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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 983 journals)
Showing 601 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
New Ideas in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
New School Psychology Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Guidance and Counselling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
O Que Nos Faz Pensar : Cadernos do Departamento de Filosofia da PUC-Rio     Open Access  
OA Autism     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Occupational Health Science     Hybrid Journal  
Online Readings in Psychology and Culture     Open Access  
Open Journal of Medical Psychology     Open Access  
Open Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Neuroimaging Journal     Open Access  
Open Psychology Journal     Open Access  
Organisational and Social Dynamics: An International Journal of Psychoanalytic, Systemic and Group Relations Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Organizational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Orientación y Sociedad : Revista Internacional e Interdisciplinaria de Orientación Vocacional Ocupacional     Open Access  
Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto)     Open Access  
Pain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Papeles del Psicólogo     Open Access  
Pastoral Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Peace and Conflict : Journal of Peace Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Pensamiento Psicologico     Open Access  
Pensando Familias     Open Access  
Pensando Psicología     Open Access  
People and Animals : The International Journal of Research and Practice     Open Access  
Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Perceptual and Motor Skills     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Persona     Open Access  
Persona : Jurnal Psikologi Indonesia     Open Access  
Persona Studies     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 183)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Personnel Assessment and Decisions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Personnel Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Perspectives on Behavior Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Perspectives On Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Perspectives Psy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Phenomenology & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Phenomenology and Mind     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Philosophical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Philosophy, Psychiatry, & Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Physiology & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
physiopraxis     Hybrid Journal  
PiD - Psychotherapie im Dialog     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Poiésis     Open Access  
Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Political Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Porn Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Possibility Studies & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
PPmP - Psychotherapie Psychosomatik Medizinische Psychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Practice Innovations     Full-text available via subscription  
Pragmatic Case Studies in Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pratiques Psychologiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Praxis der Kinderpsychologie und Kinderpsychiatrie     Hybrid Journal  
Problems of Psychology in the 21st Century     Open Access  
Professional Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Progress in Brain Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Psic : Revista de Psicologia da Vetor Editora     Open Access  
Psico     Open Access  
Psicoanalisi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicobiettivo     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicoespacios     Open Access  
Psicogente     Open Access  
Psicol?gica Journal     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia : Teoria e Prática     Open Access  
Psicologia da Educação     Open Access  
Psicologia della salute     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicología desde el Caribe     Open Access  
Psicologia di Comunità. Gruppi, ricerca-azione, modelli formativi     Full-text available via subscription  
Psicologia e Saber Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia e Saúde em Debate     Open Access  
Psicologia em Pesquisa     Open Access  
Psicologia em Revista     Open Access  
Psicologia Ensino & Formação     Open Access  
Psicologia Hospitalar     Open Access  
Psicologia Iberoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicologia para América Latina     Open Access  
Psicologia USP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicología, Conocimiento y Sociedad     Open Access  
Psicologia, Saúde e Doenças     Open Access  
Psicooncología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psicoperspectivas     Open Access  
Psicoterapia e Scienze Umane     Full-text available via subscription  
Psikis : Jurnal Psikologi Islami     Open Access  
Psikohumaniora : Jurnal Penelitian Psikologi     Open Access  
Psisula : Prosiding Berkala Psikologi     Open Access  
Psocial : Revista de Investigación en Psicología Social     Open Access  
Psych     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PsyCh Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
PSYCH up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psych. Pflege Heute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychê     Open Access  
Psyche: A Journal of Entomology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychiatrie et violence     Open Access  
Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie up2date     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychiatrische Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychiatry, Psychology and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 389)
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis, Self and Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychoanalytic Dialogues: The International Journal of Relational Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychoanalytic Inquiry: A Topical Journal for Mental Health Professionals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Psychoanalytic Review The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychoanalytic Study of the Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychodynamic Practice: Individuals, Groups and Organisations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Psychodynamic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Psychogeriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychologia : Advances de la Disciplina     Open Access  
Psychologica     Open Access  
Psychologica Belgica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Assessment     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Psychological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 255)
Psychological Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Psychological Perspectives: A Semiannual Journal of Jungian Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Reports     Hybrid Journal  
Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Psychological Research on Urban Society     Open Access  
Psychological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 234)
Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 333)
Psychological Science and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science and Education psyedu.ru     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychological Science In the Public Interest     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Psychological Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychological Thought     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Psychologie Clinique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
Psychologie Française     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychologie in Erziehung und Unterricht     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Psychologische Rundschau     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology     Open Access  
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology and Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychology and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Psychology in Russia: State of the Art     Free   (Followers: 2)
Psychology in Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Psychology Learning & Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Consciousness : Theory, Research, and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Psychology of Language and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Psychology of Leaders and Leadership     Full-text available via subscription  
Psychology of Learning and Motivation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Psychology of Men and Masculinity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Psychology of Music     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Psychology of Religion and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Violence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Psychology of Well-Being : Theory, Research and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychology Research and Behavior Management     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Psychology, Community & Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psychology, Crime & Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Psychology, Health & Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Psychology, Public Policy, and Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Psychometrika     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychomusicology : Music, Mind, and Brain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Psychoneuroendocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychonomic Bulletin & Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Psychopathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Psychopharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Psychophysiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
psychopraxis. neuropraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychosis: Psychological, Social and Integrative Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Psychosomatic Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Psychosomatic Medicine and General Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Psychosomatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Psychotherapeut     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Politics International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Psychotherapy in Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Psychotherapy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
PsychTech & Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Psyecology - Bilingual Journal of Environmental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psyke & Logos     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psykhe (Santiago)     Open Access  
Quaderni di Gestalt     Full-text available via subscription  
Quaderns de Psicologia     Open Access  
Qualitative Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Qualitative Research in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Quantitative Methods for Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Reading Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Rehabilitation Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Neuropsychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.472
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 32  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0894-4105 - ISSN (Online) 1931-1559
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Inhibitory control impairment in social disinhibition following severe
           traumatic brain injury: An experimental study using social and nonsocial
           go/no-go task.

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      Abstract: Objective: Inhibitory control impairment is highly prevalent following traumatic brain injury (TBI). There have not been any empirical investigations into whether this could explain social disinhibition following severe TBI. Further, social context may be important in studying social disinhibition. Therefore, the objectives of this research study were to investigate the role of inhibitory control impairment in social disinhibition following severe TBI, using a social and a nonsocial task. Method: This was a between-group comparative study. Twenty-six adult participants with severe TBI and 27 sex, age, and education-matched controls participated. Social disinhibition was assessed using the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale and the Social Disinhibition Interview. Inhibitory control was assessed using a social and a nonsocial go/no-go task. Two-way mixed analyses of covariance were used to test study hypotheses. Results: Overall, participants were slower, F(1, 43) = 9.841, p = .003, ηp² = .245, and made more errors of commission on no-go trials, F(1, 44) = 11.560, p = .001, ηp² = .208, on the social go/no-go task. When categorized based on disinhibition level (high vs. low), the high disinhibition group made more errors on the social task, F(1, 41) = 4.095, p = .050, ηp² = .091, than the low disinhibition group, and more errors on the social, compared to nonsocial task, task-group interaction, F(1, 41) = 7.233, p = .010, ηp² = .150. Conclusions: Social disinhibition appears to be associated with inhibitory control impairment, although this is only evident when a social task is used. No relationship between social disinhibition and response speed was found. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Aug 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000923
       
  • Central executive training for ADHD: Impact on organizational skills at
           home and school. A randomized controlled trial.

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      Abstract: Objective: The current randomized controlled trial (RCT) was the first to examine the benefits of central executive training (CET, which trains the working components of working memory [WM]) for reducing organizational skills difficulties relative to a carefully matched neurocognitive training intervention (inhibitory control training [ICT]). Method: A carefully phenotyped sample of 73 children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity–impulsivity disorder (ADHD; ages 8–13, M = 10.15, SD = 1.43; 20 girls; 73% White/Non-Hispanic) participated in a preregistered RCT of CET versus ICT (both 10-week treatments). Parent-rated task planning, organized actions, and memory/materials management data were collected at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 2–4 month follow-up; teacher ratings were obtained at pretreatment and 1–2 month follow-up. Results: CET was superior to ICT for improving organizational skills based on teacher report (Treatment × Time interaction: d = 0.61, p = .01, BF₁₀ = 31.61). The CET group also improved significantly based on parent report, but this improvement was equivalent in both groups (main effect of time: d = 0.48, p < .001, BF₁₀ = 3.13 × 10⁷; Treatment × Time interaction: d = 0.29, p = .25, BF₀₁ = 3.73). Post hocs/preregistered planned contrasts indicated that CET produced significant and clinically meaningful (number needed to treat = 3–8) pre/post gains on all three parent (d = 0.50 –0.62) and all three teacher (d = 0.46 –0.95) subscales, with gains that were maintained at 1–2 month (teacher report) and 2–4 month follow-up (parent report) for five of six outcomes. Conclusions: Results provide strong initial evidence that CET produces robust and lasting downstream improvements in school-based organizational skills for children with ADHD based on teacher report. These findings are generally consistent with model-driven predictions that ADHD-related organizational problems are secondary outcomes caused, at least in part, by underdeveloped working memory abilities. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000918
       
  • Production of emotions conveyed by voice in Parkinson’s disease:
           Association between variability of fundamental frequency and gray matter
           volumes of regions involved in emotional prosody.

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      Abstract: Objective: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with impairment in producing emotions conveyed by voice which could depend on motor limitations of the vocal apparatus and/or alterations in emotional processing. This study explores the relationship between the standard deviation of fundamental frequency (F0SD) of emotional speech and the volume of specific gray matter regions. Method: Fifteen PD patients and 15 healthy controls (HC) were asked to produce different emotions vocally elicited by reading short stories. For each vocal track, the F0SD was calculated as index of variability. All subjects underwent a structural magnetic resonance imaging and a voxel-based morphometry analysis. An ad hoc mask of brain regions implicated in emotional prosody was constructed to test the relationship between F0SD and the level of brain atrophy. Results: PD patients showed lower F0SD values than HC in the expression of anger. Neuroimaging results showed brain atrophy in PD patients in a widespread bilateral network, including frontal areas, left cingulate cortex, parietal areas as well as occipital cortices. In the PD group, a positive correlation was observed between F0SD values of anger and volumes of the bilateral supramarginal gyrus, left thalamus, right inferior frontal gyrus, and amygdala. Conclusions: The lower F0SD values observed in PD patients in anger production are consistent with their lower ability to express anger effectively through voice compared to HC. Our data demonstrated the involvement of right-lateralized areas, such as the inferior frontal gyrus and amygdala, which are typically involved in emotional prosody. Disturbances in emotion processing might contribute to speech production deficits in PD, probably in addition to the motor impairment of the articulatory system. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jul 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000912
       
  • Understanding nonliteral language abilities in children with
           neurofibromatosis type 1.

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      Abstract: Objective: Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a genetic syndrome that affects cognitive, behavioral, and social development. Nonliteral language (NLL) comprehension has not been examined in children with NF1. This study examined NLL comprehension in children with NF1 and associated neuropsychological correlates. Method: NLL comprehension was examined in children with NF1 (n = 49) and typically developing (TD) controls (n = 27) aged 4–12 years using a novel NLL task. The task assessed comprehension of sarcasm, metaphor, simile, and literal language. Cognitive (Wechsler Scales Composites or the Woodcock–Johnson Test of Cognitive Abilities Revised scaled scores) and behavioral (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder [ADHD] symptoms) correlates of NLL comprehension in children with NF1 were also examined. Results: Children with NF1 demonstrated significantly poorer sarcasm comprehension than TD children and a vulnerability in metaphor comprehension. Simile and literal language comprehension were not significantly different between groups. Working memory difficulties and impulsive/hyperactive ADHD symptoms were associated with a reduced ability to identify sarcasm in NF1, while verbal comprehension, fluid reasoning, and inattentive ADHD symptoms were not. Conclusions: Results suggest children with NF1 experience challenges in understanding complex NLL comprehension, which are related to reduced working memory and increased impulsivity/hyperactivity. This study provides an initial insight into the figurative language abilities of children with NF1, which should be examined in relation to their social difficulties in future studies. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000916
       
  • Inhibitory control and alcohol use history predict changes in
           posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms.

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      Abstract: Objective: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with significant disability and can become chronic. Predictors of PTSD symptom changes over time, especially in those with a PTSD diagnosis, remain incompletely characterized. Method: In the present study, we examined 187 post-9/11 veterans (Mage = 32.8 years, 87% male) diagnosed with PTSD who performed two extensive clinical and cognitive evaluations approximately 2 years apart. Results: We found that greater PTSD symptom reductions over time were related to lower lifetime drinking history and better baseline inhibitory control ability (Color-Word Inhibition and Inhibition/Switching), though not performance on other executive function tasks. Further, groups with reliably Improved, Worsened, or Chronic PTSD symptoms demonstrated significant differences in baseline inhibitory control and lifetime drinking history, with marked drinking differences starting in the early-to-mid 20s. We also found that PTSD symptom changes showed little-to-no associations with changes in inhibitory control or alcohol consumption. Conclusions: Together, these findings suggest that, in those diagnosed with PTSD, inhibitory control and alcohol use history reflect relatively stable risk/resiliency factors predictive of PTSD chronicity. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Jun 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000909
       
  • Childhood maltreatment and midlife cognitive functioning: A longitudinal
           study of the roles of social support and social isolation.

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      Abstract: Objective: Negative consequences of childhood maltreatment have been well-documented, including poorer executive functioning and nonverbal reasoning in midlife. However, not all adults with a history of childhood maltreatment manifest these outcomes, suggesting the presence of risk and protective factors. Based on growing empirical support for the importance of social variables in understanding neuropsychological development and functioning, we examined whether social support and social isolation mediate or moderate the effects of childhood maltreatment on cognitive functioning in midlife. Method: In the context of a prospective cohort design study, individuals with documented histories of childhood maltreatment (ages 0–11 years) and demographically matched controls were followed up and interviewed in adulthood. Social support and isolation were assessed in young adulthood (Mage = 29), and cognitive functioning was assessed in midlife (Mage = 41). Structural equation modeling was used for mediation and linear regressions for moderation. Results: Childhood maltreatment predicted higher levels of social isolation and lower levels of social support and cognitive functioning. Only social isolation mediated the relationship between childhood maltreatment and midlife cognitive functioning, whereas childhood maltreatment interacted with social support to predict Matrix Reasoning in midlife. Social support was protective for the control group but not for those maltreated. Conclusions: Social isolation and social support play different roles in understanding how childhood maltreatment impacts midlife cognitive functioning. Greater social isolation predicts greater deficits in cognitive functioning overall, whereas the protective effects of social support are limited to those without a documented history of childhood maltreatment. Clinical implications are discussed. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 29 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000911
       
  • The utility of word list and story recall for identifying older U.S.
           Chinese immigrants with cognitive impairment.

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      Abstract: Objective: This study examined the utility of the Chinese-language translations of the word list memory test (Philadelphia Verbal Learning Test) and story memory test (Logical Memory subtest of the Wechsler Memory Scale) for differentiating cognitive diagnosis in older U.S. Chinese immigrants. Method: Participants were ≥ 60 years old, with Chinese language proficiency to complete a diagnostic workup at the Mount Sinai’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. The workup included an evaluation by a geriatric psychiatrist and cognitive testing with a psychometrician. Diagnosis of normal, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and dementia was made independent of the cognitive tests at consensus led by a dementia expert physician. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the sensitivity of story and word list memory tests for distinguishing between groups. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC area/area under the curve [AUC]) was used to compare the predictive accuracy of the two tests. Results: The sample included 71 participants with normal cognition, 42 with MCI, and 24 with dementia. The MCI group was older and less educated than normal controls but younger and more educated than the dementia group. Delayed recall of both memory tests, but not immediate recall of either test, predicted diagnosis. While composite memory score of word list (AUC = 0.90) predicted diagnosis slightly better than that of stories (AUC = 0.85), the difference was not significant in this small sample (p = .14). Conclusions: Chinese-language translations of verbal memory tests, in particular delayed recall scores, were equally sensitive for classifying cognitive diagnosis in older U.S. Chinese immigrants. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000906
       
  • History of traumatic brain injury does not alter course of neurocognitive
           decline in older adults with and without cognitive impairment.

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      Abstract: Objective: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) history is associated with dementia risk, but it is unclear whether TBI history significantly hastens neurocognitive decline in older adults. Method: Data were derived from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center (NACC) data set. Participants with a history of TBI (TBI +; n = 1,467) were matched to individuals without a history of TBI (TBI−; n = 1,467) based on age (50–97, M = 71.61, SD = 8.40), sex, education, race, ethnicity, cognitive diagnosis, functional decline, number of Apolipoprotein ε4 (APOE ε4) alleles, and number of annual visits (3–6). Mixed linear models were used to assess longitudinal neuropsychological test composite scores of executive functioning/attention/speed, language, and memory in TBI + and TBI− participants. Interactions between TBI and demographics, APOE ε4 status, and cognitive diagnosis were also examined. Results: Longitudinal neuropsychological functioning did not differ between TBI groups (p’s> .001). There was a significant three-way interaction (age, TBI history, time) in language (F[20, 5750.1] = 3.133, p < .001) and memory performance (F[20, 6580.8] = 3.386, p < .001), but post hoc analyses revealed TBI history was not driving this relationship (all p’s> .096). No significant interactions were observed between TBI history and sex, education, race/ethnicity, number of APOE ε4 alleles, or cognitive diagnosis (p’s> .001). Conclusions: Findings suggest TBI history, regardless of demographic factors, APOE ε4 status, or cognitive diagnosis, does not alter the course of neurocognitive functioning later-in-life in older adults with or without cognitive impairment. Future clinicopathological longitudinal studies that well-characterize head injuries and the associated clinical course are needed to help clarify the mechanism in which TBI may increase dementia risk. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000892
       
  • Measurement and structural invariance of a neuropsychological battery
           among Middle Eastern/North African, Black, and White older adults.

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      Abstract: Objective: There is a lack of guidance on common neuropsychological measures among Arabic speakers and individuals who identify as Middle Eastern/North African (MENA) in the United States. This study evaluated measurement and structural invariance of a neuropsychological battery across race/ethnicity (MENA, Black, White) and language (Arabic, English). Method: Six hundred six older adults (128 MENA-English, 74 MENA-Arabic, 207 Black, 197 White) from the Detroit Area Wellness Network were assessed via telephone. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analyses examined four indicators corresponding to distinct cognitive domains: episodic memory (Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s Disease [CERAD] Word List), language (Animal Fluency), attention (Montreal Cognitive Assessment [MoCA] forward digit span), and working memory (MoCA backward digit span). Results: Measurement invariance analyses revealed full scalar invariance across language groups and partial scalar invariance across racial/ethnic groups suggesting a White testing advantage on Animal Fluency; yet this noninvariance did not meet a priori criteria for salient impact. Accounting for measurement noninvariance, structural invariance analyses revealed that MENA participants tested in English demonstrated lower cognitive health than Whites and Blacks, and MENA participants tested in Arabic demonstrated lower cognitive health than all other groups. Conclusions: Measurement invariance results support the use of a rigorously translated neuropsychological battery to assess global cognitive health across MENA/Black/White and Arabic/English groups. Structural invariance results reveal underrecognized cognitive disparities. Disaggregating MENA older adults from other non-Latinx Whites will advance research on cognitive health equity. Future research should attend to heterogeneity within the MENA population, as the choice to be tested in Arabic versus English may reflect immigrant, educational, and socioeconomic experiences relevant to cognitive aging. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000902
       
  • But will they use it' Predictors of adoption of an electronic memory aid
           in individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

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      Abstract: Objective: Electronic memory aids are being researched and developed widely to assist the everyday functioning of individuals experiencing cognitive decline. Although development studies show promise in the initial use of electronic memory aids, little is known about the factors that influence adoption of these aids after training ends. Method: We analyzed the baseline characteristics (e.g., demographics, cognitive performance) and training usage (e.g., frequency and pattern of use) of 32 older adults experiencing amnestic mild cognitive impairment who participated in a pilot clinical trial with an electronic memory and management aid (EMMA) tablet application. Sixteen participants who were still using EMMA at 3-months posttraining were defined as “adopters,” whereas the 16 participants who were not using EMMA at 3-months posttraining were defined as “nonadopters.” Results: Adopters scored higher on baseline delayed memory (Cohen’s d = .87) and language (Cohen’s d = .82) index scores than nonadopters. Adopters also interacted with EMMA more frequently (Cohen’s d = 1.34) and in greater quantities (Cohen’s d> .87) than nonadopters by Week 2 of training. Stepwise logistic regression revealed that higher baseline language score and increased frequency of use during training significantly predicted classification of adopters at 3-months posttraining. Conclusions: Adoption of this electronic memory aid was enhanced by teaching the aid to individuals who demonstrated average-level language abilities and who used the aid on average eight times per day during training. Encouraging individuals to use the aid early and often during training can increase adoption of electronic memory aids. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000898
       
  • Error monitoring in amnestic mild cognitive impairment: Cognitive
           correlates and relationship to measures of everyday function.

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      Abstract: Objective: Accurate error monitoring is important for successful completion of everyday tasks and compensatory strategy use. This study examined how error awareness is impacted in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) compared to cognitively healthy older adults (HOA). Cognitive correlates of error monitoring and relation to objective and self-reported measurement of everyday function were also evaluated. Method: Twenty-four individuals with aMCI and 24 cognitively HOAs completed standardized cognitive measures (domains: attention, working memory, executive functioning, memory, language, visuospatial abilities); a computerized go-no-go paradigm task that evaluated error monitoring; a naturalistic, performance-based measure of everyday functioning (day-out-task; DOT); and self- and informant-report measures of everyday dysexecutive difficulties (DEX). Results: Participants with aMCI demonstrated significantly poorer error monitoring as compared to the HOA group (Cohen’s d = 1.02). Working memory and executive functioning were significantly related to error monitoring for both groups. After accounting for age and global cognitive status, hierarchical regressions revealed error monitoring significantly predicted DOT total time (but not accuracy) as well as both self- and informant-report DEX scores. Conclusions: Compared to HOAs, individuals with aMCI exhibited poorer conscious error awareness. Better error monitoring was associated with higher working memory and executive functioning abilities and predicted better everyday functioning. If individuals with aMCI experience difficulties recognizing performance inaccuracies, they will be unable to correct their errors, leading to mistakes in everyday task completion and difficulty implementing appropriate compensatory strategies. Findings suggest that error monitoring may be a potential target for intervention with individuals with aMCI. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 23 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/neu0000887
       
 
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