Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)

Showing 1 - 31 of 31 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ada : A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Image and Video Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Communications and Network     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
E-Health Telecommunication Systems and Networks     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Future Internet     Open Access   (Followers: 87)
Granular Computing     Hybrid Journal  
IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
IEEE Wireless Communications Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
IET Wireless Sensor Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Communications, Network and System Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Digital Earth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Embedded and Real-Time Communication Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Interactive Communication Systems and Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Machine Intelligence and Sensory Signal Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Mobile Computing and Multimedia Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Satellite Communications and Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Wireless and Mobile Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Wireless Networks and Broadband Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journals Digital Communication and Analog Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Digital Information     Open Access   (Followers: 181)
Journal of Interconnection Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southern Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mobile Media & Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nano Communication Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Signal, Image and Video Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ukrainian Information Space     Open Access  
Vehicular Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Vista     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Wireless Personal Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Mobile Media & Communication
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.089
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2050-1579 - ISSN (Online) 2050-1587
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Escaping the rough life of the street: Roofless people and mobile social
           media

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      Authors: Vojtěch Dvořák
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Roofless people are among the most vulnerable, marginalized, and silenced societal groups. However, access to social media through mobile devices may provide opportunities for battling their stigmatization, social exclusion, low self-esteem, and self-acceptance. This study aims to explore how people who are experiencing rooflessness use and represent themselves on social media. This qualitative study, using thematic analysis of 16 in-depth interviews, reveals that roofless people may use social media to increase their social capital, advocate for other homeless people, and, most importantly, escape or reconstruct the reality of life on the street through continuous online social interaction and revalidation of oneself.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2024-02-12T05:39:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579241232035
       
  • Software review: What kind of music are you into' Collecting behavioral
           music consumption data in online surveys with Spotivey

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      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T05:48:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579241228684
       
  • Book Review: Left to our own devices: Coping with insecure work in a
           digital age by Ticona Julia

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      Authors: Guanqin He
      Pages: 218 - 219
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 218-219, January 2024.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-12-26T04:51:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231215250
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Book Review: Homelessness and mobile communication: Precariously connected
           by Humphry Justine

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      Authors: Tom De Leyn
      Pages: 219 - 220
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 219-220, January 2024.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-12-26T04:51:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231215250a
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Book Review: Qualitative research using social media by Bouvier Gwen &
           Rasmussen Joel

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      Authors: Deyi Kong
      Pages: 221 - 222
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 221-222, January 2024.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-12-26T04:51:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231215250b
      Issue No: Vol. 12, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • The effect of “Housing First” on mobile and digital media usage by
           people experiencing homelessness: A program evaluation based on a
           randomized controlled trial in Spain

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      Authors: José-Luis Martínez-Cantos, Juan-Ángel Martín-Fernández, Sonia Panadero
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      In 2014, a non-governmental organization called HOGAR SÍ initiated the Hábitat program as a pioneer attempt to implement the Housing First model in Spain. The present study is part of the evaluation of this program, which was carried out from May 2015 to February 2020 using a form of a randomized controlled trial. The treatment group was compared with a control group (people experiencing homelessness but not selected as Hábitat users), keeping track of their evolution over 18 months. Among the many dimensions that were evaluated (coverage of basic needs, life satisfaction, victimization, physical and mental health, etc.), the study analyzed social support and leisure activities involving the use of mobile media and other communication technologies—along similar lines to some previous research. The main results show that participating in the Hábitat program brought a few improvements in digital inclusion. That is the case of the higher use of mobile phones to receive calls, to connect to the Internet, or to have contact with relatives, partners, or friends. These gains seem to be significant for the increase in perception of available social support by Hábitat users, whereas these changes did not occur in the comparison group to the same extent. Additionally, participating in the program enhances satisfaction with leisure time, as well as the frequency of carrying out some activities such as shopping, watching TV, or doing a pastime or hobby. It could be concluded that the Hábitat program achieved significant improvements in areas beyond specific housing services. The positive effects regarding social support and leisure activities seem to be partly channeled through mobile phones and digital applications; nevertheless, we are aware that further research and discussion on the active role of these technologies in helping people experiencing homelessness is still necessary.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-12-29T06:08:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231216670
       
  • Spotivey: A web application for simplified use of the Spotify application
           programming interface in online questionnaire studies

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      Authors: Markus Radke, Steffen Lepa, Matthias Ladleif
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Everyday music listening has become an important research topic during the last decades. However, self-reporting through questionnaire surveys, the received approach for studying individual music consumption, presents methodological challenges. The rise of mobile music streaming and open application programming interfaces introduces new opportunities to address these productively. Spotivey is a free research software that integrates music streaming provider API functionalities into online surveys and in this way allows to connect digital behavioral traces with self-reported questionnaire data. The current version effortlessly retrieves comprehensive information about respondents’ past music listening on Spotify while they fill an online survey. Through an informed consent procedure, General Date Protection Regulation compliance for this new form of digital data donation is ensured. Methodical challenges include participant dropout and the need for robust statistical analysis methods. Planned future enhancements encompass expanding application programming interfaces support, enriching retrieved data with information from other music databases, and compatibility with diverse online survey design systems.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-12-26T06:47:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231220857
       
  • The association between mobile dating app use and relationship status
           satisfaction: A survey study

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      Authors: Daniëlle N. M. Bleize, Aart van Stekelenburg, Sanne L. Tamboer
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Connecting with others through mobile dating apps has become one of the most popular ways for people to meet. These apps might help people find a suitable partner and, thus, achieve a satisfactory love life. To examine whether mobile dating apps deliver on their potential for positive relationship outcomes, this study investigates if and how the use of these apps is related to satisfaction with one's relationship status. In a survey study, we compared previous and current users of mobile dating apps with people who have never used such apps (n= 1,054, from the United States or United Kingdom, younger than 35). Results showed that dating app users score lower on satisfaction with their relationship status than non-users. This negative association between dating app use and satisfaction was stronger for women than it was for men. The most crucial factor in relationship status satisfaction, however, is whether people are in a relationship or not. Future research should aim to disentangle the causal order of the association between mobile dating app use and relationship status satisfaction, and investigate if these apps have the potential to improve users’ satisfaction with their relationship status in the long term through facilitating romantic relationships.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-12-22T07:41:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231221069
       
  • Context matters: Exploring the mediated nature of digital service
           provision within homelessness organizations

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      Authors: Jennifer Harris
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      A wide body of research has demonstrated the importance of mobile media in the lives of people experiencing homelessness. However, there is a need to understand digital access, uses, and needs within wider organizational and technological contexts. Informed by a social construction of technology theoretical perspective, this article explores how different homelessness organizations in England appropriate technology within their support services. Drawing on findings from three case studies, it demonstrates how provision is shaped by interpretive, cultural, and material factors that operate to facilitate or inhibit use. Given the significance of technology within the lives of people experiencing homelessness, this article highlights the need for practitioners and policy makers to prioritize and examine the nature and impact of digital service provision and to ensure that its design and delivery reflects the needs of users.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-12-20T07:43:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231219842
       
  • The origins of mobile communication research

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      Authors: Rich Ling, Leopoldina Fortunati
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T07:42:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231220847
       
  • The rise of chronic reachability and the accelerated, flexible society:
           The social construction of the pager, 1987–1999

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      Authors: Jesper Verhoef
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Despite having been extremely popular in the 1980s and 1990s, the pager has received scant academic attention. Drawing on speed theory, this article provides a discourse analysis of popular representations of the beeper in the Netherlands between 1987 and 1999. It shows that it was first merely “emergency professionals” who were expected to be reachable whenever, wherever. However, the 1990s saw a growing number of occupations adopt the pager, which, additionally, was deployed to speed up tasks. Pagers enabled but also required people to work more efficiently and be more flexible. Articles and advertisements helped naturalize the idea that this was commonsensical. After 1994, an unprecedented pager marketing campaign sold the wider populace on the expectation of continuous reachability, which rapidly became the new norm. Advertisements successfully presented the pager as a communication technology that enabled reachability, yet—unlike its main competitor, the mobile phone—shielded users from constant availability. It thus offered autonomous reachability. All the same, journalists took issue with the reachability boom and flexibilization that pagers helped bring about. They criticized that pagers helped usher in a 24/7 economy, which in turn led to a stress society. Ultimately, then, this article demonstrates that the provenance of our sped-up society—or at least the pervasive idea that we live in one—is to be found before mobile phones and the Internet became ubiquitous.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-12-19T07:41:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231219353
       
  • Nationwide research on the uses and motivations of dating apps by young
           adults in the cultural environment of Turkey

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      Authors: Aylin Sunam Audry, Ozen Bas, İrem İnceoğlu, Yiğit Bahadır Kaya, Gözde Cöbek, Saygın Vedat Alkurt
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Since Tinder's worldwide popularity, location-based dating apps have become widespread. The existing literature mainly focuses on a single app in European and US contexts and pays little attention to other cultural contexts. This paper addresses this gap by examining dating app choices and motivations of young adults (18–29 years old) in Turkey. It examines the intersectionality of socio-demographic variables in a cultural setting that is quite different not only from European and US contexts but also from other Muslim-majority contexts. Deriving from the nationally representative survey (n = 1,498), our research finds statistically significant differences in dating app preferences and adults’ motivations regarding location, sexual, gender, and religious identities. This study underlines the crucial role of cultural geography and its social fabric in mobile dating, even within the same national setting.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-12-04T01:35:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231215709
       
  • Who “phubs”' A systematic meta-analytic review of phubbing
           predictors

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      Authors: Anisha Arenz, Anna Schnauber-Stockmann
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Phubbing (i.e., snubbing someone in face-to-face interactions by focusing on one's phone instead of those present) has increased enormously in recent years and has become a widespread usage phenomenon that is associated with negative consequences, for instance for relationships and friendships. To better understand the predictors of phubbing behavior, the present paper provides a systematic overview of the growing research field. Based on a meta-analytic review of 79 studies and 526 effect sizes, we identified 10 higher-level predictor categories of phubbing behavior: sociodemographics, personality, technology-related norms & experiences, technical equipment, (smart)phone & Internet use, problematic use, well-being, psychopathology, and resilience as well as risk factors. The results of the three-level meta-analysis models indicated that the strongest predictors were problematic use patterns.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-11-28T10:12:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231215678
       
  • Tethered compliance: Exploring the role of the smartphone in online civic
           engagement among low-income US young people through two pandemic-era case
           studies

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      Authors: Lynn Schofield Clark, Carlos Jimenez, Johnny C. Ramirez
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article considers the roles that smartphones play as young people living in low-income communities navigate everyday activities, including those of online civic engagement. Drawing on ethnographic data collected during the COVID-19 lockdown, we offer empirical and methodological support for Hartmann’s concept of mediated mobilism, highlighting smartphone-related frictions and tensions that emerge at the intersections of social and political mobilities and immobilities. Specifically, our data demonstrate that as smartphones kept young people on call for parents, caregivers, siblings and others who might need them to help negotiate the heightened demands that characterized family life during the pandemic, young people found themselves in situations that we term tethered compliance, torn between the desire to participate in online civic engagement and political mobilization and the need to fulfill various exigencies of family life that emerged as a result of physical and social immobilities. Whereas scholars previously argued that mobile media held promise for mitigating structural inequality and enhancing youth online civic engagement, our findings suggest that these technologies are instead adding a new layer to be managed.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-11-23T05:26:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231208006
       
  • (In)Visibility and the smartphone: Experiencing homelessness as dictated
           by urban figurations of social control

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      Authors: Anna Xymena Tissot, Frank Sowa
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This contribution sheds light on how people experiencing homelessness in Germany make sense of an app designed with them in mind and whether using it would be of benefit to them. However, it must be acknowledged that the app has yet to be developed. “Urban figurations of social control,” a term we use to refer to the social conditions of homelessness in Germany, give rise to a significant loss of trust as well as a state of vulnerability, feelings of loneliness, and limited agency for people experiencing homelessness. Drawing on a group discussion with 12 people experiencing homelessness that took place in Germany in 2019, our findings demonstrate that the respondents project particular fears and desires onto the use of the potential app. Whenever they fear surveillance and institutional control, they wish to be invisible to the app. On the other hand, their desire to access resources and information (food, places to sleep, housing) and to meet with peers in order to create meaningful social relationships requires their visibility. Thus, navigating between visibility and invisibility by way of a smartphone involves situationally and strategically constructing a safe environment for their digital participation, helping them to reduce their vulnerability and loneliness and restore their agency. Moreover, in that the app is used as a means of rendering assistance to homeless people (and highlighting the grievances associated with this) that is visible to others, the respondents challenge the current framing of homelessness. The supposed system of help is revealed to be the social problem itself.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-11-22T06:53:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231214898
       
  • Data collection from journalistic news apps without prerequired coding
           experience using MacroDroid smartphone automation software to simulate
           user interactions

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      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-11-15T04:15:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231202321
       
  • Appified homelessness: Locative media apps as tools for the prevention of
           homelessness in Poland

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      Authors: Blanka Brzozowska
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The paper deals with the issue of homelessness in the context of the application of location-based services in urban spaces. Using a walkthrough method, the article compares two applications that allow citizens to report the presence of homeless persons. In doing so, it discusses the use of mobile applications to address the issue of homeless people and the potential benefits and disadvantages of such applications. The paper also emphasized the need to critically examine the power relations that shape the use of locative media to address homelessness. It also highlights the unequal access to appified culture, which particularly affects the homeless. The article suggests the need for a broader discussion and identification of various aspects of the use of location media in the context of homelessness.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T10:35:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231212355
       
  • Is life brighter when your phone is not' The efficacy of a grayscale
           smartphone intervention addressing digital well-being

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      Authors: Cynthia A. Dekker, Susanne E. Baumgartner
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      In response to the growing public concern about digital well-being, many tools have been developed for individuals to reduce their screen time. An understudied but promising self-nudge intervention is turning off smartphone screen colors (i.e., grayscaling). Since a grayscale setting is available on all smartphones, it has the potential to be an easily implemented intervention. The main aim of the current study was to assess the efficacy of a grayscale intervention by addressing its effects on both objective smartphone behavior as well as on daily subjective indicators of digital well-being. Participants’ smartphone use was tracked for 2 weeks (N  =  84). The first week served as a baseline measure, followed by a 1-week grayscale intervention. Findings indicate that daily screen time was significantly reduced by 20 min, yet the daily number of phone unlocks did not change, suggesting deep-rooted checking habits. Moreover, grayscaling improved perceived control over one's smartphone use, and reduced perceived overuse, online vigilance, and stress, but did not affect productivity or sleep quality. Overall, findings indicate that grayscaling is an effective strategy to reduce screen time and improve digital well-being.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T10:34:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231212062
       
  • Technologies of inclusion and marginalization: Mobile phones and multiple
           exclusion homeless women

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      Authors: Heather Williams, Becky Faith, Linda Waldman
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Little is known about women experiencing multiple exclusion homelessness (MEH) in the UK, and even less about their use of mobile phones. MEH describes a subset of homeless people with multiple and complex needs who experience forms of deep social exclusion. Marginalized and socially excluded women often avoid social services and survive through remaining elusive and invisible. This evasion is reflected in their mobile phone practices in which both use and nonuse are expressions of their limited agency in the face of profound structural inequalities. This study explores MEH women's agency articulated through mobile phone ownership and usage in a UK coastal city. Through “deep hanging out” participant observation and interviews, it illuminates the complex ways in which MEH women access and manage mobile phones. It highlights paradoxical tensions between connection and invisibility; for example, homeless support services provide budget feature phones to MEH clients to ensure their improved safety and connectivity; however, MEH women sell these phones to meet their immediate needs. In so doing, these women reject the provision and discourse of stripped-back, financially compromised UK homeless support services. Through their mobiles, MEH women also engage with social media in uncertain ways, an activity which rather than providing connectivity and access, reaffirms social marginalization. Thus, MEH women's deep social exclusion is both mediated and reinforced by their mobile media practices.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T08:05:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231211498
       
  • “It's one of the most important things we carry for us”: How mobile
           hotspots support people experiencing homelessness

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      Authors: Colin Rhinesmith
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Previous studies have examined the benefits and challenges of using mobile phones to support people experiencing homelessness. However, few studies have considered how mobile Wi-Fi hotspots support unhoused individuals and couples through public library lending programs. This paper seeks to address a gap in mobile communication scholarship by contributing insights from a qualitative study of library patrons who checked out mobile hotspots from the Boston Public Library in Massachusetts, USA. The findings show that although mobile hotspots provided many benefits for public library patrons in general, these devices facilitated mobile communication with a different sense of urgency for six people experiencing homelessness who also happened to be in romantic relationships. More concretely, the study found that mobile Wi-Fi hotspots reduced stress and anxiety for unhoused patrons because without the devices, patrons without fixed residences worried they could not be found; that hotspots kept unhoused patrons more connected, and therefore safer, in their tents despite the cold weather and a lack of electricity; and that unhoused patrons were concerned about their devices getting stolen because of their precarious situation. Although the unhoused patrons who participated in this study also shared their recommendations regarding how mobile hotspot lending programs in public libraries could be improved, they also mentioned that the benefits of hotspot availability far outweighed their challenges. The findings have implications for those working to address homelessness, including community-based organizations, government agencies, and policymakers who seek further insights into the positive role that mobile hotspot devices can play in supporting positive health outcomes for individuals and couples experiencing homelessness.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T07:51:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231212061
       
  • Wearable witnesses: Deathlogging and framing wearable technology data in
           “Fitbit murders”

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      Authors: James N. Gilmore, Cassidy Gruber
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Wearable self-tracking devices such as Fitbit and Apple Watch have begun to be featured in high-profile criminal cases such as murder trials for the ways the data from these devices supposedly give access to objective truths about a victim's physiological state and time of death. Drawing from the concepts of deathlogging and datafication, we argue that an examination of media framing around wearables in criminal investigations and court rooms helps demonstrate how technologies become connected to different domains and practices. A discourse analysis of five case studies and 57 news stories showed how the framing of wearables in this context emphasized both enchantment with the capacity for datafication to witness, as well as contestation around how to define and interpret this witnessing. This study demonstrated how reporting around the incorporation of mobile media technologies into institutional practices often reproduced desires for digital technologies to provide access to “the truth” of social reality.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-10-18T06:44:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231208139
       
  • Audience perceptions of a speaker who uses a smartphone as a public
           speaking aid: An experimental video vignette investigation

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      Authors: Blake Hendrickson, Lucas Wen Jie Goh
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Individuals use their smartphones for an assortment of communication and functional activities and in a variety of contexts. Researchers analyzing smartphone use during interpersonal interactions have posed hypotheses and developed theories regarding the positive and negative influences that smartphones have on individuals and relationships. However, there is little research that examines the role smartphone use plays in a public speaking context. The current study uses a video vignette methodology to explore audience perceptions of a speaker who uses a smartphone as a presentation aid at a small university in Singapore. Overall, results suggest that the speaker’s smartphone use did not have a negative impact on perceptions of credibility (likeability/trustworthiness, competence, speaker ability), speaker immediacy, or persuasion. However, there was a small interaction effect when accounting for participants’ degree of smartphone acceptance. University students who reported lower smartphone acceptance perceived the speaker who used a smartphone as less credible (likable/trustworthy) than a speaker who delivered a speech from memory. Additionally, despite reporting significantly less smartphone use than students, staff and instructors did not perceive a speaker who uses a smartphone compared to a memorized presentation differently. This exploratory study carries implications for better understanding normative and appropriate smartphone use in public speaking contexts and provides recommendations for public speaking educators.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-10-13T06:36:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231204716
       
  • “Wayfearing” and the city: Exploring how experiential fear of crime
           frames the mobilities of women students at a city-based university using a
           bespoke chatbot app

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      Authors: Michael Saker, Dan Mercea, Carrie-Anne Myers
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Personal safety apps provide new ways for crime data to be utilized by citizens within the context of urban mobilities. Yet, high-profile stories reveal the fear many women continue to experience in their daily lives. Operating as locative media, personal safety apps seem to imply that environments can simply be avoided. This is not always possible. Women students attending a city-based university, for example, might have to move through various urban spaces to get to their institution. Using a bespoke chatbot app for recording the experience of environments rather than avoiding them and semi-structured interviews, the purpose of this article is to examine the experiential fear of crime (EFC) that women students attending a city-based university experience in their daily lives. Between May and June 2022, 24 students who identify as women and attend a London-based university took part in this project. Our research first explored the question, how does EFC frame the experience of moving through a city-based university' Second, how does EFC frame the experience of ambulating the wider urban environment beyond campus' The article contributes to the wider field of locative media, by revealing how fear can shape extant understandings of digital wayfaring.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T10:47:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231203556
       
  • Going above and beyond' How parent–daycare mobile communication
           reconfigures the time and space dimensions of parenting

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      Authors: Victoria Andelsman Alvarez, Sara Kepinska Meleschko
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      How does the use of parent–daycare mobile communication applications reconfigure the emplacement and timing of parenting' In what ways, if any, do parents’ practices challenge the distinction between warm care and cold technology' Based on 35 interviews with 18 parents, we identified 4 ways in which Aula, Denmark's parent–daycare app, reconfigures the time-space dimensions of parenting. While parents and children are apart, mobile communication via Aula allows parents to “plan ahead,” and “synchronize” expectations and schedules with those of their children and the daycare center and “look back” on their children's time away. In addition, communication via Aula enhances co-presence. Overall, this paper's findings offer an alternative to views that oppose technology and care, showing how mobile communication may reshape responsibility for childcare in the welfare state.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-09-27T08:23:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231203533
       
  • What happens next' The ever-dreaded “knock” and mobile access
           instability for vehicle residents

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      Authors: Kaitlin E. Montague
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This high-exposure study explores information-seeking via mobile phone usage among a specific unstably housed population. There exists a population referred to as “vehicle residents” who are people earning wages, who have chosen to move into their vehicles as a survival strategy during a time when housing expenses account for more than half of lower-income Americans’ monthly income, and whose situation varies from traditional homelessness in that they sustain some stability in maintaining ownership of the vehicle in which they are residing. Building on previous studies of homeless people and their mobile phone usage, while using mobilism as the frame, this study investigates the ways that access instability, an underexamined facet of digital inequality, impacts vehicle residents’ ability to search for information via their mobile phones to support their daily lives. This study is based on two rounds of semi-structured interviews with the same participants, complemented by a virtual guided tour of participant's vehicles. Among the key findings is that mobility creates and resolves access instability for vehicle residents, introducing the concept of mobile access instability. Overall, understanding the unique features and information needs of this particular group results in a more thorough comprehension of the contemporary housing crisis, which is necessary to improve policy by developing mitigation strategies and resolutions.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-09-27T08:22:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231202693
       
  • Finding a home in or through mobile phones: Access and usage patterns
           among homeless women in shelter-homes of India

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      Authors: Debjani Chakraborty, Chhavi Garg
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      With the number of mobile phone subscribers increasing across all sections of society, this paper aims to understand if homeless women in shelter-homes of India have access to mobile phones and, if so, what are their usage patterns. Facilitated by issues ranging from domestic violence to lack of employment to forced migration and even to human trafficking and rape, women residing in the shelter-homes of India have a myriad of stories to tell. Not all of them have been on streets forever and many have the basic literacy to understand how to use a mobile phone. For the purposes of the study, the researchers engaged with women above 18 years of age up to the age of 45 in a series of open-ended interviews to understand their access to mobile phones and contextualize their homelessness within an affordances-based framework for mobile phone access. This paper takes into account the dual barriers of gender and the lack of a home to study the digital divide experienced by homeless women in India, expanding on how both these factors shape their access and usage, eventually bridging the digital divide, and whether mobile phones are required/desired by the women themselves. The study found that the women staying in shelter-homes see a window of hope in their use of mobile phones in the form of an independent financial future or an independent marital life, but the biased perception of using a mobile phone among women hinders women’s access to and use of these devices, which ultimately results in the loss of any kind of opportunity before it has even been explored, perhaps leading to the loss of a chance at a bright future.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-09-21T06:42:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231191925
       
  • Streets as experienced through the body, mind, and screen: The smartphone
           and the pedestrian's engagement with an urban public space

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      Authors: Weixu Lu
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the influence of smartphone use on the embodied experiences of pedestrians in urban public spaces. Participants in this study engaged in leisure walks in a bustling urban environment. The study employed a multi-sensory, multi-modal data collection approach, which incorporated mobile eye tracking, screen capture, think-aloud, and participant data review. Findings revealed dynamic relationships between the urban pedestrians’ embodied experiences (“streets as experienced through the body”), digital content (“streets on the screen”), and spatial knowledge (“streets in the mind”). The study explored the “unfolding” practice between multiple versions of the surrounding environment and sheds light on the complex interplay of cognitive, experiential, and digital inputs in shaping pedestrian actions. Moreover, the study uncovers the paradoxical effects of smartphone usage and introduces both serendipity and familiarity into the pedestrian's journey through public spaces. Further, the implications of this research highlight the need for mobile media studies to embrace “messy” and “noisy” data for a more comprehensive understanding of the interconnections between minds, bodies, places, and mobilities.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-09-06T08:38:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231197304
       
  • “I am not human without my phone”: How the socio-cultural realities of
           Liberia shape Liberian mobile youth culture

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      Authors: Euriahs Togar, Marjolijn L. Antheunis, Tom De Leyn, Mariek M. P. Vanden Abeele
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Mobile youth culture (MYC) is a concept that refers to the distinctive ways in which young people adopt and use mobile phones. However, most studies on MYC are situated in the Global North, where the lived realities of teenagers are different from teenagers in the Global South. Through an investigation of how MYC manifests in Liberia, this article adds to the growing literature on mobile communication in the Global South. By doing so, the study responds to scholarly criticisms of the assumption that young people everywhere experience the use of mobile phones in similar ways. Based on qualitative semi-structured interviews with 38 Liberian teenagers, our findings challenge the western, educated, industrialized, rich, and democratic (WEIRD)-centric suggestion of a worldwide “monoculture,” because our results show that although mobile connectivity gives Liberian teenagers opportunities similar to those afforded to their peers in most WEIRD (and non-WEIRD) societies, it is simultaneously experienced markedly different by them. We therefore argue for a more “inclusive” conceptualization of the MYC concept.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T06:58:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231197373
       
  • The effects of fragmented and sticky smartphone use on distraction and
           task delay

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      Authors: Teun Siebers, Ine Beyens, Patti M. Valkenburg
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The smartphone has become an integral part of adolescents’ daily life. Despite the countless affordances of smartphones, concerns have been raised about their enormous potential to cause failures in self-regulation, such as distraction and task delay. The current study investigated whether two smartphone usage patterns, fragmented and sticky smartphone use, are associated with distraction and task delay. For three weeks, we logged the smartphone usage of 160 adolescents (733,359 observations) and assessed their distraction and task delay six times a day with experience sampling (12,723 observations). Using Dynamic Structural Equation Modeling, we found that, overall, adolescents felt more distracted when their smartphone use was more fragmented or sticky. Exploratory analyses indicated that 77% of adolescents experienced increased distraction (i.e., β > .05) when their smartphone use was more fragmented, and 55% when it was sticky. Overall, adolescents did not report more task delay as their smartphone use was more fragmented or sticky. Nonetheless, 22% experienced increased task delay when their smartphone use was more fragmented, and 42% when it was sticky. Together, our findings underline the dynamic nature of smartphone use and its differential impact on self-regulation outcomes.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-08-17T06:11:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231193941
       
  • Where's the bathroom in this “mobile home”' Adding Water, Sanitation &
           Hygiene (WaSH) infrastructure to agendas on homelessness and digital media
           

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      Authors: Erika Polson, Renée A. Botta, Emily Van Houweling
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Although access to water and sanitation have been recognized by the United Nations as human rights since 2010, that access continues to be a site of struggle in everyday life, especially among homeless populations. In this paper, we draw from two summers of a fieldwork-based course on homelessness and Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in Denver, Colorado to consider whether a Google Map of public restrooms in the city might be useful for unhoused people. The paper's conceptual framework stems from Hartmann's idea of “homing”—which refers to how digital media can help unhoused people create everyday routines, exercise some control over their lives and spaces, and gradually create a safe environment—to consider whether the Google Water, Sanitation & Hygiene Map might help unhoused people integrate bathroom access into routines, rounding out the so-called “mobile home” to provide relief and personal agency. The effort runs up against digital literacy issues that mitigate “access” and point to the limits of techno-solutions. This paper points to the need to consider both media literacies and inclusive design in creating digital solutions to address issues faced by unhoused people. We also argue that planners should think holistically about how digital and telecom-focused “solutions” relate to other necessary infrastructures—in this case, public toilets and water access.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-08-16T06:30:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231191929
       
  • Homeless food delivery riders and their transportal home in Shanghai's
           lockdown

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      Authors: Pengfei Fu, Chengxi Liao, Haiqing Yu
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article draws on the concept of “transportal home” to examine the intersection of mobile media, mobility, and place-making among homeless food delivery workers in the Shanghai lockdown. Shanghai's lockdown lasted from February 28 to May 31, 2022, and was one of the strictest in China, resulting in thousands of food delivery riders being locked out of their homes, treated as potential carriers of the virus, and forced to sleep on the streets until the lockdown was lifted. The article uses qualitative research methods to explore the COVID-related homelessness of food delivery riders during the lockdown, focusing on their media practices and highlighting their experiences and agency in using mobile media to negotiate their lives amid the (im)mobile mobility they faced. It argues that mobile phones, as a transportal home, can offer a technological imaginary of home out of “homelessness”; however, they also serve as a reminder of the constraints of such an imaginary, as these (temporarily) homeless food delivery riders continue to be subject to platform exploitation and pandemic surveillance.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-08-14T05:45:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231194500
       
  • Mobile phone use before and during the COVID-19 pandemic – a panel study
           of older adults in seven countries

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      Authors: Sakari Taipale, Tomi Oinas, Loredana Ivan, Dennis Rosenberg
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in older adults’ mobile phone use from before to during the COVID-19 pandemic. The media displacement and digital divide approaches served as the theoretical frameworks of the study. The data were drawn from the 2018 and 2020 waves of the Aging + Communication + Technology cross-national longitudinal panel study. The sample consisted of older Internet users, aged 62 to 96 (in 2018), from Austria, Canada, Finland, Israel, the Netherlands, Romania, and Spain, who participated in both waves (N = 4,398). Latent class analysis and latent transition analysis with multinomial regression models were the main methods applied to the data. With regard to the findings, three mobile phone function use profiles—Narrow Use, Medium Use, and Broad Use—were identified from the data. Lower age, being married, higher income, and place of residence (in 2018) predicted belonging to the three profiles, while country differences in the prevalence of the profiles were substantial. Between 2018 and 2020, transition from one profile to another was relatively rare but typically toward the “Broad Use” category. Profile transitions were most common in Romania, while stability was highest in Finland, Israel, and Canada. In addition, gender, age, marital status, and place of residence predicted the likelihood of changing from one profile to another between 2018 and 2020. The results suggest that older adults’ mobile phone function use is relatively stable over a two-year time span. While new mobile phone functions are adopted, they seem to augment the spectrum of mobile usage rather than displace older similar functionalities. In addition, demographic, socioeconomic, and country-level digital divides, although slightly modified over time, remain significant among older adults.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-07-10T08:44:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231185479
       
  • Mechanisms of maternal and paternal phubbing on adolescents’
           self-control: The attenuating effect of having a sibling

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      Authors: Xiaochun Xie, Xiangyun Tang, Siqi Wu, Xinyuan Shen
      Abstract: Mobile Media & Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Parental phubbing refers to parents being distracted by their phone during an interaction with their child. The present study investigated how parental phubbing relates to adolescents’ self-control through the mediators of parent–adolescent closeness and loneliness. The current study also compared the effects of maternal and paternal phubbing. Having a sibling may influence adolescent mental health and behaviors. Thus, this study also examined whether siblings attenuate the effects of parental phubbing on self-control. We recruited 670 adolescents to participate in our survey. Path analyses revealed that maternal phubbing had both direct and indirect effects on self-control through mother–adolescent closeness and loneliness. However, paternal phubbing had only a sequential indirect effect through father–adolescent closeness and loneliness. This shows that maternal and paternal phubbing have different effects on adolescents’ self-control. Multi-group comparisons revealed that the direct and indirect effects of maternal phubbing on self-control were non-significant for adolescents with siblings. Thus, siblings attenuated the adverse relationships between maternal phubbing and adolescent self-control.
      Citation: Mobile Media & Communication
      PubDate: 2023-02-28T06:48:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/20501579231158225
       
 
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  Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)

Showing 1 - 31 of 31 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ada : A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Image and Video Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Communications and Network     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
E-Health Telecommunication Systems and Networks     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
EURASIP Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Future Internet     Open Access   (Followers: 87)
Granular Computing     Hybrid Journal  
IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
IEEE Wireless Communications Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
IET Wireless Sensor Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Communications, Network and System Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Digital Earth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Embedded and Real-Time Communication Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Interactive Communication Systems and Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Machine Intelligence and Sensory Signal Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Mobile Computing and Multimedia Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Satellite Communications and Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Wireless and Mobile Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Wireless Networks and Broadband Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journals Digital Communication and Analog Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Digital Information     Open Access   (Followers: 181)
Journal of Interconnection Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Southern Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Mobile Media & Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Nano Communication Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Psychology of Popular Media Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Signal, Image and Video Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ukrainian Information Space     Open Access  
Vehicular Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Vista     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Wireless Personal Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
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