Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)

Showing 1 - 31 of 31 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ada : A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Image and Video Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Communications and Network     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
E-Health Telecommunication Systems and Networks     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Future Internet     Open Access   (Followers: 84)
Granular Computing     Hybrid Journal  
IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
IEEE Wireless Communications Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
IET Wireless Sensor Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Communications, Network and System Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Digital Earth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Embedded and Real-Time Communication Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Interactive Communication Systems and Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Machine Intelligence and Sensory Signal Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Mobile Computing and Multimedia Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Satellite Communications and Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Wireless and Mobile Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Wireless Networks and Broadband Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journals Digital Communication and Analog Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Digital Information     Open Access   (Followers: 164)
Journal of Interconnection Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southern Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mobile Media & Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nano Communication Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Signal, Image and Video Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Ukrainian Information Space     Open Access  
Vehicular Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Vista     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Wireless Personal Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Mobile Media & Communication
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.089
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2050-1579 - ISSN (Online) 2050-1587
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Book Review: A billion little pieces: RFID and infrastructures of
           identification by Jordan Frith

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      Authors: Jean Hebert
      Pages: 132 - 133
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Volume 11, Issue 1, Page 132-133, January 2023.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-01-02T07:52:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221132486
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Book Review: Selfies: Why we love (and hate) them by Katrin Tiidenberg

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      Authors: Biying Wu-Ouyang
      Pages: 133 - 135
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Volume 11, Issue 1, Page 133-135, January 2023.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-01-02T07:52:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221132486a
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Book Review: Information and communications technology in support of
           migration by Babak Akhgar

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      Authors: Galung Triko
      Pages: 135 - 136
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Volume 11, Issue 1, Page 135-136, January 2023.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-01-02T07:52:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221132486b
      Issue No: Vol. 11, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Digital borders in spatial-temporal mobility: Social inclusion and
           exclusion of Chinese migrant students in Macao

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      Authors: Chuyue Ou, Zhongxuan Lin
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      While mobile social media has increasingly become embedded in migrants’ daily lives, how mobile social media affects migrants’ cross-border experiences remains under-researched. Based on a 2-year ethnographic study, this article demonstrates a more complex relationship among mobile social media, migrants’ spatial-temporal mobility, and their subjective experience of social inclusion and exclusion. Situated in a Chinese cross-border context (Macao Special Administrative Region), this article elaborates on how mobile social media leads to heterogeneous and synchronous spatial-temporal mobility in a homogeneous time-narrative. This article further explains how and why mainland students’ social exclusion transforms into digital inclusion, where the blurring boundaries create the possibility of digital and social inclusion but also risk deeper exclusion and internal borders. The article argues for a new epistemology of the border, which is complicated, heterogeneous, and paradoxical, while mobile social media reinvigorates the border concept in how it constructs and deconstructs territorial/internal boundaries and inclusion/exclusion dynamics.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T06:13:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221149838
       
  • Networks in motion: The alliances of information communication
           

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      Authors: Miles C. Coleman, Will Mari
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we turn back to the 1918 influenza pandemic to throw light on the alliances of information communication technologies and technologies of mobility (such as the car) during the pandemic. We examine newspaper articles, technical publications, and other historical texts to demonstrate that, despite the fact that mobile technologies—such as cellular phones—did not exist during the 1918 pandemic, the telephone and mobility technology nonetheless formed alliances as networks in motion, or social moments in which risk and reward are calculated not simply by the ability to move, but rather the ability to move, while remaining connected, revealing insight into early cultural formations that share similarities and differences with the use of modern mobile media and mobility technologies during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T01:15:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221148427
       
  • Pilgrimage to Fátima and Santiago after COVID: Dis/connection in the
           post-digital age

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      Authors: Ana Jorge
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This paper reports on a practice-centered study focusing on pilgrimage to explore mobile and digital media dis/connectivity in the context of a particular configuration of personal mobility. Pilgrimage is a practice bringing together people motivated by religion, tourism, leisure, or self-development, in what have been termed “post-secular” forms of pilgrimage and tourism. In 2020 and 2021, restrictions on individual mobility were imposed to contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus. This exploratory study consisted of interviews with 13 pilgrims in Portugal, who went on pilgrimage to Fátima or Santiago de Compostela in 2021. We argue that dis/connection by pilgrims is evidence of a post-digital moment. Our analysis shows how pilgrims maintain an ambivalent relationship with mobile media in light of this experience which limits their access to habitual devices, people, and digital services, while opening up for the use of others that facilitate the mobility and the spiritual, affective, and sensorial experience as a pilgrim. However, digital and mobile media are deeply entangled in pilgrims’ relationships with space, time, and others—and thus disconnection is partial and transitional. Moreover, dis/connection is embodied in pilgriming—for example, in how they choose the mobile media considering the weight and energy, and place it on the body, at the same time that mobile media can also afford disembodiment to the experience of pilgrimage—by alleviating the physical pain of walking, for example. Pilgrims also use the media in ways that blur the distinctions between digital and non-digital in the ways they invest meanings in their practices.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T06:13:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221151041
       
  • W(h)ither the device divide' Changing relationships between personal
           computer or mobile device with online activities

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      Authors: Ronald E. Rice, Katy E. Pearce, Kevin J. Calderwood
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The “device divide” occurs when uses of the Internet vary substantially by device. While the mobile phone was welcomed as a way to reduce the general digital divide, much early research presumed that mobile Internet was essentially inferior to personal-computer-based Internet in terms of possible online activities and related benefits. Given ongoing developments in devices, online activities, and socio-demographic differences, we reassess the device divide. After reviewing the concept, and considering mobile phone capabilities that could influence activities, followed by summarizing changes in device usage and online activities in the United States, we analyze the device divide from 2011 to 2019 in Armenia. Over time, use of mobile Internet separately and combined with personal computer Internet grew, and differences in online activity use withered, raising issues of whither device divide research. Nonetheless, in all years, there are continuing demographic-based digital divides after controlling for device divides.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T08:10:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221142134
       
  • Google Maps’ COVID-19 layer as an interface for pandemic life

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      Authors: Alex Gekker
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The paper explores Google Maps’ COVID-19 layer, a special feature launched by the cartographic platform in September 2020, and shut down two years later. Through the reading of promotional corporate blogposts and interfacial analysis of the layer, it critiques the layers' mediation of the pandemic, caught between public health needs and Google's overarching ethos. The analysis underscores three central claims: that interfacial choices endemic to the layer impose certainty and reduce necessary user hesitancy; promote data commodification regardless of its pandemic need; and stake unnecessary exceptionalism to the pandemic-spcecific information rather than integrating it into the maps’ existing hybridity. The paper ends with design recommendation for a better COVID layer, centered around bottom-up community practices, higher degree of personalisation, and increased friction.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-12-14T06:48:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221143325
       
  • The second-level smartphone divide: A typology of smartphone use based on
           frequency of use, skills, and types of activities

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      Authors: Alexander Wenz, Florian Keusch
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Smartphones have become one of the most frequently used devices for accessing the Internet. Although a growing body of research has examined the second-level digital divide with a focus on general Internet and digital media use, little is known about patterns of smartphone use and smartphone-related skills in the general population. This paper examines inequalities in the use of smartphone technology based on two nationally representative samples of smartphone owners collected in Germany in 2017 and 2020. We identify six distinct types of smartphone users by conducting latent class analyses that classify individuals based on their frequency of smartphone use, self-rated smartphone skills, and activities carried out on their smartphone. Smartphone use differs significantly by sociodemographic characteristics and operating system. The types reflecting more frequent and diverse smartphone use are younger, have higher levels of educational attainment, and are more likely to use an iPhone. Overall, the composition of the latent classes and their characteristics are robust across samples.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-12-01T06:40:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221140761
       
  • Repurposing a WhatsApp group: How a fantasy cricket group transformed into
           a site of care and support during India's second wave of Covid-19

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      Authors: Aditya Deshbandhu, Sejal Sahni
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Set in the context of India's second Covid-19 wave (April–June 2021), this article examines the transformation of a WhatsApp group originally created to study a pool of fantasy sport players into a site of care, concern, and support. By using netnography and in-depth interviews to chart the various challenges faced by the study's participants, the article analyzes how key health information was curated, moderated, and shared by the group's participants during the period. Our findings indicate that during the Covid-19 wave, users of WhatsApp relied on the personal connections it offered as they found ways to make the platform their own. By harnessing WhatsApp's capabilities with regard to accessing and sharing essential information that was both timely and locationally relevant, users of the service found ways to stay informed in moments that were fraught with uncertainty. By analyzing the various ways in which the group's participants shared information with each other and outside of the group, this study argues that the insights obtained can be used to understand broader social realities and the possibilities offered by platforms such as WhatsApp that could help navigate the various challenges presented by the ongoing pandemic in the Global South.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T08:21:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221137998
       
  • Overestimating or underestimating communication findings' Comparing
           self-reported with log mobile data by data donation method

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      Authors: Biying Wu-Ouyang, Michael Chan
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile phone usage is typically measured via self-reporting. However, scholars have questioned the validity of self-reported data, which may lead to Type I or Type II errors. Using an online survey (n = 777), this study compared self-reported and log mobile phone usage data using a simplified version of the mobile data donation method. The results showed that people generally underreported their mobile phone usage in terms of time duration, the number of notifications, and apps used. Moreover, self-reported data may either have no additional effect on or overestimate the communication findings depending on the outcome variables. This challenges the Type II error explanation and suggests that the effect sizes of self-reported data might not be underestimated after all. Instead, past research examining mobile use and pertinent outcomes may have false-positive findings and Type I errors. Given the potential inaccuracies of self-reported data, future research on mobile media and communications should go beyond self-reported data to enhance the validity of findings.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T08:40:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221137162
       
  • Situational boundary conditions of digital stress: Goal conflict and
           autonomy frustration make smartphone use more stressful

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      Authors: Alicia Gilbert, Susanne E. Baumgartner, Leonard Reinecke
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile connectivity can negatively affect smartphone users by eliciting stress. Past research focused on stress-inducing potentials of smartphone use behaviors and, recently, on the cognitive-motivational engagement with online interactions. However, theoretical perspectives as the mobile connectivity paradox and the IM³UNE model further suggest that digital stress effects may be conditional. A preregistered experience sampling study (n = 123; 1,427 use episodes) investigated relationships of cognitive-motivational (online vigilance) and behavioral (communication load, media multitasking) smartphone use patterns with perceived stress and introduced two situational boundary conditions (goal conflict, autonomy need dissatisfaction). Results demonstrate that online vigilance can induce stress directly and via increasing communication load. Goal conflict and autonomy need dissatisfaction moderated the influence of online vigilance and media multitasking on stress. Findings are discussed in the context of effect directionality and the need to further investigate boundary conditions in digital well-being research.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T06:18:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221138017
       
  • Does parental smartphone use predict parents’ perceptions of family
           life' An examination of momentary associations between parental
           smartphone use, parental experiences of quality time, and parental
           perceptions of difficult child behavior

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      Authors: Floor Denecker, Lieven De Marez, Koen Ponnet, Mariek Vanden Abeele
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article reports the findings of a multi-method study that explored whether frequency and duration of parental smartphone use in the presence of children is associated with parents’ perceptions of quality time and child restlessness, an indicator of difficult child behavior. Additionally, the study explored whether parental perceptions of technoference, respectively time displacement, mediate the association between smartphone use measures - respectively frequency and duration of use - and the outcome measures. We collected experience sampling and smartphone log data among parents of children aged between 4 and 10 years to assess momentary between- and within-person-level associations between the frequency and duration of co-present parental smartphone use and parents’ perceptions of quality time, their child's restlessness, technoference, and time displacement. We gathered 1484 observations from 56 participants. Multilevel mediation analysis revealed no between-person associations between our two measures of parental smartphone use and the outcome measures. At the within-person level, no associations were found with child restlessness. However, smartphone frequency did predict perceptions of greater technoference, and smartphone duration predicted time displacement. Technoference in turn negatively predicted parental experiences, although the hypothesized mediation did not reach statistical significance. Time displacement predicted parental experiences of quality time in the opposite direction of what was hypothesized. Some heterogeneity was found in the observed within-person associations, suggesting that there is person-specificity. We discuss the theoretical and practical implications of our findings.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T07:32:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221134168
       
  • Looking back to look forward: 5G/COVID-19 conspiracies and the long
           history of infrastructural fears

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      Authors: Jordan Frith, Scott Campbell, Leah Komen
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Almost as soon as the COVID-19 pandemic began spreading throughout much of the world, conspiracies arose that blamed the virus on the deployment of fifth-generation cellular networks (5G) infrastructure. These conspiracies had significant consequences, including protests against 5G and the destruction of 5G infrastructure. This article uses a media genealogy approach to place the 5G/COVID-19 conspiracies within the long and recurring cycle of conspiracies focused on mobile infrastructure. Placed within that broader history, this article argues that the 5G/COVID-19 conspiracies should have been unsurprising, and these types of infrastructural conspiracies should be a more significant part of mobile media and communication (MMC) research because infrastructures are an often invisible, yet crucial, part of the mobile practices studied within MMC research. The article concludes by theorizing about why mobile infrastructures are such a frequent target for conspiracy theories and argues that researchers should begin planning now for combatting the conspiracies that will almost inevitably arise when the next generation of mobile infrastructure gets linked to fears about public health.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T04:25:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221133950
       
  • Playing remotely: The COVID-19 pandemic and mobile locative gaming in
           Northeast Brazil

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      Authors: Luiz Adolfo Andrade, Jesse Nery Filho
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile locative games consist of a subset of mobile games that encourage players to go outside, by promoting outdoor activities and physical meetings. Because of this, their gameplay breaks the core of social distancing strategies implemented since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, developers implemented changes in their locative games supported by the mobile game revenue model, which enabled a strategy called “playing remotely” that encourages the players to spend their money with microtransactions. This study analyses the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in mobile locative gaming, by examining the preferences and behavior of players from the Northeast Brazil, a region with socioeconomic inequalities and urban violence, among other issues that shape mobility practices.Accordingly, we pose a research question: how do players living in Northeast Brazil manage the mobile game revenue model for playing remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic' With this in mind, we have conducted an online survey among communities of players located in Northeast Brazil, by sharing a questionnaire with 21 questions. Seventy-four players from the region responded to our survey. The sample's age was from 16 to 58 years old, and they lived in seven of the nine states that form Northeast Brazil. We have found that players’ preference is to invest their time in gathering resources by playing the game, instead of spending their money in microtransactions for playing remotely. Moreover, we have found that mobile communication plays a significant role in keeping players in touch during the COVID-19 pandemic, allowing players to expand their networks to other cities and countries. We have concluded that playing remotely represents an important strategy to support the development of locative games and other location-based applications, which can help us to prepare for the next pandemic.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T06:11:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221132208
       
  • (Im)mobility and performance of emotions: Chinese international
           students’ difficult journeys to home during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Guanqin He, Yijia Zhang
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines mediated performances of emotions by Chinese international students in their transnational journeys returning to China during the COVID-19 pandemic with a focus on the role of mobile media in helping students cope with their cross-border (im)mobility and symbolic immobility. By thematically analyzing 36 self-representational videos produced by returning Chinese students on a burgeoning mobile media platform Douyin, we identify 5 overarching themes of emotional performance: fear, pride, gratitude, shame, and solidarity. We propose that mobile media has the potential to create a hybrid space that witnesses and elicits empathy for the hardship experienced by marginalized mobile groups during the global pandemic. Mobile media, by enabling simultaneous communication, amplifies the sensation of belonging in times of isolation and ambiguity and offers dialogic venues for disparate groups across geographical and socioemotional distances. Our findings suggest the vulnerability of mobile communities in the event of a global pandemic, and the affordances of mobile media in confronting and resolving such precarity. We call attention to the intersections of mobile communities and mobile media amid the global pandemic, particularlyon the experiences and performances of emotions in hybrid spaces.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-07T06:02:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221119585
       
  • Book readers in the digital age: Reading practices and media technologies

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      Authors: Annika Schwabe, Lukas Kosch, Hajo G. Boomgaarden, Günther Stocker
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      With the rising popularity of digital reading media, leisure reading is undergoing a transformation process. However, the reasons for readers to adopt e-book reading or to stick to traditional printed books are mainly unknown. Therefore, we explored demographic and motivational differences between print readers, digital readers, and readers using both reading media. We further studied their book-reading practices, like the amount of reading, the preferred genres, the different reading situations, and if there are dedicated reading media for specific genres or situations. Additionally, we explored if digital reading media have changed the reading process or just appeal to a certain type of reader. Therefore, we conducted a survey (n  =  779) of adult book readers about their leisure reading behavior. The results show that print readers, digital readers, and readers using both media differ in age, gender, amount of reading, genre preference, and the situations in which they read. Furthermore, digital reading media especially foster reading on the move.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T06:30:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221122208
       
  • The relational ontology of mobile touchscreens and the body: Ambient
           proprioception and risk during COVID-19

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      Authors: Ingrid Richardson, Rowan Wilken
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we explore the tension between the significance of touch as a vital sensory modality of human experience and how, with the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, proximity and (tactile) intimacy with other bodies in urban and domestic spaces becomes fraught with the risk of viral contagion. Informed by haptic media studies, the corporeal or sensory turn in contemporary theory, and phenomenology-informed mobile media studies, we examine the possible impacts for mobile device use of the risks of viral contagion associated with our routinized uses of haptic interfaces. We also examine the role and possibility of mobile haptics and the touchscreen in these contexts, and our capacity—via embodied and material metaphor—to extend corporeal reach through the mobile interface. Our contention is that, while the “stand in” for touch that mobile media offers may be perpetually incomplete, the “as-if” structure of habitual experience can play a significant role in narrowing the sensorial gap.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-09-02T06:29:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221117434
       
  • Mobile communication research in 15 top-tier journals, 2006–2020: An
           updated review of trends, advances, and characteristics

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      Authors: Ran Wei, Jichen Fan, Jindong Liu
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Benefiting from the smartphone turn in wireless telecommunication, studies about mobile telephony have continued to grow in the 3/4G era. To explore the growth trends in the 3/4G era, and what and how mobile media are studied, the present study analyzes patterns and trends of mobile communication research in 512 articles published in 15 top-ranked communication journals from 2006 to 2020. Findings indicate that mobile communication research has grown into a distinctive subfield or sub-discipline, defined by four main characteristics. First, the scope of mobile communication research is broader than studies of mobile media alone. Second, mobile media as global technologies have attracted international authors, although global scholarship is uneven. Third, the boundary of mobile communication has expanded from social, economic, and cultural perspectives to those of health, education, and tourism. Fourth, although mobile communication research is increasingly theory-informed, building distinctive theories about mobile communication remains a challenge for future growth.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-30T06:32:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221110324
       
  • Corrigendum to “Book Review: Protests in the Information Age: Social
           Movements, Digital Practices and Surveillance by Lucas Melgaço and
           Jeffrey Monaghan”

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      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-24T04:35:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221087331
       
  • Celebrating 10 years of Mobile Media & Communication

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      Authors: Steve Jones, Veronika Karnowski, Rich Ling, Thilo von Pape
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T08:08:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221134909
       
  • Predicting the next decade of mobile communication studies research: More
           mobile media, fewer mobile phones

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      Authors: Jordan Frith
      First page: 8
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-09-13T02:51:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221126958
       
  • Mobile things—lost, found, and made

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      Authors: Klaus Bruhn Jensen
      First page: 13
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T06:28:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221126960
       
  • The smartphone between the present and the future: Five changes

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      Authors: Leopoldina Fortunati
      First page: 19
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-10T05:45:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221131223
       
  • Evolving mobile media: Changing technology and transforming behavior

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      Authors: Ran Wei
      First page: 25
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-11T07:34:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221131448
       
  • The structure of knowledge and dynamics of scholarly communication in
           mobile media and communication research, 2013–2022

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      Authors: Sun Kyong Lee
      First page: 30
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-23T04:24:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221132212
       
  • Doing Mobile Media and Communication scholarship in different keys:
           Sounding out structure and integration in the field

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      Authors: Scott W. Campbell, Leah J. Komen
      First page: 40
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-10T05:46:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221131422
       
  • Field challenges

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      Authors: James E. Katz
      First page: 47
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T06:52:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221132211
       
  • Playing with place: Location-based mobile games in post-pandemic public
           spaces

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      Authors: Larissa Hjorth, Adriana de Souza e Silva
      First page: 52
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-07T06:02:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221126959
       
  • Hybrid spaces 2.0: Connecting networked urbanism, uneven mobilities, and
           creativity, in a (post) pandemic world

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      Authors: Adriana de Souza e Silva
      First page: 59
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-19T06:51:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221132118
       
  • What we do in the shadows: The consumption of mobile messaging by social
           media mobile apps in the twilight of the social networking era

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      Authors: Jeffrey A. Hall
      First page: 66
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T05:36:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221133610
       
  • Mobile social media: The challenges and opportunities continue;

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lee Humphreys
      First page: 74
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T05:35:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221132209
       
  • Mobile media in China: Media practice as a research orientation

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      Authors: Guoliang Zhang
      First page: 80
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T07:03:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221134947
       
  • The transnationality of mobile media and contemporary racisms: A future
           research agenda

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      Authors: Jason Vincent A. Cabañes
      First page: 88
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T07:52:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221133023
       
  • Reluctant mobilism: Forced displacement

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      Authors: Maren Hartmann
      First page: 95
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The article returns to Maren Hartmann's 2013 concept of mediated mobilism, not only highlighting its current relevance, but also underlining its less convincing aspects. Emphasized is the enduring relevance of coupling mobile media research with questions (and insights) from the mobilities framework. The article's other primary focus is on extending the concept of mediated mobilism to more clearly concentrate on forced (im)mobilities as well as reluctant ones.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-09-26T05:42:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221126965
       
  • Observations on mobile communication and well-being research

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      Authors: Michael Chan
      First page: 101
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-10T05:46:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221131232
       
  • Psychological perspectives on mobile media: A flyover review

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      Authors: Joseph B. Bayer, Leonard Reinecke, Mariek M. P. Vanden Abeele
      First page: 107
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T06:17:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221134369
       
  • Mobile work, mobility, and mobile devices: Responding to a societal shift

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      Authors: Keri K. Stephens
      First page: 118
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T06:28:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221126956
       
  • On the becoming of an academic home for research into the intersection of
           mobile devices and news

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      Authors: Oscar Westlund
      First page: 125
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T06:13:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579221134261
       
 
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