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Showing 1401 - 1600 of 1720 Journals sorted alphabetically
The Condor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
The Enzymes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The FASEB Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
The Herpetological Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
The International Journal of Advanced Manufacturing Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Journal of Technology Transfer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
The Knee     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Lancet Microbe     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Lichenologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Nucleus     Hybrid Journal  
The Plant Cell     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
The Protein Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Theoretical Population Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Therya     Open Access  
Tissue and Cell     Hybrid Journal  
Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Tissue Engineering Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Tissue Engineering Part B: Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Toxicological Research     Hybrid Journal  
Toxicology in Vitro     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Toxicon     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicon : X     Open Access  
Traffic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Transactions of the Royal Society of South Australia     Hybrid Journal  
Transcription     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Transgenic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Translational Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Transportation Planning and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Tree Genetics & Genomes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Trees     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Trends in Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Trends in Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 141)
Trends in Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Trends in Microbiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Trends in Molecular Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Trends in Plant Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Tropical Drylands     Open Access  
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
Tropical Freshwater Biology     Full-text available via subscription  
Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Turkish Journal of Agricultural and Natural Science / Türk Tarım ve Doğa Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Ukrainian Journal of Ecology     Open Access  
Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
UNED Research Journal / Cuadernos de Investigación UNED     Open Access  
Uniciencia     Open Access  
Universal Journal of Biomedical Engineering     Open Access  
UNM Journal of Biological Education     Open Access  
Unnes Journal of Biology Education     Open Access  
Vakuum in Forschung und Praxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Vascular Cell     Open Access  
Vegetation Classification and Survey     Open Access  
Victorian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
View     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Virchows Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Virologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal  
Virology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Virulence     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Virus Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Virus Genes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Virus Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Visnyk of Dnipropetrovsk University. Biology, ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Visnyk of Dnipropetrovsk University. Biology, medicine     Open Access  
VITIS : Journal of Grapevine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Walailak Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Water Biology and Security     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Web Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Webbia : Journal of Plant Taxonomy and Geography     Hybrid Journal  
West African Journal of Applied Ecology     Open Access  
Western Undergraduate Research Journal : Health and Natural Sciences     Open Access  
Wetlands     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Wildlife Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews - System Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Developmental Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : Membrane Transport and Signaling     Hybrid Journal  
Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews : RNA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
World Mycotoxin Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Xenobiotica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Yeast     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Zebrafish     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Evidenz, Fortbildung und Qualität im Gesundheitswesen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Zitteliana     Open Access  
Zygote     Hybrid Journal  

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The Plant Cell
Journal Prestige (SJR): 5.597
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 23  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1040-4651 - ISSN (Online) 1532-298X
Published by ASPB Homepage  [2 journals]
  • From the archives: complexity of posttranscriptional control; miRNA,
           polyadenylation, and splicing

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chan C.
      Pages: 2101 - 2103
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac098
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • RDR2 in maize: one-way road to double-stranded RNA

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      Authors: Zicola J.
      Pages: 2104 - 2105
      Abstract: In plants, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) mediate RNA-dependent DNA methylation to silence transposable elements. siRNAs are 21- to 24-nucleotide double-stranded (ds) RNA fragments derived from cleaved dsRNAs generated by RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) from single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs). Maize contains five RdRP genes, including ZmRDR2, initially named MEDIATOR OF PARAMUTATION1 (Mop1) (Qian et al., 2011). The mop1 knockout mutant shows a ∼80% decrease in 24-nucleotide siRNA abundance compared with wild type, leading to the release of silencing at transposable elements and paramutation loci (Nobuta et al., 2008). Although ZmRDR2 is of critical importance to ensure the stability of the maize genome, we do not know how it processes ssRNAs into dsRNAs.
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac100
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • A roadmap of plant clathrin-mediated vesicle trafficking

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      Authors: Gorelova V.
      Pages: 2106 - 2107
      Abstract: Imagine a city without traffic lights, a postal system without addresses, or yourself at a busy international airport with no gate information. Cells alike, without proper logistics can easily descend into chaos! The regulation of vesicle trafficking is critical for the exchange of information and cellular components between the multiple organelles and compartments of eukaryotic cells.
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac099
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Decoding the cis-regulation of tomato fruit development with deep learning

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      Authors: Herrera-Ubaldo H.
      Pages: 2108 - 2109
      Abstract: The transcriptional regulation underlying biological processes is mostly controlled by transcription factors (TFs) and co-factors (trans-factors) that bind specific sequences in the promoter regions (cis-elements) to activate or repress gene expression (see Figure). Natural variation in promoter regions contributes to the diversity of expression patterns seen in nature. Modifications within regulatory regions can also generate novel alleles that alter crop traits; for example, CRISPR/Cas9-induced mutations in the promoters of key regulators of meristematic activity led to enhanced inflorescence branching and increased locule number and fruit size in tomato (Rodríguez-Leal et al., 2017).
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac094
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Remembering a warm day: daytime temperature influences nighttime hypocotyl
           growth in Arabidopsis

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      Authors: Hendrix S.
      Pages: 2110 - 2111
      Abstract: Extreme temperatures are generally detrimental to plant growth. However, mild temperature increases can actually favor the growth of certain plant organs through a process known as thermomorphogenesis. A classic example is the enhanced hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings exposed to elevated ambient temperatures. The transcription factor PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) functions as a central hub in this response and promotes hypocotyl growth by transcriptionally inducing auxin biosynthesis genes (Quint et al., 2016). One of the many players that regulate PIF4 expression or function is EARLY-FLOWERING 3 (ELF3). This protein is a component of the circadian clock evening complex, which serves as a transcriptional repressor of PIF4. Furthermore, ELF3 can physically interact with PIF4, preventing it from binding to its target genes (Casal and Balasubramanian, 2019). So far, research in this field has mainly focused on elucidating how these thermomorphogenic regulators influence hypocotyl growth in response to the current temperature. Now, Germán Murcia and colleagues (Murcia et al., 2022) have demonstrated that PIF4 and ELF3 also store information on temperatures to which the plant was previously exposed, enabling nighttime hypocotyl growth to respond to the preceding daytime temperature (see Figure).
      PubDate: Thu, 10 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac085
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • A WRINKLE in the time of seed maturation: chromatin-level control of fatty
           acid biosynthesis

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      Authors: Méteignier L.
      Pages: 2112 - 2113
      Abstract: Fatty acid biosynthesis during seed development is essential for storing carbon and energy to support seedling growth after germination. Aside from their significance to plant growth, plant fatty acids also play important roles in animal nutrition and as biofuel feedstocks. The transcription of fatty acid biosynthetic genes requires several transcription factors whose detailed mechanisms of action remain obscure.
      PubDate: Wed, 23 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac097
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • The sum is greater than the parts: Co-dependent auxin efflux is mediated
           by ABCBs and PINs

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      Authors: Hilleary R.
      Pages: 2114 - 2115
      Abstract: Since Charles Darwin studied how seedlings move toward a directional light source (a phenomenon known as phototropism), a mobile signal transmitted from a site of perception to a distal site of the plant that influences plant organ growth kinetics was hypothesized. This signal was later identified as the growth regulator auxin, an integral player in plant development and physiological responses, including leaf primordia patterning, vascular development, primary and lateral root growth, and gravitropism (reviewed by Geisler, 2021). Primary root growth is tightly controlled and requires specific spatial distributions of auxin regulated by a suite of membrane-localized auxin influx/efflux carriers, many of which have been identified: PIN-FORMED (PIN) family transporters, which famously exhibit an asymmetric cellular localization that can drive polarized auxin transport throughout an organ via a chemiosmotic mechanism; ATP-binding cassette transporters of the B sub-family (ABCBs), whose cellular localization is more symmetric, possesses family members capable of auxin transport both with and against auxin gradients; and AUX1/LAX auxin importers.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac087
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • A surprising feature of the blue light: Regulation of leaf hydraulic
           conductance via an autonomous phototropin-mediated blue light signaling
           pathway in bundle-sheath cells

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      Authors: Rahmati Ishka M.
      Pages: 2116 - 2117
      Abstract: Blue light (BL, 390–550 nm) has been shown to cause stomatal opening and increase leaf hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) in many species. However, the molecular mechanisms of Kleaf regulation remain elusive. Bundle-sheath cells (BSCs), a parenchymal layer surrounding leaf vasculature (see Figure), act as a selective xylem–mesophyll barrier to water and ions. In this issue of The Plant Cell, Yael Grunwald and colleagues (Grunwald et al., 2022) show that BL induces an autonomous signaling pathway in BSCs (like that of guard cells [GCs]), which regulates Kleaf via activation of the BSCs plasma membrane autoinhibited H+-ATPase 2 (AHA2) (see Figure).
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac088
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Do mitochondria hold the key to understanding growth-defense
           tradeoffs'

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      Authors: Hilleary R.
      Pages: 2118 - 2119
      Abstract: Facing an onslaught of more frequent climactic calamities, plant scientists seek to uncover creative genetic solutions that provide plants protections against myriad stresses. The development of “dream” plants that are resilient to a spectrum of environmental insults, both biotic and abiotic, must accelerate to feed a growing human population (Kim et al., 2021). However, most molecular defensive programs that provide pathogen resistance come at the expense of growth, necessitating the discovery of unique defensive modalities that circumvent this issue. Yang Yang and colleagues (Yang et al., 2022) recently discovered a potential mechanism via the modulation of electron transport efficiency in mitochondria during pathogen infection that confers resistance to a broad spectrum of pathogens without any significant growth-defense tradeoffs.
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac096
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Division site determination during asymmetric cell division in plants

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      Authors: Yi P; Goshima G.
      Pages: 2120 - 2139
      Abstract: AbstractDuring development, both animals and plants exploit asymmetric cell division (ACD) to increase tissue complexity, a process that usually generates cells dissimilar in size, morphology, and fate. Plants lack the key regulators that control ACD in animals. Instead, plants have evolved two unique cytoskeletal structures to tackle this problem: the preprophase band (PPB) and phragmoplast. The assembly of the PPB and phragmoplast and their contributions to division plane orientation have been extensively studied. However, how the division plane is positioned off the cell center during asymmetric division is poorly understood. Over the past 20 years, emerging evidence points to a critical role for polarly localized membrane proteins in this process. Although many of these proteins are species- or cell type specific, and the molecular mechanism underlying division asymmetry is not fully understood, common features such as morphological changes in cells, cytoskeletal dynamics, and nuclear positioning have been observed. In this review, we provide updates on polarity establishment and nuclear positioning during ACD in plants. Together with previous findings about symmetrically dividing cells and the emerging roles of developmental cues, we aim to offer evolutionary insight into a common framework for asymmetric division-site determination and highlight directions for future work.
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac069
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Structure of plant RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2, an enzyme involved in
           small interfering RNA production

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      Authors: Du X; Yang Z, Ariza A, et al.
      Pages: 2140 - 2149
      Abstract: AbstractIn plants, the biogenesis of small interfering RNA (siRNA) requires a family of RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that convert single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) into double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which is subsequently cleaved into defined lengths by Dicer endonucleases. Here, we determined the structure of maize (Zea mays) RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 2 (ZmRDR2) in the closed and open conformations. The core catalytic region of ZmRDR2 possesses the canonical DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (DdRP) catalytic sites, pointing to a shared RNA production mechanism between DdRPs and plant RDR-family proteins. Apo-ZmRDR2 adopts a highly compact structure, representing an inactive closed conformation. By contrast, adding RNA induced a significant conformational change in the ZmRDR2 Head domain that opened the RNA binding tunnel, suggesting this is an active elongation conformation of ZmRDR2. Overall, our structural studies trapped both the active and inactive conformations of ZmRDR2, providing insights into the molecular mechanism of dsRNA synthesis during plant siRNA production.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac067
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Proteomic characterization of isolated Arabidopsis clathrin-coated
           vesicles reveals evolutionarily conserved and plant-specific components

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      Authors: Dahhan D; Reynolds G, Cárdenas J, et al.
      Pages: 2150 - 2173
      Abstract: AbstractIn eukaryotes, clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) facilitate the internalization of material from the cell surface as well as the movement of cargo in post-Golgi trafficking pathways. This diversity of functions is partially provided by multiple monomeric and multimeric clathrin adaptor complexes that provide compartment and cargo selectivity. The adaptor-protein assembly polypeptide-1 (AP-1) complex operates as part of the secretory pathway at the trans-Golgi network (TGN), while the AP-2 complex and the TPLATE complex jointly operate at the plasma membrane to execute clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Key to our further understanding of clathrin-mediated trafficking in plants will be the comprehensive identification and characterization of the network of evolutionarily conserved and plant-specific core and accessory machinery involved in the formation and targeting of CCVs. To facilitate these studies, we have analyzed the proteome of enriched TGN/early endosome-derived and endocytic CCVs isolated from dividing and expanding suspension-cultured Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cells. Tandem mass spectrometry analysis results were validated by differential chemical labeling experiments to identify proteins co-enriching with CCVs. Proteins enriched in CCVs included previously characterized CCV components and cargos such as the vacuolar sorting receptors in addition to conserved and plant-specific components whose function in clathrin-mediated trafficking has not been previously defined. Notably, in addition to AP-1 and AP-2, all subunits of the AP-4 complex, but not AP-3 or AP-5, were found to be in high abundance in the CCV proteome. The association of AP-4 with suspension-cultured Arabidopsis CCVs is further supported via additional biochemical data.
      PubDate: Sat, 26 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac071
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Genome-wide cis-decoding for expression design in tomato using cistrome
           data and explainable deep learning

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      Authors: Akagi T; Masuda K, Kuwada E, et al.
      Pages: 2174 - 2187
      Abstract: AbstractIn the evolutionary history of plants, variation in cis-regulatory elements (CREs) resulting in diversification of gene expression has played a central role in driving the evolution of lineage-specific traits. However, it is difficult to predict expression behaviors from CRE patterns to properly harness them, mainly because the biological processes are complex. In this study, we used cistrome datasets and explainable convolutional neural network (CNN) frameworks to predict genome-wide expression patterns in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit from the DNA sequences in gene regulatory regions. By fixing the effects of trans-acting factors using single cell-type spatiotemporal transcriptome data for the response variables, we developed a prediction model for crucial expression patterns in the initiation of tomato fruit ripening. Feature visualization of the CNNs identified nucleotide residues critical to the objective expression pattern in each gene, and their effects were validated experimentally in ripening tomato fruit. This cis-decoding framework will not only contribute to the understanding of the regulatory networks derived from CREs and transcription factor interactions, but also provides a flexible means of designing alleles for optimized expression.
      PubDate: Tue, 08 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac079
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Hysteresis in PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 and EARLY-FLOWERING 3
           dynamics dominates warm daytime memory in Arabidopsis

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      Authors: Murcia G; Nieto C, Sellaro R, et al.
      Pages: 2188 - 2204
      Abstract: AbstractDespite the identification of temperature sensors and downstream components involved in promoting stem growth by warm temperatures, when and how previous temperatures affect current plant growth remain unclear. Here we show that hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis thaliana during the night responds not only to the current temperature but also to preceding daytime temperatures, revealing a short-term memory of previous conditions. Daytime temperature affected the levels of PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5) in the nucleus during the next night. These factors jointly accounted for the observed growth kinetics, whereas nighttime memory of prior daytime temperature was impaired in pif4 and hy5 mutants. PIF4 promoter activity largely accounted for the temperature-dependent changes in PIF4 protein levels. Notably, the decrease in PIF4 promoter activity triggered by cooling required a stronger temperature shift than the increase caused by warming, representing a typical hysteretic effect; this hysteretic pattern required EARLY-FLOWERING 3 (ELF3). Warm temperatures promoted the formation of nuclear condensates of ELF3 in hypocotyl cells during the afternoon but not in the morning. These nuclear speckles showed poor sensitivity to subsequent cooling. We conclude that ELF3 achieves hysteresis and drives the PIF4 promoter into the same behavior, enabling a short-term memory of daytime temperature conditions.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac078
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Embryonic reactivation of FLOWERING LOCUS C by ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 3
           establishes the vernalization requirement in each Arabidopsis generation

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      Authors: Xu G; Tao Z, He Y.
      Pages: 2205 - 2221
      Abstract: AbstractMany over-wintering plants grown in temperate climate acquire competence to flower upon prolonged cold exposure in winter, through vernalization. In Arabidopsis thaliana, prolonged cold exposure induces the silencing of the potent floral repressor FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) through repressive chromatin modifications by Polycomb proteins. This repression is maintained to enable flowering after return to warmth, but is reset during seed development. Here, we show that embryonic FLC reactivation occurs in two phases: resetting of cold-induced FLC silencing during embryogenesis and further FLC activation during embryo maturation. We found that the B3 transcription factor (TF) ABSCISIC ACID-INSENSITIVE 3 (ABI3) mediates both FLC resetting in embryogenesis and further activation of FLC expression in embryo maturation. ABI3 binds to the cis-acting cold memory element at FLC and recruits a scaffold protein with active chromatin modifiers to reset FLC chromatin into an active state in late embryogenesis. Moreover, in response to abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation during embryo maturation, ABI3, together with the basic leucine zipper TF ABI5, binds to an ABA-responsive cis-element to further activate FLC expression to high level. Therefore, we have uncovered the molecular circuitries underlying embryonic FLC reactivation following parental vernalization, which ensures that each generation must experience winter cold prior to flowering.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac077
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • EAR APICAL DEGENERATION1 regulates maize ear development by maintaining
           malate supply for apical inflorescence

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      Authors: Pei Y; Deng Y, Zhang H, et al.
      Pages: 2222 - 2241
      Abstract: AbstractEar length (EL) is a key trait that contributes greatly to grain yield in maize (Zea mays). While numerous quantitative trait loci for EL have been identified, few causal genes have been studied in detail. Here we report the characterization of ear apical degeneration1 (ead1) exhibiting strikingly shorter ears and the map-based cloning of the casual gene EAD1. EAD1 is preferentially expressed in the xylem of immature ears and encodes an aluminum-activated malate transporter localizing to the plasma membrane. We show that EAD1 is a malate efflux transporter and loss of EAD1 leads to lower malate contents in the apical part of developing inflorescences. Exogenous injections of malate rescued the shortened ears of ead1. These results demonstrate that EAD1 plays essential roles in regulating maize ear development by delivering malate through xylem vessels to the apical part of the immature ear. Overexpression of EAD1 led to greater EL and kernel number per row and the EAD1 genotype showed a positive association with EL in two different genetic segregating populations. Our work elucidates the critical role of EAD1 in malate-mediated female inflorescence development and provides a promising genetic resource for enhancing maize grain yield.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac093
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • BLISTER promotes seed maturation and fatty acid biosynthesis by
           interacting with WRINKLED1 to regulate chromatin dynamics in Arabidopsis

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      Authors: Huang R; Liu M, Gong G, et al.
      Pages: 2242 - 2265
      Abstract: AbstractWRINKLED1 (WRI1) is an important transcription factor that regulates seed oil biosynthesis. However, how WRI1 regulates gene expression during this process remains poorly understood. Here, we found that BLISTER (BLI) is expressed in maturing Arabidopsis thaliana seeds and acts as an interacting partner of WRI1. bli mutant seeds showed delayed maturation, a wrinkled seed phenotype, and reduced oil content, similar to the phenotypes of wri1. In contrast, BLI overexpression resulted in enlarged seeds and increased oil content. Gene expression and genetic analyses revealed that BLI plays a role in promoting the expression of WRI1 targets involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and regulates seed maturation together with WRI1. BLI is recruited by WRI1 to the AW boxes in the promoters of fatty acid biosynthesis genes. BLI shows a mutually exclusive interaction with the Polycomb-group protein CURLY LEAF (CLF) or the chromatin remodeling factor SWITCH/SUCROSE NONFERMENTING 3B (SWI3B), which facilitates gene expression by modifying nucleosomal occupancy and histone modifications. Together, these data suggest that BLI promotes the expression of fatty acid biosynthesis genes by interacting with WRI1 to regulate chromatin dynamics, leading to increased fatty acid production. These findings provide insights into the roles of the WRI1–BLI–CLF–SWI3B module in mediating seed maturation and gene expression.
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac083
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • The photomorphogenic repressors BBX28 and BBX29 integrate light and
           brassinosteroid signaling to inhibit seedling development in Arabidopsis

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      Authors: Cao J; Liang Y, Yan T, et al.
      Pages: 2266 - 2285
      Abstract: AbstractB-box containing proteins (BBXs) integrate light and various hormonal signals to regulate plant growth and development. Here, we demonstrate that the photomorphogenic repressors BBX28 and BBX29 positively regulate brassinosteroid (BR) signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Treatment with the BR brassinolide stabilized BBX28 and BBX29, which partially depended on BR INSENSITIVE1 (BRI1) and BIN2. bbx28 bbx29 seedlings exhibited larger cotyledon aperture than the wild-type when treated with brassinazole in the dark, which partially suppressed the closed cotyledons of brassinazole resistant 1-1D (bzr1-1D). Consistently, overexpressing BBX28 and BBX29 partially rescued the short hypocotyls of bri1-5 and bin2-1 in both the dark and light, while the loss-of-function of BBX28 and BBX29 partially suppressed the long hypocotyls of bzr1-1D in the light. BBX28 and BBX29 physically interacted with BR-ENHANCED EXPRESSION1 (BEE1), BEE2, and BEE3 and enhanced their binding to and activation of their target genes. Moreover, BBX28 and BBX29 as well as BEE1, BEE2, and BEE3 increased BZR1 accumulation to promote the BR signaling pathway. Therefore, both BBX28 and BBX29 interact with BEE1, BEE2, and BEE3 to orchestrate light and BR signaling by facilitating the transcriptional activity of BEE target genes. Our study provides insights into the pivotal roles of BBX28 and BBX29 as signal integrators in ensuring normal seedling development.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac092
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • COP1 positively regulates ABA signaling during Arabidopsis seedling growth
           in darkness by mediating ABA-induced ABI5 accumulation

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      Authors: Peng J; Wang M, Wang X, et al.
      Pages: 2286 - 2308
      Abstract: AbstractCONSTITUTIVELY PHOTOMORPHOGENIC1 (COP1), a well-characterized E3 ubiquitin ligase, is a central repressor of seedling photomorphogenic development in darkness. However, whether COP1 is involved in modulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in darkness remains largely obscure. Here, we report that COP1 is a positive regulator of ABA signaling during Arabidopsis seedling growth in the dark. COP1 mediates ABA-induced accumulation of ABI5, a transcription factor playing a key role in ABA signaling, through transcriptional and post-translational regulatory mechanisms. We further show that COP1 physically interacts with ABA-hypersensitive DCAF1 (ABD1), a substrate receptor of the CUL4-DDB1 E3 ligase targeting ABI5 for degradation. Accordingly, COP1 directly ubiquitinates ABD1 in vitro, and negatively regulates ABD1 protein abundance in vivo in the dark but not in the light. Therefore, COP1 promotes ABI5 protein stability post-translationally in darkness by destabilizing ABD1 in response to ABA. Interestingly, we reveal that ABA induces the nuclear accumulation of COP1 in darkness, thus enhancing its activity in propagating the ABA signal. Together, our study uncovers that COP1 modulates ABA signaling during seedling growth in darkness by mediating ABA-induced ABI5 accumulation, demonstrating that plants adjust their ABA signaling mechanisms according to their light environment.
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac073
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Systems approaches reveal that ABCB and PIN proteins mediate co-dependent
           auxin efflux

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      Authors: Mellor N; Voß U, Ware A, et al.
      Pages: 2309 - 2327
      Abstract: AbstractMembers of the B family of membrane-bound ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters represent key components of the auxin efflux machinery in plants. Over the last two decades, experimental studies have shown that modifying ATP-binding cassette sub-family B (ABCB) expression affects auxin distribution and plant phenotypes. However, precisely how ABCB proteins transport auxin in conjunction with the more widely studied family of PIN-formed (PIN) auxin efflux transporters is unclear, and studies using heterologous systems have produced conflicting results. Here, we integrate ABCB localization data into a multicellular model of auxin transport in the Arabidopsis thaliana root tip to predict how ABCB-mediated auxin transport impacts organ-scale auxin distribution. We use our model to test five potential ABCB–PIN regulatory interactions, simulating the auxin dynamics for each interaction and quantitatively comparing the predictions with experimental images of the DII-VENUS auxin reporter in wild-type and abcb single and double loss-of-function mutants. Only specific ABCB–PIN regulatory interactions result in predictions that recreate the experimentally observed DII-VENUS distributions and long-distance auxin transport. Our results suggest that ABCBs enable auxin efflux independently of PINs; however, PIN-mediated auxin efflux is predominantly through a co-dependent efflux where co-localized with ABCBs.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac086
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Out of the blue: Phototropins of the leaf vascular bundle sheath mediate
           the regulation of leaf hydraulic conductance by blue light

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      Authors: Grunwald Y; Gosa S, Torne-Srivastava T, et al.
      Pages: 2328 - 2342
      Abstract: AbstractThe Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf veins bundle-sheath cells (BSCs)—a selective barrier to water and solutes entering the mesophyll—increase the leaf radial hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) by acidifying the xylem sap by their plasma membrane H+-ATPase,  AHA2. Based on this and on the BSCs’ expression of phototropins PHOT1 and PHOT2, and the known blue light (BL)-induced Kleaf increase, we hypothesized that, resembling the guard cells, BL perception by the BSCs’ phots activates its H+-ATPase, which, consequently, upregulates Kleaf. Indeed, under BL, the Kleaf of the knockout mutant lines phot1-5, phot2-1, phot1-5 phot2-1, and aha2-4 was lower than that of the wild-type (WT). BSC-only-directed complementation of phot1-5 or aha2-4 by PHOT1 or AHA2, respectively, restored the BL-induced Kleaf increase. BSC-specific silencing of PHOT1 or PHOT2 prevented such Kleaf increase. A xylem-fed kinase inhibitor (tyrphostin 9) replicated this also in WT plants. White light—ineffective in the phot1-5 mutant—acidified the xylem sap (relative to darkness) in WT and in the PHOT1-complemented phot1-5. These results, supported by BL increase of BSC protoplasts’ water permeability and cytosolic pH and their hyperpolarization by BL, identify the BSCs as a second phot-controlled water conductance element in leaves, in series with stomatal conductance. Through both, BL regulates the leaf water balance.
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac089
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • A mitochondrial RNA processing protein mediates plant immunity to a broad
           spectrum of pathogens by modulating the mitochondrial oxidative burst

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      Authors: Yang Y; Zhao Y, Zhang Y, et al.
      Pages: 2343 - 2363
      Abstract: AbstractMitochondrial function depends on the RNA processing of mitochondrial gene transcripts by nucleus-encoded proteins. This posttranscriptional processing involves the large group of nuclear-encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins. Mitochondrial processes represent a crucial part in animal immunity, but whether mitochondria play similar roles in plants remains unclear. Here, we report the identification of RESISTANCE TO PHYTOPHTHORA PARASITICA 7 (AtRTP7), a P-type PPR protein, in Arabidopsis thaliana and its conserved function in immunity to diverse pathogens across distantly related plant species. RTP7 affects the levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) by participating in RNA splicing of nad7, which encodes a critical subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I, the largest of the four major components of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system. The enhanced resistance of rtp7 plants to Phytophthora parasitica is dependent on an elevated mROS burst, but might be independent from the ROS burst associated with plasma membrane-localized NADPH oxidases. Our study reveals the immune function of RTP7 and the defective processing of Complex I subunits in rtp7 plants resulted in enhanced resistance to both biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens without affecting overall plant development.
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac082
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Insights into polyamine metabolism: homospermidine is double-oxidized in
           two discrete steps by a single copper-containing amine oxidase in
           pyrrolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis

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      Authors: Zakaria M; Stegemann T, Sievert C, et al.
      Pages: 2364 - 2382
      Abstract: AbstractPolyamines are important metabolites in plant development and abiotic and biotic stress responses. Copper-containing amine oxidases (CuAOs) are involved in the regulation of polyamine levels in the cell. CuAOs oxidize primary amines to their respective aldehydes and hydrogen peroxide. In plants, aldehydes are intermediates in various biosynthetic pathways of alkaloids. CuAOs are thought to oxidize polyamines at only one of the primary amino groups, a process frequently resulting in monocyclic structures. These oxidases have been postulated to be involved in pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) biosynthesis. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of homospermidine oxidase (HSO), a CuAO of Heliotropium indicum (Indian heliotrope), involved in PA biosynthesis. Virus-induced gene silencing of HSO in H. indicum leads to significantly reduced PA levels. By in vitro enzyme assays after transient in planta expression, we show that this enzyme prefers Hspd over other amines. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry analyses of the reaction products demonstrate that HSO oxidizes both primary amino groups of homospermidine (Hspd) to form a bicyclic structure, 1-formylpyrrolizidine. Using tracer feeding, we have further revealed that 1-formylpyrrolizidine is an intermediate in the biosynthesis of PAs. Our study therefore establishes that HSO, a canonical CuAO, catalyzes the second step of PA biosynthesis and provides evidence for an undescribed and unusual mechanism involving two discrete steps of oxidation that might also be involved in the biosynthesis of complex structures in other alkaloidal pathways.
      PubDate: Fri, 25 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac068
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • The Arabidopsis cyclophilin CYP18-1 facilitates PRP18 dephosphorylation
           and the splicing of introns retained under heat stress

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      Authors: Jo S; Park H, Lee A, et al.
      Pages: 2383 - 2403
      Abstract: AbstractIn plants, heat stress induces changes in alternative splicing, including intron retention; these events can rapidly alter proteins or downregulate protein activity, producing nonfunctional isoforms or inducing nonsense-mediated decay of messenger RNA (mRNA). Nuclear cyclophilins (CYPs) are accessory proteins in the spliceosome complexes of multicellular eukaryotes. However, whether plant CYPs are involved in pre-mRNA splicing remain unknown. Here, we found that Arabidopsis thaliana CYP18-1 is necessary for the efficient removal of introns that are retained in response to heat stress during germination. CYP18-1 interacts with Step II splicing factors (PRP18a, PRP22, and SWELLMAP1) and associates with the U2 and U5 small nuclear RNAs in response to heat stress. CYP18-1 binds to phospho-PRP18a, and increasing concentrations of CYP18-1 are associated with increasing dephosphorylation of PRP18a. Furthermore, interaction and protoplast transfection assays revealed that CYP18-1 and the PP2A-type phosphatase PP2A B′η co-regulate PRP18a dephosphorylation. RNA-seq and RT-qPCR analysis confirmed that CYP18-1 is essential for splicing introns that are retained under heat stress. Overall, we reveal the mechanism of action by which CYP18-1 activates the dephosphorylation of PRP18 and show that CYP18-1 is crucial for the efficient splicing of retained introns and rapid responses to heat stress in plants.
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac084
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Functional nuclear retention of pre-mRNA involving Cajal bodies during
           meiotic prophase in European larch (Larix decidua)

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      Authors: Rudzka M; Wróblewska-Ankiewicz P, Majewska K, et al.
      Pages: 2404 - 2423
      Abstract: AbstractGene regulation ensures that the appropriate genes are expressed at the proper time. Nuclear retention of incompletely spliced or mature mRNAs is emerging as a novel, previously underappreciated layer of posttranscriptional regulation. Studies on this phenomenon indicated that it exerts a significant influence on the regulation of gene expression by regulating export and translation delay, which allows the synthesis of specific proteins in response to a stimulus or at strictly controlled time points, for example, during cell differentiation or development. Here, we show that transcription in microsporocytes of European larch (Larix decidua) occurs in a pulsatile manner during prophase of the first meiotic division. Transcriptional activity was then silenced after each pulse. However, the transcripts synthesized were not exported immediately to the cytoplasm but were retained in the nucleoplasm and Cajal bodies (CBs). In contrast to the nucleoplasm, we did not detect mature transcripts in CBs, which only stored nonfully spliced transcripts with retained introns. Notably, the retained introns were spliced at precisely defined times, and fully mature mRNAs were released into the cytoplasm for translation. As similar processes have been observed during spermatogenesis in animals, our results illustrate an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of gene expression regulation during generative cells development in Eukaryota.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac091
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • SEED LIPID DROPLET PROTEIN1, SEED LIPID DROPLET PROTEIN2, and LIPID
           DROPLET PLASMA MEMBRANE ADAPTOR mediate lipid droplet–plasma membrane
           tethering

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      Authors: Krawczyk H; Sun S, Doner N, et al.
      Pages: 2424 - 2448
      Abstract: AbstractMembrane contact sites (MCSs) are interorganellar connections that allow for the direct exchange of molecules, such as lipids or Ca2+ between organelles, but can also serve to tether organelles at specific locations within cells. Here, we identified and characterized three proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana that form a lipid droplet (LD)–plasma membrane (PM) tethering complex in plant cells, namely LD-localized SEED LD PROTEIN (SLDP) 1 and SLDP2 and PM-localized LD-PLASMA MEMBRANE ADAPTOR (LIPA). Using proteomics and different protein–protein interaction assays, we show that both SLDPs associate with LIPA. Disruption of either SLDP1 and SLDP2 expression, or that of LIPA, leads to an aberrant clustering of LDs in Arabidopsis seedlings. Ectopic co-expression of one of the SLDPs with LIPA is sufficient to reconstitute LD–PM tethering in Nicotiana tabacum pollen tubes, a cell type characterized by dynamically moving LDs in the cytosolic streaming. Furthermore, confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed both SLDP2.1 and LIPA to be enriched at LD–PM contact sites in seedlings. These and other results suggest that SLDP and LIPA interact to form a tethering complex that anchors a subset of LDs to the PM during post-germinative seedling growth in Arabidopsis.
      PubDate: Mon, 28 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac095
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Correction to: Bypassing reproductive barriers by chemical epimutagenesis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 2449 - 2449
      Abstract: The Plant Cell, koab314, https://doi.org/10.1093/plcell/koab314
      PubDate: Fri, 11 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac075
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Correction to: Arabidopsis CHROMATIN REMODELING 19 acts as a
           transcriptional repressor and contributes to plant pathogen resistance Get
           access Arrow

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      Pages: 2450 - 2450
      Abstract: The Plant Cell, koab318, https://doi.org/10.1093/plcell/koab318
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac074
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
  • Correction to: Reductive stress triggers ANAC017-mediated retrograde
           signaling to safeguard the endoplasmic reticulum by boosting mitochondrial
           respiratory capacity

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      Authors: Fuchs P; Bohle F, Lichtenauer S, et al.
      Pages: 2451 - 2451
      Abstract: The Plant Cell, koac017, https://doi.org/10.1093/plcell/koac017
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plcell/koac090
      Issue No: Vol. 34, No. 6 (2022)
       
 
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