Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

Showing 1 - 17 of 17 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Image and Video Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Radio Science (ARS)     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Critical Studies in Media Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Critical Studies in Television: scholarly studies in small screen fictions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
EURASIP Journal on Audio, Speech, and Music Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Film & History: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Film and Television Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Film International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Genre en séries. Cinéma, télévision, médias     Open Access  
Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Radio Frequency Identification Technology and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Popular Film and Television     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Mise au Point     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Series - International Journal of TV Serial Narratives     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Signal, Image and Video Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Television & New Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
TV/Series     Open Access  
Vista     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Television & New Media
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.955
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 32  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1527-4764 - ISSN (Online) 1552-8316
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Digital Domestic (Im)material Labor: Managing Waste and Self While
           Producing Closet Decluttering Videos

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zizi Li
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines (im)material digital labor essential to the production of closet decluttering videos on YouTube by analyzing two case studies: Leighannsays and Bestdressed. I highlight three interconnected forms of tidying labor, that is, home, data, and waste management, mobilized for influencer work and cultural platform economy. Wardrobe clean-out videos capitalize on both corporeal and affective aspects of housework and content production in the construction and maintenance of the digital self. They also assemble management labor to organize material articles in domestic space, produce/manage multimedia, and construct/amplify digital existence. The essay also discusses the (im)material labor required by the personal and outsourced handling of the disposed’s hereafters as goods and trash outside of the home. Unpacking how closet decluttering video production nests together (im)material tidying labor associated with disparate sectors from home-based platform cultural production to public management of household waste shed lights on imbricated operations of the influencer ecosystem.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T07:07:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221150163
       
  • The Millennial Medium: The Interpretive Community of Early Podcast
           Professionals

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Corrina Laughlin
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Through evidence gathered from sixteen interviews with producers and businesspeople in the podcast industry, this paper argues that the professionals that populated the early phase of the formalizing podcasting scene made up an interpretive community defined, in part, by their appreciation for, and experiences with, public radio. I chart how this interpretive community cast themselves against dominant public radio paradigms when they moved into podcasting, while also retaining much of public radio’s ethos, and I discuss what the central preoccupations of this interpretive community were. I assert that audio broadcasting as understood and practiced within the interpretive community is a particularly millennial medium, influenced by the norms of digital communication. And I make claims about how this is foundational to understanding podcasting’s political and aesthetic predispositions. Ultimately, this argument advances and nuances one connection between public radio and podcasting using qualitative interview data.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T07:04:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221146475
       
  • Book Review: The Podcaster’s Dilemma: Decolonizing Podcasters in the Era
           of Surveillance Capitalism, by Nicholas L. Baham III & Nolan Higdon

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: L. Dugan Nichols
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2023-01-05T07:24:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221146187
       
  • Where are the Women' Gendered Indian Digital Production Cultures Post
           #metoo

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Smith Mehta
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      My article examines the influence of platformization in labor exchanges to assess how gendered expectations impact digital production cultures. It investigates the socio-cultural transactions that marginalized communities, especially women, from above-the-line professions have to navigate as they seek work opportunities on streaming services. Drawing on feminist production studies and media studies scholarships, the article discusses how gendered expectations become the norm in hiring creator labor. Through analysis of the data-set on the gender representation of key creative professionals in the Indian web series produced between 2014 and 2020, semi-structured interviews with creative professionals, and trade press literature, this research offers a nuanced understanding of how and why Indian on-screen dynamic representations and democratic entrepreneurial working structures do not eradicate gendered production norms. On the contrary, gendered interpretation of algorithmic data, the #metoo movement, and newer forms of sexism emerge alongside existing gendered production cultures to hamper the participation of women and minorities.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-12-16T12:58:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221135798
       
  • Exploring the Virtual Culture of Reality Television Communities: Lessons
           From #Date My Family

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mthobeli Ngcongo
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      The socio-technological affordances of Twitter have steadily enabled audiences of reality television shows to form virtual communities through the use of hashtags to organize and share commentary about their favorite shows. Although the communication activities around hashtag communities are becoming more apparent, research on mapping their online cultures remains underappreciated. Scholarly work is needed that makes the links between culture and communication more apparent, thereby enhancing our understanding of virtual communities formed around interest in reality television. Using a small-scale sample of tweets (n = 203) from season eight of the reality dating show Date My Family, I explore what the cultural expressions of the South African #Datemyfamily virtual community entail. A thematic analysis suggests that values, norms, beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors constitute a strong cultural part of what is communicated by the #Datemyfamily community. Ultimately, the virtual culture of this online group places emphasis on solidifying the community’s imagined collective consciousness.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-12-09T09:32:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221138235
       
  • Search Engines and Free Speech: A Historical Analysis of Editorial
           Analogies and the Position of Media Companies and Users in US Free Speech
           Discourse

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer Petersen
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes current debates over search engine regulation and free speech. In these debates, Google and other companies have relied on the “editorial analogy”: that search results are equivalent to editorial decisions, and thus cannot be regulated without violating freedom of speech. These debates largely focus on analogies to earlier media or the nature of algorithmic judgment. The paper argues that this framing misses key issues relevant to how we think about search engines (and algorithmic decisions in general) and freedom of speech. The paper examines the free speech debates that surrounded media in the 1930s and 1940s in order to: (1) clarify the stakes and politics of the editorial analogy being used today; (2) offer an alternate framing of the debate, that highlights conflicts of expressive interest and asks what it means to participate in the public sphere under conditions of rapid technological and political economic transition.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T09:30:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221137245
       
  • Reaction Media: Archeology of an Intermedium

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lauren Bliss, Bjørn Nansen
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This paper unearths the archeology of reaction media across cinema, television and the Internet. We show how reaction content exists in high and low modes, tracing their reoccurrence and remediation from art-house and horror in cinema, to television soap opera, to animated GIFS, and YouTube compilations. Because reactions can be readily repackaged and resourced, we argue that they are a form of inter-media; operating in-between media text and media reception; in-between narrative and sensation; in-between authenticity and performativity; and in-between entertainment and resource. Reaction media are a form of sensory media with material properties. The textual and aesthetic richness of reaction content informs their persistent function, allowing for generative repurposing by internet users as a form of cultural expression and also operating as a rich resource of content able to be repackaged by professional content creators for producing economic value.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-12-03T09:26:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221134520
       
  • Data Trafficking and the International Risks of Surveillance Capitalism:
           The Case of Grindr and China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aynne Kokas
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This article offers a framework to discuss when a community’s data is moved abroad without their informed consent, a practice I term data trafficking. I analyze Grindr, an LGBTQIA+ dating platform that has changed hands between China and the United States to demonstrate what data trafficking is, how it undermines national sovereignty, and how it erodes human rights. In the United States, corporate policies are the leading indicator for data governance practices, influencing a system known as multi-stakeholderism. In China, forced localization to government servers drives data governance practices. This article extends how we think about transnational consumer data security by examining how weak data security designed to support the growth of Silicon Valley firms amplifies the capacity of extra-territorial data governance practices asserted by the Chinese government.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T08:46:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221137250
       
  • Platformization as a Structural Dimension for Public Service Media in
           Germany: The funk Content Network and the New Interstate Media Treaty

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sven Stollfuß
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      As social media is constantly gaining in importance, public service media (PSM) is forced to create content that fits the environment of social media platforms (SMPs). In Germany, the content network funk by the ARD and ZDF represents a change in the thinking of PSM and policy makers. Since platformization affects PSM institutionally and structurally, German media regulators are addressing platformization in the context of the new Interstate Media Treaty. The article aims to discuss the treaty’s orientation toward digital platforms and SMPs as it attempts to subject them to the control of local state media authorities. Algorithms and data-driven content curation are policed in terms of transparency and non-discrimination, and to ensure that public value content is not marginalized. To enforce this, I would argue, the treaty has to acknowledge the importance of platformization as a structural prerequisite that enables PSM to serve its public demand.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-11-19T01:01:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221138248
       
  • When Brands Become Stans: Netflix, Originals, and Enacting a Fannish
           Persona on Instagram

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Casta Sligh, Crystal Abidin
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      While brand-run accounts of Twitter have attracted many a meme for their hit-and-miss attempts at relatable humor, on Instagram one type of brand account is quietly thriving: the Netflix Original series Instagram account. This paper studies brand personification on social media at a niche angle. By analyzing posts from three popular Netflix Original series Instagram accounts, we found that each account co-ops fan practices and enacts its own specific fannish persona. This paper reports on how and why Netflix enacts a fannish persona on its Original series Instagram accounts, to locate the personified Instagram account within the context of social media communication strategies. As the original advertisers of Instagram, there is established research on influencers which investigates the implications of people turning themselves into brands. What may call for more research in the future is the opposite: what are the consequences of brands turning themselves into people'
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T05:51:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221134778
       
  • The Politics of Female Anger in Older Age: The Good Fight, Older
           Femininity and Political Change

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ella Fegitz
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This article identifies an important conversation about the politics of female anger in older age in the CBS show The Good Fight (2017–). By centring the narrative around the emotional life of a woman in her 60s, the show offers older femininity as a site for discussing social and political changes that have occurred in the USA in the aftermath of the election of Donald Trump. Through a close analysis of the four seasons that were released before the Covid-19 pandemic, this article maps the emotional journey of Diane Lockheart through her personal, economic, and political crises, showing how different emotions are connected with Diane’s engagement—and at times disengagement—with politics. Ultimately, the article contributes to the field of feminist cultural studies by exploring the way The Good Fight offers female anger in older age as key to feminist engagement and political change.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-11-04T04:40:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221131945
       
  • The Magical Work of Brand Futurity: The Mythmaking of Disney+

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jake Pitre
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      The Walt Disney Company has maintained an aggressive approach to brand management for nearly a century. With the acquisition of a number of highly reputable companies, this aggression has become unignorable within the media industry. At the same time, Disney has embraced digital expansionism, culminating with the launch of its own on-demand streaming service, Disney+, in late 2019. The platform’s documentary series offer a unique window into this new era of the Disney empire, usefully demonstrating the careful navigation of corporate legacy and history in the creation and maintenance of what I term brand futurity. Thinking critically about the concept of collective imaginaries in the context of the digital and streaming economies, this article argues that these docuseries illustrate Disney’s digital corporate strategy as a narrativization of wonderful work and ever-expanding value.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T01:08:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221128923
       
  • Curating a Scopic Contact Zone: Short Video, Rural Performativity, and the
           Mediatization of Socio-Spatial Order in China

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sheng Zou
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      With the promulgation of the “rural revitalization” initiative, China has been promoting the marriage between technology and rurality to chart a digital future for what is christened “a new countryside.” Rural revitalization is not simply a socio-economic project but a profoundly ideological one, which choreographs a socio-spatial order, fashions an aspirational rural subjectivity, and realigns imaginaries of rurality. This article examines the role of short video in fostering an emergent rural performativity in line with official ideology through idyll-icized displays of rural lifestyles and landscapes, which are loaded with affective and ideological connotations. A scopic contact zone is thus carved out between rural vloggers and urban viewers, one characterized by mutual appropriation and strategic differentiation. This article foregrounds the limitations of this urban-rural contact zone and its immanent “cruel optimism,” while advocating a kind of radical utopia to enable imaginations of the alternative futures of digital rurality.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T10:47:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221128925
       
  • On Digital Reproductive Labor and the “Mother Commodity”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lachlan Ross, Lyn Craig
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Reproductive domestic labor is shifting from its old norm of invisibly creating and maintaining labor power in the highly private and ostensibly non-economic zone of the household. This paper asks whether new forms of complex motherhood, and the means presented to mothers for coping with them in the digital age, should be conceived of as further unpaid labor that sits on top of old forms of exploitation. As mothers increasingly become digital reproductive laborers, the family home is becoming a public and highly economized zone: a workhouse for both standard employers and emerging parties who designate themselves as merely providing online services. In contrast to the frequently posited thesis that mothers are only indirectly drawn into the circuit of capital, this paper argues that the current situation creates the “mother commodity”: a being whose social reproductive labor time is supercommodified via the normative addition of “audience commodity” labor duties.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T10:43:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221125742
       
  • Netflix & Big Data: The Strategic Ambivalence of an Entertainment
           Company

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Karin van Es
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Netflix actively fueled what is known as the myth of big data, promoting their recommender system and data-driven production as cutting-edge, all-seeing, and all-knowing. Today, however, the company is increasingly acknowledging the role of human expertise and creativity. In this paper I explore the strategic repositioning of Netflix from technology company to entertainment company, enabling them to be understood as both “data” and “gut.” This transformation is discussed as motivated by the increasing public criticism of data and algorithms and the company’s foray into original programing. More specifically, I examine how Netflix, in public-facing materials, discusses big data and how those ideas are taken up in public discourse. These sources disclose an assumption of opposing characteristics between data and human expertise and creativity. As a point of a larger critique, I comment on the limitations of this data and human opposition for thinking about Netflix and technologies at large.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-09-26T10:30:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221125745
       
  • When Mainstream and Alternative Media Integrate: A Polysystem Approach to
           Media System Interactions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matan Aharoni
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      In a diverse media ecosystem of transitions and integrations, this research uses polysystem theory to conceptualize the integration of alternative media systems within their mainstream media counterparts. These interactions are examined using interviews and participant observations through three case studies—(1–2) Integration of two independent web-content creator groups into mainstream Israeli television system and (3) integration of ultra-Orthodox filmmakers into mainstream Israeli cinema system. The findings show that stiff and flexible systems are two main forms of characterizing relations between alternative and mainstream systems—defined based on the specific interests and implications for each media system, including integrated content, producer perceptions, and audience reception. It includes themes of recognition, conservatism, novelty, freedom, and authenticity. The interactions reveal processes of diffusion or symbiosis of the source system’s products. The findings contribute to a theoretical model of media interactions that offers ways of examining and defining the characteristics of media system interactions.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T11:33:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221123036
       
  • Optimizing Looking and Buying on Instagram: Tracing the Platformization of
           Advertising and Retail on Mobile Social Media

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicholas Carah, Maria-Gemma Brown, Sarah Hickman
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Over its first decade Instagram became central to Facebook’s dominance of audience and advertising markets. In this article, we critically examine how marketing and advertising trade press documented the development of advertising and retail on the platform. Instagram’s platformization involved formalizing relationships among users, influencers, creators, advertisers, retailers, and analytics services. The development of advertising and retail on the platform was characterized by open-ended third-party experimentation and innovation, which was gradually incorporated into, and controlled by, the platform. Advertisers and marketers increasingly approach the platform not just as an advertising service, but an end-to-end advertising, analytics and retail infrastructure. While much attention has been given to the promotional and influencer culture of Instagram, advertisers and marketers saw it as an opportunity to integrate advertising with retail. We argue that Instagram has platformized practices of looking and buying historically associated with department stores, malls, home shopping, and catalogs.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-09-10T06:46:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221123033
       
  • Comparing Populist Media: From Fox News to the Young Turks, From Cable to
           YouTube, From Right to Left

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Reece Peck
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This article compares populist media styles on US cable news and in online video. It juxtaposes the conservative cable giant Fox News with the progressive YouTube-based network the Young Turks (TYT). TYT stands as one of YouTube’s longest running and most successful “news and politics” channels on the platform. This progressive digital network has long embraced a populist anchoring style that resembles Fox News and the style of its conservative YouTube competitors. This study establishes the stylistic affinity between TYT and Fox News and then explains how it is driven by a similar commercial-economic logic that prizes “loyal” viewership and “intense” engagement above all else. Shifting from political economy to media activism, this article also chronicles TYT’s role in creating the Justice Democrats, the progressive PAC that recruited Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and other “Squad” members. This article seeks to complicate the commonly held association between populism and political conservatism.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T06:39:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221114349
       
  • Review: Televising Chineseness: Gender, Nation, and Subjectivity, by Geng
           Song

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ran Xi
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T11:21:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221118543
       
  • Why Can’t We Believe in That' Partisan Political Entertainment in
           the Mexican YouTube Sphere

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Frida V. Rodelo
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      The YouTube video platform has provided fertile ground for creators outside the journalistic field to produce programs that combine elements of entertainment with information on public affairs. Behind the emergence of these practices lie important trends enabling alternative public discourses and altering the cultural production, but also an environment mainly characterized by the low trust in mainstream news organizations and high ideological polarization that seem to give shape to political entertainment contents—and especially their overt political partisanship. Based on observations of independent political entertainment YouTube channels in Mexico, this study delves into their apparently contradictory intersections with professional journalism and the constraints imposed on their practice by platform affordances.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-08-09T08:53:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221117170
       
  • “Action on the Game”: Sports Gambling as Fan Identity and
           Transactional Participation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ethan Tussey
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This article describes Fox Sports’ depiction of sports gambling following the Supreme Court decision legalizing this activity at the federal level. The gambling personas offered by Fox Sports programming are particularly worthy of analysis, given efforts by media networks and sports leagues to rehabilitate the image of the gambler. Applying a critical discourse analysis of industry trade press, mobile app design, and sports gambling television programming, this article demonstrates how the persona of the “benign degenerate” is offered as a masculine fan identity designed to align gambling with more common social tv practices and interactive “transactional participation.” The introduction of this new sports gambling persona challenges previous depictions of sports gambling that have categorized this behavior as a form of financialized citizenship.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-08-01T06:56:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221115870
       
  • Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Courtney D. Tabor
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-07-22T11:06:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221115101
       
  • Institutional Polymorphism: Diversification of Content and Monetization
           Strategies on YouTube

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jacob Ørmen, Andreas Gregersen
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Through guidelines, terms of service and algorithmic curation, digital platforms such as YouTube encourage creators to produce content that fits with the commercial goals of the platform. Scholars have argued that this pressure to conform might lead to uniformity, or isomorphism, in the ways organizations manage their presence on platforms. This article contributes to the debate on isomorphism by taking a bottom-up approach and ask to which extent creators on YouTube pursue similar, or different, strategies for uploading and monetizing content. Through quantitative and qualitative analyses of a sample of YouTube channels, we show how content creators adapt to, negotiate with, and defy institutional pressures. In the end, we find greater support for diversification, that is, polymorphism, than concentration in the ways organizations manage their presence on the platform. This has implications for how we understand platform power and integrate institutional theories in communication research.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T12:04:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221110198
       
  • BSkyB and the 1991 World Student Games: The Transformation of Live Sports
           Television Acquisition and Coverage in the UK in the Early 1990s

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: James Fenwick
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      In 1991, Sheffield was the host city for the XVI Summer Universiade, better known as the World Student Games (WSG). Studies of the 1991 WSG commonly assert that it received little to no television coverage. This article intervenes to demonstrate that the WSG did receive substantial television coverage on Sky Sports and across the ITV network. The article draws on new archival sources to provide perspectives on the negotiations and interactions between the WSG organizers and the broadcasters, focusing on BSkyB. The article serves as an instrumental case study on how newly available television archival collections can be used to reframe perspectives of television history. In particular, the article considers the early history of Sky Sports, its approach to sports acquisition, its relationship with public service broadcasters, and the impact of satellite television on live-sports coverage and a rapidly changing media landscape in the UK in the early 1990s.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T12:02:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221110194
       
  • Spanish-Language Television and Diaspora in Detroit and Los Angeles:
           Toward Latinx Media Enfranchisement

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Catherine L. Benamou
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Spanish-language media have often been portrayed as catering to a “niche” market, because of presumed ethnic specificity and issues of linguistic proficiency and preference. Constructed as such, these media are seldom considered in the mainstream as having an impact on social incorporation, and media and opinions in the larger U.S. public sphere. Based on field research conducted in Detroit and Los Angeles, this article challenges such notions, showing how Spanish-language television, when utilized as a place-making tool as well as a source of local and national information, can contribute to viewers’ resilience, sense of self, and sociopolitical expression through media enfranchisement. In contrast to other studies that emphasize textual analysis or media enterprises in the aggregate, this article takes a meso-level approach, focusing on the differences made for Latinx communities by innovation in media access, reception strategies, and outreach by media professionals, along with the qualitative improvement of audiovisual representation.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-07-09T06:57:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221098067
       
  • Making a “Hate-Watch”: Netflix’s Indian Matchmaking and the
           Stickiness of “Cringe Binge TV”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Suryansu Guha
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Netflix’s 2020 release Indian Matchmaking drew a massive backlash particularly from South Asian and diasporic audiences who felt it normalized the experiences associated with arranged marriages. Audiences took to the internet to express how much they loved hating the show but at the same time also continued to obsessively watch despite their reservations. My paper takes up this paradox of simultaneously loving and hating a media product. By drawing from interviews with the showrunner, members of the production team and a close reading of the show’s texts and paratexts, I argue that “hatewatching” or “cringe-binge” as a mode of spectatorship only seems an oppositional form of viewing or an act of resistance to the reification of dominant hegemonic values. Far from being a function of spectatorial agency, I demonstrate how the platforms utilize “hatewatching” as a lucrative form of viewership and consumer habit to cultivate stickiness for their content.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T10:16:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221095792
       
  • Review: Pain Generation, Social Media Feminist Activism, and the
           Neoliberal Selfie

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cat Mahoney
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-07-05T12:50:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221098066
       
  • The Masks We Wear: Watchmen, Infrastructural Racism, and Anonymity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Benjamin Burroughs, Benjamin J. Morse, Travis Snow, Michael Carmona
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      As COVID-19 has led to the politicization of masks and the donning of masks, the prescient commentary that emerges from HBO’s Watchmen speaks to our contemporary moment, replete with animosity, distrust, and wounding. Race, the legacy of racial injustice, and anonymity are major themes found throughout the series, which highlight the complicated nature of social control and the infrastructural legacy of racism. The mask itself is a site of struggle with polarizing calls for freedom from the mask as tyranny and freedom through the mask as safety, all during a public health crisis. In Watchmen, the deployment of infrastructural control and the implications of masking and unmasking are enacted through racist ideologies and promises of safety through anonymity.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T06:30:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221104995
       
  • Television Production of Yesteryears, Today and in the Future: Impact of
           Reduced Collaboration in TV News Production on Job Satisfaction in Nigeria
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Felix Olajide Talabi, Tokunbo Alex Adaja, Samson Adepoju Bello, Omowale Adelabu, Oberiri Destiny Apuke, Gever Verlumun Celestine
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this study was to determine the impact of reduced collaboration in TV news production on job satisfaction and to explore the contributing effect of modern technologies on reduced collaboration in TV news production in Nigeria. The researchers utilized a descriptive survey research design with a structured questionnaire as the instrument for data collection. The data for the study were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a one-way multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA). The result of the study showed that reduced collaboration decreases job satisfaction. Also, modern technologies increase reduced collaboration. Further results showed that modern technologies have led to reduced collaboration in private TV stations more than federal and state TV stations. It was also found that the creative application of modern technologies will lead to increased collaboration and job satisfaction among TV stations in Nigeria.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:27:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221097651
       
  • Picturing Diversity: Netflix’s Inclusion Strategy and the Netflix
           Recommender Algorithm (NRA)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Olivia Khoo
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This essay asks two related questions: what is unique about streaming services (and Netflix specifically), that generates a greater investment in the diversity of its content, and how does the technology associated with streaming, in particular algorithmic recommendation systems, facilitate an engagement with diversity and inclusion' To answer these questions the essay considers the relationship between Netflix’s Inclusion Strategy, its Recommender Algorithm, and the diversity of its content, exploring the complex set of relations that exist between the way Netflix recommends content to its audience and its (perceived) diversity.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:25:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221102864
       
  • “We Don’t Aspire to Be Netflix”: Understanding Content Acquisition
           Practices Among Niche Streaming Services

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Michael L. Wayne, Matt Sienkiewicz
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Using the media industry studies approach, this article examines the acquisition strategies and licensing practices employed by three recently launched niche Jewish/Israeli subscription video on-demand (SVOD) services. Drawing on qualitative interviews with executives and publicly available materials, this analysis argues that these services acquire film and television titles through a combination of traditional and innovative licensing arrangements intended to maximize access to Jewish-themed or Israeli-produced content unwanted by better funded platforms. The findings reveal the ways in which access to specific kinds of content is dependent on executives’ ability to leverage preexisting industry-specific professional relationships as they attempt to maximize the value created from limited economic resources. As such, this article offers insights by contextualizing licensing practices being employed by niche SVODs across film and television industries while also highlighting the limitations of using the mainstream/niche binary to understand streaming distribution.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T02:15:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221100474
       
  • Wrap You Up in My Blue Hair”: Vocaloid, Hyperpop, and Identity in
           “Ashnikko Feat. Hatsune Miku – Daisy 2.0”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lucy March
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      In 2020, hyperpop artist Ashnikko released a remix of her single “Daisy” with virtual idol Hatsune Miku. While the rights to any commercial use of Miku’s voice and likeness are owned by Crypton Future Media, anyone with Vocaloid software can produce songs for her. While scholars have found that fan-produced performances are foundational to Miku’s development as a performer, less attention has been paid to how intercultural commercial ventures have shaped her identity. This paper employs a textual analysis of the “Daisy 2.0” music video and an observation of comments posted on the video’s YouTube upload to demonstrate how the video’s narrative and its surrounding audience discourse both limit and expand Miku’s cultural signifiers. While fluid approaches to identity afforded by the hyperpop and virtual idol subcultures hold potential to liberate these performers from hegemonic notions of gender and sexuality, cultural and commercial constraints still loom large in these spaces.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T10:49:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221093599
       
  • Data Ableism: Ability Expectations and Marginalization in Automated
           Societies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vassilis Charitsis, Tuukka Lehtiniemi
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      While data is increasingly proffered as the resource that unlocks the promises of the digitalized world, for underprivileged individuals and communities, instead of fulfilled promises, datafication means additional marginalization. Examining these forms of marginalization, this article considers how technological advancements come with ability expectations, and highlights the exclusion and discrimination of disadvantaged segments of the population that result from failing to meet digital ability expectations and reach prescribed data norms. Drawing from critical disability scholarship, we introduce the notions of data ableism and data disablism, which encapsulate privileged ability expectations pertaining to data production and the resulting forms of exclusion that are prevalent in automated societies. Underlining the intersectional nature of data ableism, we discern its two main mechanisms, namely data (in)visibility and data (un)desirability, and document the role of free market ideology in producing and upholding data ableism.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-02-23T07:43:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221077660
       
  • The Place of Convergent Audiences in the Small Industry Market

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Iveta Jansová, Charles Michael Elavsky
      First page: 19
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      In this day and age, it is increasingly important to ask how the cultural industries adapt to the evolution of communication technology. Recent technological changes influencing our understanding of media communication processes are discussed in various fields, with western traditions often predominating. However, the particular impact on industry dynamics is hardly universal. Specifically, the way such changes influence the dynamics of small, distinct peripheral markets remains largely underexamined. To this end, this manuscript focuses on such questions as they relate to the specificities of Central and Eastern Europe and the Czech Republic, a particularly small industry with distinct cultural proclivities. In ascertaining how media representatives/workers comprehend and engage their audiences, this paper presents a fuller understanding of the microsocial processes by which Czech media audiences are framed and conceptualized within Czech media industries and offers insights into the rationales directing the Czech media industry itself, particularly in relation to mediating the dialectic of local dynamics, international competition, and the evolution of digitalization.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T09:48:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764211061323
       
  • There’s Certainly a Lot of History Here, But We’re Here to Roast
           Oysters: Afterlives of Trans-Atlantic Exchange in Top Chef: Charleston

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Olivia Stowell
      First page: 37
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This article reads the premiere episode of Top Chef’s fourteenth season, Top Chef: Charleston (2016), for its engagement with the history of slavery in the United States, arguing that Top Chef deploys acknowledgments of historical violences for the purpose of concealing those same violences. By analyzing the discursive and visual content of Charleston’s premiere’s elimination challenge, which required two chefs to cook head-to-head at a plantation, this article outlines how race shapes the action of Top Chef both overtly and covertly, emerging as an organizing factor for the program as a whole. Charleston’s premiere episode illuminates how history is repackaged into popular discursive and material formations, while also suggesting the potential for such formations to cohere around race in unexpected and unpredictable ways.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T10:36:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764211067735
       
  • Immigrants on Chinese Television and Limitations of China’s
           Globalist Discourse

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chun Gan
      First page: 54
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Traditionally perceived as a country of emigration, China has in recent years become an increasingly popular subject for immigration and diaspora studies, with an immigrant population that has been growing quietly and steadily since the 1990s. However, media representations of immigrants in China have not garnered much attention. This article provides a critical assessment of how immigrants and immigrant experience are portrayed on Chinese television, using the example of Foreigner in China (2013–19), the first-ever program on a national platform to tackle this topic. It argues that, while the program paints a rather insightful and entertaining picture of contemporary immigrant life in China, its representation of immigrants is restricted by not only the internal contradiction of the Xi administration’s globalist discourse, but also the exclusive, ethnocentric conception of Chinese nationhood, which remains the norm in a more heterogenous and globally conscious Chinese society.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T10:06:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764211061256
       
  • Reclaiming the People: Counter-Populist Algorithmic Activism on Israeli
           Facebook

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Yoav Halperin
      First page: 71
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines a new form of resistance to right-wing populist discourse on social media which I define as counter-populist algorithmic activism. Practitioners of this type of activism exploit platforms’ automated ranking mechanisms and interface design to bolster the online visibility of counter-populist voices. By so doing, activists seek to stymie the digitally mediated spread of right-wing populist rhetoric and advance an alternative, non-exclusionary vision of “the people.” To explore this nascent form of resistance, this study draws on a year-long online ethnography of a Facebook group of Israeli activists called Strengthening the Left Online. Through an observation of the group’s activities during 2017, as well as interviews with its main administrator and other left-wing Facebook users, I elucidate the distinctive nature of the motivations, strategies, and goals that guide counter-populist algorithmic activists.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-01-04T10:05:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764211059462
       
  • Netflix in Mexico: An Example of the Tech Giant’s Transnational
           Business Strategies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rodrigo Gómez, Argelia Muñoz Larroa
      First page: 88
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Netflix, as a tech company, is currently the largest global streaming platform challenging traditional US studios. This article analyses Netflix’s transnational business strategies disrupting such status quo by focusing, on one local example: Mexico. Literature on Netflix has identified some of the transnational strategies studied here, this article adds to the discussion the use of local elements to infiltrate the power hub of Hollywood. By using the holistic scope of Political Economy, this research presents an integrated examination of: (a) the structural conditions of the Mexican audiovisual system in which Netflix is immersed; (b) the tech company’s expansion strategies; (c) the case of the movie Roma as a pivot-like tactic to push forward different company goals. The article argues that Netflix, by setting a new form of audiovisual circulation through innovation technology, has understood the key areas to break the audiovisual market value chain allowing it to gain global dominance.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-02-25T10:13:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221082107
       
  • The Routinization of Media Events: Televised Sports in the Era of Mega-TV

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ilan Tamir, Sam Lehman-Wilzig
      First page: 106
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Media events theory, developed by Katz and Dayan in the 1990s, has become one of the most well-known and cited theories in communications research, well-aligned with television’s central role in social life at the time. However, three decades since, in which events have spilled over to other media spaces thereby reshaping the theory’s underlying concept, sports broadcasts have remained a consistently stable source of media events. Although the original theory addressed media events as a rare phenomenon of a distinct, well-defined nature, the current study describes sports events that globally now constitute a sequence of routine mega media events that effectively function as a key anchor in traditional television programing. In the era of multiple screens, content abundance, and flexible viewing times, media events have become classic linear television’s programing core—instrumental in retaining its viewer base and in exploiting television’s advantage over rival screens and content. As a result, sport has become television’s main resource, thus indicating a need to revise elements of media theory. This study suggests several revision possibilities and what they entail methodologically for researchers.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-03-05T07:29:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221080989
       
  • Televisual Drag: Reimagining South Asian Film and Media Studies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Aswin Punathambekar, Padma Chirumamilla
      First page: 123
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This article engages with the history of television and television studies in South Asia to reflect on how “media” can be re-imagined as an object of analysis and critique. Questioning the analytic primacy accorded to film, we develop the concept of televisual drag and argue that bringing television to the fore can reveal different temporalities, modalities, and logics for the evolution of South Asian screen media, both in their past forms and current constitution. We critically engage with recent studies—of Indian women filmmakers, Pakistani comic shows and YouTube videos, and small-town video circulation in India—to illuminate the currents of televisual drag at work in contemporary media scholarship. We conclude by reflecting how how televisual drag might be a critical method for drawing insights from media histories, practices, and environments that do not or will not follow an easily comprehensible path toward a seemingly inevitable digital horizon.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-03-30T01:16:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221080923
       
  • The Refractive Comic: Nanette and Comedy From Inside Identity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kiah E. Bennett
      First page: 139
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This essay theorizes a millennial-era iteration of stand-up comedy: refractive comedy. Through close textual analysis of Hannah Gadsby’s Nanette (2018), I argue refractive comedy alters the message, affective nature, and form of stand-up comedy through a rejection of the dominant worldview and subsequent centering of marginalized standpoints. This essay examines Gadsby’s refraction in a broader discourse of industrial and cultural, gendered, and racial gatekeeping. I examine how refractive comedy, additionally, has inspired critical conversation on comedy’s role in relation to shared and collective trauma, as seen in Bo Burnham’s Inside (2021).
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T10:51:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221093600
       
  • “Shudder” and the Aesthetics and Platform Logics of
           Genre-Specific SVOD services

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jessica Balanzategui, Andrew Lynch
      First page: 156
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Major subscription-video-on-demand (SVOD) services including Netflix and Apple TV+ target a wide range of consumers through catalogs that house a diverse variety of genres. However, as the SVOD ecology has evolved, services have emerged that focus on particular genres, and thus target enthusiasts of specific content types. This article examines the horror-focused SVOD service “Shudder” to highlight how these genre-specific SVOD services curate content in ways that differ from major services like Netflix. Unlike the top-tier generalist SVODs, niche services like Shudder do not appeal to users via personalized algorithmic recommendation of titles from a seemingly limitless catalog: instead, these services are branded around the affective pleasures of and fan cultures surrounding specific genres. Our analysis of Shudder combines interface and genre analysis to illuminate how the platform offers a “phenomenal experience” of generic immersion in ways that reflect on new intersections between SVOD platforms, genre, nostalgia, and cinephilic subcultures.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T08:19:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221093602
       
  • Contingency, Precarity and Short-Video Creativity: Platformization Based
           Analysis of Chinese Online Screen Industry

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chunmeizi Su
      First page: 173
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Platformization theory proposes that cultural productions are contingent on platforms. This study argues that in the Chinese context; however, online productions are contingent not only on platforms, but on government policies. Under the influence of state, market, and platform policy, major streaming services in China are becoming an online “state TV.” The limitations placed on grassroots content has forced creators to thrive elsewhere, contributing to the proliferation of short video platforms such as TikTok. This study investigates the contingency and precarity of the online sector to map the migration of content creators from conventional streaming services to the emerging creative forms of short videos and livestreaming.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-04-23T11:52:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221087994
       
  • Bilingualism and the Televisual Architecture of Linguistic (dis-)
           Encounters in the Israeli Television Show Arab Labor

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nahuel Ribke
      First page: 190
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Considered the first fully Hebrew-Arabic bilingual television show on Israeli prime time television, Arab Labor (2007–2013) attracted the attention of critics and scholars for its sharp satire and criticism of the daily dilemmas and discrimination faced by Israeli Arab citizens. Although its success among audiences and critics opened the door for other bilingual television shows spoken in Hebrew and Arabic, it also caused frustration for the series’ creator due the limits imposed by commercial television operating in an antagonistic socio-political context. While previous studies on the show have focused on its main narrative conflicts and themes, the present study proposes to examine the televisual spatio-temporal, linguistic and dramatic structures that foster the encounters and conflicts between the two languages spoken in the series.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T11:31:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221084285
       
  • Stuck in a cul de sac of care: Therapy Assistance Online and the
           platformization of mental health services for college students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: James N. Gilmore, Bailey Troutman, Madeline DePuy, Katherine Kenney, Jessica Engel, Katherine Freed, Sidney Campbell, Savannah Garrigan
      First page: 204
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      Many reports indicate higher education counseling centers are finding it difficult to keep pace with the growing rates of stress, anxiety, depression, and sleeping difficulties in undergraduate populations. Some universities are turning to telepsychology, or means of providing mental health care through videoconferencing, software, and other digital tools. This article analyzes one such platform, therapy assistance online (TAO), through a critical walkthrough of the platform’s self-help modules to consider how they communicate and construct care as individual labor which generates data for the platform. We argue that by removing traces of the therapist’s body and, in turn, dialogic communication, the platform produces modes of neoliberal self-care operationalized through data extraction, where the individual user works through modules while providing personal information to the platform. While TAO is offered as a solution to overcrowded and understaffed care facilities, it demonstrates some limitations of relying on third-party platforms to care for students.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T05:45:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221092159
       
  • First-Run Syndication and Unwired Networks in the 1980s: Viacom’s
           Superboy and Buena Vista TV’s DuckTales

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: M. J. Clarke
      First page: 221
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.
      This article historically examines the boom in US first-run syndication during the 1980s. At this time, Hollywood-based major distributors eagerly entered this market, thanks to regulatory and industrial changes, in an effort to create competing unwired television networks. The article presents a contextual history to describe these changes and uses two sustained case studies—Viacom’s Superboy and Buena Vista TV’s DuckTales—to more closely examine these syndicators. Through these case studies, the article demonstrates the shared industrial strategies of these distributors in exploiting pre-sold brands, globalized labor, and package deals for programing.
      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T09:40:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221087216
       
  • Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Krysten Stein
      First page: 242
      Abstract: Television & New Media, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Television & New Media
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T10:00:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15274764221096838
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 44.212.99.248
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-