Subjects -> BIOLOGY (Total: 3174 journals)
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BIOLOGY (1491 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Showing 401 - 600 of 1720 Journals sorted alphabetically
Cryoletters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Applied Science and Technology     Open Access  
Current Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 227)
Current Genomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Landscape Ecology Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Medical Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Molecular Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Opinion in Cell Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Current Opinion in Molecular Therapeutics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Current Opinion in Neurobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Current Opinion in Structural Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Current Opinion in Systems Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Pharmacogenomics and Personalized Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Protein and Peptide Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Proteomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Protocols in Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Protocols in Cell Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Current Protocols in Molecular Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Current Protocols in Mouse Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Current Protocols in Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal  
Current Protocols in Plant Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Protocols in Protein Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Current Research in Bacteriology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Current Research in Biostatistics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Current Research in Chemical Biology     Open Access  
Current Research in Neurobiology     Open Access  
Current Research in Parasitology & Vector-Borne Diseases     Open Access  
Current Research in Structural Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Research in Translational Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Current Research in Virological Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Science     Open Access   (Followers: 115)
Current Stem Cell Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Stem Cell Research & Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Topics in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Current Topics in Membranes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cytotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Database : The Journal of Biological Databases and Curation     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Dendrochronologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Developing World Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Developmental & Comparative Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Developmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Developmental Cell     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46)
Developmental Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Developmental Neurobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Dhaka University Journal of Biological Sciences     Open Access  
Diatom Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Differentiation     Hybrid Journal  
Digital Biomarkers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Disease Models and Mechanisms     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Diseases of Aquatic Organisms     Hybrid Journal  
DNA and Cell Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
DNA Repair     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
DNA Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Doklady Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Drug Discovery Today: Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Drug Resistance Updates     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
e-Jurnal Rekayasa dan Teknologi Budidaya Perairan     Open Access  
Ecocycles     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ecohydrology & Hydrobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ecología en Bolivia     Open Access  
Ecological Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ecological Questions     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ecological Solutions and Evidence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 246)
Economics & Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ecoprint : An International Journal of Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ecoscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ecosystem Health and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ecosystems and People     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Educational Technology Research and Development     Partially Free   (Followers: 45)
EDUSAINS     Open Access  
EFB Bioeconomy Journal     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Biology     Open Access  
Egyptian Journal of Natural History     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EJNMMI Research     Open Access  
Ekologia     Open Access  
el-Hayah     Open Access  
Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal  
eLife     Open Access   (Followers: 95)
Embo Molecular Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
EMBO reports     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Endangered Species Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Endocrine Connections     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Endothelium: Journal of Endothelial Cell Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Engineering & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Engineering Economist, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Engineering in Life Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Engineering Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Biology of Fishes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Environmental DNA     Open Access  
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Environmental Epigenetics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Environmental Microbiome     Open Access  
Environmental Science & Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 180)
Enzyme and Microbial Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Epidemiology & Infection     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Epigenomes     Open Access  
EPMA Journal     Open Access  
Ethiopian Journal of Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ethnobiology Letters     Open Access  
Ethnobotany Research & Applications : a journal of plants, people and applied research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ethnoscientia : Brazilian Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnoecology     Open Access  
Ethology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ethology Ecology & Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
EuPA Open Proteomics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EUREKA : Life Sciences     Open Access  
European Journal of Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Cell Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology : X     Open Access  
European Journal of Phycology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Protistology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Soil Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Online Journal of Natural and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Scientific Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Evolution     Partially Free   (Followers: 129)
Evolution and Human Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Evolution Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Evolutionary Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Evolutionary Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Evolutionary Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Evolutionary Computation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Evolutionary Systematics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
EXCLI Journal : Experimental and Clinical Sciences     Open Access  
Experimental & Molecular Medicine     Open Access  
Experimental and Applied Acarology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Experimental Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Expert Opinion on Environmental Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Expert Review of Proteomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
ExRNA     Open Access  
Extreme Life, Biospeology & Astrobiology - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Extremophiles     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
F&S Science : Official journal of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine     Open Access  
Facta Universitatis, Series : Medicine and Biology     Open Access  
Familial Cancer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
FASEB BioAdvances     Open Access  
Fauna Norvegica     Open Access  
Fauna of New Zealand     Open Access  
Febs Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Feddes Repertorium     Hybrid Journal  
Fems Yeast Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
FIGEMPA : Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fire Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fish & Shellfish Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Fish and Shellfish Immunology Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fishes     Open Access  
Fitoterapia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Florea : Jurnal Biologi dan Pembelajarannya     Open Access  
Fly     Full-text available via subscription  
Folia Biologica     Free   (Followers: 1)
Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica     Open Access  
Folia Microbiologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Folia Primatologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Food and Bioproducts Processing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Food and Ecological Systems Modelling Journal     Open Access  
Food and Waterborne Parasitology     Open Access  
Food Webs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forensic Genomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Forest Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Forschung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Foundations of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Free Radical Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Free Radical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Freshwater Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 45)
Frontiers in Evolutionary Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Frontiers in Life Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Frontiers in Network Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Neurogenesis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Neuroprosthetics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Frontiers of Biogeography     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers of Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Frontiers of Medical and Biological Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Functional & Integrative Genomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Fundamental and Applied Limnology / Archiv für Hydrobiologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Fundamental Research     Open Access  
Fungal Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Fungal Biology and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fungal Biology Reviews     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Fungal Diversity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Fungal Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Fungal Genetics Reports     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Extremophiles
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.791
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1433-4909 - ISSN (Online) 1431-0651
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Simple sequence repeat insertion induced stability and potential ‘gain
           of function’ in the proteins of extremophilic bacteria

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      Abstract: Abstract Here, we analysed the genomic evolution in extremophilic bacteria using long simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Frequencies of occurrence, relative abundance (RA) and relative density (RD) of long SSRs were analysed in the genomes of extremophilic bacteria. Thermus aquaticus had the most RA and RD of long SSRs in its coding sequences (110.6 and 1408.3), followed by Rhodoferax antarcticus (77.0 and 1187.4). A positive correlation was observed between G + C content and the RA–RD of long SSRs. Geobacillus kaustophilus, Geobacillus thermoleovorans, Halothermothrix orenii, R. antarcticus, and T. aquaticus preferred trinucleotide repeats within their genomes, whereas others preferred a higher number of tetranucleotide repeats. Gene enrichment showed the presence of these long SSRs in metabolic enzyme encoding genes related to stress tolerance. To analyse the functional implications of SSR insertions, three-dimensional protein structure modelling of SSR containing diguanylate cyclase (DGC) gene encoding protein was carried out. Removal of SSR sequence led to an inappropriate folding and instability of the modelled protein structure.
      PubDate: 2022-05-05
       
  • Fungal diversity in a sediment core from climate change impacted Boeckella
           Lake, Hope Bay, north-eastern Antarctic Peninsula assessed using
           metabarcoding

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      Abstract: Abstract We studied the fungal DNA present in a lake sediment core obtained from Trinity Peninsula, Hope Bay, north-eastern Antarctic Peninsula, using metabarcoding through high-throughput sequencing (HTS). Sequences obtained were assigned to 146 amplicon sequence variants (ASVs) primarily representing unknown fungi, followed by the phyla Ascomycota, Rozellomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota and Mortierellomycota. The most abundant taxa were assigned to Fungal sp., Pseudeurotium hygrophilum, Rozellomycota sp. 1, Pseudeurotiaceae sp. 1 and Chytridiomycota sp. 1. The majority of the DNA reads, representing 40 ASVs, could only be assigned at higher taxonomic levels and may represent taxa not currently included in the sequence databases consulted and/or be previously undescribed fungi. Different sections of the core were characterized by high sequence diversity, richness and moderate ecological dominance indices. The assigned diversity was dominated by cosmopolitan cold-adapted fungi, including known saprotrophic, plant and animal pathogenic and symbiotic taxa. Despite the overall dominance of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota and psychrophilic Mortierellomycota, members of the cryptic phyla Rozellomycota and Chytridiomycota were also detected in abundance. As Boeckella Lake may cease to exist in approaching decades due the effects of local climatic changes, it also an important location for the study of the impacts of these changes on Antarctic microbial diversity.
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
       
  • Limits to the three domains of life: lessons from community assembly along
           an Antarctic salinity gradient

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      Abstract: Abstract Extremophiles exist among all three domains of life; however, physiological mechanisms for surviving harsh environmental conditions differ among Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. Consequently, we expect that domain-specific variation of diversity and community assembly patterns exist along environmental gradients in extreme environments. We investigated inter-domain community compositional differences along a high-elevation salinity gradient in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Conductivity for 24 soil samples collected along the gradient ranged widely from 50 to 8355 µS cm−1. Taxonomic richness varied among domains, with a total of 359 bacterial, 2 archaeal, 56 fungal, and 69 non-fungal eukaryotic operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Richness for bacteria, archaea, fungi, and non-fungal eukaryotes declined with increasing conductivity (all P < 0.05). Principal coordinate ordination analysis (PCoA) revealed significant (ANOSIM R = 0.97) groupings of low/high salinity bacterial OTUs, while OTUs from other domains were not significantly clustered. Bacterial beta diversity was unimodally distributed along the gradient and had a nested structure driven by species losses, whereas in fungi and non-fungal eukaryotes beta diversity declined monotonically without strong evidence of nestedness. Thus, while increased salinity acts as a stressor in all domains, the mechanisms driving community assembly along the gradient differ substantially between the domains.
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
       
  • Study of osmoadaptation mechanisms of halophilic Halomonas alkaliphila
           XH26 under salt stress by transcriptome and ectoine analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Halophilic bacteria such as the genus Halomonas are promising candidates in diverse industrial, agricultural and biomedical applications. Here, we successfully isolated a halophilic Halomonas alkaliphila strain XH26 from Xiaochaidan Salt Lake, and studied its osmoadaptation strategies using transcriptome and ectoine analysis. Divergent mechanisms were involved in osmoadaptation at different salinities in H. alkaliphila XH26. At moderate salinity (6% NaCl), increased transcriptions of ABC transporters related to iron (III), phosphate, phosphonate, monosaccharide and oligosaccharide import were observed. At high salinity (15% NaCl), transcriptions of flagellum assembly and cell motility were significantly inhibited. The transcriptional levels of ABC transporter genes related to iron (III) and iron3+-hydroxamate import, glycine betaine and putrescine uptake, and cytochrome biogenesis and assembly were significantly up-regulated. Ectoine synthesis and accumulation was significantly increased under salt stress, and the increased transcriptional expressions of ectoine synthesis genes ectB and ectC may play a key role in high salinity induced osmoadaptation. At extreme high salinity (18% NaCl), 5-hydroxyectoine and ectoine worked together to maintain cell survival. Together these results give valuable insights into the osmoadaptation mechanisms of H. alkaliphila XH26, and provide useful information for further engineering this specific strain for increased ectoine synthesis and related applications.
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-022-01256-1
       
  • Desulfovulcanus ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic
           autotrophic iron and sulfate-reducing bacterium from subseafloor basalt
           that grows on akaganéite and lepidocrocite minerals

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      Abstract: Abstract A deep-sea thermophilic bacterium, strain Ax17T, was isolated from 25 °C hydrothermal fluid at Axial Seamount. It was obligately anaerobic and autotrophic, oxidized molecular hydrogen and formate, and reduced synthetic nanophase Fe(III) (oxyhydr)oxide minerals, sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate, and elemental sulfur for growth. It produced up to 20 mM Fe2+ when grown on ferrihydrite but < 5 mM Fe2+ when grown on akaganéite, lepidocrocite, hematite, and goethite. It was a straight to curved rod that grew at temperatures ranging from 35 to 70 °C (optimum 65 °C) and a minimum doubling time of 7.1 h, in the presence of 1.5–6% NaCl (optimum 3%) and pH 5–9 (optimum 8.0). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the strain was 90–92% identical to other genera of the family Desulfonauticaceae in the phylum Pseudomonadota. The genome of Ax17T was sequenced, which yielded 2,585,834 bp and contained 2407 protein-coding sequences. Based on overall genome relatedness index analyses and its unique phenotypic characteristics, strain Ax17T is suggested to represent a novel genus and species, for which the name Desulfovulcanus ferrireducens is proposed. The type strain is Ax17T (= DSM 111878T = ATCC TSD-233T).
      PubDate: 2022-02-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-022-01263-2
       
  • Anion-type modulates the effect of salt stress on saline lake bacteria

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      Abstract: Abstract Beside sodium chloride, inland saline aquatic systems often contain other anions than chloride such as hydrogen carbonate and sulfate. Our understanding of the biological effects of salt composition diversity is limited; therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of different anions on the growth of halophilic bacteria. Accordingly, the salt composition and concentration preference of 172 strains isolated from saline and soda lakes that differed in ionic composition was tested using media containing either carbonate, chloride or sulfate as anion in concentration values ranging from 0 to 0.40 mol/L. Differences in salt-type preference among bacterial strains were observed in relationship to the salt composition of the natural habitat they were isolated from indicating specific salt-type adaptation. Sodium carbonate represented the strongest selective force, while majority of strains was well-adapted to growth even at high concentrations of sodium sulfate. Salt preference was to some extent associated with taxonomy, although variations even within the same bacterial species were also identified. Our results suggest that the extent of the effect of dissolved salts in saline lakes is not limited to their concentration but the type of anion also substantially impacts the growth and survival of individual microorganisms.
      PubDate: 2022-02-09
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-022-01260-5
       
  • tRNA modification profiles in obligate and moderate thermophilic bacilli

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      Abstract: Abstract Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are the most ancient RNA molecules in the cell, modification pattern of which is linked to phylogeny. The aim of this study was to determine the tRNA modification profiles of obligate (Anoxybacillus, Geobacillus, Paragebacillus) and moderate (Bacillus, Brevibacillus, Ureibacillus, Paenibacillus) thermophilic aerobic bacilli strains to find out its linkage to phylogenetic variations between species. LC-MS was applied for the quantification of modified nucleosides using both natural and isotopically labeled standards. The presence of m2A and m7G modifications at high levels was determined in all species. Relatively high level of i6A and m5C modification was observed for Paenibacillus and Ureibacillus, respectively. The lowest level of Cm modification was found in Bacillus. The modification ms2i6A and m1G were absent in Brevibacillus and Ureibacillus, respectively, while modifications Am and m22G were observed only for Ureibacillus. While both obligate and moderate thermophilic species contain Gm, m1G and ms2i6A modifications, large quantities of them (especially Gm and ms2i6A modification) were detected in obligate thermophilic ones (Geobacillus, Paragebacillus and Anoxybacillus). The collective set of modified tRNA bases is genus-specific and linked to the phylogeny of bacilli. In addition, the dataset could be applied to distinguish obligate thermophilic bacilli from moderate ones.
      PubDate: 2022-02-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-022-01258-z
       
  • Microorganisms harbor keys to a circular bioeconomy making them useful
           tools in fighting plastic pollution and rising CO2 levels

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      Abstract: Abstract The major global and man-made challenges of our time are the fossil fuel-driven climate change a global plastic pollution and rapidly emerging plant, human and animal infections. To meet the necessary global changes, a dramatic transformation must take place in science and society. This transformation will involve very intense and forward oriented industrial and basic research strongly focusing on (bio)technology and industrial bioprocesses developments towards engineering a zero-carbon sustainable bioeconomy. Within this transition microorganisms—and especially extremophiles—will play a significant and global role as technology drivers. They harbor the keys and blueprints to a sustainable biotechnology in their genomes. Within this article, we outline urgent and important areas of microbial research and technology advancements and that will ultimately make major contributions during the transition from a linear towards a circular bioeconomy.
      PubDate: 2022-02-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-022-01261-4
       
  • Biome-specific distribution of Ni-containing carbon monoxide
           dehydrogenases

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      Abstract: Abstract Ni-containing carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni-CODH) plays an important role in the CO/CO2-based carbon and energy metabolism of microbiomes. Ni-CODH is classified into distinct phylogenetic clades, A–G, with possibly distinct cellular roles. However, the types of Ni-CODH clade used by organisms in different microbiomes are unknown. Here, we conducted a metagenomic survey of a protein database to determine the relationship between the phylogeny and biome distribution of Ni-CODHs. Clustering and phylogenetic analyses showed that the metagenome assembly-derived Ni-CODH sequences were distributed in ~ 60% Ni-CODH clusters and in all Ni-CODH clades. We also identified a novel Ni-CODH clade, clade H. Biome mapping on the Ni-CODH phylogenetic tree revealed that Ni-CODHs of almost all the clades were found in natural aquatic environmental and engineered samples, whereas those of specific subclades were found only in host-associated samples. These results are comparable with our finding that the diversity in the phylum-level taxonomy of host-associated Ni-CODH owners is statistically different from those of the other biomes. Our findings suggest that while Ni-CODH is a ubiquitous enzyme produced across diverse microbiomes, its distribution in each clade is biased and mainly affected by the distinct composition of microbiomes.
      PubDate: 2022-01-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-022-01259-y
       
  • Prokaryotic diversity across a pH gradient in the “El Chichón”
           crater-lake: a naturally thermo-acidic environment

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      Abstract: Abstract The "El Chichón" crater-lake in Mexico is a thermo-acidic environment whose microorganisms have been scarcely studied. In this study, we surveyed the prokaryotic communities by amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene considering samples of sediment and water collected within a pH/temperature gradient (pH 1.9–5.1, 38–89 °C). Further, we interpreted these results within a physicochemical context. The composition of the microbial assemblage differed significantly between the sediments and water. Sediment communities were different in the site with the highest temperature and lower pH value compared to the other ones sampled, while those in the water were relatively similar at all points. Most of the genera found were related to Alicyclobacillus, Acinetobacter, Bacillus, Mesoaciditoga, Methanothermobacter, Desulfitobacterium, Therminicanus, Kyrpidia, Paenibacillus, Thermoanaerobacterium, and Gelria. Some of these genera are known by their thermo-acidic tolerant capacities with flexible metabolisms to use diverse electron donor/acceptors (S or Fe), while others are thermo(acid)philes that mainly occur in the most extreme sites of the lake. These results show the presence of a microbial community adapted to the changing conditions of a very dynamic crater-lake, that include chemoorganotrophs and chemolithotrophs.
      PubDate: 2022-01-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-022-01257-0
       
  • The smallest space miners: principles of space biomining

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      Abstract: Abstract As we aim to expand human presence in space, we need to find viable approaches to achieve independence from terrestrial resources. Space biomining of the Moon, Mars and asteroids has been indicated as one of the promising approaches to achieve in-situ resource utilization by the main space agencies. Structural and expensive metals, essential mineral nutrients, water, oxygen and volatiles could be potentially extracted from extraterrestrial regolith and rocks using microbial-based biotechnologies. The use of bioleaching microorganisms could also be applied to space bioremediation, recycling of waste and to reinforce regenerative life support systems. However, the science around space biomining is still young. Relevant differences between terrestrial and extraterrestrial conditions exist, including the rock types and ores available for mining, and a direct application of established terrestrial biomining techniques may not be a possibility. It is, therefore, necessary to invest in terrestrial and space-based research of specific methods for space applications to learn the effects of space conditions on biomining and bioremediation, expand our knowledge on organotrophic and community-based bioleaching mechanisms, as well as on anaerobic biomining, and investigate the use of synthetic biology to overcome limitations posed by the space environments.
      PubDate: 2022-01-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-021-01253-w
       
  • Haloprofundus salilacus sp. nov., Haloprofundus halobius sp. nov. and
           Haloprofundus salinisoli sp. nov.: three extremely halophilic archaea
           isolated from salt lake and saline soil

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      Abstract: Abstract Three halophilic archaeal strains, Gai1-5T, SEDH52T and SQT7-1T were isolated from Gaize salt lake and Xiadi salt lake in Tibet, and saline soil from Xinjiang, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene and rpoB’ gene sequences showed that these three strains formed different branches separating them from Haloprofundus halophilus NK23T (97.7–98.3% similarities for 16S rRNA gene and 94.7–94.8% similarities for rpoB’ gene, respectively) and Haloprofundus marisrubri SB9T (94.7–96.4% similarities for 16S rRNA gene and 92.3–93.2% similarities for rpoB’ gene, respectively). Several phenotypic characteristics distinguish the strains Gai1-5 T, SEDH52T and SQT7-1T from Haloprofundus halophilus NK23T and Haloprofundus marisrubri SB9T. The average nucleotide identity (ANI) and in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (isDDH) values among the three strains and current Haloprofundus members were in the range of 83.3–88.3% and 27.2–35.7%, respectively, far below the species boundary threshold values. The major polar lipids of three strains were phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylglycerol sulphate (PGS), phosphatidylglycerol phosphate methyl ester (PGP-Me), sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether (S-DGD-1), mannosyl glucosyl diether-phosphatidic acid (DGD-PA) and sulfated mannosyl glucosyl diether-phosphatidic acid (S-DGD-PA). These results showed that strains Gai1-5T (= CGMCC 1.16079T = JCM 33561T), SQT7-1T (= CGMCC 1.16063T = JCM 33553 T) and SEDH52T (= CGMCC 1.17434T) represented three novel species in the genus Haloprofundus, for which the names Haloprofundus salilacus sp. nov., Haloprofundus salinisoli sp. nov., and Haloprofundus halobius sp. nov. are proposed.
      PubDate: 2021-12-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-021-01255-8
       
  • Extremophile enzyme optimization for low temperature and high salinity are
           fundamentally incompatible

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      Abstract: Abstract The evolutionary mechanisms behind cold and high-saline co-adaptation of proteins are not thoroughly understood. To explore how enzymes evolve in response to multiple environmental pressures we developed a novel in silico method to model the directed evolution of proteins, the Protein Evolution Parameter Calculator (PEPC). PEPC carries out single amino acid substitutions that lead to improvements in the selected user-defined parameters. To investigate the evolutionary relationship between increased flexibility and decreased isoelectric point, which are presumed indicators of cold and saline adaptation in proteins, we applied PEPC to a subset of core haloarchaea orthologous group (cHOG) proteins from the mesophilic Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 and cold-tolerant Halorubrum lacusprofundi strain ATCC 49239. The results suggest that mutations that increase flexibility will also generally increase isoelectric point. These findings suggest that enzyme adaptation to low temperature and high salinity might be evolutionarily counterposed based on the structural characteristics of probable amino acid mutations. This may help to explain the apparent lack of truly psychrophilic halophiles in nature, and why microbes adapted to polar hypersaline environments typically have mesophilic temperature optima. A better understanding of protein evolution to extremely cold and salty conditions will aid in our understanding of where and how life is distributed on Earth and in our solar system.
      PubDate: 2021-12-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-021-01254-9
       
  • The monofunctional CO dehydrogenase CooS is essential for growth of
           Thermoanaerobacter kivui on carbon monoxide

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      Abstract: Abstract Thermoanaerobacter kivui is a thermophilic acetogen that can grow on carbon monoxide as sole carbon and energy source. To identify the gene(s) involved in CO oxidation, the genome sequence was analyzed. Two genes potentially encoding CO dehydrogenases were identified. One, cooS, potentially encodes a monofunctional CO dehydrogenase, whereas another, acsA, potentially encodes the CODH component of the CODH/ACS complex. Both genes were cloned, a His-tag encoding sequence was added, and the proteins were produced from a plasmid in T. kivui. His-AcsA copurified by affinity chromatography with AcsB, the acetyl-CoA synthase of the CO dehydrogenase/acetyl CoA synthase complex. His-CooS copurified with CooF1, a small iron-sulfur center containing protein likely involved in electron transport. Both protein complexes had CO:ferredoxin oxidoreductase as well as CO:methyl viologen oxidoreductase activity, but the activity of CooSF1 was 15-times and 231-times lower, respectively. To underline the importance of CooS, the gene was deleted in the CO-adapted strain. Interestingly, the ∆cooS deletion mutant did not grow on CO anymore. These experiments clearly demonstrated that CooS is essential for growth of T. kivui on CO. This is in line with the hypothesis that CooS is the CO-oxidizing enzyme in cells growing on CO.
      PubDate: 2021-12-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-021-01251-y
       
  • Prokaryotic communities in the historic silver mine Reiche Zeche

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      Abstract: Abstract The research and education mine “Reiche Zeche” in Freiberg (Saxony, Germany) represents one of the most famous mining facilities reminiscent to the century-long history of silver production in the Ore Mountains. The mine was set up at the end of the fourteenth century and became part of the “Bergakademie Freiberg” in 1919. Galena, pyrite, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, and chalcopyrite are the most common minerals found in the mine. As acid mine drainage is generated from the dissolution of sulfidic ores, the microbial habitats within the adits and galleries are characterized by low pH and high concentrations of metal(loid)s. The community composition was investigated at locations characterized by biofilm formation and iron-rich bottom pools. Amplicon libraries were sequenced on a MiSeq instrument. The taxonomic survey yielded an unexpected diversity of 25 bacterial phyla including ten genera of iron-oxidizing taxa. The community composition in the snottites and biofilms only slightly differed from the communities found in acidic bottom pools regarding the diversity of iron oxidizers, the key players in most investigated habitats. Sequences of the Candidate Phyla Radiation as, e.g., Dojkabacteria and Eremiobacterota were found in almost all samples. Archaea of the classes Thermoplasmata and Nitrososphaeria were detected in some biofilm communities.
      PubDate: 2021-12-08
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-021-01249-6
       
  • Experimental study of proteome halophilicity using nanoDSF: a proof of
           concept

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      Abstract: Abstract Adaption to environmental conditions is reflected by protein adaptation. In particular, proteins of extremophiles display distinctive traits ensuring functional, structural and dynamical properties under permanently extreme physical and chemical conditions. While it has mostly been studied with approaches focusing on specific proteins, biophysical approaches have also confirmed this link between environmental and protein adaptation at the more complex and diverse scale of the proteome. However, studies of this type remain challenging and often require large amounts of biological material. We report here the use of nanoDSF as a tool to study proteome stability and solubility in cell lysates of the model halophilic archaeon Haloarcula marismortui. Notably, our results show that, as with single halophilic protein studies, proteome stability was correlated to the concentration of NaCl or KCl under which the cells were lysed and hence the proteome exposed. This work highlights that adaptation to environmental conditions can be experimentally observed at the scale of the proteome. Still, we show that the biochemical properties of single halophilic proteins can only be partially extrapolated to the whole proteome.
      PubDate: 2021-12-07
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-021-01250-z
       
  • Metagenomic insights into Himalayan glacial and kettle lake sediments
           revealed microbial community structure, function, and stress adaptation
           strategies

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      Abstract: Abstract Glacial and kettle lakes in the high-altitude Himalayas are unique habitats with significant scope for microbial ecology. The present study provides insights into bacterial community structure and function of the sediments of two high-altitude lakes using 16S amplicon and whole-genome shotgun (WGS) metagenomics. Microbial communities in the sediments of Parvati kund (glacial lake) and Bhoot ground (kettle lake) majorly consist of bacteria and a small fraction of archaea and eukaryota. The bacterial population has an abundance of phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, and Verrucomicrobia. Despite the common phyla, the sediments from each lake have a distinct distribution of bacterial and archaeal taxa. The analysis of the WGS metagenomes at the functional level provides a broad picture of microbial community metabolism of key elements and suggested chemotrophs as the major primary producers. In addition, the findings also revealed that polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) are a crucial stress adaptation molecule. The abundance of PHA metabolism in Alpha- and Betaproteobacteria and less representation in other bacterial and archaeal classes in both metagenomes was disclosed. The metagenomic insights provided an incisive view of the microbiome from Himalayan lake's sediments. It has also opened the scope for further bioprospection from virgin Himalayan niches.
      PubDate: 2021-12-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-021-01252-x
       
  • Correction to: Pentose degradation in archaea: Halorhabdus species degrade
           D-xylose, L-arabinose and D-ribose via bacterial-type pathways

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      PubDate: 2021-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-021-01248-7
       
  • Transcriptomic responses of haloalkalitolerant bacterium Egicoccus
           halophilus EGI 80432T to highly alkaline stress

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      Abstract: Abstract The haloalkalitolerant bacterium Egicoccus halophilus EGI 80432T exhibits high adaptability to saline–alkaline environment. The salinity adaptation mechanism of E. halophilus EGI 80432T was fully understood based on transcriptome analyses and physiological responses; however, the alkaline response mechanism has not yet been investigated. Here, we investigated the alkaline response mechanism of E. halophilus EGI 80432T by a transcriptomic comparison. In this study, the genes involved in the glycolysis, TCA cycle, starch, and trehalose metabolism for energy production and storage, were up-regulated under highly alkaline condition. Furthermore, genes responsible for the production of acidic and neutral metabolites, i.e., acetate, pyruvate, formate, glutamate, threonine, and ectoine, showed increased expression under highly alkaline condition, compared with the control pH condition. In contrast, the opposite results were observed in proton capture or retention gene expression profiles, i.e., cation/proton antiporters and ATP synthases. The above results revealed that E. halophilus EGI 80432T likely tended to adopt an “acidic metabolites production” strategy in response to a highly alkaline condition. These findings would pave the way for further studies in the saline–alkaline adaptation mechanisms of E. halophilus EGI 80432T, and hopefully provide a new insight into the foundational theory and application in ecological restoration with saline–alkaline strains.
      PubDate: 2021-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-021-01239-8
       
  • Fairy ring disease affects epiphytic algal assemblages associated with the
           moss Sanionia uncinata (Hedw.) Loeske (Bryophyta) on King George Island,
           Antarctica

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      Abstract: Abstract Since the nineteenth century, a ring-forming disease attacking Antarctic mosses has been reported. However, to date, only the effects on the mosses themselves are known. In this study, we used DNA metabarcoding to investigate the effects on the moss epiphytic algal community at different stages of disease progression. As the disease progressed, algal species richness decreased, although overall abundance was not significantly affected. Prasiolales appeared unaffected, whereas Ulotrichales were more sensitive. Trebouxiales dominated the advanced disease stage, suggesting a possible benefit from the disease, either through the elimination of competition or creation of new niches. Infection is responsible for moss death, leading to habitat loss for other organisms, but pathogenic effects on algae cannot be ruled out. Our data indicate that the disease not only impacts mosses but also other groups, potentially resulting in loss of Antarctic biodiversity. This study provides the first report of the disease effects on epiphytic algal communities of Antarctic bryophytes.
      PubDate: 2021-11-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s00792-021-01246-9
       
 
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