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Current Research in Parasitology & Vector-Borne Diseases     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
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Medicine in Omics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Network Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Biodiversity Observations     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Science and Technology Journal of Namibia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Metabolomics & Systems Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bioethica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
iBOL Barcode Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Bioethics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
VITIS : Journal of Grapevine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bionature     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Bio-X Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
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Bioactive Compounds in Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Phycology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RSC Chemical Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Plant-Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Zoological and Botanical Gardens     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Research in Neurobiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Artificial Intelligence in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Research in Chemical Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EFB Bioeconomy Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
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Fish and Shellfish Immunology Reports     Open Access  
Biomimetic Intelligence and Robotics     Open Access  
Fundamental Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Advanced Statistics and IT&C for Economics and Life Sciences     Open Access  
Clinical Spectroscopy     Open Access  
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Quantitative Plant Biology     Open Access  
International Journal of Biological, Physical and Chemical Studies     Open Access  
Passer Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences     Open Access  
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Jurnal Biogenerasi     Open Access  
Journal of Biocommunication     Open Access  
Fungal Genetics Reports     Open Access  
Proceedings of the Nova Scotian Institute of Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Vegetation Classification and Survey     Open Access  
Food and Ecological Systems Modelling Journal     Open Access  
Caucasiana     Open Access  
Arabian Journal of Scientific Research / المجلة العربية للبحث العلمي     Open Access  
Journal of Transplantation & Stem Cell Biology     Open Access  
Journal of Toxins     Open Access  
International Journal of Reproductive BioMedicine     Open Access  
KnE Life Sciences     Open Access  
Natural Product Communications     Open Access  
Global Journal of Ecology     Open Access  

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Vegetation Classification and Survey
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2683-0671
Published by Pensoft Homepage  [58 journals]
  • Nordic-Baltic Grassland Vegetation Database (NBGVD) – current state
           and future prospects

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 5: 75-84
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.119968
      Authors : Nadiia Skobel, Łukasz Kozub, Iwona Dembicz, Steffen Boch, Hans Henrik Bruun, Olha Chusova, Valentin Golub, Aveliina Helm, Dmytro Iakushenko, Paweł Pawlikowski, Piotr Zaniewski, Jürgen Dengler : This Long Database Report describes the historical background and current contents of the Nordic-Baltic Grassland Vegetation Database (NBGVD) (GIVD-code EU-00-002). NBGVD is the EDGG-associated collaborative vegetation-plot database that collects vegetation-plot data of grasslands and other open habitats (except segetal and deep aquatic vegetation) from the Nordic-Baltic region excluding Germany, namely Belarus, Denmark, Estonia, Faroe Islands, Finland, Iceland, Latvia, Lithuania, Norway, N Poland, NW Russia, Svalbard and Jan Mayen, and Sweden. Target vegetation types are lowland grasslands and heathlands, arctic-alpine communities, coastal communities, non-forested mires and other wetlands, rocky, tall-herb and ruderal communities. As of March 2024, it included 12,694 relevés recorded between 1910 and 2023. These were mainly digitised from literature sources (84%), while the remainder comes from individual unpublished sources (16%). The data quality is high, with bryophytes and lichens being treated in more than 80% of all plots and measured environmental variables such as topography and soil characteristics often available in standardised form. A peculiarity of the Nordic-Baltic region are the relatively small plot sizes compared to other regions (median: 4 m2). The available data stem from 35 vegetation classes, with Koelerio-Corynephoretea, Festuco-Brometea, Sedo-Scleranthetea, Molinio-Arrhenatheretea and Scheuchzerio-Caricetea being most frequent. We conclude that NBGVD provides valuable data, allowing interesting analyses at the regional scale and fills gaps in continental to global analyses. Still, since there are many more data around, we ask interested readers to contribute their own data or help find and digitise old data from the literature. Taxonomic reference: TURBOVEG species list “Europe”. Syntaxonomic reference: Mucina et al. (2016). Abbreviations: EDGG = Eurasian Dry Grassland Group, EVA = European Vegetation Archive, GIVD = Global Index of Vegetation-Plot Databases, NBGVD = Nordic-Baltic Grassland Vegetation Database HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 23 May 2024 07:50:02 +030
       
  • Dry grasslands and thorn-cushion communities of Armenia: a first
           syntaxonomic classification

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 5: 39-73
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.119253
      Authors : Denys Vynokurov, Alla Aleksanyan, Thomas Becker, Idoia Biurrun, Dariia Borovyk, George Fayvush, Itziar García-Mijangos, Martin Magnes, Salza Palpurina, Ute Becker, Asun Berastegi, Beata Cykowska-Marzencka, Iwona Dembicz, Dieter Frank, Andreas Hilpold, Philipp Kirschner, Helmut Mayrhofer, Marine Oganesian, Iuliia Vasheniak, Jürgen Dengler : Aim: To provide the first syntaxonomic, plot-based classification of the dry grasslands and thorn-cushion communities in Armenia. Study area: Armenia. Methods: We sampled 111 vegetation plots (10 m2) and recorded environmental and structural parameters. We collected additional 487 relevés from surrounding countries for a broad-scale comparison. We used modified TWINSPAN to derive a syntaxonomic classification system, whose units were then compared among each other regarding species composition, structure, site conditions and distribution. Results: The classification of Armenian vegetation plots resulted in a 12-cluster solution. Unsupervised classification of the broad-scale dataset yielded five main groups, which were used for the high-level syntaxonomic assignments of the Armenian data. We assigned about half of the plots of the Armenian dataset to the Festuco-Brometea, while the remaining represented a potential new class, preliminarily called “Ziziphora tenuior-Stipa arabica grasslands”. Most of the syntaxa below class level are new to science, therefore we provide formal descriptions of three orders (Plantagini atratae-Bromopsietalia variegatae, Onobrychido transcaucasicae-Stipetalia pulcherrimae, Cousinio brachypterae-Stipetalia arabicae), four alliances (Acantholimono caryophyllacei-Stipion holosericeae, Artemision fragrantis, Onobrychido michauxii-Stipion capillatae, Onobrychido transcaucasicae-Stipion pulcherrimae) and six associations. We found significant differences in the topographic, climatic and soil characteristics, and structural parameters, species life forms and distribution range types between the grassland types at different syntaxonomic levels. The mean species richness was 47.3 (vascular plants: 46.8, bryophytes: 0.4, lichens: 0.1). Conclusions: We found remarkable differences of the Armenian dry grasslands from the previously known units and described most of the higher syntaxa and all the associations as new to science. Our study provides arguments for a potential new class of Ziziphora tenuior-Stipa arabica grasslands separate both from the Euro-Siberian Festuco-Brometea and the Anatolian Astragalo-Brometea. Finally, we found plot scale richness of vascular plants clearly above the Palaearctic average of dry grasslands and that of non-vascular plants clearly below, which calls for further biodiversity analyses. Taxonomic reference: Euro+Med (2023) for vascular plants, Hodgetts et al. (2020) for bryophytes, Nimis et al. (2018) for lichens except for Xanthoparmelia camtschadalis (Ach.) Hale. Abbreviations: EDGG = Eurasian Dry Grassland Group; DCA = detrended correspondence analysis; ICPN = International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature (Theurillat et al. 2021); TWINSPAN = two-way indicator species analysis. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 9 May 2024 14:51:24 +0300
       
  • Nomenclatural revision of the syntaxa of European coastal dune vegetation

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 5: 27-37
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.108560
      Authors : Corrado Marcenò, Jiří Danihelka, Tetiana Dziuba, Wolfgang Willner, Milan Chytrý : This manuscript provides a review of the phytosociological nomenclature of the European syntaxa included in the classes Ammophiletea arundinaceae, Honckenyo peploidis-Elymetea arenarii, and Koelerio glaucae-Corynephoretea canescentis. The nomenclature has been refined and updated following the 4th edition of the International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature (ICPN). In the Appendix, we submit two proposals (37, 38) to conserve the names Ammophilion arundinaceae Braun-Blanquet 1933 and Medicagini marinae-Ammophiletum arundinaceae Braun-Blanquet 1933. Taxonomic reference: see references in the main text. Syntaxonomic reference: see references in the main text. Abbreviations: EVCC = European Vegetation Classification Committee; ICPN = 4th edition of the International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature (Theurillat et al. 2021). HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 15 Mar 2024 11:03:21 +020
       
  • How to classify forests' A case study from Central Europe

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 5: 17-26
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.117703
      Authors : Wolfgang Willner : Aims: Inconsistent treatment of the vegetation layers is one of the main problems in the floristic classification of forests. In this study I investigate whether a classification based solely on woody species leads to units similar to the Braun-Blanquet system or to something completely different. Study area: Austria (Central Europe) and adjacent regions. Methods: 23,681 forest relevés from the Austrian Vegetation Database were classified using TWINSPAN. Spruce and pine plantations and stands with a cover of non-native woody species > 5% were excluded from the dataset. Only native tree and shrub species were used in the classification while herbs, dwarf shrubs, cryptogams and all records of woody species in the herb layer were omitted. Results: The TWINSPAN classification revealed elevation (i.e., climate) as the main floristic gradient in the data set. Within lowland communities, soil moisture was the dominant factor. The higher units of the Braun-Blanquet system were mostly well reproduced. Conclusions: The higher levels of the phytosociological forest classification (class, order, partly also alliance) can basically be defined by taking only the shrub and tree layer into account. However, all past and current classifications suffer from arbitrary exceptions to this rule. This leads to many inconsistencies and blurs the main biogeographical patterns within European forests. Here I argue that using the tree and shrub species for defining the higher levels and the understorey species for defining the lower ones is best suited to meet the properties that users would expect from a good forest classification. Taxonomic reference: Fischer et al. (2008). Syntaxonomic reference: Mucina et al. (2016) if not stated otherwise. Abbreviations: EVC = EuroVegChecklist (Mucina et al. 2016). HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Mar 2024 09:13:15 +0200
       
  • Proposal (36) to conserve the name Philonotidion seriatae Hinterlang 1992
           for the species-poor, bryophyte-dominated, non-calcareous arctic-alpine
           spring vegetation of Europe

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 5: 11-15
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.103154
      Authors : Michal Hájek, Tomáš Peterka, Petra Hájková, Dirk Hinterlang, Harald Zechmeister, Milan Chytrý : According to the International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature, a younger name of a syntaxon may be conserved against its older name to improve the stability of the nomenclature and avoid misunderstandings in scientific communication. Here, we propose conserving the name Philonotidion seriatae Hinterlang 1992 for arctic-alpine, bryophyte-dominated, non-calcareous spring vegetation against the names Cardamino-Montion Braun-Blanquet 1925, Cardamino-Montion Braun-Blanquet 1926, and Montion Maas 1959. In current vegetation classification systems, the two name-giving taxa of Cardamino-Montion no longer indicate the character of the vegetation corresponding to the nomenclatural type of this alliance and are instead characteristic of other currently distinguished alliances. Maintaining the oldest name Cardamino-Montion in strict adherence to the Code would be a source of errors. In the current vegetation classification systems, two similar but counter-intuitive names would then have to be used: Cardamino-Montion for arctic-alpine springs (although the name-giving taxa are more indicative of montane springs) and Epilobio nutantis-Montion for montane springs (although the name-giving taxon Epilobium nutans is indicative of arctic-alpine vegetation). Hence, there is a risk that the name Cardamino-Montion may gradually become ambiguous. We also propose conserving the name Philonotidion seriatae against Mniobryo-Epilobion hornemannii Nordhagen 1943 to prevent confusion in case of a merger of these alliances. (36) Philonotidion seriatae Hinterlang 1992 Typus: Cratoneuro-Philonotidetum Geissler 1976 (holotypus) (=) Cardamino-Montion Braun-Blanquet 1925 Typus: Bryetum schleicheri Braun-Blanquet 1925 [≡ Montio fontanae-Bryetum schleicheri Braun-Blanquet 1925 nom. corr. et invers. (alternative name)] (holotypus) (=) Cardamino-Montion Braun-Blanquet 1926 nom. superfl. [≡ Cardamino-Montion Braun-Blanquet 1925] (=) Mniobryo-Epilobion hornemannii Nordhagen 1943 Typus: Mniobryo-Epilobietum hornemannii Nordhagen 1943 (lectotypus selected by Zechmeister & Mucina 1994) (=) Montion Maas 1959 nom. superfl. [≡ Cardamino-Montion Braun-Blanquet 1925] Taxonomic reference: Euro+Med PlantBase (http://europlusmed.org; accessed 4 January 2024) HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 1 Mar 2024 08:47:59 +0200
       
  • Vegetation Classification and Survey is performing well

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 5: 1-10
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.118454
      Authors : Jürgen Dengler, Idoia Biurrun, Florian Jansen, Wolfgang Willner : On the occasion of the completion of the fourth volume of Vegetation Classification and Survey (VCS), we have analysed the performance of the journal since its inception. The number of papers and pages show a moderate increase over the years. VCS has been included in the Scopus database for more than a year and received its first CiteScore of 2.0 in summer 2023 but is not yet included in the Web of Science Core Edition. We therefore used data from the Scopus database to compare the citation impact of articles in VCS with that of 29 other ecological journals. By calculating normalized citation rates per journal and publication year, we found that VCS started at the bottom of the rankings in the first two years (28th out of 30) but improved to 26th in 2022 and 14th in 2023. Together with the known time lag and the strong positive relationships between the different citation metrics, this allows a projection of the future development of the CiteScores and, after inclusion in the Web of Science, the Journal Impact Factor (JIF). Using the Field-Weighted Citation Impact (FWCI) from the Scopus database, we identified the top 12 out of 95 VCS articles published in the first four years that received more citations than expected for their age and field. We also present the four Editors’ Choice papers of 2023, among which Strohbach and Strohbach (2023; Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 241–284) received the Editors’ Award in 2023. We conclude that VCS is on the right track, supported by the fact that in 2024 most authors will still be charged no or very low article processing charges (APCs). Abbreviations: APC = article processing charge; IAVS = International Association for Vegetation Science; JIF = Journal Impact Factor; OA = open access; VCS = Vegetation Classification and Survey; WoS = Web of Science Core Edition. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 19 Jan 2024 16:00:03 +020
       
  • Invasive species over-stabilise the vegetation of a mobile dunefield,
           Manawatū, New Zealand, disrupting natural succession

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 343-360
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.98391
      Authors : Gillian L. Rapson, Ashley L. Murphy, Angelina R. Smith : Aims: Mobile, coastal dunefields around the world are under threat from invasive plants, which may out-compete native plant species. These aliens may also accelerate stabilisation of the dunes, to the complete exclusion of early successional native flora. In a mobile dunefield we examine the impact of the increasing abundance of alien species on substrate stability and successional trends of the native vegetation. Study area: Tawhirihoe Scientific Reserve, Manawatū, New Zealand. Methods: We recorded species’ covers and environmental factors in quadrats placed randomly over the mobile dunefield, and analysed the vegetation and its successional patterns via multivariate analysis. We explored the degrees of stabilisation and nativeness, referencing changes over the last three decades. Results: Our analysis reveals seven vegetation types, three with a high native component and following an established successional trend, and the others becoming dominated by alien grasses and herbs, and associated with increasing dune stability. Biodiversity is trending towards aliens, especially behind the foredunes, and aliens occupy nearly double the area of the mobile dunefield as do natives. Coverage of unvegetated or mobile sand has declined to 21 % and is projected to decline further. Conclusions: Only the foredunes and dune-slack wetlands are now in a mostly natural state, while native rear dune vegetation is becoming rare, and natural succession appears to be interrupted. Alien species over-stabilise the dunefield, facilitating further alien invasion, the longer-term implications of which are unknown. Intervention to destabilise the dunefield seems the most viable management option. Taxonomic reference: Nga Tipu o Aotearoa (http://nzflora.landcareresearch.co.nz) [accessed 10 Jan 2023]. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Dec 2023 17:31:52 +020
       
  • Classification and nomenclature of temperate forest types in
           Mexico

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 329-341
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.100796
      Authors : Víctor Ávila-Akerberg, Rubén Rosaliano-Evaristo, Tanya González-Martínez, Brayan Pichardo-García, Diana Serrano-González : Aims: To analyze and synthesize the principal contributions to the creation of a classification of established forests in sub-humid, temperate climatic regions in Mexico. Methods: Documentary analysis and review of works on the classification of the vegetation of Mexico, with emphasis from 1950 to the present. To identify and analyze the terms frequently used to refer to these plant communities, the following was done: literature search, analysis of frequencies and co-occurrences of these terms that appeared in the titles of the documents. A list of associations of these communities was compiled through a documentary review. Results: Vegetation classification proposals, both nationally and internationally, tend towards the standardization of criteria and nested hierarchical integration at various levels based on physiognomic, climatic, phenological and floristic attributes. The two highest levels of organization in these proposals are based on major vegetation, defined by vegetation forms and climatic criteria as “temperate forests”. Meanwhile lower levels, including the level of associations, are based on their floristic composition. The most frequently used term to refer to these plant communities, according to the documents used in the search, is “temperate forest”, although other terms frequently used are “coniferous forest”, “pine forest”, and “oak forest”. Conclusions: Knowledge about the classification of vegetation in Mexico dates back to pre-Hispanic times. However, it was not until the second half of the 20th century that solid proposals that are influential today were put forward. Given the high biological diversity of the country, it is still a pending task to characterize and make an inventory of the diversity at the level of associations that form this type of temperate forests. Taxonomic reference: Villaseñor (2016). Abbreviations: FVT = Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt; SECLAVEMEX = Mexican Vegetation Classification System; SMO = Sierra Madre Oriental; SMOc = Sierra Madre Occidental; SMS = Sierra Madre del Sur (SMS). HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Wed, 13 Dec 2023 17:51:04 +020
       
  • Proposal (35) to conserve the name Festucion valesiacae

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 323-327
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.108437
      Authors : Jean-Paul Theurillat, Romeo Di Pietro, Norbert Bauer, Massimo Terzi : For ninety years, the alliance name Festucion valesiacae has been widely and almost exclusively used to designate the al­liance of steppic, xeric grasslands on deep soils from Central Europe to western Ukraine. However, there is an earlier, hardly used heterotypic synonym, the Festucion sulcatae, that would be the correct name according to the rules [recte: Festucion rupicolae nom. corr.]. In order to preserve a well-established name, we propose to conserve the name Festucion valesiacae against the name Festucion sulcatae. In addition, we typify the name Festucion rupicolae Soó 1930 nom. corr. with the association Festuco rupicolae-Stipetum pennatae Soó 1930 nom. corr., for which we also select a neotype. This proposal is supported by the fact that the alliance Festucion valesiacae is the conserved type of the order Festucetalia valesiacae. (35) Festucion valesiacae Klika 1931 Typus: Ranunculo illyrici-Festucetum valesiacae Klika 1931 (lectotypus designated by Toman 1975: 131) (=) Festucion rupicolae Soó 1930 nom. corr. (≡ Festucion sulcatae Soó 1930 nom. inept.) Typus: Festuco rupicolae-Stipetum pennatae Soó 1930 nom. corr. (lectotypus hoc loco) Taxonomic reference: Euro+Med (2023) unless otherwise indicated. Syntaxonomic reference: Mucina et al. (2016). Abbreviations: EVC = EuroVegChecklist (Mucina et al. 2016); ICPN = 4th edition of the International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature (Theurillat et al. 2021). HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Mon, 11 Dec 2023 19:35:28 +020
       
  • Nomenclatural comments on the alliance Pino sibiricae-Laricion
           sibiricae

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 319-321
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.104301
      Authors : Oleg A. Anenkhonov : The name Pino sibiricae-Laricion sibiricae was introduced in 1988 by Dostálek et al. and then again in 2004 by Ermakov. Further, the latter name, despite of homonymy, has been accepted in several Russian literature sources on the basis of a misapplication of ICPN Art. 37. The validity and legitimacy of the name introduced by Dostálek et al. are discussed and clarified, whereas Ermakov’s illegitimate homonym must be rejected according to Art. 31. Taxonomic reference: Catalogue of Life Checklist, Version COL23.5 (https://doi.org/10.48580/dfs6) [accessed 16 November 2023]. Abbreviations: ICPN = International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature (Theurillat et al. 2021). HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Mon, 11 Dec 2023 00:19:11 +020
       
  • Syntaxonomic classification of forb steppes and related vegetation of
           subalpine and alpine belts in the Pamir-Alai Mountains (Tajikistan, Middle
           Asia)

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 291-317
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.102634
      Authors : Sebastian Świerszcz, Marcin Nobis, Grzegorz Swacha, Sylwia Nowak, Arkadiusz Nowak : Aims: To complete the syntaxonomic scheme of subalpine forb steppes in the Pamir-Alai Mountains in Tajikistan with some remarks on its environmental predictors. Study area: Tajikistan. Methods: A total of 149 relevés were sampled in 2014 and 2021 using the seven-degree cover-abundance scale of the Braun-Blanquet scheme. These were classified with a modified TWINSPAN algorithm with pseudospecies cut-off levels of 0%, 2%, 5% and 25%, and total inertia as a measure of cluster heterogeneity. Diagnostic species were determined using the phi coefficient as a fidelity measure. Detrended Correspondence Analysis (DCA) was used to show compositional differences between the distinguished alpine and subalpine grassland units. Results: Our classification revealed 12 clusters of alpine and subalpine grassland vegetation in Middle Asia. A total of nine new associations and three communities were distinguished. New vegetation types at potential class rank for Irano-Turanian subalpine and alpine grasslands have been proposed: forb steppes with Eremogone griffithii and Nepeta podostachys in subalpine and alpine belts and alpine grasslands with Festuca alaica and Festuca kryloviana for mesic habitats in the alpine belt. The main factors differentiating the species composition were the mean diurnal temperature range, the sum of annual precipitation, precipitation seasonality and the minimum temperature of the coldest month. Conclusions: Our study sheds light on the open habitat vegetation in the Pamir-Alai Mountains and has contributed to the consistent hierarchical classification of the vegetation of the eastern Irano-Turanian region. Subalpine and alpine forb steppes are a very interesting and distinct grassland type in Middle Asia. The syntaxonomic position of some of the distinguished communities is still unclear and further research on this type of alpine and subalpine vegetation within the mountains of Middle Asia is needed. Taxonomic references: The nomenclature of the vascular plants follows Plants of the World Online (POWO 2023) and problematic taxonomic issues were solved according to The World Flora Online (WFO 2023). Nomenclature of Stipa spp. follows Nobis et al. (2020, 2022) and of Geranium spp. Cherepanov (1995). The nomenclature of bryophytes follows Ignatov et al. (2006). Abbreviations: DCA = Detrended Correspondence Analysis. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Nov 2023 18:02:39 +020
       
  • Syntaxonomic ranks, biogeography and typological inflation

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 285-290
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.101648
      Authors : Javier Loidi : To reduce the typological inflation observed in some territories where intensive phytosociological studies have been carried out and numerous descriptive papers have been published, an outline of the biogeographical amplitude of the different syntaxonomic ranks is proposed. Phytosociological classes are divided into five main vegetation clusters: 1. Zonal vegetation, determined mainly by climatic conditions; 2. Azonal coastal and saline vegetation; 3. Azonal rocky vegetation; 4. Azonal wetland and aquatic vegetation; 5. Highly disturbed anthropogenic vegetation. In each of these, the various ranks (class, order, alliance, association and subassociation) have a particular range which is expressed by the biogeographical territory in which they most likely occur. This area can refer to different respective categories: kingdom, region, province, sector and district. Some additional comments about typological inflation are made in order to focus on two phenomena: desire for fame and geographic drift. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Nov 2023 17:13:32 +020
       
  • A first syntaxonomic description of the vegetation of the
           Karstveld in Namibia

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 241-284
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.99045
      Authors : Ben J. Strohbach, Marianne M. Strohbach : Aims: The Karstveld in Namibia has been recognized as an area of high plant diversity. However, this area is also recognised as a hotspot of various forms of degradation including bush encroachment. Minimal baseline data on the composition and diversity of vegetation in this area is available, therefore this paper is a first attempt to rectify this data deficiency. Study area: The Karstveld in Namibia is formed around the Otavi Mountain Range in northern Central Namibia, consisting of strongly karstified carbonate bedrock, rising up to 2000 m a.s.l. The Karstveld includes the Ovambo Basin plains with shallow calcrete soils north of the range, up to the Omuramba Ovambo. Because of orographic effects, the area receives some of the highest rainfall in Namibia, with up to 600 mm per year. Methods: A set of 889 relevés with 868 species was selected from the GVID ID AF-NA-001 database. A partial data set, using trees, shrubs, dwarf shrubs and grasses only, was used for the classification with modified TWINSPAN. The initial result yielded four main groups, according to which the data was split and further classified. Several vegetation types observed during field surveys were not reflected in the classification results; these were refined using Cocktail with known characteristic species. Results: The four main units represented wetlands and grasslands with six associations, a Thornbush savanna – Karstveld transition zone with four associations, Kalahari vegetation with four associations and the Karstveld proper with eight associations. The latter are grouped together as the Terminalietea prunioides, with two orders and three alliances recognised under them. We describe 16 associations according to the ICPN. Conclusions: Although the associations presented in this paper are clearly defined, there exists a high degree of diversity within these. The Karstveld is also extraordinary species rich within the context of the arid to semi-arid Namibian environment. Taxonomic reference: Klaassen and Kwembeya (2013) for vascular plants, with the exception of the genus Acacia s.l. (Fabaceae), for which Kyalangalilwa et al. (2013) was followed. Abbreviations: ga = annual grass; gp = perennial grass; GPS = Global Positioning System, referring to a hand-held ground receiver; hl = herb layer, containing all hemicryptophytes, therophytes and geophytes, but excluding grasses (Poaceae); ICPN = International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature (Theurillat et al. 2021); MAP = mean annual precipitation; NMS = nonmetric multidimensional scaling (Kruskal 1964); RDL = Red Data List (IUCN Species Survival Commission 2001); s1 = tall shrubs, i.e. multi-stemmed phanerophytes between 1 and 5 m; s2 = short shrubs, i.e. chamaephytes or ‘dwarf shrubs’ below 1 m; SOTER = Global and National Soils and Terrain Digital Database (FAO 1993); t1 = tall trees, > 10 m; t2 = short trees, between 5 and 10 m; t3 = low trees, i.e. single-stemmed phanerophytes between 2 and 5 m; TWINSPAN = Two Way Indicator Species Analysis (Roleček et al. 2009); WGS84 = World Geodetic System, 1984 ensemble. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Tue, 24 Oct 2023 18:28:19 +030
       
  • Transcaucasian Vegetation Database – a phytosociological database of
           the Southern Caucasus

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 231-240
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.105521
      Authors : Pavel Novák, Veronika Kalníková, Daniel Szokala, Alla Aleksanyan, Ketevan Batsatsashvili, George Fayvush, Sandro Kolbaia, George Nakhutsrishvili, Vojtěch Sedláček, Tadeáš Štěrba, Dominik Zukal : The Caucasus is a hotspot of global biodiversity. However, even in the era of big data, this region remains underrepresented in public vegetation-plot databases. The Transcaucasian Vegetation Database (GIVD code AS-00-005) is a novel dataset which primarily aims to compile, store and share vegetation-plot records sampled by the Braun-Blanquet approach and originating from Transcaucasia (the Southern Caucasus), i.e. the countries of Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia. The database currently contains 2,882 vegetation plots. The oldest plots originate from 1929, the newest from 2022, and their collection is ongoing. The data include mesophilous forests (phytosociological class Carpino-Fagetea) and various alpine and subalpine communities (e.g. Carici-Kobresietea, Loiseleurio-Vaccinietea) – selected other habitats are also represented. Most of the plots (84%) are georeferenced, 36% with high precision of 25 m or less. The database includes 2,500 taxon names; Asteraceae, Poaceae, Fabaceae and Rosaceae represent the most common families. Vascular plants are recorded in all plots, while data on species composition of bryophytes are available for 11% of plots. The database intends to contribute to the complex biodiversity research of this biologically unique territory. The data might be used in diverse projects in botany, biogeography, ecology and nature protection. Taxonomic reference: The Plant List (http://www.theplantlist.org/ [Accessed 10 Jan 2023]). Syntaxonomic reference: Mucina et al. (2016). Abbreviations: TVD = Transcaucasian Vegetation Database. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Oct 2023 18:55:56 +030
       
  • Priorities in journal selection for authors, reviewers, editors,
           librarians and science funders

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 219-229
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.110296
      Authors : Jürgen Dengler : With this Forum contribution I wish to shed light on the problematic developments in scientific publishing resulting from the strong push of science funders towards gold open access (OA). This has given rise to numerous “predatory” journals, that maximise profit at the expense of scientific quality. With a bibliometric analysis in the field of ecology I demonstrate that over the period 2014–2022 the publication numbers in “predatory” OA journals have grown exponentially (+44% annually), while in all other journal types, article numbers were stagnating or even decreasing since a few years. Then I highlight how different OA publication models from society-owned journals to publisher-owned “predatory” journals, differ in the prices authors pay and how the income is split between effective costs, pure profit and money transferred back to science. To help with the recognition of the different journal types, I provide a list journals in the fields of ecology and organismal botany that are owned by academic societies, as well as a list of criteria to recognize “predatory” journals.
      Authors , reviewers and editors should consider carefully where they submit papers or provide volunteer service. My suggestion is to prioritize society-owned journals, while avoiding cooperation with “predatory” journals. Science funders and libraries have played a major role in the negative developments reviewed in this paper, but at the same time they have the capacity to change the course, mainly by two steps: In the short term they should link the payment of article processing charges (APCs) to strict quality criteria, while in the medium term, they should overcome the gold OA system towards a diamond OA system that would avoid the inflation of low-quality publications and remove barriers not only from readers, but also from authors, while at the same time likely reducing the overall costs. Abbreviations: APC = article processing charge; AVS = Applied Vegetation Science; IAVS = International Association for Vegetation Science; COVID-19 = Coronavirus disease 2019; DOAJ = Directory of Open Access Journals; JIF = 2-year Journal Impact Factor of the Web of Science; JVS = Journal of Vegetation Science; OA = open access; VCS = Vegetation Classification and Survey; WoS = Web of Science Core Collection. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Mon, 2 Oct 2023 16:05:59 +0300
       
  • Vegetation survey methodology in arable weeds is reported with less
           detail from vegetation science than weed science

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 209-218
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.105300
      Authors : Jana Bürger, Filip Küzmič : Aims: Understand and illustrate differences and common methods in surveys of arable weed vegetation from the two scientific disciplines Vegetation science and Weed science; analyse the relationship between study aims and the employed methodology; assess in how much detail methodologies are reported and whether this changed over time. Study area: Europe. Methods: Literature review, classification of studies according to their reported aims and according to the journal scope. Results: Survey methods were reported in greater detail in studies aiming to describe management effects on weed vegetation compared to phytosociological studies. Methods employed in vegetation science and weed science differ in plot sizes, surveyed field parts and the seasonal timing of the survey. Conclusions: We recommend for future weed surveys to record and report on plot size and position relative to field limits, recording date, abundance scale, as well as the crop grown in a field. This information should also be retained when digitising published data and compiling large databases. A data standard should be developed in an interdisciplinary process. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Mon, 2 Oct 2023 16:05:30 +0300
       
  • Proposals (33–34) to conserve the name Poo-Astragalion and to
           conserve the name Poo-Astragaletum sesamei with a conserved type, and
           requests (5–7) for a binding decision on the name-giving taxa in the
           same names and the inversion of the name Poo-Astragaletum sesamei

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 203-207
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.108769
      Authors : Federico Fernández-González, Massimo Terzi, Romeo Di Pietro, Jean-Paul Theurillat : The alliance name Poo-Astragalion has been widely used by Iberian phytosociologists for nearly fifty years to indicate a type of sheep pastures thriving on base-rich substrates. This alliance is currently classified in the order Poetalia bulbosae and class Poetea bulbosae. However, the revision of its original diagnosis highlights that this alliance name must be considered as an alternative name to the largely disused name Medicagini-Brachypodion distachyi. In order to stabilize the nomenclature, we propose the conservation of the traditionally used name Poo-Astragalion. On the other hand, the type association of the alliance (Poo-Astragaletum sesamei) turns out to be a superfluous name for another association neglected in the syntaxonomical literature, the Astragalo scorpioidis-Medicaginetum truncatulae. Hence, with the same objective of stabilizing the nomenclature, we propose the designation of a conserved neotype for the Poo-Astragaletum sesamei and the conservation of this name against the earlier heterotypic synonym in case of union of both associations. At the same time, we propose to complete the two names Poo-Astragalion and Poo-Astragaletum sesamei by selecting Poa bulbosa and Astragalus sesameus as the name-giving taxa, and to invert the name Poo-Astragaletum in accordance with its neotype (Astragalo sesamei-Poetum bulbosae). (33) Poo-Astragalion Rivas Goday et Ladero 1970: 165–169, nom. cons. propos. Typus: Poo-Astragaletum sesamei Rivas-Goday et Ladero 1970: 166–170 (holotypus). (≡) Medicagini-Brachypodion distachyi Rivas-Goday et Rivas-Martínez in Rivas Goday et Ladero 1970: 165–166 (alternative name) [original form: “Medicago-Brachypodion”] (34) Poo-Astragaletum sesamei Rivas-Goday et Ladero 1970: 166–170, nom. cons. et typus cons. propos. [original forms: “Poo-Astragaletum”, ”Poeto-Astragaletum sesamei”] Typus cons. propos.: neotypus hoc loco (see below). (=) Astragalo scorpioidis-Medicaginetum truncatulae Rivas Goday et Borja 1959 nom. corr. [original form: Astragalo scorpioidis-Medicaginetum tribuloidis nom. inept. (Rivas Goday and Borja 1959: 475, table 2)] Taxonomic reference: Euro+Med (2023). Syntaxonomic reference: Mucina et al. (2016). Abbreviations: EVC = EuroVegChecklist (Mucina et al. 2016); ICPN = 4th edition of the International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature (Theurillat et al. 2021). HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Sep 2023 09:51:23 +030
       
  • Dynamics of inselberg landscapes and their adjacent areas in the
           Sudano-Guinean zone of Benin through remote sensing analysis

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 189-202
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.89746
      Authors : Ranmi Elsa Denise Ayeko, Sêwanoudé Scholastique Mireille Toyi, Achille Ephrem Assogbadjo, Brice Augustin Sinsin : Aims: Land cover change in inselbergs and adjacent areas was studied from 2003 to 2018 in a region facing anthropogenic pressures to assess dynamics and preserve rare endemic species. Study area: Inselbergs and their adjacent areas in the Sudano-Guinean zone of Benin are included in this study. Methods: Land cover classes of inselbergs and adjacent areas were obtained through supervised classification of Sentinel-2 (2018) and Spot 5 (2003) satellite images. A Chi-square test was used to compare protected and unprotected LULC classes of inselbergs, with 10 m spatial resolution. Results: The results showed that forest and woodland decreased respectively from 8.55% to 3.05% and from 17.63% to 4.79% between 2003 and 2018 while tree and shrub savanna, and grassland increased respectively from 6.52% to 9.49% and from 7.60% to 16.69%. Field and fallow increased from 5.57% in 2003 to 26.12% in 2018 and tree plantation from 6.05% to 13.47%. The analysis of spatial comparisons using the chi-square test showed that the presence of inselbergs in a protected area has no significant effect on their land use. Conclusions: Natural vegetation in inselbergs and adjacent areas is being converted into human-made landscapes by farmers. An urgent conservation plan is needed, including awareness campaigns, tree planting, and sustainable forest management. Taxonomic reference: Akoègninou et al. (2006). Abbreviations: DEM = Digital Elevation Model; GCP = Ground Control Point; LULC = Land Use/Land Cover; ROI = Region of Interest; SRTM = Satellite imagery data, Shuttle radar topography mission. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Mon, 24 Jul 2023 15:03:55 +030
       
  • Vegetation types of the Arid Chaco in Central-Western Argentina

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 167-188
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.100532
      Authors : Sebastián R. Zeballos, Alicia T. R. Acosta, Walter D. Agüero, Rodrigo J. Ahumada, Martín G. Almirón, Daihana S. Argibay, Daniel N. Arroyo, Lisandro J. Blanco, Fernando N. Biurrun, Juan J. Cantero, Justo Márquez, Alejandro Quiroga, Raúl E. Quiroga, Marcelo R. Cabido : Aims: We address the following questions: 1) Which are the main vegetation types that currently occur in the Arid Chaco' 2) Do those vegetation types differ in terms of floristic composition, endemism, chorotypes and life forms' and 3) Is there any spatial association between the vegetation types and the environmental heterogeneity of the Arid Chaco' Study area: The southwestern extreme of the Gran Chaco, in Central-Western Argentina. Methods: The survey was based on a dataset comprising 654 relevés collected according to the Braun-Blanquet method. Data were classified by the hierarchical ISOmetric feature mapping and Partition Around Medoids (ISOPAM), and ordinated through isometric feature mapping (ISOMAP). Bioclimatic and edaphic variables were related to the ISOMAP ordination. Results: We recorded 439 vascular plant species, 62 endemic at the national level and 22 endemic species restricted to the study and surrounding environments in Central-Western Argentina. A total of nine vegetation types, belonging to four major clusters, were identified. The most prominent chorotypes included species distributed in the Chaco region and in the Arid Chaco/Monte phytogeographic units. The predominant life forms were micro- and nano-phanerophytes, followed by hemicryptophytes, chamaephytes and mesophanerophytes. Conclusions: Major results highlighted that xerophytic shrublands are the most common vegetation types in this area as a result of the historical and present use, while old growth forests were constrained to areas with low anthropogenic disturbance in the last decades or to protected areas. Most vegetation types (with the exception of halophytic environments) are poorly differentiated from a floristic point of view; however, they clearly differ in physiognomy. The floristic composition of the vegetation types described revealed numerous species in common with other sectors of the Chaco of northern Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay. Although the number of species restricted to the Arid Chaco was quite low, the most relevant chorotype included species with Western and Eastern Chaco distribution, conferring a clear Chaquenian identity to this area and discriminating it from other phytogeographic units. Taxonomic reference: Catálogo de las Plantas Vasculares del Cono Sur (Zuloaga et al. 2008) and its online update (http://www.darwin.edu.ar). Abbreviations: ISOMAP = isometric feature mapping; ISOPAM = isometric partitioning around medoids. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Mon, 24 Jul 2023 08:43:53 +030
       
  • Ecological and structural differentiation of the Sudanian woodlands in
           the Biosphere Reserve of Pendjari, Benin

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 139-165
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.91126
      Authors : Eméline S. P. Assèdé, S. S. Honoré Biaou, Hidirou Orou, Madjidou Oumorou, Coert J. Geldenhuys, Paxie W. Chirwa, Brice Sinsin : Aims: This study aims to: i) differentiate the plant associations in the Biosphere Reserve of Pendjari (BRP), ii) determine the ecological characteristics of their habitats and iii) present distribution maps on different soil types. Study area: The BRP, located in the Sudanian Zone of Benin. Methods: 202 phytosociological relevés were sampled according to the Braun-Blanquet method within the BRP. Ordination was performed using Detrended Correspondence Analysis to evaluate vegetation patterns. Soil parameters were used to characterize the vegetation types. Results: The numerical analysis of 202 plots and 249 plant species showed two major floristic groups that correlated with a moisture gradient: drylands versus wetlands. The dryland group was a mixture of woodland and shrub savanna, the dominant ecosystems of the study area. The wetland group encompassed species primarily from riparian forest, tree savanna and grass savanna on floodplains. Syntaxonomical analysis of the dryland group showed rocky and gravelly soil associations (Burkeo africanae-Detarietum microcarpi) and soils associated with or without fine gravels (Andropogono gayani-Terminalietum avicennioidis, Andropogono gayani-Senegalietum dudgeonii and Terminalietum leiocarpae). Syntaxonomical analysis of the wetland group showed riparian forest associations on sandy-clay soil (Coletum laurifoliae, Borassetum aethiopi and Hyparrhenio glabriusculae-Mitragynetum inermis) and floodplain associations on silt-clay soil (Terminalio macropterae-Mitragynetum inermis, Brachiario jubatae-Terminalietum macropterae, Sorghastro bipennati-Vachellietum hockii). Conclusions: Eleven new associations were identified in this study. If the distribution of plant associations was determined by different soil properties, the soil humidity would be one of the main ecological factors determining the establishment of plant species and thus plant association development. Taxonomic reference: Akoègninou et al. (2006), Angiosperm Phylogeny Group classification for the orders and families of flowering plants (APG IV, 2016). Abbreviations: BRP = Biosphere Reserve of Pendjari; CBD = Convention on Biological Diversity; CCA = Constrained Correspondence Analysis; DCA = Detrended Correspondence Analysis; GPS UTM = Global Positioning System Universal Transverse Mercator. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Jul 2023 08:40:00 +030
       
  • Should we estimate plant cover in percent or on ordinal
           scales'

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 131-138
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.98379
      Authors : Jürgen Dengler, Iwona Dembicz : Question: We explored the error resulting from different methods for recording the cover of plants in vegetation plots, specifically the direct estimation of percent cover vs. the use of ordinal cover scales (7-step Braun-Blanquet and 5-step Hult-Sernander-Du Rietz). Methods: We simulated 121 plant species of different cover, sampled with 13 different levels of estimation precision. Estimation precision was either based on a constant coefficient of variation (0.1–1.0) across all cover values or on empirical data from Hatton et al. (1986, Journal of Range Management 39: 91–92) (× 0.5, × 1.0, × 1.5). Each sampling was repeated 10 times. Subsequently, we determined the mean relative and absolute errors that occurred in the data used for ensuing numerical analyses. Results: Except for few cases with unrealistic settings (very high estimation error and ignorance of species with lower cover values), direct estimation in percent yielded better results than the use of ordinal scales. Based on the empirical values of estimation accuracy, the use of ordinal scales inflated the mean absolute and relative errors nearly 2-fold in case of the 7-step Braun-Blanquet scale and about 1.5-fold in case of the Hult-Sernander-Du Rietz scale if only considering cover values above 1%. Conclusions: From our personal experience, the careful application of an ordinal scale is not faster than the direct estimation of percent cover. For this reason, we see no plausible argument supporting the use of ordinal cover scales when essentially all subsequent analyses are numeric. Abbreviations: Br.-Bl. = 7-step variant of the Braun-Blanquet scale and its numerical replacement as in Table 2; CV = coefficient of variation; H.-S. = Hult-Sernander-Du Rietz scale and its numerical replacement as shown in Table 1. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 7 Jul 2023 17:00:03 +0300
       
  • Proposal (32) to conserve the name Agrostion castellanae with a
           conserved type

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 127-130
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.105269
      Authors : Massimo Terzi, Federico Fernández-González, Romeo Di Pietro, Jean-Paul Theurillat : The alliance name Agrostion castellanae has been widely used for nearly sixty years to indicate a type of acidophilic perennial grasslands occurring in the Iberian Peninsula. At present, the alliance is classified in the order Agrostietalia castellanae, and the class Stipo giganteae-Agrostietea castellanae. However, the nomenclatural type (lectotype) of the Agrostion castellanae is a therophytic grassland, namely the association Holco setiglumis-Anthoxanthetum aristati, that was consistently classified for two decades by Iberian authors within the therophytic class Helianthemetea guttati. In order to preserve the name Agrostion castellanae in its current use, we propose to designate the association Festuco amplae-Agrostietum castellanae as the conserved type of the alliance. (32) Agrostion castellanae Rivas Goday 1958 corr. 1964: 353 nom. cons. propos. Typus: Festuco amplae-Agrostietum castellanae Rivas-Martínez et Belmonte 1986: 418 (typus cons. propos.). (≡) Agrostion castellano-tenuis Rivas-Goday 1958: 626 nom. inept. Taxonomic reference: Euro+Med (2023). Syntaxonomic reference: Mucina et al. (2016). Abbreviations: EVC = EuroVegChecklist (Mucina et al. 2016); ICPN = 4th edition of the International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature (Theurillat et al. 2021). HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 7 Jul 2023 17:00:02 +0300
       
  • Vegetation structure and composition at different elevational intervals
           in the arid Tankwa Karoo National Park, South Africa

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 115-126
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.86310
      Authors : Mogamat Igshaan Samuels, Manam Saaed, Shayne Jacobs, Mmoto Leonard Masubelele, Helga Van der Merwe, Lesego Khomo : Study area: The study was conducted in the Tankwa Karoo National Park, one of the driest areas in South Africa. Historic overgrazing has resulted in the poor and often degraded state of vegetation in large parts of the Tanqua Karoo region. Aim: This study assessed the spatial variation of vegetation structure and composition in the three main vegetation types namely: Tanqua Karoo (TK), Tanqua Wash Riviere (TWR) and Tanqua Escarpment Shrubland (TES), along an elevational gradient. Method: Using the point intercept survey method, vegetation cover, plant height, species diversity, life forms, proportions of perennials and annuals were examined in 43 sites, widely distributed in these vegetation types. Results: There were 150 vascular plant species belonging to 83 genera and 29 families recorded across all sites. The most diverse vegetation type was TES with 96 species belonging to 61 genera and 26 families. The vegetation structure was comprised mainly of shrubs and dwarf shrubs with a high proportion of leaf and stem succulent species. The mean perennial vegetation cover throughout the study area was 28 and annuals covered 22%, but this cover varied significantly between the vegetation types. The most dominant life forms were chamaephytes, which comprised 64% of all species, with cryptophytes (18%), therophytes (16%) and nanophanerophytes (2%) less abundant. Surveyed sites in the TES showed a clear association with each other but there was an overlap in the species composition and environmental conditions between some TWR and TK sites. This study highlighted the important role of elevation and topography as drivers of vegetation characteristics. Conclusion: The findings from this study can be used as a vegetation baseline to identify and prioritise degraded areas for active restoration in order to limit further degradation. Considering climate change, elevational studies may provide additional insight into species dynamics across landscapes. Taxonomic reference: Plants of Southern Africa Checklist (South African National Biodiversity Institute 2016). Abbreviations: ANOVA = analysis of variance; GPS = Global Positioning System; LFA = Landscape Function Assessment; NDVI = Normalized difference vegetation index; PCA = principal component analysis; PCo-A = principal co-ordinate analysis; TES = Tanqua Escarpment Shrubland; TK = Tanqua Karoo; TKNP = Tankwa Karoo National Park; TWR = Tanqua Wash Riviere. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 7 Jul 2023 17:00:01 +0300
       
  • South American terrestrial biomes as geocomplexes: a geobotanical
           landscape approach

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 75-114
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.96710
      Authors : Gonzalo Navarro, Federico Luebert, José Antonio Molina : The classic and current perception of biome in its various meanings is fundamentally based on vegetation types that are considered as discrete or independent and fragmented entities in the landscape. Vegetation units are characterized by their physiognomy, which is based on the dominant life forms and mainly determined by climatic conditions. However, vegetation units are associated and mutually interacting at a landscape level. They are determined by local or regional, climatic, topographic and edaphic gradients within a given territory or geographic area. In this work, we propose a new conceptual and methodological approach aiming to better understand the biome concept in a landscape framework, developing ideas already partially advanced by us. In this sense, we consider the biome as a landscape complex (geocomplex), that spatially includes one to several vegetation geoseries which, in turn, each comprise the following possible geomorphologically linked vegetation series: i) the potential natural climatophilic vegetation (zonal vegetation) and their seral successional stages which occur repeatedly in the landscape; ii) edapho-xerophyllous vegetation (azonal vegetation such as occurs on rocky outcrops or sandy soils); and iii) edapho-hygrophilic vegetation (azonal vegetation such as flooded vegetation on river banks). Based on surveys and field data (more than ca. 300 transects) obtained by the authors in most South American countries from 1990 to the present, 33 South American geocomplex biomes and 16 macrobiomes were identified and synoptically characterized, through graphic general zonation models (phyto-topographic type-profiles) extrapolated from numerous observations along representative bioclimatical, geomorphological and biogeographically stratified transects. Field data and transect-plots are currently being processed to be included into the “GIVD database”. Taxonomic reference: Tropicos.org, Missouri Botanical Garden (https://tropicos.org) [accessed 1 Feb 2023]. In Memoriam: Salvador Rivas-Martínez HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 11 May 2023 09:54:22 +030
       
  • CACTUS – Vegetation database of the Dutch Caribbean Islands

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 69-74
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.101114
      Authors : John Janssen, Erik Houtepen, André van Proosdij, Stephan Hennekens : The vegetation database CACTUS (registered in GIVD under SA-00-004) aims to bring together all plot-based relevés from the Dutch Caribbean Islands that are available from literature, unpublished resources, and recent field surveys. The database currently contains 2,701 vegetation descriptions. The database is used for vegetation classification, to investigate vegetation change over time, to assist in the planning of vegetation surveys, as a source for plant species distribution maps, and to inform nature conservation and policy. Taxonomic references: Van Proosdij (2012) for the Leeward Islands, Axelrod (2017, 2021) for the Windward Islands, except for St. Martin (Howard 1974-1989). HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Tue, 2 May 2023 12:03:00 +0300
       
  • Proposal (31) to conserve the name Brachypodietalia pinnati Korneck
           1974 as a nomen conservandum with a conserved type

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 63-68
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.100985
      Authors : Jürgen Dengler, Wolfgang Willner : After a nomenclatural review of the available names for the order of mesoxeric grasslands within the class Festuco-Brometea, we propose the conservation of the name Brachypodietalia pinnati (with a conserved type) against the names Brometalia erecti and Scorzoneretalia villosae. In syntaxonomic concepts not accepting a single order for the mesoxeric grasslands of Europe, the latter names could still be used, as they are based on different nomenclatural types. (31) Brachypodietalia pinnati Korneck 1974: 123 nom. cons. propos. Typus: Cirsio-Brachypodion pinnati Hadač & Klika in Klika and Hadač 1944 (lectotypus; Dengler et al. 2003: 608; typus cons. propos.). (=) Brometalia erecti W. Koch 1926: 20. Typus: Bromion erecti W. Koch 1926: 121 (holotypus). (=) Scorzoneretalia villosae Kovačević 1959: 7 Typus: Scorzonerion villosae Horvatić ex Kovačević 1959 (holotypus) Syntaxonomic reference: Mucina et al. (2016). Abbreviations: ICPN = International Code of Phytosociological Nomenclature, 4th edn (Theurillat et al. 2021). HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Apr 2023 21:54:29 +030
       
  • A vector map of the world’s terrestrial biotic units: subbiomes,
           biomes, ecozones and domains

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 59-61
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.99167
      Authors : Javier Loidi, Gonzalo Navarro-Sánchez, Denys Vynokurov : A vector map of biotic units encompassing the entire terrestrial area of the earth is provided. It contains a hierarchical system of domains, ecozones, biomes and subbiomes, as a large-scale description of the terrestrial ecosystems. The map can be used for different analysis, including monitoring of climate change. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Mar 2023 08:24:45 +020
       
  • Modeling the potential distribution of floristic assemblages of high
           Andean wetlands dominated by Juncaceae and Cyperaceae in the Argentine
           Puna

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 47-58
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.95779
      Authors : Elvira Casagranda, Andrea E. Izquierdo : Aims: The aim of this work was to model the distribution of suitable environmental conditions of vegas with specific floristic characteristics. Vegas are high Andean wetlands that represent the main sequestered carbon stocks, biodiversity hotspots, and water regulating systems in the region. In these wetlands, plant communities are the main biological factor that determines functional processes, and plant species assemblages are associated with different ecogeographic features. Study area: Argentine Central Andean Puna ecoregion. Methods: For two different floristic assemblages of vegas, we develop ecological niche models of n-dimensional minimum volume ellipsoids through NicheToolBox, then obtain potential distribution maps. One floristic assemblage was dominated by the cushion-structured plant Oxychloe andina (Juncaceae) and the other by plants of the Cyperaceae family. Results: Elevation and precipitation were the main environmental factors determining the distribution of the two floristic assemblages. Juncaceae dominated vegas tend to be located in high, humid, and cold places, while Cyperaceae vegas are found at a lower elevation, with less humidity, and higher temperatures. According to the dominant climatic gradient in the region, potential distribution maps show that vegas of Juncaceae are commonly found towards the Northeast of the Puna while Cyperaceae vegas are more frequent at lower elevations to the South of the region. Conclusions: This study represents the first approach to niche modeling based on plant communities in vegas of the Argentine Puna, providing knowledge on the environmental factors that limit their distribution. This information could serve as a planning tool in a region exposed to growing perturbations such as mining and climate change. Taxonomic reference: Zuloaga et al. (2019). Abbreviations: AUC = Area Under the ROC Curve; NDVI = Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; ROC = Receiver Operating Characteristic. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Feb 2023 08:15:02 +020
       
  • Plant diversity in traditional agroecosystems of North Morocco

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 31-45
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.86024
      Authors : Soufian Chakkour, Erwin Bergmeier, Stefan Meyer, Jalal Kassout, Mohamed Kadiri, Mohammed Ater : Questions: While globalisation favours intensive yield-maximizing agriculture with cropping practices that entail agrobiodiversity loss, extensive production systems still exist in areas of marginal lands such as in mountainous regions or islands. It is overdue to study such systems, their sustainability and ecology as potential models for decentralized environmentally balanced land-use. For that purpose, we investigated the composition of the wild arable (segetal) flora in traditional thermo- to mesomediterranean cereal-growing agroecosystems of northwestern Morocco. Study area: The Tingitane (Tangier) Peninsula in the Northwest of Morocco. Methods: A sample of 94 relevés was collected in six areas in the foreland of the Rif Mountains. Results: We found 209 species in 150 genera and 41 families, a mean of 22 species per relevé and a Shannon index of 3.04±0.06. A TWINSPAN classification revealed a high level of similarity between the areas, with the plant communities corresponding to the order Brometalia rubenti-tectorum, but also differences in species composition as a result of climatic, soil and land-use effects. Therophytes dominated, but biennial and perennial herbs indicating shallow tillage and fields under fallow were also common. Almost half of the species found were agrestal species (confined to arable fields), and almost a third were apophytes (native species occurring in fields but also in natural habitats). Twenty-nine species (14%) of the segetal flora were regional endemics and six are considered nationally rare. Although there is evidence of recent structural and floristic diversity decline, traditional agroecosystems tend to favour native species including some of particular conservation interest. Conclusions: The traditional agroecosystems of the Rif Mountains fulfil criteria of High Nature Value agriculture but, in view of recent socio-economic change, require support by policy for their maintenance. Taxonomic reference: Euro+Med PlantBase (http://www.europlusmed.org) [accessed 26 Nov 2022]. Syntaxonomic reference: EuroVegChecklist (Mucina et al. 2016). Abbreviations: TWINSPAN = Two Way Indicator Species Analysis. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Tue, 28 Feb 2023 08:15:01 +020
       
  • Ecological Indicator Values for Europe (EIVE) 1.0

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 7-29
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.98324
      Authors : Jürgen Dengler, Florian Jansen, Olha Chusova, Elisabeth Hüllbusch, Michael P. Nobis, Koenraad Van Meerbeek, Irena Axmanová, Hans Henrik Bruun, Milan Chytrý, Riccardo Guarino, Gerhard Karrer, Karlien Moeys, Thomas Raus, Manuel J. Steinbauer, Lubomir Tichý, Torbjörn Tyler, Ketevan Batsatsashvili, Claudia Bita-Nicolae, Yakiv Didukh, Martin Diekmann, Thorsten Englisch, Eduardo Fernández-Pascual, Dieter Frank, Ulrich Graf, Michal Hájek, Sven D. Jelaska, Borja Jiménez-Alfaro, Philippe Julve, George Nakhutsrishvili, Wim A. Ozinga, Eszter-Karolina Ruprecht, Urban Šilc, Jean-Paul Theurillat, François Gillet : Aims: To develop a consistent ecological indicator value system for Europe for five of the main plant niche dimensions: soil moisture (M), soil nitrogen (N), soil reaction (R), light (L) and temperature (T). Study area: Europe (and closely adjacent regions). Methods: We identified 31 indicator value systems for vascular plants in Europe that contained assessments on at least one of the five aforementioned niche dimensions. We rescaled the indicator values of each dimension to a continuous scale, in which 0 represents the minimum and 10 the maximum value present in Europe. Taxon names were harmonised to the Euro+Med Plantbase. For each of the five dimensions, we calculated European values for niche position and niche width by combining the values from the individual EIV systems. Using T values as an example, we externally validated our European indicator values against the median of bioclimatic conditions for global occurrence data of the taxa. Results: In total, we derived European indicator values of niche position and niche width for 14,835 taxa (14,714 for M, 13,748 for N, 14,254 for R, 14,054 for L, 14,496 for T). Relating the obtained values for temperature niche position to the bioclimatic data of species yielded a higher correlation than any of the original EIV systems (r = 0.859). The database: The newly developed Ecological Indicator Values for Europe (EIVE) 1.0, together with all source systems, is available in a flexible, harmonised open access database. Conclusions: EIVE is the most comprehensive ecological indicator value system for European vascular plants to date. The uniform interval scales for niche position and niche width provide new possibilities for ecological and macroecological analyses of vegetation patterns. The developed workflow and documentation will facilitate the future release of updated and expanded versions of EIVE, which may for example include the addition of further taxonomic groups, additional niche dimensions, external validation or regionalisation. Abbreviations: EIV = Ecological indicator value; EIVE = Ecological Indicator Values for Europe; EVA = European Vegetation Archive; GBIF = Global Biodiversity Information Facility; i = index for taxa; j = index for EIV systems; L = ecological indicator for light; M = ecological indicator for moisture; N = ecological indicator for nitrogen availability; R = ecological indicator for reaction; T = ecological indicator for temperature. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jan 2023 10:21:16 +020
       
  • Vegetation Classification and Survey in the third year

    • Abstract: Vegetation Classification and Survey 4: 1-6
      DOI : 10.3897/VCS.100394
      Authors : Jürgen Dengler, Idoia Biurrun, Florian Jansen, Wolfgang Willner : We report on the completed third volume of Vegetation Classification and Survey (VCS). VCS has been included in the Scopus bibliometric database and will receive its first CiteSore in mid-2023. We announce the 2022 Editors’ Award for a paper selected from the four papers nominated for Editors’ Choice during 2022. We selected Liu et al. (2022; Vegetation Classification and Survey 3: 121–144) for the Editors’ Award. This author team developed a comprehensive hierarchical classification system for the steppe vegetation over China. We present five Special Collections (two concluded and three ongoing) which form a backbone for VCS. Apart from Research Papers, Long and Short Database Reports were the prevailing article category in 2022. By contrast, there were no VCS Methods paper in 2022, and thus we encourage submissions particularly in this category. Finally, we welcome new members to the Editorial Board and open a call for free applications for our Editorial Review Board or as a Linguistic Editor. Abbreviations: APC = article processing charge; IAVS = International Association for Vegetation Science; VCS = Vegetation Classification and Survey. HTML XML PDF
      PubDate: Fri, 13 Jan 2023 07:59:28 +020
       
 
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