors: Dear; Blake F.; Karin, Eyal; Fogliati, Rhiannon; Dudeney, Joanne; Nielssen, Olav; Gandy, Milena; Staples, Lauren; Scott, Amelia J.; Heriseanu, Andreea I.; Bisby, Madelyne A.; Hathway, Taylor; Titov, Nickolai; Schroeder, Liz
      Abstract: imageThere is interest in the potential of Internet-delivered programs to cost-effectively increase access to pain management for people with chronic pain. However, few large-scale clinical and economic evaluations have been undertaken. Using a randomised controlled trial design, the current study (n = 659) examined the clinical efficacy, cost-effectiveness, and cost utility of an Internet-delivered pain management program for people with mixed chronic pain conditions when delivered with optional clinician support. The treatment group reported significant improvements in disability, depression, anxiety, average pain intensity, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), compared with control, and exhibited relatively high levels of treatment engagement and satisfaction. Each additional clinical improvement (defined as ≥ 30% improvement) produced by the intervention, over control, was associated with a cost of $48, $27, $38, and $83 for disability, depression, anxiety, and average pain intensity, respectively. Gaining one QALY was associated with a cost of $152 or $11,910 per QALY when an 80% probability criterion for cost utility was applied. The program itself was associated a relatively small, fixed, cost per patient but was not cost saving over the brief intervention period. The findings support the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of Internet-delivered programs with “on demand” clinician support as a way to increase access to pain management. Key limitations of the current study include the use of a waitlist-control group, a short follow-up period, and the focus on governmental healthcare costs. Further evaluation of these programs is necessary if they are scaled up and offered as routine care.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Peripheral GABAA receptor signaling contributes to visceral
           hypersensitivity in a mouse model of colitis

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      Authors: Loeza-Alcocer; Emanuel; Gold, Michael S.
      Abstract: imagePain is a common and debilitating symptom of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Based on evidence that peripheral GABAA receptor (GAR) inhibition plays an important role in establishing colonic afferent excitability and nociceptive threshold, we hypothesized that the increase in pain associated with IBD is due to, at least in part, a decrease in peripheral GAR–mediated inhibition. Acute colitis was induced with 5 days of dextran sodium sulfate (DSS, 3%) in the drinking water. Visceral sensitivity was assessed with the visceromotor response (VMR) evoked with balloon distention of the colon in control and DSS-treated mice before and after intracolonic administration of GAR agonist muscimol, the high-affinity GAR preferring agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridine-3-ol (THIP), the GAR positive allosteric modulator diazepam, or the GAR antagonists gabazine and bicuculline. Low concentrations of muscimol or THIP increased the VMR in DSS-treated mice but not in control mice. However, high concentrations of muscimol decreased the VMR in both control and DSS-treated mice. Diazepam decreased the VMR in both DSS-treated and control mice. By contrast, at a concentration of gabazine that blocks only low-affinity GAR, there was no effect on the VMR in either DSS-treated or control mice, but at concentrations of the antagonist that block low-affinity and high-affinity GAR, the VMR was increased in control mice and decreased in DSS-treated mice. Furthermore, bicuculline increased the VMR in control mice but decreased it in DSS-treated mice. These data suggest that activating of low-affinity GAR or blocking high-affinity GAR may be effective therapeutic strategies for the management of pain in IBD.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Interactions between cannabinoid and opioid receptors in a mouse model of
           diabetic neuropathy

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      Authors: Toniolo; Elaine F.; Gupta, Achla; Franciosi, Adriano C.; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A.; Dale, Camila S.
      Abstract: imageDiabetic neuropathy, often associated with diabetes mellitus, is a painful condition with no known effective treatment except glycemic control. Studies with neuropathic pain models report alterations in cannabinoid and opioid receptor expression levels; receptors whose activation induces analgesia. We examined whether interactions between CB1R and opioid receptors could be targeted for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. For this, we generated antibodies that selectively recognize native CB1R-MOR and CB1R-DOR heteromers using a subtractive immunization strategy. We assessed the levels of CB1R, MOR, DOR, and interacting complexes using a model of streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy and detected increased levels of CB1R, MOR, DOR, and CB1R-MOR complexes compared with those in controls. An examination of G-protein signaling revealed that activity induced by the MOR, but not the DOR agonist, was potentiated by low nanomolar doses of CB1R ligands, including antagonists, suggesting an allosteric modulation of MOR signaling by CB1R ligands within CB1R-MOR complexes. Because the peptide endocannabinoid, hemopressin, caused a significant potentiation of MOR activity, we examined its effect on mechanical allodynia and found that it blocked allodynia in wild-type mice and mice with diabetic neuropathy lacking DOR (but have CB1R-MOR complexes). However, hemopressin does not alter the levels of CB1R-MOR complexes in diabetic mice lacking DOR but increases the levels of CB1R-DOR complexes in diabetic mice lacking MOR. Together, these results suggest the involvement of CB1R-MOR and CB1R-DOR complexes in diabetic neuropathy and that hemopressin could be developed as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of this painful condition.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Sleep problems in pain patients entering tertiary pain care: the role of
           pain-related anxiety, medication use, self-reported diseases, and sleep
           disorders

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      Authors: Miettinen; Teemu; Sverloff, Jaana; Lappalainen, Olli-Pekka; Linton, Steven J.; Sipilä, Kirsi; Kalso, Eija
      Abstract: imageChronic pain and sleep problems frequently co-occur. Pain itself disturbs sleep, but other factors may also contribute to sleep problems in pain patients. This cross-sectional study of 473 patients (69.9% female, mean age 47 years) entering tertiary pain management compared normally sleeping pain patients with those having recurring sleep problems to determine the relationship between pain and sleep. Groups were compared for pain and pain aetiology, pain-related anxiety, childhood adversities, use of sleep and pain medications, self-reported diseases, and sleep disorders. Furthermore, the association of pain-related anxiety (cognitive anxiety, escape/avoidance, fear, and physiological anxiety) with more disturbing sleep problems was investigated in the whole cohort. The main results were that those with sleep problems more often reported multiple health conditions than those sleeping normally (depression 31.6% vs 5.0%; angina pectoris 6.5% vs 0.0%; asthma 19.6% vs 1.7%; low back problems 55.1% vs 23.3%; joint disease other than rheumatoid arthritis 32.3% vs 18.3%). Accumulations of 5 or more childhood adversities were more often present in those with sleep problems. Restless legs symptoms were more common in those with sleep problems than those sleeping normally (33.2% vs 11.7%). Patients having sleep problems reported more use of sleep and pain medications than those sleeping normally. Findings about pain-related anxiety suggest physiological reactions as significant factors for increased sleep disturbances. These factors need to be addressed in the management of the comorbidity of pain and sleep problems, and research to understand mechanisms in these is sorely needed.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Unbiased immune profiling reveals a natural killer cell-peripheral nerve
           axis in fibromyalgia

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      Authors: Verma; Vivek; Drury, Gillian L.; Parisien, Marc; Özdağ Acarli, Ayşe N.; Al-Aubodah, Tho-Alfakar; Nijnik, Anastasia; wen, Xia; Tugarinov, Nicol; Verner, Maria; Klares, Richie III; Linton, Alexander; Krock, Emerson; Morado Urbina, Carlos E.; Winsvold, Bendik; Fritsche, Lars G.; Fors, Egil A.; HUNT-All In Pain; Piccirillo, Ciriaco; Khoutorsky, Arkady; Svensson, Camilla I.; Fitzcharles, Mary A.; Ingelmo, Pablo M.; Bernard, Nicole F.; Dupuy, Franck P.; Üçeyler, Nurcan; Sommer, Claudia; King, Irah L.; Meloto, Carolina B.; Diatchenko, Luda
      Abstract: imageThe pathophysiology of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) remains elusive, leading to a lack of objective diagnostic criteria and targeted treatment. We globally evaluated immune system changes in FMS by conducting multiparametric flow cytometry analyses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and identified a natural killer (NK) cell decrease in patients with FMS. Circulating NK cells in FMS were exhausted yet activated, evidenced by lower surface expression of CD16, CD96, and CD226 and more CD107a and TIGIT. These NK cells were hyperresponsive, with increased CCL4 production and expression of CD107a when co-cultured with human leukocyte antigen null target cells. Genetic and transcriptomic pathway analyses identified significant enrichment of cell activation pathways in FMS driven by NK cells. Skin biopsies showed increased expression of NK activation ligand, unique long 16–binding protein, on subepidermal nerves of patients FMS and the presence of NK cells near peripheral nerves. Collectively, our results suggest that chronic activation and redistribution of circulating NK cells to the peripheral nerves contribute to the immunopathology associated with FMS.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Tyrosine kinase type A–specific signalling pathways are critical for
           mechanical allodynia development and bone alterations in a mouse model of
           rheumatoid arthritis

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      Authors: Delay; Lauriane; Barbier, Julie; Aissouni, Youssef; Jurczak, Alexandra; Boudieu, Ludivine; Briat, Arnaud; Auzeloux, Philippe; Barrachina, Célia; Dubois, Emeric; Ardid, Denis; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Svensson, Camilla I.; Moqrich, Aziz; Marchand, Fabien
      Abstract: imageRheumatoid arthritis is frequently associated with chronic pain that still remains difficult to treat. Targeting nerve growth factor (NGF) seems very effective to reduce pain in at least osteoarthritis and chronic low back pain but leads to some potential adverse events. Our aim was to better understand the involvement of the intracellular signalling pathways activated by NGF through its specific tyrosine kinase type A (TrkA) receptor in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis using the complete Freund adjuvant model in our knock-in TrkA/C mice. Our multimodal study demonstrated that knock-in TrkA/C mice exhibited a specific decrease of mechanical allodynia, weight-bearing deficit, peptidergic (CGRP+) and sympathetic (TH+) peripheral nerve sprouting in the joints, a reduction in osteoclast activity and bone resorption markers, and a decrease of CD68-positive cells in the joint with no apparent changes in joint inflammation compared with wild-type mice after arthritis. Finally, transcriptomic analysis shows several differences in dorsal root ganglion mRNA expression of putative mechanotransducers, such as acid-sensing ionic channel 3 and TWIK-related arachidonic acid activated K+ channel, as well as intracellular pathways, such as c-Jun, in the joint or dorsal root ganglia. These results suggest that TrkA-specific intracellular signalling pathways are specifically involved in mechanical hypersensitivity and bone alterations after arthritis using TrkA/C mice.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Transcranial direct current stimulation of 3 cortical targets is no more
           effective than placebo as treatment for fibromyalgia: a double-blind
           sham-controlled clinical trial

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      Authors: Samartin-Veiga; Noelia; Pidal-Miranda, Marina; González-Villar, Alberto J.; Bradley, Claire; Garcia-Larrea, Luis; O'Brien, Anthony T.; Carrillo-de-la-Peña, María T.
      Abstract: imageTranscranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex seem to improve pain and other symptoms of fibromyalgia (FM), although the evidence on the effectiveness of tDCS and the optimal stimulation target is not robust enough. Our main objective was to establish the optimal area of stimulation, comparing the 2 classical targets and a novel pain-related area, the operculo-insular cortex, in a sham-controlled trial. Using a double-blind design, we randomly assigned 130 women with FM to 4 treatment groups (M1, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, operculo-insular cortex, and sham), each receiving fifteen 20-minute sessions of 2 mA anodal tDCS over the left hemisphere. Our primary outcome was pain intensity. The secondary outcomes were the other core symptoms of FM (fatigue, mood, cognitive and sleep disorders, and hyperalgesia measured by the pressure pain threshold). We performed the assessment at 3 time points (before, immediately after treatment, and at 6 months follow-up). The linear mixed-model analysis of variances showed significant treatment effects across time for clinical pain and for fatigue, cognitive and sleep disturbances, and experimental pain, irrespective of the group. In mood, the 3 active tDCS groups showed a significantly larger improvement in anxiety and depression than sham. Our findings provide evidence of a placebo effect, support the use of tDCS for the treatment of affective symptoms, and challenge the effectiveness of tDCS as treatment of FM.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Compliance with telephone-based lifestyle weight loss programs improves
           low back pain but not knee pain outcomes: complier average causal effects
           analyses of 2 randomised trials

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      Authors: Robson; Emma; Kamper, Steven J.; Lee, Hopin; Palazzi, Kerrin; O'Brien, Kate M.; Williams, Amanda; Hodder, Rebecca K.; Williams, Christopher M.
      Abstract: imageWe conducted a complier average causal effect (CACE) analyses for 2 pragmatic randomised controlled trials. We aimed to assess the effectiveness of telephone-based lifestyle weight loss interventions compared with usual care among compliers. Participants from 2 trials with low back pain (n = 160) and knee osteoarthritis (n = 120) with a body mass index ≥27 kg/m2 were included. We defined adherence to the telephone-based lifestyle weight loss program as completing 60% (6 from 10) of telephone health coaching calls. The primary outcomes for CACE analyses were pain intensity (0-10 Numerical Rating Scale) and disability (Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire for low back pain and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index for knee osteoarthritis). Secondary outcomes were weight, physical activity, and diet. We used an instrumental variable approach to estimate CACE in compliers. From the intervention groups of the trials, 29% of those with low back pain (n = 23/80) and 34% of those with knee osteoarthritis (n = 20/60) complied. Complier average causal effect estimates showed potentially clinically meaningful effects, but with low certainty because of wide confidence intervals, for pain intensity (−1.4; 95% confidence interval, −3.1, 0.4) and small but also uncertain effects for disability (−2.1; 95% confidence interval, −8.6, 4.5) among compliers in the low back pain trial intervention compared with control but not in the knee osteoarthritis trial. Our findings showed that compliers of a telephone-based weight loss intervention in the low back pain trial generally had improved outcomes; however, there were inconsistent effects in compliers from the knee osteoarthritis trial. Complier average causal effect estimates were larger than intention-to-treat results but must be considered with caution.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Examination of the contribution of Nav1.7 to axonal propagation in
           nociceptors

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      Authors: Goodwin; George; McMurray, Sheridan; Stevens, Edward B.; Denk, Franziska; McMahon, Stephen B.
      Abstract: imageNav1.7 is a promising drug target for the treatment of pain. However, there is a mismatch between the analgesia produced by Nav1.7 loss-of-function and the peripherally restricted Nav1.7 inhibitors, which may reflect a lack of understanding of the function of Nav1.7 in the transmission of nociceptive information. In the periphery, the role of Nav1.7 in transduction at nociceptive peripheral terminals has been comprehensively examined, but its role in axonal propagation in these neurons is less clearly defined. In this study, we examined the contribution of Nav1.7 to axonal propagation in nociceptors using sodium channel blockers in in vivo electrophysiological and calcium imaging recordings in mice. Using the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) (1-10 µM) to inhibit Nav1.7 and other tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels along the sciatic nerve, we first showed that around two-thirds of nociceptive L4 dorsal root ganglion neurons innervating the skin, but a lower proportion innervating the muscle (45%), are blocked by TTX. By contrast, nearly all large-sized cutaneous afferents (95%-100%) were blocked by axonal TTX. Many cutaneous nociceptors resistant to TTX were polymodal (57%) and capsaicin sensitive (57%). Next, we applied PF-05198007 (300 nM-1 µM) to the sciatic nerve between stimulating and recording sites to selectively block axonal Nav1.7 channels. One hundred to three hundred nanomolar PF-05198007 blocked propagation in 63% of C-fiber sensory neurons, whereas similar concentrations produced minimal block (5%) in rapidly conducting A-fiber neurons. We conclude that Nav1.7 is essential for axonal propagation in around two-thirds of nociceptive cutaneous C-fiber neurons and a lower proportion (≤45%) of nociceptive neurons innervating muscle.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Congenital insensitivity to pain: a novel mutation affecting a U12-type
           intron causes multiple aberrant splicing of SCN9A

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      Authors: Marchi; Margherita; D'Amato, Ilaria; Andelic, Mirna; Cartelli, Daniele; Salvi, Erika; Lombardi, Raffaella; Gumus, Evren; Lauria, Giuseppe
      Abstract: imageMutations in the alpha subunit of voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 (NaV1.7), encoded by SCN9A gene, play an important role in the regulation of nociception and can lead to a wide range of clinical outcomes, ranging from extreme pain syndromes to congenital inability to experience pain. To expand the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum of SCN9A-related channelopathies, we describe the proband, a daughter born from consanguineous parents, who had pain insensitivity, diminished temperature sensation, foot burns, and severe loss of nociceptive nerve fibers in the epidermis. Next-generation sequencing of SCN9A (NM_002977.3) revealed a novel homozygous substitution (c.377+7T>G) in the donor splice site of intron 3. As the RNA functional testing is challenging, the in silico analysis is the first approach to predict possible alterations. In this case, the computational analysis was unable to identify the splicing consensus and could not provide any prediction for splicing defects. The affected intron indeed belongs to the U12 type, a family of introns characterised by noncanonical consensus at the splice sites, accounting only for 0.35% of all human introns, and is not included in most of the training sets for splicing prediction. A functional study on proband RNA showed different aberrant transcripts, where exon 3 was missing and an intron fragment was included. A quantification study using real-time polymerase chain reaction showed a significant reduction of the NaV1.7 canonical transcript. Collectively, these data widen the spectrum of SCN9A-related insensitivity to pain by describing a mutation causing NaV1.7 deficiency, underlying the nociceptor dysfunction, and highlight the importance of molecular investigation of U12 introns' mutations despite the silent prediction.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Association of parental and adolescent emotion-related factors with
           adolescent chronic pain behaviors

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      Authors: Koechlin; Helen; Beeckman, Melanie; Meier, Andrea H.; Locher, Cosima; Goubert, Liesbet; Kossowsky, Joe; Simons, Laura E.
      Abstract: imageChronic pain is a prevalent condition in youth, and the pain experience is strongly influenced by emotional processes. Studying emotion variability and regulation (ER) may help better understand pain behavior. As the development of emotion-related abilities predominantly takes place in the family context, examining ER within parent–adolescent dyads is important. We set out to test the association of parent and adolescent ER and adolescent emotional variability with adolescent pain behavior (ie, pain interference, activity avoidance, and activity engagement). A sample of 56 adolescents (Mage = 14.5, 85.7% women) with chronic pain and one of their parents (92.9% mothers) participated in this study. Adolescents completed baseline measures of average pain intensity, ER, and mean positive and negative affect. Furthermore, adolescents completed an electronic diary for 14 consecutive days, reporting on emotional state, activity avoidance, activity engagement, and pain interference. Parents completed measures of ER and their own history of pain. We performed a variable selection procedure, the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator method, to determine important predictors of adolescent pain behavior. Adolescent high positive affect was associated with more activity engagement, less pain interference, and less activity avoidance, indicating that positive affect might enhance the willingness to engage in activities in the presence of pain. Adolescent ER strategy emotional reappraisal and parents' own history of pain were predictors of less activity engagement. Parent ER was not related to adolescent ER. In conclusion, our results highlight the potential of enhancing positive affect as an intervention target for chronic pain.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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