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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Academic Psychiatry and Psychology Journal : APPJ     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Adolescent Research Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Journal of Professional Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Advances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Affective Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 361)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Aging Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Ajayu Órgano de Difusión Científica del Departamento de Psicología UCBSP     Open Access  
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 205)
An-Nafs : Jurnal Fakultas Psikologi     Open Access  
Anales de Psicología / Annals of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access  
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analogías del Comportamiento     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 84)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 50)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 291)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Investigaciones de la Facultad de Psicología     Open Access  
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 171)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Aprender     Open Access  
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Archives of Depression and Anxiety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Augmented Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access  
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behavior and Social Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 142)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioural Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavioural Sciences Undergraduate Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Beyond Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brain Science Advances     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 174)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 76)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Art Therapy : Research, Practice, and Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
CES Psicología     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice & Epidemiology in Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 88)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Coaching Psykologi : The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Community Psychology in Global Perspective     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Psychoneuroendocrinology     Open Access  
Comprehensive Results in Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Consumer Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Contemporary Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Crime Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cuadernos de Marte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos Hispanoamericanos de Psicología     Open Access  
cultura & psyché : Journal of Cultural Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Culture - Society - Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Neuropsychology Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.574
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 22  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-6660 - ISSN (Online) 1040-7308
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • A Systematic Review on Common and Distinct Neural Correlates of
           Risk-taking in Substance-related and Non-substance Related Addictions

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      Abstract: Abstract Both substance-related as well as non-substance-related addictions may include recurrent engagement in risky actions despite adverse outcomes. We here apply a unified approach and review task-based neuroimaging studies on substance-related (SRAs) and non-substance related addictions (NSRAs) to examine commonalities and differences in neural correlates of risk-taking in these two addiction types. To this end, we conducted a systematic review adhering to the PRISMA guidelines. Two databases were searched with predefined search terms to identify neuroimaging studies on risk-taking tasks in individuals with addiction disorders. In total, 19 studies on SRAs (comprising a total of 648 individuals with SRAs) and 10 studies on NSRAs (comprising a total of 187 individuals with NSRAs) were included. Risk-related brain activation in SRAs and NSRAs was summarized individually and subsequently compared to each other. Results suggest convergent altered risk-related neural processes, including hyperactivity in the OFC and the striatum. As characteristic for both addiction types, these brain regions may represent an underlying mechanism of suboptimal decision-making. In contrast, decreased DLPFC activity may be specific to SRAs and decreased IFG activity could only be identified for NSRAs. The precuneus and posterior cingulate show elevated activity in SRAs, while findings regarding these areas were mixed in NSRAs. Additional scarce evidence suggests decreased ventral ACC activity and increased dorsal ACC activity in both addiction types. Associations between identified activation patterns with drug use severity underpin the clinical relevance of these findings. However, this exploratory evidence should be interpreted with caution and should be regarded as preliminary. Future research is needed to evaluate the findings gathered by this review.
      PubDate: 2022-07-30
       
  • Silent Brain Infarction, Delirium, and Cognition in Three Invasive
           Cardiovascular Procedures: a Systematic Review

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      Abstract: Abstract Silent brain infarctions (SBIs) are brain lesions noted on neuroimaging that are not associated with clinical symptoms. SBIs are associated with a number of vascular risk factors and are common following invasive cardiovascular procedures such as atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), and transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Although not eliciting signs of clinical stroke, SBIs are associated with increased frailty, and motor and mood features. Less is known, however, about the relationship between SBI, cognition, and delirium following invasive cardiac procedures and most investigations into these relationships have been reported in large-scale epidemiological studies. In the current paper, we conducted a systematic review to evaluate evidence of a relationship between SBI, delirium, and cognitive decline following CABG, AF ablation, and TAVR. Twenty studies met inclusion criteria. In general, our review identified conflicting results for each cardiac procedure, with some studies suggesting a relationship between SBI, cognitive impairment, and delirium, whereas others showed no relationship between SBI, cognitive impairment, and delirium. Potential reasons for this discrepancy as well as suggestions for future research are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-07-08
       
  • Quantitative Meta-analyses of Cognitive Abilities in Children With
           Pediatric-onset Multiple Sclerosis

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      Abstract: Abstract Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS), is the manifestation of multiple sclerosis in individuals before 18 years of age. About a third of children with POMS show some form of lower cognitive performance. The purpose of this study is to examine using quantitative meta-analyses the effect size of altered performance between children with and without POMS on overall intelligence quotient (IQ), information processing speed, and language functions. We searched the literature for studies that reported scores on cognitive tests administered to children with and without POMS. Studies were systematically reviewed using PRISMA guidelines. We analyzed data from 14 studies that examined 1283 children with and without POMS when cognitive categories consisted of five or more studies. Effect sizes, publication bias and potential confounds were considered. Significant cognitive differences are revealed for all categories with the strongest effect observed for overall IQ. A moderate effect is observed for information processing speed, and small effects for verbal fluency and verbal memory. Cognitive abilities present differently in children with POMS and a better understanding of this manifestation will inform intervention and remediation tools that can improve clinical and educational practice for the benefit of children with POMS.
      PubDate: 2022-07-08
       
  • Relationships Among Structural Neuroimaging and Neurocognitive Outcomes in
           Adolescents and Young Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: A Systematic
           Review

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      Abstract: Abstract Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common cause of major congenital anomalies in the world. Disruptions to brain development in this population may impact cognitive outcomes. As individuals with CHD age, understanding of long-term neurocognitive and brain outcomes is essential. Synthesis of the current literature of brain-behavior relationships in adolescents and young adults with CHD is needed to understand long-term outcomes and identify literature gaps. This systematic review summarizes and integrates the current literature on the relationship between structural neuroimaging and neurocognitive outcomes in adolescents and young adults with CHD. Included papers were published through August 2, 2021. Searches were conducted on Pubmed and APA PsycInfo. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated adolescents or young adults (ages 10–35) with CHD, and without genetic comorbidity. Studies explored relationships among structural neuroimaging and neurocognitive outcomes, were in English, and were an empirical research study. A total of 22 papers were included in the current review. Data from each study was extracted and included in a table for comparison along with a systematic assessment of study quality. Results suggest worse brain outcomes (i.e., brain abnormality, reduced volume, lower fractional anisotropy, and brain topology) are related to poorer performance in neuropsychological domains of intelligence, memory, and executive functioning. Consistently, poorer memory performance was related to lower hippocampal and temporal region volumes. Statistically significant brain-behavior relationships in adolescents and young adults with CHD are generally observed across studies but there is a lack of consistency in investigated neuropsychological constructs and brain regions to be able to make specific conclusions. Further research with adult samples of CHD is needed to better understand the long-term impacts of early neurological insult.
      PubDate: 2022-07-01
       
  • Effectiveness of Pharmacotherapy for Depression after Adult Traumatic
           Brain Injury: an Umbrella Review

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      Abstract: Abstract Symptoms of depression are common following traumatic brain injury (TBI), impacting survivors’ ability to return to work, participate in leisure activities, and placing strain on relationships. Depression symptoms post TBI are often managed with pharmacotherapy, however, there is little research evidence to guide clinical practice. There have been a number of recent systematic reviews examining pharmacotherapy for post TBI depression. The aim of this umbrella review was to synthesize systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the effectiveness of pharmacotherapy for the management of post TBI depression in adults. Eligible reviews examined any pharmacotherapy against any comparators, for the treatment of depression in adults who had sustained TBI. Seven databases were searched, with additional searching of online journals, Research Gate, Google Scholar and the TRIP Medical Database to identify published and unpublished systematic reviews and meta-analyses in English up to May 2020. A systematic review of primary studies available between March 2018 and May 2020 was also conducted. Evidence quality was assessed using Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Instruments. The results are presented as a narrative synthesis. Twenty-two systematic reviews were identified, of which ten reviews contained a meta-analysis. No new primary studies were identified in the systematic review. There was insufficient high quality and methodologically rigorous evidence to recommend prescribing any specific drug or drug class for post TBI depression. The findings do show, however, that depression post TBI is responsive to pharmacotherapy in at least some individuals. Recommendations for primary studies, systematic reviews and advice for prescribers is provided. Review Registration PROSPERO (CRD42020184915).
      PubDate: 2022-06-14
       
  • Correction to: The Impact of Right Temporal Lobe Epilepsy on Nonverbal
           Memory: Meta-regression of Stimulus- and Task-related Moderators

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      PubDate: 2022-06-13
       
  • Effectiveness of Non-Pharmacological Interventions for Agitation during
           Post-Traumatic Amnesia following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic
           Review

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      Abstract: Abstract Agitation is common in the early recovery period following traumatic brain injury (TBI), known as post-traumatic amnesia (PTA). Non-pharmacological interventions are frequently used to manage agitation, yet their efficacy is largely unknown. This systematic review aims to synthesize current evidence on the effectiveness of non-pharmacological interventions for agitation during PTA in adults with TBI. Key databases searched included MEDLINE Ovid SP interface, PubMed, CINAHL, Excerpta Medica Database, PsycINFO and CENTRAL, with additional online reviewing of key journals and clinical trial registries to identify published or unpublished studies up to May 2020. Eligible studies included participants aged 16 years and older, showing agitated behaviours during PTA. Any non-pharmacological interventions for reducing agitation were considered, with any comparator accepted. Eligible studies were critically appraised for methodological quality using Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Instruments and findings were reported in narrative form. Twelve studies were included in the review: two randomized cross-over trials, three quasi-experimental studies, four cases series and three case reports. Non-pharmacological interventions were music therapy, behavioural strategies and environmental modifications, physical restraints and electroconvulsive therapy. Key methodological concerns included absence of a control group, a lack of formalised agitation measurement and inconsistent concomitant use of pharmacology. Interventions involving music therapy had the highest level of evidence, although study quality was generally low to moderate. Further research is needed to evaluate non-pharmacological interventions for reducing agitation during PTA after TBI. Systematic review registration number: PROSPERO (CRD42020186802), registered May 2020.
      PubDate: 2022-06-10
       
  • A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Cognitive Training in Adults with
           Major Depressive Disorder

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      Abstract: Abstract Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is common and disabling, and is linked to functional impairment and increased mortality. While current treatments for MDD are moderately effective, ultimately, up to one third of patients do not achieve full remission. Interestingly, while affective symptoms of major depression typically resolve with the depressive episode, cognitive impairment frequently persists, and has been identified as one of the most prominent predictors of illness recurrence. Additionally, MDD is well-recognised as a key risk factor for further cognitive decline and dementia. Yet, available treatments for MDD do not typically address cognitive impairment. Cognitive training, represents a promising and novel therapeutic intervention in this regard. This review systematically identified and evaluated the evidence for cognitive training in adults with MDD. Following PRISMA guidelines, eligible studies were selected according to pre-defined criteria delineating our target population (adults with clinically defined MDD), parameters for cognitive training interventions (computer-or strategy-based, clinician-facilitated), and study design (controlled trials including pre-post cognitive and psychological or functional outcome data). Of 448 studies identified, nine studies met inclusion criteria. These studies were evaluated for methodological quality and risk of bias. Despite heterogeneity, qualitative and meta-analytic synthesis of study findings revealed significant improvements in cognitive and affective outcomes following cognitive training, with moderate pooled effect sizes. Unfortunately, very few studies investigated ‘far transfer’ to broader domains of everyday functioning. Overall, given the strong evidence for the efficacy and value of cognitive training in this context, cognitive training should be considered as a primary therapeutic intervention in the treatment of MDD.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-021-09487-3
       
  • Frailty and Cognitive Function in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-Analysis of Cross-Sectional Studies

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      Abstract: Abstract The relationship between cognitive function and frailty among older adults is a growing area of research due to the implications of cognitive and physical decline for functional independence in late life. Multiple studies demonstrate a meaningful relationship between these two factors, which together may constitute increased risk of negative health outcomes for older adults. The current analysis was conducted to 1) systematically review current evidence for differences in cognitive performance based on frailty status among older adults and provide quantitative evidence for the magnitude of this effect, and 2) assess the influence of demographic and methodological variables on this effect. The preregistered protocol (CRD42018087138) included a search of EBSCOhost, Pubmed, and Embase online databases and reference lists to identify cross-sectional studies comparing frail and non-frail or robust older adults (60+) on cognitive performance. In total, 42 effects were retrieved from 38 studies, expressed as Hedges’ g, and pooled based on a random-effects model. Results indicated an overall significant, negative effect of frailty status on cognitive function among tests of global cognitive function (g = 0.734: 95% CI = 0.601-0.867) and individual cognitive domains (g = 0.439: 95% CI = 0.342–0.535). Age, frailty assessment used, and cognitive status of the sample did not significantly moderate the overall effect. Post-hoc moderator analysis revealed that difference in mean age of frail and robust groups significantly moderated the overall effect (R2 = 0.38, β = .0974, 95% CI = 0.0537-0.141). Implications for future research are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-021-09497-1
       
  • Repetition Priming in Individuals with Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment
           and Alzheimer’s Dementia: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract The literature on repetition priming in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is inconsistent, with some findings supporting spared priming while others do not. Several factors may explain these inconsistencies, including AD severity (e.g., dementia vs. Mild Cognitive Impairment; MCI) and priming paradigm-related characteristics. This systematic review and meta-analysis provides a quantitative summary of repetition priming in AD. We examined the between-group standard mean difference comparing repetition priming in AD dementia or amnestic MCI (aMCI; presumably due to AD) to controls. Thirty-two studies were selected, including 590 individuals with AD dementia, 267 individuals with amnestic MCI, and 703 controls. Our results indicated that both individuals with aMCI and AD dementia perform worse on repetition priming tasks than cognitively older adults. Paradigm-related moderators suggested that the effect size between studies comparing the combined aMCI or AD dementia group to cognitively healthy older adults was the highest for paradigms that required participants to produce, rather than identify, primes during the test phase. Our results further suggested that priming in AD is impaired for both conceptual and perceptual priming tasks. Lastly, while our results suggested that priming in AD is impaired for priming tasks that require deep processing, we were unable to draw firm conclusions about whether priming is less impaired in aMCI or AD dementia for paradigms that require shallow processing.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-021-09504-5
       
  • Saccadic Eye Movement in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s
           Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is considered the transitional state to AD dementia (ADD) and other types of dementia, whose symptoms are accompanied by altered eye movement. In this work, we reviewed the existing literature and conducted a meta-analysis to extract relevant eye movement parameters that are significantly altered owing to ADD and MCI. We conducted a systematic review of 35 eligible original publications in saccade paradigms and a meta-analysis of 27 articles with specified task conditions, which used mainly gap and overlap conditions in both prosaccade and antisaccade paradigms. The meta-analysis revealed that prosaccade and antisaccade latencies and frequency of antisaccade errors showed significant alterations for both MCI and ADD. First, both prosaccade and antisaccade paradigms differentiated patients with ADD and MCI from controls, however, antisaccade paradigms was more effective than prosaccade paradigms in distinguishing patients from controls. Second, during prosaccade in the gap and overlap conditions, patients with ADD had significantly longer latencies than patients with MCI, and the trend was similar during antisaccade in the gap condition as patients with ADD had significantly more errors than patients with MCI. The anti-effect magnitude was similar between controls and patients, and the magnitude of the latency of the gap effect varied among healthy controls and MCI and ADD subjects, but the effect size of the latency remained large in both patients. These findings suggest that, using gap effect, anti-effect, and specific choices of saccade paradigms and conditions, distinctions could be made between MCI and ADD patients as well as between patients and controls.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-021-09495-3
       
  • A Scoping Review of Communicating Neuropsychological Test Results to
           Patients and Family Members

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      Abstract: Abstract Feedback of neuropsychological test results to patients and family members include psychoeducation and implications for daily life. This scoping review aimed to provide an overview of the literature on neuropsychological feedback and to offer clinical recommendations. In accordance with formal scoping review methodology, PubMed, PsycInfo, Web of Science, CINAHL, and Embase databases were searched. Studies were included if they reported on neuropsychological feedback, if full papers were available, and if they included human participants. All languages were included, and no limit was placed on the year of publication. Of the 2,173 records screened, 34 publications met the inclusion criteria. Five additional publications were included after cross-referencing. An update of the search led to the inclusion of two additional papers. Of these 41 publications, 26 were research papers. Neuropsychological feedback is provided for a wide spectrum of diagnoses and usually given in-person and has been related to optimal a positive effect on patient outcomes (e.g. increase the quality of life). Most papers reported on satisfaction and found that satisfaction with an NPA increased when useful feedback was provided. However, information retention was found to be low, but communication aids, such as written information, were found to be helpful in improving retention. The current review demonstrated the benefits of neuropsychological feedback and that this should be part of standard clinical procedures when conducting a neuropsychological assessment. Further research on the benefits of neuropsychological feedback and how to improve information provision would enrich the neuropsychological literature.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-021-09507-2
       
  • Virtual-Reality Performance-Based Assessment of Cognitive Functions in
           Adult Patients With Acquired Brain Injury: A Scoping Review

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      Abstract: Abstract Individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI) commonly present with impairments in cognitive abilities. As these competencies seem to be predictive of patients’ abilities to reintegrate into the everyday settings, it is crucial to assess them properly. However, previous research has indicated that patients may perform relatively well on standard tests of cognitive functioning, but may nonetheless encounter significant difficulties in organizing and executing everyday tasks. In order to overcome this issue, virtual reality (VR) methods have been introduced in clinical practice with the aim of creating assessments that simulate real-world activities and thus, provide a clearer picture of patients’ functioning in everyday settings. This review offers an overview of VR assessment tools described in the scientific literature between 2010 and 2019. Overall, 38 relevant records describing 31 different tools were found. Among these tools, 16 assessed executive functions and prospective memory, while the other 15 assessed visuo-spatial abilities. Although promising results have been reported, our analysis indicated that about half of the tools deliver tasks that differ from everyday activities, thus limiting the generalizability of patients’ performance to the real-world. Moreover, a variety of methodological shortfalls related to study Internal and External Validity have been highlighted, which hamper the possibility of drawing definite recommendations on tool choice. These limitations suggest the importance of putting considerable efforts into the improvement or development of VR tools for patients with ABI for both research and clinical purposes, considering the great potential of this form of assessment.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-021-09498-0
       
  • The Effect of Cognitive Intervention on Cognitive Function in Older Adults
           With Alzheimer’s Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Cognitive intervention includes cognitive stimulation, cognitive training, and cognitive rehabilitation. This systematic review was performed to re-assess the efficacy of cognitive intervention for the patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Twenty studies (2012 participants) were eventually included. For global cognitive function, the combined mean difference (MD) in eight studies was 1.67 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.45, 2.89, p = 0.007; Q = 33.28, df = 8, p < 0.0001, τ2 = 2.17, I2 = 76%) for the short term. The pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) of six RCTs was 1.61 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.65, 2.56, p = 0.0009; Q = 127.66, df = 6, p < 0.00001, τ2 = 1.56, I2 = 95%) for the medium term. The pooled SMD of seven studies was 0.79 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.33, 1.25, p = 0.0008; Q = 35.10, df = 7, p < 0.0001, τ2 = 0.33, I2 = 80%) for the long term. For depression, the pooled SMD of two trials was -0.48 (95% Confidence Interval: -0.71, -0.24; p < 0.0001, I2 = 4%) for the short term. Cognitive training may show obvious improvements in global cognitive function whether after short, medium, or long-term interventions and in depression after short term intervention. However, the positive effect of the intervention on general cognitive function or depression did not seem to persist after intervention ended. There is still a lack of reliable and consistent conclusions relevant to the effect of cognitive stimulation and cognitive rehabilitation on observed outcomes, cognitive training for memory or other non-cognitive outcomes. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42019121768.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-021-09486-4
       
  • The Episodic Memory Profile in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Bayesian
           Meta-Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Although autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are commonly characterized by diminished episodic memory, the literature in this area is mixed. We address these inconsistent findings by employing multilevel Bayesian meta-analysis to quantify episodic memory differences between individuals with ASD and typically developing (TD) controls. We used meta-regression to evaluate the effects of test modality (e.g., word list, story recall), delay interval (immediate vs. delayed), retrieval demands (recognition vs. recall), and sensory modality (auditory vs. visual) on episodic memory in ASD. A total of 338 effect sizes from 113 empirical articles, including 5,632 unique participants (ASD = 2,777, TD = 2,855), were included. Results show that the memory deficits associated with ASD were larger for recall (g = -0.52, se = 0.04, 95% CrI [-0.60, -0.43]) compared to recognition (g = -0.25, se = 0.05, 95% CrI [-0.35, -0.14]) and differed based on the testing modality. For example, effect sizes were smallest for words (g = -0.28, se = 0.05, 95% CrI [-0.38, -0.18]), pictures (g = -0.38, se = 0.07, 95% CrI [-0.52, -0.24]), and figure reproduction (g = -0.49, se = 0.11, 95% CrI [-0.70, -0.27]). However, effect sizes for sentences (g = -0.59, se = 0.20, 95% CrI [-1.00, -0.21]), stories (Hedges’ g = -0.54, se = 0.08, 95% CrI [-0.69, -0.38]) and staged events (g = -0.75, se = 0.10, 95% CrI [-0.95, -0.55]) were much larger. These findings suggest that ASD is associated with a small to medium reduction in scores on episodic memory tests relative to TD controls.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-021-09493-5
       
  • A Meta-Analysis of Line Bisection and Landmark Task Performance in Older
           Adults

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      Abstract: Abstract Young adults exhibit a small asymmetry of visuospatial attention that favours the left side of space relative to the right (pseudoneglect). However, it remains unclear whether this leftward bias is maintained, eliminated or shifted rightward in older age. Here we present two meta-analyses that aimed to identify whether adults aged ≥50 years old display a group-level spatial attention bias, as indexed by the line bisection and the landmark tasks. A total of 69 datasets from 65 studies, involving 1654 participants, were analysed. In the meta-analysis of the line bisection task (n = 63), no bias was identified for studies where the mean age was ≥50, but there was a clear leftward bias in a subset where all individual participants were aged ≥50. There was no moderating effect of the participant’s age or sex, line length, line position, nor the presence of left or right cues. There was a small publication bias in favour of reporting rightward biases. Of note, biases were slightly more leftward in studies where participants had been recruited as part of a stand-alone older group, compared to studies where participants were recruited as controls for a clinical study. Similarly, no spatial bias was observed in the meta-analysis of the landmark task, although the number of studies included was small (n = 6). Overall, these results indicate that over 50s maintain a group-level leftward bias on the line bisection task, but more studies are needed to determine whether this bias can be modulated by stimulus- or state-dependent factors.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-021-09505-4
       
  • Best Practices in Structural Neuroimaging of Neurodevelopmental Disorders

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      Abstract: Abstract Structural magnetic resonance imaging (sMRI) offers immense potential for increasing our understanding of how anatomical brain development relates to clinical symptoms and functioning in neurodevelopmental disorders. Clinical developmental sMRI may help identify neurobiological risk factors or markers that may ultimately assist in diagnosis and treatment. However, researchers and clinicians aiming to conduct sMRI studies of neurodevelopmental disorders face several methodological challenges. This review offers hands-on guidelines for clinical developmental sMRI. First, we present brain morphometry metrics and review evidence on typical developmental trajectories throughout adolescence, together with atypical trajectories in selected neurodevelopmental disorders. Next, we discuss challenges and good scientific practices in study design, image acquisition and analysis, and recent options to implement quality control. Finally, we discuss choices related to statistical analysis and interpretation of results. We call for greater completeness and transparency in the reporting of methods to advance understanding of structural brain alterations in neurodevelopmental disorders.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-021-09496-2
       
  • Prospective Memory Training in Older Adults: A Systematic Review and
           Meta-Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Prospective memory (PM), which enables one to remember to carry out delayed intentions, is crucial for everyday functioning. PM commonly deteriorates upon cognitive decline in older adults, but several studies have shown that PM in older adults can be improved by training. The current study aimed to summarise this evidence by conducting a qualitative systematic analysis and quantitative meta-analysis of the effects of PM training in older adults, for which systematic searches were conducted across seven databases (Cochrane Library, Embase, PubMed, PsycInfo, Web of Science, CINAHL and Scopus). Forty-eight studies were included in the qualitative analysis, and 43% of the assessed PM training interventions showed positive gains in enhancing PM. However, the methodological quality varied across the studies, with 41% of the non-randomised control trials (non-RCTs) rated as having either serious or critical risk of bias. Therefore, only 29 RCTs were included in the subsequent quantitative meta-analysis. We found a significant and moderate immediate efficacy (Hedges’ g = 0.54) of PM training in enhancing PM performance in older adults, but no significant long-term efficacy (Hedges’ g = 0.21). Two subgroup analyses also revealed a robust training efficacy across the study population (i.e., healthy and clinical population) and the number of training sessions (i.e., single session and programme-based). Overall, this study provided positive evidence to support PM training in older adults. Further studies are warranted to explore the mechanisms by which PM training exerts its effects, and better-quality RCTs are needed to provide more robust evidence supporting our findings.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-022-09536-5
       
  • Correction to: A Systematic Review of the Validity and Reliability of
           Assessment Tools for Executive Function and Adaptive Function Following
           Brain Pathology among Children and Adolescents in Low- and Middle-Income
           Countries

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      PubDate: 2022-04-30
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-022-09542-7
       
  • A Systematic Review of the Validity and Realiability of Assessment Tools
           for Executive Function and Adaptive Function Following Brain Pathology
           among Children and Adolescents in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

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      Abstract: Abstract Minimal but increasing number of assessment instruments for Executive functions (EFs) and adaptive functioning (AF) have either been developed for or adapted and validated for use among children in low and middle income countries (LAMICs). However, the suitability of these tools for this context is unclear. A systematic review of such instruments was thus undertaken. The Systematic review was conducted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) checklist (Liberati et al., in BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), 339, 2009). A search was made for primary research papers reporting psychometric properties for development or adaptation of either EF or AF tools among children in LAMICs, with no date or language restrictions. 14 bibliographic databases were searched, including grey literature. Risk of bias assessment was done following the COSMIN (COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments) guidelines (Mokkink et al., in Quality of Life Research, 63, 32, 2014). For EF, the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning (BRIEF- multiple versions), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Go/No-go and the Rey-Osterrieth complex figure (ROCF) were the most rigorously validated. For AFs, the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS- multiple versions) and the Child Function Impairment Rating Scale (CFIRS- first edition) were most validated. Most of these tools showed adequate internal consistency and structural validity. However, none of these tools showed acceptable quality of evidence for sufficient psychometric properties across all the measured domains, particularly so for content validity and cross-cultural validity in LAMICs. There is a great need for adequate adaptation of the most popular EF and AF instruments, or alternatively the development of purpose-made instruments for assessing children in LAMICs. Systematic Review Registration numbers: CRD42020202190 (EF tools systematic review) and CRD42020203968 (AF tools systematic review) registered on PROSPERO website (https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/).
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s11065-022-09538-3
       
 
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