Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

Showing 1 - 17 of 17 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Popular Film and Television     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Film & History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Film and Television Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Television & New Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Critical Studies in Media Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Advances in Image and Video Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Film International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Studies in Television: scholarly studies in small screen fictions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Radio Science (ARS)     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Signal, Image and Video Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EURASIP Journal on Audio, Speech, and Music Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Radio Frequency Identification Technology and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Vista     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Mise au Point     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Series - International Journal of TV Serial Narratives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Genre en séries. Cinéma, télévision, médias     Open Access  
TV/Series     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Critical Studies in Television: scholarly studies in small screen fictions
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.231
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1749-6020 - ISSN (Online) 1749-6039
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Editorial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephen Lacey
      Pages: 3 - 6
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Volume 19, Issue 1, Page 3-6, March 2024.

      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T03:57:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231224140
      Issue No: Vol. 19, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Binge-watching and mental illness versus comfort TV and mental health in
           WandaVision

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      Authors: Christopher L Moore, Chris Comerford, Ren Vettoretto
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      WandaVision launched the Disney+ subscription video-on-demand (SVOD) platform by blending the sitcom and the superhero genres in a nostalgia-inducing fusion of Marvel comics, cinema and television. The series represents the canonisation of Marvel media into a single cohesive narrative ‘multiverse’, yet the story focuses on the personal experience of the character, Wanda, and her struggle with loss, grief, and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). In this article, we explore how WandaVision presents a unique examination of the tension between the role of screen media as comfort TV and the pervasive fears over the obsessive escapism of binge-watching. The article also assesses the potential risks of excessive media consumption through the framing of American sitcoms and superhero families from the 1950s and onward.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T11:28:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020241229038
       
  • Positive masculinity or toxic positivity' Apple TV+’s Ted Lasso
           as a capitalist utopia

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      Authors: Alexander Hudson Beare, Robert Boucaut
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      Ted Lasso (2020-present) follows American Football coach, Ted Lasso, as he transforms the waning English Premier League team, AFC Richmond, through his relentless optimism and his mantra of ‘believe’. The show has been praised by critics for its emphasis on kindness and particularly for its exploration of ‘positive’ and ‘vulnerable’ masculinities. It is placed front and centre not just in promotion for Apple TV+ but also for the broader Apple brand which is heavily integrated into the show’s storyworld. Through a textual analysis of the series, this article critically examines Ted Lasso’s representations of masculinity and homophobia within the context of professional football. We argue that Ted Lasso subtly replicates the corporate identity of Apple in which real-world issues are selectively harnessed and distorted to create a utopic world-vision. Despite a celebrated veneer of ‘positive masculinities’ the show still exists in service of a sporting culture that is overtly steeped in hypermasculinity. Instead of challenging sports-based homophobia as it exists in the real-world, the show minimizes its existence at the (almost total) expense of including gay characters and storylines. In ‘dismantling’ toxic masculinity through such shallow means, we contend that Ted Lasso is ultimately symptomatic of a show sublimating its narrative wants to Apple’s corporate needs.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T03:44:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020241228162
       
  • Book Review: Moments in Television: Complexity/simplicity

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      Authors: Michael Samuel
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T05:37:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231222734
       
  • Book Review: Their Own Best Creations: Women Writers in Postwar Television

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      Authors: Mary Irwin
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T04:23:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231222743
       
  • Book Review: Geopolitics, Northern Europe, And Nordic Noir: What
           Television Series Tell Us About World Politics

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      Authors: Jaakko Seppälä
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T04:09:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231222731
       
  • Book Review: Convergent Chinese Television Industries: An Ethnography of
           Chinese Production Cultures

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      Authors: Yajie Li
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T03:55:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231222739
       
  • Book Review: Broadcasting for Wales: The Early Years of S4C

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      Authors: John Ellis
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2024-01-02T03:43:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231222741
       
  • Deterritorialisation of Korean TV dramas in “Netflix Originals”: “We
           are living in the Squid Game world”

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      Authors: Hyejung Ju
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      Squid Game’s phenomenal success calls attention to the local specificity of Netflix’s global expansion as it commissions original K-dramas. This practice has rich implications, both positive and negative, for Netflix’s production and distribution of Korean content. K-dramas classified as Netflix Originals have been riding its international market power to a wide range of transnational audiences, enabling national television creators to reimagine cultural spheres for both production and distribution that transgress the uneven circuit of transnational media. At the same time, the deterritorialisation of Netflix’s K-dramas raises concerns about its deep interpenetration of the Korean TV industry.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-12-01T01:27:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231207498
       
  • A modern version of restoration comedy' Double entendre, objectification,
           fearful men and rakes manqué in the television work of Benny Hill

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      Authors: Joseph Gibbs
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      Benny Hill’s once globally popular (but controversial) television humour was often built around elements associated with Restoration comedy. These included double entendre; the objectification of women (which Hill in the 1980s intensified, to the detriment of his comedy and career); and themes involving men fearing women. Additionally, some of Hill’s characters had traits suggestive of those of Restoration comedy, although his men generally lacked the classic rakes’ social status and sexual success, and their frequent failures introduced into Hill’s comedy an ironic caricature of contemporary views of male sexuality and ego.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-11-13T06:17:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231214478
       
  • From traditional regionalism to national distinction: German television
           co-productions through time

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      Authors: Elke Weissmann
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers a historical perspective on co-productions of high-end television drama in Germany. It argues that such co-productions have seen three distinct phases that although overlapping, are described by industry insiders and critics as distinct periods where one form of co-production is dominant at a particular time but then becomes residual as other forms take over. These three forms are, first, public broadcaster-led co-productions, second, ‘Europudding’ co-productions, and finally, distinctive co-productions in TVIV. This article shows that these phases are connected to stylistic as well as industrial changes, which do not always overlap with the description of industry insiders.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-11-09T09:40:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231211545
       
  • ‘I miss when my problems were about nothing’: Millennial angst,
           neoliberal feminism, and paratexts in Search Party (2016–2022)

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      Authors: Sarah Lahm
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the articulation of complex demands of neoliberal feminism, such as individualism, entrepreneurialism and self-management on the millennial woman in recent streaming series. The portrayal of a fractured female self and its entanglement with millennial angst will shed light on serial depictions of neoliberal individualism and female subjectivity. Search Party, a satirical, genre-bending, half-hour comedy-drama serves as an example through which the contradictory demands of neoliberal feminism are negotiated and questioned. In addition to assessment of the narrative and character framing, paratextual materials and specifically the series’ promotional posters work to further situate the twenty-first century millennial female, underscoring her split self.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T02:45:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231209862
       
  • Awkwardness sells, but who’s buying' How students navigate
           awkward TV comedy series

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      Authors: Iván Kirschbaum, Pauwke Berkers
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on in-depth interviews, this study examines how students engage with awkwardness in television comedies. The article contributes to studies of awkwardness, its configuration in popular culture, and audiences’ response to awkward-comic texts. Our findings show typical sequences and resources for producing awkward scenes. Participants tend to evaluate awkward scenes in terms of ‘realism’, i.e., whether they could relate the scene to their personal lives and/or imagine themselves in that situation. Furthermore, awkward sequences and feelings of awkwardness from the characters increases the evaluation of scenes as realistic. Finally, in line with Kotsko’s (2010) characterisation of awkwardness as a social feeling, awkwardness spreads from the television screen when participants perceive if the character is feeling awkward or imagine themselves feeling awkward in that situation.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T04:52:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231211485
       
  • Television will archive itself: Channel 4’s role in revalorising
           ‘old’ TV

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      Authors: Richard Hewett
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      A notable feature of Channel 4’s scheduling in the 1980s was the extent to which it drew upon repeats of archive television, long-unseen US and UK sitcoms and cult dramas either providing a nostalgic reminder of yesteryear or being discovered afresh by new generations. In addition, the themed archive evenings that began at Christmas 1982, culminating in 1992's extensive TV Heaven season, now seem prescient in an era when digital channels such as GOLD, Yesterday, Dave and Talking Pictures TV draw extensively upon the archive to compile their schedules. Channel 4’s use of archive programming receives little attention in academic histories, aside of Maggie Brown’s dismissal of its repeats as ‘tellyfilla’. This article redresses the balance, drawing upon publicity material from Channel 4’s press packs, research into patterns of repeats and original interviews with those involved in the curatorial process to investigate the extent to which Channel 4’s decision to revisit the archives was born of economic pragmatism, or was in fact a conscious act of contextualisation, re-evaluation and revalorisation.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-10-26T01:40:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231208049
       
  • ‘Are we having fun yet'’: The Starz television network and
           Party Down as indie TV

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      Authors: James Lyons
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the sitcom Party Down (2009-10) one of the first shows commissioned by the US premium cable service Starz as it sought to compete with HBO and Showtime, but cancelled after two seasons due to low ratings. Reports in 2021 of plans for its return characterised it as a ‘cult TV’ show revived due to fan demand. Yet by analysing its original production contexts and its aesthetic attributes the article argues that it is best understood as a proto-typical instance of ‘indie TV,’ aligned with Starz' strategic positioning in relation to its indie-oriented subscriber base at that time.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T12:53:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231201083
       
  • Voices from the emptiness. Developing the agentic rural on Spanish
           television

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      Authors: Enric Castelló
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyses rural representations in the documentary series Ruralitas (2020) on the Spanish TVE. The programme shows that the people living in the countryside have agency and do not conform to common rural stereotypes. Nevertheless, the stories flirt with ideas of the ‘rural idyll’ by focusing on the beauty of the landscape and traditional rural versus urban binaries. However, the series also develops what the author names an agentic rural. The agentic rural not only empowers countryside dwellers and portrays self-determined destinies in the countryside, but also highlights problems associated with depopulation.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T10:32:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231202511
       
  • A future without homophobia' Gay men and personal responsibility in the
           Chilean telenovela Casa de Muñecos

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      Authors: Ricardo Ramírez
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      The inclusion of four gay characters in the telenovela Casa de Muñecos (2018-9) was an event that, until then, had not taken place in any other Chilean telenovela. Through a qualitative textual analysis of these figures, this article argues that the programme has strengthened a neoliberal discourse of personal responsibility that makes gay men not only accountable for their own well-being but also for the well-being of others, as they are singled out as responsible for making the ‘right’ decisions that will contribute to the process of articulating a non-homophobic future in the country.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-09-12T09:28:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231201747
       
  • New scheduling strategies and production culture in public service
           television in the digital era: The case of DR and TV 2 in Denmark

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      Authors: Hanne Bruun, Julie Münter Lassen
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses the development of new scheduling practices within public service media (PSM) in the Nordic, focusing on DR and TV 2 in Denmark. These practices relate to in-house broadcaster-video-on-demand-services (BVoDs). Our findings show, first, that television’s time-structured identity and liveness are re-configured for a mainstream audience as opposed to the segmented audiences approach of the earlier multi-channel era. Second, we find that the public service identity and the benefits of being PSM natives are harnessed to help the survivability of PSM companies in the digital era.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-08-19T04:58:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231196422
       
  • Broadcasting change: An aerial overview of South African television
           debates in an age of constant transition

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      Authors: Reina-Marie Loader
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      This aerial review concentrates on the development of the South African television industry as chronicled and analysed by scholarship. Academic reflections on the evolution of television are categorised into three main periods: First, the advent of South African television, second, the transitional period, and third, a period of stocktaking. The overview aims to provide readers with key academic discussions during these periods and the historical context within which they took shape. Looking at issues ranging from censorship, nation-building, restructuring and globalisation, to event television, edutainment programming and community TV, the South African television environment is shown to be in constant transition.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-08-12T07:27:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231194465
       
  • Reality television and the politics of mass surveillance in channel
           4’s hunted

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      Authors: Sean Brayton
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      This paper is interested in representations of mass surveillance in Hunted, Channel 4’s reality tv series in which ‘ordinary British citizens’ roleplay as ‘fugitives’ that must evade surveillance and capture by ‘the state.’ Here contentious powers of state surveillance are mitigated by (a) the programme’s deployment of a myth of surveillance ‘symmetry’ and a ‘fugitive fantasy’ that obfuscate the racial politics of ‘being watched’ in a post-9/11 climate; (b) personal stories of contestants or ‘fugitives’ that enable a ‘therapeutic self’ that situates the mass surveillance experience as productive and transformative; and (c) the ‘gamification’ of surveillance itself.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-07-15T10:42:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231185103
       
  • Supporting children’s drama in the on demand age: Assessing the efficacy
           of forty years of Australian policy frameworks and funding schemes

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      Authors: Anna Potter
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      This is a case study of 40 years of policy approaches in Australian children’s television during which the children’s television production ecology was profoundly altered by new distribution technologies. For decades Australia used quotas, subsidies and screen organisation The Australian Children’s Television Foundation to safeguard supplies of children’s television including drama. Digitisation has caused enormous industrial disruption while delivering abundant children’s content on demand. The article calls for new approaches to supporting local children’s screen content through increased funding of public service media rather than the ad hoc distribution of resources to an organisation without direct pathways to audiences.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-04-27T10:16:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231170266
       
  • Autism spectrum disorder in contemporary American sitcoms: Narrative and
           social implication

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      Authors: Betty Kaklamanidou
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      The Big Bang Theory, Atypical and Community are sitcoms paradigmatic of a recent representational shift, in which center stage is assumed by individuals who face psychological and neurological challenges. Sheldon Cooper (TBBT), Sam Gardner (Atypical) and Abed Nadir (Community) are young male protagonists who all fall somewhere on the spectrum of autism. These representations signal a breakthrough from past, mainly cinematic depictions, which stereotypically addressed mentally challenged individuals as unstable, problematic, and crazy. Our goal is to examine the narrative and social function of autism in these three sitcoms. The theoretical context uses Thomas Elsaesser ’s concept of “productive pathologies” (2009) to argue that autism is also a “productive pathology” that can be applied in the study of contemporary sitcoms. Autism spectrum disorder as a “productive pathology” is then combined with the Incongruity Theory of humour in order to analyze how Sheldon’s, Sam’s and Abed’s developmental disorder is used to create a distinct type of incongruous comedy and at the same time destabilize notions of identity and social “propriety.”
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-03-09T08:57:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231163306
       
  • Finding words: Aesthetic criticism and television

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      Authors: James Walters
      Abstract: Critical Studies in Television, Ahead of Print.
      Those endorsing or opposing the development of television aesthetics scholarship have exhibited an admirable willingness to reflect upon the rationales and motivations for formulating value judgements. However, very little equivalent attention has been afforded to processes that occur within this area: how scholars conduct analysis and develop claims for achievement in television. In addressing this lack, the following article surveys some of the meanings that ‘criticism’ has encompassed in Television Studies, offering ‘aesthetic criticism’ as a useful term to describe the work of analysis and evaluation, before moving to a series of close readings of aesthetic criticism in practice.
      Citation: Critical Studies in Television
      PubDate: 2023-01-30T03:07:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17496020231154462
       
 
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  Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

Showing 1 - 17 of 17 Journals sorted by number of followers
Journal of Popular Film and Television     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Film & History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Film and Television Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Television & New Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Critical Studies in Media Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Advances in Image and Video Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Film International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Critical Studies in Television: scholarly studies in small screen fictions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Radio Science (ARS)     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Signal, Image and Video Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
EURASIP Journal on Audio, Speech, and Music Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Radio Frequency Identification Technology and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Vista     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Mise au Point     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Series - International Journal of TV Serial Narratives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Genre en séries. Cinéma, télévision, médias     Open Access  
TV/Series     Open Access  
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