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Showing 1 - 30 of 30 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Technology for Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 125)
Aprendo con NooJ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Educational Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Computer Assisted Language Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Computer Speech & Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Education in the Knowledge Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Educational Technology Research and Development     Partially Free   (Followers: 45)
eLearn Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning - EURODL     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Human-centric Computing and Information Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Interdisciplinary Journal of e-Skills and Lifelong Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge, and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Adult Education and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Ambient Computing and Intelligence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Computer-Assisted Language Learning and Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Online Pedagogy and Course Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Research Studies in Educational Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Computers in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Machine Learning Research     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Jurnal Inovasi Teknologi Pendidikan     Open Access  
Jurnal Komtika     Open Access  
Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy     Open Access  
Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Research in Learning Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
RIED. Revista Iberoamericana de Educación a Distancia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RU&SC. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tidsskriftet Læring og Medier (LOM)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
UOC Papers. Revista sobre la sociedad del conocimiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
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Journal Cover
Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge, and Management
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.163
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 12  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1555-1229 - ISSN (Online) 1555-1237
Published by Informing Science Institute Homepage  [11 journals]
  • IJIKM Volume 17, 2022 – Table of Contents

    • Authors: Geoffrey Z. Liu
      Abstract: Table of Contents for Volume 17, 2022, of the Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge, and Management
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-01-06
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4901
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • The Influence of Ethical and Transformational Leadership on Employee
           Creativity in Malaysia's Private Higher Education Institutions: The
           Mediating Role of Organizational Citizenship Behaviour

    • Pages: 001 - 033
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: THIS PAPER IS CURRENTLY UNAVAILABLEBackground: ..Methodology: ..Contribution: ..Findings: ..Recommendations for Practitioners: ..Recommendation for Researchers: ..Impact on Society: ..Future Research: ..
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-01-06
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4896
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Modeling the Impact of Covid-19 on the Farm Produce Availability and
           Pricing in India

    • Authors: Niharika Prasanna Kumar
      Pages: 035 - 065
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This paper aims to analyze the availability and pricing of perishable farm produce before and during the lockdown restrictions imposed due to Covid-19. This paper also proposes machine learning and deep learning models to help the farmers decide on an appropriate market to sell their farm produce and get a fair price for their product. Background: Developing countries like India have regulated agricultural markets governed by country-specific protective laws like the Essential Commodities Act and the Agricultural Produce Market Committee (APMC) Act. These regulations restrict the sale of agricultural produce to a predefined set of local markets. Covid-19 pandemic led to a lockdown during the first half of 2020 which resulted in supply disruption and demand-supply mismatch of agricultural commodities at these local markets. These demand-supply dynamics led to disruptions in the pricing of the farm produce leading to a lower price realization for farmers. Hence it is essential to analyze the impact of this disruption on the pricing of farm produce at a granular level. Moreover, the farmers need a tool that guides them with the most suitable market/city/town to sell their farm produce to get a fair price. Methodology: One hundred and fifty thousand samples from the agricultural dataset, released by the Government of India, were used to perform statistical analysis and identify the supply disruptions as well as price disruptions of perishable agricultural produce. In addition, more than seventeen thousand samples were used to implement and train machine learning and deep learning models that can predict and guide the farmers about the appropriate market to sell their farm produce. In essence, the paper uses descriptive analytics to analyze the impact of COVID-19 on agricultural produce pricing. The paper explores the usage of prescriptive analytics to recommend an appropriate market to sell agricultural produce.Contribution: Five machine learning models based on Logistic Regression, K-Nearest Neighbors, Support Vector Machine, Random Forest, and Gradient Boosting, and three deep learning models based on Artificial Neural Networks were implemented. The performance of these models was compared using metrics like Precision, Recall, Accuracy, and F1-Score.Findings: Among the five classification models, the Gradient Boosting classifier was the optimal classifier that achieved precision, recall, accuracy, and F1 score of 99%. Out of the three deep learning models, the Adam optimizer-based deep neural network achieved precision, recall, accuracy, and F1 score of 99%.Recommendations for Practitioners: Gradient boosting technique and Adam-based deep learning model should be the preferred choice for analyzing agricultural pricing-related problems. Recommendation for Researchers: Ensemble learning techniques like Random Forest and Gradient boosting perform better than non-Ensemble classification techniques. Hyperparameter tuning is an essential step in developing these models and it improves the performance of the model.Impact on Society: Statistical analysis of the data revealed the true nature of demand and supply and price disruption. This analysis helps to assess the revenue impact borne by the farmers due to Covid-19. The machine learning and deep learning models help the farmers to get a better price for their crops. Though the da-taset used in this paper is related to India, the outcome of this research work applies to many developing countries that have similar regulated markets. Hence farmers from developing countries across the world can benefit from the outcome of this research work.Future Research: The machine learning and deep learning models were implemented and tested for markets in and around Bangalore. The model can be expanded to cover other markets within India.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-01-09
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4897
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • The Impacts of KM-Centred Strategies and Practices on Innovation: A Survey
           Study of R&D Firms in Malaysia

    • Authors: Chin Wei Chong, Yee Yen Yuen
      Pages: 067 - 086
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: The aim of this paper is to examine the influences of KM-centred strategies on innovation capability among Malaysian R&D firms. It also deepens understanding of the pathways and conditions to improve the innovation capability by assessing the mediating role of both KM practices, i.e., knowledge exploration practices, and knowledge exploitation practices. Background: Knowledge is the main organisational resource that is able to generate a competitive advantage through innovation. It is a critical success driver for both knowledge exploration and exploitation for firms to achieve sustainable competitive advantages. Methodology: A total of 320 questionnaires were disseminated to Malaysian R&D firms and the response rate was 47 percent. The paper utilised structural equation modelling and cross-sectional design to test hypotheses in the proposed research model.Contribution: This paper provides useful information and valuable initiatives in exploring the mediating role of knowledge exploration and knowledge exploitation in influencing innovation in Malaysian R&D firms. It helps R&D firms to frame their KM activities to drive the capability of creating and retaining a greater value onto their core business competencies.Findings: The findings indicate that all three KM-centred strategies (leadership, HR practices, and culture) have a direct effect on innovation. In addition, KM exploration practices mediate HR practices on innovation while KM exploitation mediates both leadership and HR practices on innovation. Recommendations for Practitioners: This paper serves as a guide for R&D managers to determine the gaps and appropriate actions to collectively achieve the desired R&D results and national innovation. It helps R&D firms frame their KM activities to enhance the capability of creating and retaining a greater value to their core business competencies.Recommendation for Researchers: This paper contributes significantly to knowledge management and innovation research by establishing new associations among KM-centred strategies, i.e., leadership, HR practices, and culture, both KM practices (knowledge exploration and knowledge exploitation), and innovation.Impact on Society: This paper highlights the important role of knowledge leaders and the practice of effective HR practices to help R&D firms to create a positive environment that facilitates both knowledge exploration and knowledge exploitation in enhancing innovation capabilities.Future Research: Further research could use a longitudinal sample to examine relationships of causality, offering a more comprehensive view of the effect of KM factors on innovation over the long term. Future research should also try to incorporate information from new external sources, such as customers or suppliers.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-01-17
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4892
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Impact of Text Diversity on Review Helpfulness: A Topic Modeling Approach

    • Authors: Lusi Li, Wenlu Zhang, Liuliu Fu
      Pages: 087 - 100
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: In this study, we aim to investigate the impact of an important characteristic of textual reviews – the diversity of the review content on review helpfulness.Background: Consumer-generated reviews are an essential format of online Word-of-Month that help customers reduce uncertainty and information asymmetry. However, not all reviews are equally helpful as reflected by the varying number of helpfulness votes received by reviews. From consumers’ perspective, what kind of content is more effective and useful for making purchase decisions is unclear.Methodology: We use a data set consisting of consumer reviews for laptop products on Amazon from 2014 to 2018. A topic modeling technique is implemented to unveil the hidden topics embedded in the reviews. Based on the extracted topics, we compute the text diversity score of each review. The diversity score measures how diverse the content in a review is compared to other reviews.Contribution: In the literature, studies have examined various factors that can influence review helpfulness. However, studies that emphasized the information value of textual reviews are limited. Our study contributes to the extant literature of online word-of-mouth by establishing the connection between the diversity of the review content and consumer perceived helpfulness.Findings: Empirical results show that text diversity plays an important role in consumers’ evaluation of whether the review is helpful. Reviews that contain more diverse content tend to be more helpful to consumers. Moreover, we find a negative interaction effect between text diversity and the text depth. This result suggests that text depth and text diversity have a substitution effect. When a review contains more in-depth content, the impact of text diversity is weakened.Recommendations for Practitioners: For consumers to quickly find the informative reviews, platforms should incorporate measures such as text diversity in the ranking algorithms to rank consumer reviews.Future Research: Future study can extend the current research by examine the impact of text diversity for experienced goods and compare the results with search goods.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-02-22
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4922
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Adoption of Mobile Commerce Services Among Artisans in Developing
           Countries

    • Authors: Isaac Asampana, Albert Akanlisikum Akanferi, Akwetey Henry Matey, Hannah Ayaba Tanye
      Pages: 101 - 123
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This paper aims to analyze how artisans in Ghana are incorporating mobile commerce into their everyday business and how perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, subjective norms, age, gender, expertise, and educational level affected the adoption and usage of m-commerce. Background: This study integrates well-established theoretical models to create a new conceptual model that ensures a comprehensive mobile commerce adoption survey.Methodology: A cross-sectional survey was conducted to measure the constructs and their relations to test the research model.Contribution: The study’s findings confirmed previous results and produced a new conceptual model for mobile commerce adoption and usage.Findings: Except for gender, perceived ease of use, and subjective norms that did not have specific effects on mobile commerce adoption, age, educational level, perceived usefulness, expertise, attitude, and behavioral intention showed significant effects. Recommendations for Practitioners: First of all, mobile commerce service providers should strategically pay critical attention to customer-centered factors that positively affect the adoption of mobile commerce innovations than focusing exclusively on technology-related issues. Mobile service providers can attract more users if they carefully consider promoting elements like perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use which directly or indirectly affect the individuals’ decision to adopt information technology from consumer perspectives.Second, mobile commerce service providers should strategically focus more on younger individuals since, per the research findings, they are more likely to adopt mobile commerce innovations than the older folks in Ghana.Third, service providers should also devise strategies to retain actual users of m-commerce by promoting elements like behavioral intentions and attitude, which according to the research findings, have a higher predictive power on actual usage of m-commerce. Recommendation for Researchers: The conceptual model developed can be employed by researchers worldwide to analyze technology acceptance research.Impact on Society: The study’s findings suggested that mobile commerce adoption could promote a cashless society that is convenient for making buying things quicker and easier. Future Research: The research sample size could be increased, and also the study could all sixteen regions in Ghana or any other country for a broader representation.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-02-24
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4921
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • The Extended TRA Model for the Assessment of Factors Driving
           Individuals’ Behavioral Intention to Use Cryptocurrency

    • Authors: Saad Alaklabi, Kyeong Kang
      Pages: 125 - 149
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the factors driving individuals’ behavioral intention to use cryptocurrency in Saudi Arabia using the extended TRA model. Background: Despite the great potential of cryptocurrencies and the exponential growth of cryptocurrency use throughout the world, scholarly research on this topic remained scarce. Whereas prior studies are mostly done in developed countries or specific cultural contexts, limiting the generalizability of their results, they mainly used technology adoption models that cannot fully explain the acceptance of new technology involved with financial transactions such as cryptocurrency and provided contradictory evidence. Entire regions have been excluded from the research on this topic, including Saudi Arabia which has a high potential to increase the volume of cryptocurrency use. Methodology: This study extends the theory of reasoned action (TRA) with the factors from technology adoption models that proved relevant for this topic, namely perceived usefulness, perceived enjoyment, perceived innovativeness, and perceived risk with three sub-factors: security, financial, and privacy risk. Data are collected using a quantitative research methodology from 181 respondents residing in Saudi Arabia and then analyzed by several methods, including exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation modeling (SEM). Contribution: This study contributes to the scientific knowledge by extending the TRA model with a range of factors from the technology adoption field, thus enabling the analysis of this topic from human, financial, and technology perspectives and providing additional empirical evidence on the factors that previously either provided contradictory evidence or were not explored in this field. This research also provides the first empirical data on this topic in Saudi Arabia and enables further research on the topic and a comparison of the results. The study also contributes to practice by enhancing the actual understanding of the phenomena and providing valuable information and recommendations for governments, investors, merchants, developers, and the general population. Findings: The study found attitude, subjective norm, perceived usefulness, perceived enjoyment, personal innovativeness, privacy risk, and financial risk as significant predictors of the intention to use cryptocurrencies, whereas the influence of security risk was not found to be significant in Saudi Arabia. Recommendations for Practitioners: Using this study’s results, governments can create appropriate legal frameworks, developers can design fewer complex platforms, and merchants may create appropriate campaigns that emphasize the benefits of cryptocurrency use and transpire trust in cryptocurrency transactions by enhancing the factors with a positive impact, such as usefulness, enjoyment, and personal innovativeness while reducing concerns of potential users regarding the risky factors. By promoting a positive user experience, they can also improve attitudes and social norms towards cryptocurrencies, thus further stimulating the interest in their use. Recommendation for Researchers: As this study validated the influence of factors from technology, financial, and human-related fields, researchers may follow this approach to ensure a comprehensive analysis of this complex topic, especially as privacy risk was never examined in this context, while personal innovativeness, perceived enjoyment, financial, and security risk were explored in just a few studies. It is also recommended that researchers explore the impact of each part of subjective norms: social media, friends, and family, as well as how information on the benefits of cryptocurrencies affects the perception of the factors included. Impact on Society: Understanding the factors affecting cryptocurrency use can help utilize the full potential of cryptocurrencies, especially their benefits for developing countries reflected in safe, speedy, and low-cost financial transactions with no need for an intermediary. The research model of this study could also be used to investigate this topic in other contexts to discover similarities and differences, as well as to investigate other information systems.Future Research: Future studies should test this research model in similar and different contexts to determine whether its validity and study results depend on cultural and contextual factors. They can also include different or additional variables, or use mixed methods, as interviews would augment the comprehension of this topic. Future studies may also explore whether the impact of variables would remain the same if circumstances changed or use cases expanded, and how the preferences of the target population would change within a longitudinal time frame.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4948
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • The International Case for Micro-Credentials for Life-Wide And Life-Long
           Learning: A Systematic Literature Review

    • Authors: Nkosikhona T Msweli, Hossana Twinomurinzi, Mymoena Ismail (was Sharif)
      Pages: 151 - 190
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: Systematic literature reviews seek to locate all studies that contain material of relevance to a research question and to synthesize the relevant outcomes of those studies. The primary aim of this paper was to synthesize both research and practice reports on micro-credentials (MCRs).Background: There has been an increase in reports and research on the plausibility of MCRs to support dynamic human skills development for an increasingly impatient and rapidly changing digital world. The integration of fast-paced emerging technologies and digitalization necessitate alternative learning paradigms. MCRs offer time, financial, and space flexibility and can be stacked into a larger qualification, thereby allowing for a broader range of transdisciplinary competencies within a qualification. However, MCRs often lack the academic rigor required for accreditation within existing disciplines.Methodology: The study followed the PRISMA framework (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta Analyses), which offers a rigorous method to enhance reporting quality. The study used both academic research and practice reports.Contribution: The paper makes a theoretical contribution to the discourse about the need for innovation within existing educational paradigms for continued relevance in a changing world. It also contributes to the debate on the role of MCRs in bridging the gap between practice and academia despite the growing difference between their interests, and the role that MCRs play in the social-economic plans of countries.Findings: The key findings are that investments in MCRs are mainly in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and Education sectors, and have taken place mainly in high-income countries and regions – contexts that particularly value practice-accredited MCRs. Low-income countries, by contrast, remain traditional and insist on MCRs that are formally accredited by a recognized academic institution. This contributes to a widening skills gap between low- and high-income countries or regions, which results in greater global disparities. There is also a growing divide between academia and practice concerning their interest in MCRs (a reflection of the rigor versus relevance debate), which partially explains why many global and larger organizations have gone on to create their own learning institutions.Recommendations for Practitioners: We recommend that educational mechanisms consider the critical importance of MCRs as part of innovative efforts for life-wide (different sectors) and life-long (same sector) learning, especially in low-income countries. MCRs provide dynamic mechanisms to fill skills gaps in an increasing ruthless international battle for talent.Recommendation for Researchers: We recommend focused research into skills and career pathways using MCRs while at the same time remaining responsive to transdisciplinary efforts and sensitive to global and local changes within any sector.Impact on Society: Work and society have transformed over time, and more so in the new digital age, yet academia has been slow in adapting to the changes, forcing organizations to create their own learning institutions or to use MCRs to fill the skills gap. The purpose of education goes beyond preparing individuals for work, extending further to creating an environment where individuals and governments seek their own social and economic outcomes. MCRs provide a flexible means for co-creation between individuals, education, organizations, and government that could stem global rising unemployment, social exclusion, and redundancy.Future Research: Future research should focus on the co-creation of MCRs between practitioners and academia.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-05-01
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4954
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • BITCOIN: An Exploratory Study Investigating Adoption in South Africa

    • Authors: Raphael W Jankeeparsad, Devi Datt Tewari
      Pages: 191 - 214
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This paper identified and explored the factors influencing Bitcoin adoption and use in South Africa.Background: Since its introduction in 2008, the value and popularity of Bitcoin has risen exponentially. Captivating the eyes of the world, from regulators to economists, Bitcoin promises to revolutionize the digital currency space. Despite being over 10 years old, the concept of cryptocurrency is fairly new in South Africa, a developing country. South African’s interest in Bitcoin continues to grow with the country constantly ranking within the top 10 in online searches for “Bitcoin” and “cryptocurrency” on Google. The primary objective of this research was to identify adoption factors amongst South African citizens, an area that has not received much research focus in the past. In addition to this, the study aimed to identify how Bitcoin is primarily used in South Africa.Methodology: A survey-based questionnaire was utilized to obtain responses from adopters of Bitcoin in South Africa. The quantitative survey was completed by 204 respondents.Contribution: This research contributes to the body of knowledge relating to Bitcoin adoption, specifically from a developing country. Adoption factors are identified that can be utilized by businesses that intend to adopt cryptocurrency, to strategically prepare for the potential risks or opportunities brought about by Bitcoin and cryptocurrency in general.Findings: The findings of this study indicate that while perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, subjective norms, and facilitating conditions positively influence intention to adopt Bitcoin, trust was the only construct that is statistically significant and hence is the greatest driver of adoption in South Africa. In terms of its primary use in South Africa, the study revealed that Bitcoin is used as a speculative instrument for short-term trading in South Africa followed by being used as a long-term investment in the crypto-asset class. No respondent indicated that they utilize Bitcoin as a payment method in South Africa.Recommendations for Practitioners: When developing crypto-based investment products, custodians of assets must ensure that a minimum-security protocol is followed to safeguard these assets. This will enhance the trust that potential investors and customers have in their systems and products. Recommendation for Researchers: This study focused on adoption factors for South African citizens. Future studies should be conducted to identify adoption factors by businesses in South Africa.Impact on Society: Bitcoin offers an alternate trading instrument and investment option, with the possibility of large gains over a relatively short period. Bitcoin also presents the possibility of cross-border transactions at a significantly lower cost compared to traditional cross-border transfers of funds.Future Research: Studies should be conducted to explore the factors influencing the adoption of altcoins to determine if the technological differences influence the adoption of one currency over the other. Research should also be conducted comparing the taxation of cryptocurrency in various countries around the world.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-05-20
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4947
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • The Effect of Perceived Support on Repatriate Knowledge Transfer in MNCs:
           The Mediating Role of Repatriate Adjustment

    • Authors: Anam Aslam, Aamir Aslam, Sunayana Kumar
      Pages: 215 - 234
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: The present study examines the effect of perceived organisational and co-worker support on the adjustment of repatriates and its impact on their intention to transfer knowledge in multinational companies (MNCs). It also examines the relationship between perceived organisational support, co-worker support, and knowledge transfer through the mediating role of repatriate adjustment.Background: The ability of acquiring and utilising international knowledge is one of the core competitive advantages of MNCs. This knowledge is transferred by MNCs across their subsidiaries efficiently through repatriates, which will result in superior performance when compared to their local competitors. But in MNCs the expatriation process has been given more emphasis than the repatriation process; therefore, there is limited knowledge about repatriation knowledge transfer. Practically, the knowledge transferred by repatriates is not managed properly by the MNCs.Methodology: The proposed model was supported by Uncertainty Reduction Theory, Organisational Socialisation Theory, Organisational Support Theory, and Socialisation Resource Theory. The data were gathered from 246 repatriates working in Indian MNCs in the manufacturing and information technology sectors who had been on an international assignment for at least one year. The data obtained were analysed using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) using AMOS 21 software.Contribution: The present study expands prior research on repatriate knowledge transfer by empirically investigating the mediating role of repatriate adjustment between perceived support and repatriate knowledge transfer in MNCs. The present study also highlights that organisational and co-worker support during repatriation is beneficial for repatriate knowledge transfer. It is important that MNCs initiate support practices during repatriation to motivate repatriates to transfer international knowledge.Findings: The results revealed that both perceived organisational and co-worker support had a significant role in predicting repatriate adjustment in MNCs. Furthermore, the results also revealed that perceived organisational and co-worker support increases repatriate knowledge transfer through repatriate adjustment in MNCs.Recommendations for Practitioners: This study indicates the role of management in motivating repatriates to transfer their knowledge to the organisation. The management of MNCs develop HR policies and strategies leading to high perceived organisational support, co-worker support, and repatriate adjustment. They need to pay particular attention to the factors that affect the repatriates’ intention to share knowledge with others in the organisation.Recommendation for Researchers: Researchers can use the validated measurement instrument which could be essential for the advancement of future empirical research on repatriate knowledge transfer. Impact on Society: The present study will assist MNCs in managing their repatriates during the repatriation process by developing an appropriate repatriation support system. This will help the repatriates to better adjust to their repatriation process which will motivate them to transfer the acquired knowledge.Future Research: Future research can adopt a longitudinal style to test the different levels of the adjustment process which will help in better understanding the repatriate adjustment process. Additionally, this model can be tested with the repatriates of other countries and in diverse cultures to confirm its external validity. Furthermore, future research can be done with the repatriates who go on an international assignment through their own initiative (self-initiated expatriates).
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-05-26
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4979
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Human Resource Management and Humanitarian Operations Performance: A Case
           Study of Humanitarian Organizations in Malaysia

    • Authors: Nasruddin Hassan, Mazlan Hassan, Haslinda Hashim, Zeti Suzila Mat Jusoh
      Pages: 235 - 258
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This research aims to analyze the effect of human resource management on humanitarian operations performance, using humanitarian organizations in Malaysia as a case.Background: Humanitarian organizations need to develop and continue effective on-the-job human resource management, such as training and development and managing employee performance to enhance the performance of their humanitarian operations.Methodology: The sampling technique that was conducted is probability sampling. In particular, the technique is called stratified sampling. This technique is chosen because it is involving the division of a population into a smaller group, called “strata”. The questionnaire survey was distributed to humanitarian organizations in Malaysia to collect research data, and PLS-SEM analysis was conducted to validate the conceptual model.Contribution: This research focuses on the effect of human resource management on humanitarian operations performance in humanitarian organizations with consistent training to ensure successful humanitarian operations. Findings: The results of PLS-SEM analysis confirmed that Training and Employee Development, Recruitment and Employee Selection, and Communicative Management Style are significantly correlated with humanitarian operations performance, giving 75.7% variations which means that these human resource management are critical factors for increasing humanitarian operations performance in Malaysian humanitarian organizations.Recommendations for Practitioners: This research will enhance humanitarian operations performance for humanitarian organizations, in-line policies outlined under the Malaysia National Security Council Directive No. 20, and benefit the field of disaster management.Recommendation for Researchers: This research can be used by the authorized individual involved in humanitarian operations to satisfy the needs of the victims, which ultimately contributes to the performance of these humanitarian organizations.Impact on Society: This research highlighted the human resource management that is vital for humanitarian organizations, which will increase humanitarian operations performance in an organization.Future Research: This study is conducted in the context of humanitarian organizations in Malaysia. It is unclear whether the key findings of this study can be generalized. Therefore, it is suggested that, in future research, the current research model should be extended to include different countries for validation.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4972
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Drivers of the Consumers Adoption of Fintech Services

    • Authors: Heba Alhajjaj, Alaeddin Mohammad Khalaf Ahmad
      Pages: 259 - 285
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This study aimed to explore the impact of environmental drivers and trust on consumers’ adoption of Fintech services in the Jordanian context. It had also evaluated the mediating role of trust on the relation between environmental drivers and consumers adoption of Fintech services.Background: The reviewed studies on Fintech adoption demonstrated a lack of focus on the role of external or environmental drivers on consumers’ intentions to use and continue to use of Fintech services. Amongst the analyzed studies, the majority had examined the role of consumers perception of services usefulness and ease of use while few had included some environmental variables within the investigated variables such as social influence and government support. Furthermore, shortage of Fintech adoption related research in the developing countries, especially the Jordanian context was noted. Methodology: The study conceptual model was derived from Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) and Technological Personal Environmental (TPE) framework. This study was a quantitative one that employed survey method to empirically address its research questions and test the proposed hypotheses. Jordanian residents over the age of 18 who are familiar with Fintech were targeted, and convenience sampling was applied to get representative sample. Data was assembled from 323 respondents using an online questionnaire. Partial Least Squares Structure Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) was applied to analyze the gathered data through SMART-PLS software.Contribution: This article adds to the existing literature on multiple stands, as it adds to literature related to Fintech adoption, as well as the interaction between consumer environment and their level of adoption. It also enriches the limited literature on the influence of COVID-19 to drive consumer usage of innovative services. Moreover, it supplements the scarce literature on Fintech adoption in the Jordanian settings.Findings: The main findings revealed the positive influence of both environmental drivers and trust as predictors of consumer intention to use Fintech services. It had also asserted the positive mediating effect of trust on the relationship amongst environmental drivers and consumer usage intent. Recommendations for Practitioners: By understanding the importance of consumer environment and trust on encouraging consumer to adopt Fintech services, governments, policy makers and practitioners can utilize this knowledge to adopt their offered services. They need to work on enhancing the technological infrastructure, as well as establishing general technological knowledge. They also need to highlight the role of Fintech service in fighting Covid-19, by adhering to the social distancing rules. Moreover, they need to guarantee the security and reliability of the developed services to increase their level of trust in the offered services.Recommendation for Researchers: This research has confirmed the positive influence of consumer environment represented by social influence, government support, technological readiness, and COVID-19 on their adoption of Fintech services. It has also established the mediating influence of consumer trust on the relation between environmental drivers and consumer intent to use Fintech services. This area is unexplored and needs more validation.Impact on Society: By understanding the factors affecting the Jordanian society in adopting Fintech services, this research provides set of recommendation to the Jordanian government and policy makers that can lead for more adoption of the developed Fintech services, which in turn would lead to better services provided to the society as well as increasing the financial inclusion level in the Jordanian society.Future Research: Future research can explore other environmental variables that were not included in the current research. Future research can also investigate the moderating effect of personal attributes such as consumer’s demographics, or more personal attributes such as self-efficacy, inherit innovativeness or risk aversion. It can also examine the moderating effect of financial literacy and/ or technological background.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-06-06
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4971
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Adoption of Mobile Commerce and Mobile Payments in Ghana: An Examination
           of Factors Influencing Public Servants

    • Authors: Isaac Asampana, Albert Akanlisikum Akanferi, Hannah Ayaba Tanye, Akwetey Henry Matey
      Pages: 287 - 313
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: Mobile commerce adoption is low in developing countries; hence, public servants may not consider mobile commerce and mobile payments. Understanding the factors that influence mobile commerce and mobile payments in their context will aid in promoting those services.Background: The study investigates the factors that influence public servants’ mobile commerce and mobile payments in Ghana. Hence, it provides some understanding of the various aspects of mobile commerce and mobile payments adoption, such as acceptance, use, and eventual adoption into the user’s daily life, and how that affects their behaviour.Methodology: The research was conducted by surveying the factors influencing public servants’ adoption of mobile commerce and payments in Ghana. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken to put the research model to the test to measure the constructs and their relationships.Contribution: The study confirmed previous findings and created a new conceptual model for mobile commerce and mobile payment adoption and usage in the Ghanaian context.Findings: The variables of performance expectancy, trust, and facilitating conditions have a significant positive influence on behavioural intention. The factors of effort expectation and social influence have a significant negative impact. Price value and perceived reliability are latent variables that do not affect behavioural intention. Behavioural intention and facilitating conditions significantly influence the actual use behaviour of mobile commerce and mobile payment users.Recommendations for Practitioners: Mobile commerce is emerging as a new mode of transactions, with firms providing enabling platforms for users. Mobile commerce could become the most acceptable application for the next generation of mobile platform applications. This study offers insights into the fluidity of the mobile environment, with implications that spell out what will be effective mobile commerce services that will continue to be relevant.Mobile applications are attractive to people because they provide a better user experience. These mobile applications have been optimised to provide a fast, easy and delightful experience. Mobile commerce and mobile payment service providers can attract and retain more users if attention is paid to performance expectancy, trust, and facilitating conditions since they influence individuals’ decisions to adopt.Mobile technology is almost ubiquitous, influencing both online sales and in-store sales. With the right mobile commerce platform and features, businesses can expect to increase in-store and online sales, catering to a more extensive clientele. Mobile devices are the primary means that most customers use to look up information about products they see in stores, such as product reviews and pricing options. This study indicates that mobile commerce service providers can achieve a more extensive customer base by promoting performance expectancy, trust, and behavioural intentions.Recommendation for Researchers: Despite the numerous studies in the mobile commerce literature, few have used integrated models of perceived reliability, trust, and price value or methods to evaluate these factors in the emerging mobile commerce industry. Also, it combines mobile commerce and mobile payments, which very few that we know of have done.Impact on Society: Ghana is already in a cash-lite economy. Thus, the study is appropriate with the result of trust being a significant factor. It implies that people will begin using mobile commerce and mobile payments with a bit of drive to bring about this drive quickly.Future Research: Future research could further test the adapted model with moderating factors of age, gender, and education to delve deeper into the complexities of mobile commerce and mobile payments.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-06-25
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4981
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • Traits Contributing to the Promotion of the Individual’s Continuance
           Usage Intention and Perceived Value of M-University Services

    • Authors: Ashraf Ahmed Fadelelmoula
      Pages: 315 - 338
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: This study aims to examine the roles of key traits of m-university services and their users in promoting two crucial post-adoption outcomes of these services; namely, continuance usage intention and perceived value.Background: M-university (i.e., a university providing services via mobile technologies) has gained a great interest in the higher education sector as a driver of new business models and innovative service offerings. However, its assessment has been greatly overlooked, especially in evaluating the factors that drive the stakeholders’ continuance intention to use it and the determinants of its post-adoption perceived value. Consequently, research efforts undertaking such assessment facets empirically are highly required.Methodology: An integrated research model that enables such assessment was developed and evaluated using a quantitative research methodology. Accordingly, data were collected using a formulated closed-ended survey questionnaire. The target population consisted of the academic staff of a Saudi public university that has witnessed an extensive adoption of m-university services. The obtained data (i.e., 207 fully completed responses) were evaluated using the structural equation modeling approach.Contribution: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that gains the chance to provide the research community and m-service providers with new knowledge and understanding about the predictors that drive the continuance usage intention and value of m-university services.Findings: The findings showed that all of the examined traits of m-university services and their users (i.e., reliability, usability, customization, self-efficacy, and involvement) are having positive roles in promoting the continuance intention to use these services, while only two traits (i.e., reliability and involvement) contribute significantly to augmenting the perceived value.Recommendations for Practitioners: The study recommends developing effective design and implementation specifications that strengthen the contributions of the examined traits in the post-adoption stage of m-university services.Recommendation for Researchers: Further studies should be devoted to addressing the notable need to assess the factors influencing the adoption of m-university services, as well as to explore which ones are having significant roles in the attainment of post-adoption outcomes.Impact on Society: The empirical insights provided by the present study are essential for both university stakeholders and mobile service providers in their endeavors to improve the key aspects of the anticipated post-adoption outcomes of the provided services. Future Research: Further empirical investigations are needed to examine the roles of more m-university services and user traits in achieving a broad range of post-adoption outcomes of such services.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 17 (2022)
      PubDate: 2022-06-25
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4984
      Issue No: Vol. 17 (2022)
       
  • A Knowledge Transfer Perspective on Front/Back-Office Structure and New
           Service Development Performance: An Empirical Study of Retail Banking in
           China

    • Authors: Qiubo Huang, Qing Xia, Rukmal Nishantha Weerasinghe
      Pages: 505 - 527
      Abstract: Aim/Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism of the front/back-office structure affecting new service development (NSD) performance and examine the role of knowledge transfer in the relationship between front/back-office structure and NSD. Background: The separation of front and back-office has become the prevailing trend of the organizational transformation of modern service enterprises in the digital era. Yet, the influence of front and back-office separation dealing with new service development has not been widely researched. Methodology: Building on the internal social capital perspective, a multivariate regression analysis was conducted to investigate the impact of front/back-office structure on the NSD performance through knowledge transfer as an intermediate variable. The data was collected through a survey questionnaire from 198 project-level officers in the commercial banking industry of China. Contribution: This study advances the understanding of front/back-office structure’s influence mechanism on new service development activity. It reveals that knowledge transfer plays a critical role in bridging the impact of front and back-office separation to NSD performance under the trend of digitalization of service organizations. Findings: This study verified the positive effects of front/back-office social capital on NSD performance. Moreover, knowledge transfer predicted the variation in NSD performance and fully mediated the effect of front/back-office social capital on NSD performance. Recommendations for Practitioners: Service organizations should optimize knowledge transfer by promoting the social capital between front and back-office to overcome the negative effect organizational separation brings to NSD. Service and other organizations could explore developing an internal social network management platform, by which the internal social network could be visualized and dynamically managed.Recommendation for Researchers: The introduction of information and communications technology not only divides the organization into front and back-office, but also reduces the face-to-face customer contact. The impacts of new forms of customer contact to new service development and knowledge transfer between customer and service organizations call for further research. Along with the digital servitization, some manufacturing organizations also separate front and back-offices. The current model can be applied and assessed further in manufacturing and other service sectors.Impact on Society: The conclusion of this study guides us to pay attention to the construction of social capital inside organizations with front/back-office structure and implicates introducing and developing sociotechnical theory in front/back-office issue undergoing technological revolution.Future Research: As this study is based on the retail banking industry, similar studies are called upon in other service sectors to identify differences and draw more general conclusions. In addition, as the front and back-offices are being replaced increasingly by information technology such as artificial intelligence (AI), it is necessary to advance the research on front/back-office research with a new theoretical perspective, such as sociotechnical theory.
      Citation: IJIKM, Volume 16 (2021)
      PubDate: 2022-01-07
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/4895
      Issue No: Vol. 16 (2022)
       
  • An Examination of Home Internet and Mobile Device Use in the U.S.
    • An Examination of Home Internet and Mobile Device Use in the U.S.

      Authors: James N. Morgan, Sury Ravindran

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1935
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Mise en Scène: A Film Scholarship Augmented Reality Mobile
           Application
    • Mise en Scène: A Film Scholarship Augmented Reality Mobile Application

      Authors: Joseph T. Chao, Tanxin Du, Christopher Wagenheim, Theodore Rippey

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1936
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • The Survey of Information Systems in Public Administration in Poland
    • The Survey of Information Systems in Public Administration in Poland

      Authors: Ewa Ziemba, Iwona Obłąk

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1939
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • The Generalized Requirement Approach for Requirement Validation with
           Automatically Generated Program Code
    • The Generalized Requirement Approach for Requirement Validation with Automatically Generated Program Code

      Authors: Aleksandar Bulajic, Radoslav Stojic, Samuel Sambasivam

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1946
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • A Comparison of International Information Security Regulations
    • A Comparison of International Information Security Regulations

      Authors: Joseph Johnson, Susan J. Lincke, Ralf Imhof, Charles Lim

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1963
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • The Impact of Business Intelligence on Healthcare Delivery in the USA
    • The Impact of Business Intelligence on Healthcare Delivery in the USA

      Authors: Noushin Ashrafi, Lori Kelleher, Jean-Pierre Kuilboer

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1993
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Interaction and Innovation - Reframing Innovation Activities for a Matrix
           Organization
    • Interaction and Innovation - Reframing Innovation Activities for a Matrix Organization

      Authors: Martti Mäkimattila, Minna Saunila, Juho Salminen

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2023
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Social Capital and Knowledge Transfer in New Service Development: The
           Front/Back Office Perspective
    • Social Capital and Knowledge Transfer in New Service Development: The Front/Back Office Perspective

      Authors: Jing-Hua Li, Qui-Bo Huang, Li Lin

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2073
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • A Knowledge Integration Methodology for Developing Customized Maintenance
           Documents
    • A Knowledge Integration Methodology for Developing Customized Maintenance Documents

      Authors: Ying Huang, Xingjun Wang, Mickaël Gardoni, Coulibaly Amadou

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 9 (2014)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/2080
      Issue No: Vol. 9
       
  • Critical Success Factors for ERP Systems Implementation in Public
           Administration
    • Critical Success Factors for ERP Systems Implementation in Public Administration

      Authors: Ewa Ziemba, Iwona Obłąk

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1785
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Boosting Creativity with Transformational Leadership in Fuzzy Front-end
           Innovation Processes
    • Boosting Creativity with Transformational Leadership in Fuzzy Front-end Innovation Processes

      Authors: Mirva Hyypiä, Satu Parjanen

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1786
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • The Influence of User Efficacy and Expectation on Actual System Use
    • The Influence of User Efficacy and Expectation on Actual System Use

      Authors: Olusola I. Akinbobola, Akinniyi A. Adeleke

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1892
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Evaluating and Developing Innovation Capabilities with a Structured Method
    • Evaluating and Developing Innovation Capabilities with a Structured Method

      Authors: Anna-Maija Nisula, Aino Kianto

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1902
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • The Effects of Knowledge Sharing and Absorption on Organizational
           Innovation Performance – A Dynamic Capabilities Perspective
    • The Effects of Knowledge Sharing and Absorption on Organizational Innovation Performance – A Dynamic Capabilities Perspective

      Authors: Fan-Yun Pai, Hung-Fan Chang

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1904
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Environmental Knowledge Management of Finnish Food and Drink Companies in
           Eco-Efficiency and Waste Management
    • Environmental Knowledge Management of Finnish Food and Drink Companies in Eco-Efficiency and Waste Management

      Authors: Momir Beljić, Virgilio Panapanaan, Lassi Linnanen, Tuomo Uotila

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 8 (2013)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1924
      Issue No: Vol. 8
       
  • Determinants of Intent to Continue Using Online Learning: A Tale of Two
           Universities
    • Determinants of Intent to Continue Using Online Learning: A Tale of Two Universities

      Authors: Tantatape Brahmasrene, Jung-Wan Lee

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1548
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Locating the Weak Points of Innovation Capability before Launching a
           Development Project
    • Locating the Weak Points of Innovation Capability before Launching a Development Project

      Authors: Anne Kallio, Paula Kujansivu, Satu Parjanen

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1563
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Social Networking, Teaching, and Learning: Introduction to Special Section
           on Social Networking, Teaching, and Learning (SNTL)
    • Social Networking, Teaching, and Learning: Introduction to Special Section on Social Networking, Teaching, and Learning (SNTL)

      Authors: Jelena Jovanovic, Raymond Chiong, Thomas Weise

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1576
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • (SNTL #1) Costs and Benefits of Facebook for Undergraduate Students
    • (SNTL #1) Costs and Benefits of Facebook for Undergraduate Students

      Authors: Ruti Gafni , Moran Deri

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1577
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • (SNTL #2) Social Networking in Undergraduate Education
    • (SNTL #2) Social Networking in Undergraduate Education

      Authors: Nicole A. Buzzetto-More

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1578
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • (SNTL #3) Design and Implementation Challenges to an Interactive Social
           Media Based Learning Environment
    • (SNTL #3) Design and Implementation Challenges to an Interactive Social Media Based Learning Environment

      Authors: Glen Hordemann, Joseph T. Chao

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1579
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Experiencing Creativity in the Organization: From Individual Creativity to
           Collective Creativity
    • Experiencing Creativity in the Organization: From Individual Creativity to Collective Creativity

      Authors: Satu Parjanen

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1580
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Critical Success Factors for Implementing Business Intelligence Systems in
           Small and Medium Enterprises on the Example of Upper Silesia, Poland
    • Critical Success Factors for Implementing Business Intelligence Systems in Small and Medium Enterprises on the Example of Upper Silesia, Poland

      Authors: Celina M. Olszak, Ewa Ziemba

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1584
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Text-Based Collaborative Work and Innovation: Effects of Communication
           Media Affordances on Divergent and Convergent Thinking in Group-Based
           Problem-Solving
    • Text-Based Collaborative Work and Innovation: Effects of Communication Media Affordances on Divergent and Convergent Thinking in Group-Based Problem-Solving

      Authors: Leif Jarle Gressgård

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1713
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Barriers to the Effective Deployment of Information Assets: An Executive
           Management Perspective
    • Barriers to the Effective Deployment of Information Assets: An Executive Management Perspective

      Authors: Nina Evans, James Price

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1721
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Introduction to the Special Section on Game-based Learning: Design and
           Applications (GbL)
    • Introduction to the Special Section on Game-based Learning: Design and Applications (GbL)

      Authors: Jelena Jovanovic, Raymond Chiong

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1747
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • (GbL #1) Life Skills Developed by Those Who Have Played in Video Game
           Tournaments
    • (GbL #1) Life Skills Developed by Those Who Have Played in Video Game Tournaments

      Authors: M. O. Thirunarayanan, Manuel Vilchez

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1748
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • (GbL #2) Constructive Simulation as a Collaborative Learning Tool in
           Education and Training of Crisis Staff
    • (GbL #2) Constructive Simulation as a Collaborative Learning Tool in Education and Training of Crisis Staff

      Authors: Goran Šimić

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1749
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • (GbL #3) Innovative Teaching Using Simulation and Virtual Environments
    • (GbL #3) Innovative Teaching Using Simulation and Virtual Environments

      Authors: Joseph Barjis, Ashish Gupta, Ramesh Sharda, Tatiana Bouzdine-Chameeva, Peggy D. Lee, Alexander Verbraeck

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 7 (2012)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1750
      Issue No: Vol. 7
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 6, 2011
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 6, 2011

      Authors:

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1338
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Socio-Technical Knowledge Management and Epistemological Paradigms:
           Theoretical Connections at the Individual and Organisational Level
    • Socio-Technical Knowledge Management and Epistemological Paradigms: Theoretical Connections at the Individual and Organisational Level

      Authors: Matthew Jelavic

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1337
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Relationship between Knowledge Management Process and Creativity among
           Faculty Members in the University
    • Relationship between Knowledge Management Process and Creativity among Faculty Members in the University

      Authors: Hamid Rahimi, Azizollah ArbabiSarjou , Sayeed Mohsen Allammeh , Razieh Aghababaei

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1360
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Knowledge Management Systems Development: Theory and Practice
    • Knowledge Management Systems Development: Theory and Practice

      Authors: Raafat George Saadé, Fassil Nebebe, Tak Mak

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1361
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Relational Algebra Programming With Microsoft Access Databases
    • Relational Algebra Programming With Microsoft Access Databases

      Authors: Kirby McMaster, Samuel Sambasivam, Nicole Anderson

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1365
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Empowering PowerPoint: Slides and Teaching Effectiveness
    • Empowering PowerPoint: Slides and Teaching Effectiveness

      Authors: Sabra E. Brock, Yogini Joglekar

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1366
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Using eTechnologies for Active Learning
    • Using eTechnologies for Active Learning

      Authors: Jo Coldwell, Annemieke Craig, Annegret Goold

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1367
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Second Time Lucky' A Tale of Two Systems
    • Second Time Lucky? A Tale of Two Systems

      Authors: Hans Lehmann

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1370
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Pair Modeling with DynaLearn – Students’ Attitudes and Actual
           Effects
    • Pair Modeling with DynaLearn – Students’ Attitudes and Actual Effects

      Authors: Rachel Or-Bach, Bert Bredeweg

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1371
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Web Usage Association Rule Mining System
    • Web Usage Association Rule Mining System

      Authors: Maja Dimitrijevic, Zita Bošnjak

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1372
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • A Guide for Novice Researchers on Experimental and Quasi-Experimental
           Studies in Information Systems Research
    • A Guide for Novice Researchers on Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Studies in Information Systems Research

      Authors: Yair Levy, Timothy J. Ellis

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1373
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Assessment of Risk of Misinforming: Dynamic Measures
    • Assessment of Risk of Misinforming: Dynamic Measures

      Authors: Dimitar Christozov, Stefanka Chukova, Plamen Mateev

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1374
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Back to Basics of Informing: The INIS Principle
    • Back to Basics of Informing: The INIS Principle

      Authors: Bob Travica

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1375
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • The Use of ICT for Economic Development in the Silesian Region in Poland
    • The Use of ICT for Economic Development in the Silesian Region in Poland

      Authors: Celina M. Olszak, Ewa Ziemba

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1392
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Analysis of Explanatory and Predictive Architectures and the Relevance in
           Explaining the Adoption of IT in SMEs
    • Analysis of Explanatory and Predictive Architectures and the Relevance in Explaining the Adoption of IT in SMEs

      Authors: Ojiabo Ukoha, Hart Awa, Christen A. Nwuche, Ikechukwu Asiegbu

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1431
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Examining a Flow-Usage Model to Understand MultiMedia-Based Learning
    • Examining a Flow-Usage Model to Understand MultiMedia-Based Learning

      Authors: Raafat George Saadé, Serge Elgaly, Fassil Nebebe

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1495
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • A Return on Investment as a Metric for Evaluating Information Systems:
           Taxonomy and Application
    • A Return on Investment as a Metric for Evaluating Information Systems: Taxonomy and Application

      Authors: Alexei Botchkarev, Peter Andru

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 6 (2011)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1535
      Issue No: Vol. 6
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 5, 2010
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 5, 2010

      Authors:

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/712
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Collective Creativity and Brokerage Functions in Heavily Cross-Disciplined
           Innovation Processes
    • Collective Creativity and Brokerage Functions in Heavily Cross-Disciplined Innovation Processes

      Authors: Satu Parjanen, Vesa Harmaakorpi, Tapani Frantsi

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/713
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • The Reference List Formatter: An Object-Oriented Development Project
    • The Reference List Formatter: An Object-Oriented Development Project

      Authors: Kevin R. Parker

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1108
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Using Research Techniques to Teach Management of IT Concepts to
           Postgraduate Business Students
    • Using Research Techniques to Teach Management of IT Concepts to Postgraduate Business Students

      Authors: Stephen Burgess, G. Michael McGrath

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1120
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Assessment of Quality of Warranty Policy
    • Assessment of Quality of Warranty Policy

      Authors: Dimitar Christozov, Stefanka Chukova, Plamen Mateev

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1121
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • The Effect of Static Visual Instruction on Students’ Online
           Learning: A Pilot Study
    • The Effect of Static Visual Instruction on Students’ Online Learning: A Pilot Study

      Authors: Pao-Nan Chou, Hsi-Chi Hsiao

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1124
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Secure Software Engineering: A New Teaching Perspective Based on the
           SWEBOK
    • Secure Software Engineering: A New Teaching Perspective Based on the SWEBOK

      Authors: Manar Abu Talib, Adel Khelifi, Leon Jololian

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1125
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Simulation Modeling of an Iron Ore Operation to Enable Informed Planning
    • Simulation Modeling of an Iron Ore Operation to Enable Informed Planning

      Authors: J. E. Everett

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1126
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Time Management: Procrastination Tendency in Individual and Collaborative
           Tasks
    • Time Management: Procrastination Tendency in Individual and Collaborative Tasks

      Authors: Ruti Gafni , Nitza Geri

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1127
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Generativity: The New Frontier for Information and Communication
           Technology Literacy
    • Generativity: The New Frontier for Information and Communication Technology Literacy

      Authors: Jorge Pérez, Meg Coffin Murray

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1134
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Clickers in the Laboratory: Student Thoughts and Views
    • Clickers in the Laboratory: Student Thoughts and Views

      Authors: Kevin Johnson, Catherine Lillis

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1133
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Transaction Flow in Card Payment Systems Using Mobile Agents
    • Transaction Flow in Card Payment Systems Using Mobile Agents

      Authors: Olufunke R. Vincent, Olusegun Folorunso, Adio Taofiki Akinwale, Adebayo D. Akinde

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1153
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Factors Determining the Balance between Online and Face-to-Face Teaching:
           An Analysis using Actor-Network Theory
    • Factors Determining the Balance between Online and Face-to-Face Teaching: An Analysis using Actor-Network Theory

      Authors: Lily Wong, Arthur Tatnall

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1152
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • An Initiative to Address the Gender Imbalance in Tertiary IT Studies
    • An Initiative to Address the Gender Imbalance in Tertiary IT Studies

      Authors: Annemieke Craig, Jo Coldwell

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1154
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Discovering Interesting Association Rules in the Web Log Usage Data
    • Discovering Interesting Association Rules in the Web Log Usage Data

      Authors: Maja Dimitrijevi?, Zita Bošnjak

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1159
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Can We Help Information Systems Students Improve Their Ethical Decision
           Making'
    • Can We Help Information Systems Students Improve Their Ethical Decision Making?

      Authors: Theda Thomas, Mary Ahyick

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1160
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Adaptive Innovation and a MOODLE-based VLE to Support a Fully Online MSc
           Business Information Technology (BIT) at the University of East London
           (UEL)
    • Adaptive Innovation and a MOODLE-based VLE to Support a Fully Online MSc Business Information Technology (BIT) at the University of East London (UEL)

      Authors: Anastasis Petrou

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1161
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Interest in ICT Studies and Careers: Perspectives of Secondary School
           Female Students from Low Socioeconomic Backgrounds
    • Interest in ICT Studies and Careers: Perspectives of Secondary School Female Students from Low Socioeconomic Backgrounds

      Authors: Iwona Miliszewska , Ewa Sztendur

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1162
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Designing a Self-Assessment Item Repository: An Authentic Project in
           Higher Education
    • Designing a Self-Assessment Item Repository: An Authentic Project in Higher Education

      Authors: Dorothy Langley, Miki Ronen

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1169
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Development and Testing of a Graphical FORTRAN Learning Tool for Novice
           Programmers
    • Development and Testing of a Graphical FORTRAN Learning Tool for Novice Programmers

      Authors: Anuoluwapo Ajayi, Emmanuel A. Olajubu, D. F. Ninan, S. A. Akinboro, H. Abimbola Soriyan

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1176
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Egocentric Database Operations for Social and Economic Network Analysis
    • Egocentric Database Operations for Social and Economic Network Analysis

      Authors: Adio Taofiki Akinwale, Adekoya Felix Adebayo, S. Adebukola Onashoga

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1177
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Understanding ICT Based Advantages: A Techno Savvy Case Study
    • Understanding ICT Based Advantages: A Techno Savvy Case Study

      Authors: Karyn Rastrick, James Corner

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1187
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • The Relationship among Organizational Knowledge Sharing Practices,
           Employees' Learning Commitments, Employees' Adaptability, and
           Employees' Job Satisfaction: An Empirical Investigation
    • The Relationship among Organizational Knowledge Sharing Practices, Employees' Learning Commitments, Employees' Adaptability, and Employees' Job Satisfaction: An Empirical Investigation

      Authors: Soud Almahamid, Arthur C. McAdams, Taher Kalaldeh

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1225
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Information Quality and Absorptive Capacity in Service and Product
           Innovation Processes
    • Information Quality and Absorptive Capacity in Service and Product Innovation Processes

      Authors: Helinä Melkas, Tuomo Uotila, Anne Kallio

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1293
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Pedagogy for Mobile ICT Learning Using Video-Conferencing Technology
    • Pedagogy for Mobile ICT Learning Using Video-Conferencing Technology

      Authors: Dragana Martinovic, Timothy Pugh, Jelena Magliaro

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1307
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • User Acceptance of the E-Government Services in Malaysia: Structural
           Equation Modelling Approach
    • User Acceptance of the E-Government Services in Malaysia: Structural Equation Modelling Approach

      Authors: Norazah Mohd Suki, T Ramayah

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 5 (2010)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/1308
      Issue No: Vol. 5
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 4, 2009
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 4, 2009

      Authors:

      IJIKM, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/638
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • Discovering a Decision Maker’s Mental Model with Instance-Based
           Cognitive Mining:
    • Discovering a Decision Maker’s Mental Model with Instance-Based Cognitive Mining:

      Authors: David M. Steiger, Natalie M. Steiger

      IJIKM, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/61
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • Decision Making for Predictive Maintenance in Asset Information Management
    • Decision Making for Predictive Maintenance in Asset Information Management

      Authors: R. B. Faiz, Eran A. Edirisinghe

      IJIKM, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/696
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • Ontology-based Collaborative Inter-organizational Knowledge Management
           Network
    • Ontology-based Collaborative Inter-organizational Knowledge Management Network

      Authors: Nelson K. Y. Leung, Seung Hwan Kang, Sim Kim Lau, Joshua Fan

      IJIKM, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/699
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • An Improved SMS User Interface Result Checking System
    • An Improved SMS User Interface Result Checking System

      Authors: Oludele Awodele, Emmanuel Rotimi Adagunodo, Adio Taofiki Akinwale, Sunday Idowu, M. Agbaje

      IJIKM, Volume 4 (2009). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 4 (2009)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/700
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 3, 2008
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 3, 2008

      Authors:

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/639
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Multi-Agent System for Knowledge-Based Access to Distributed Databases
    • Multi-Agent System for Knowledge-Based Access to Distributed Databases

      Authors: Priti Srinivas Sajja

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/86
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • A Guided Approach for Personalized Information Search and Visualization
    • A Guided Approach for Personalized Information Search and Visualization

      Authors: Wei-Bang Chen, Yufeng Li, Seng-Jaw Soong, Dongquan Chen

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/87
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Framework for Quality Metrics in Mobile-Wireless Information Systems
    • Framework for Quality Metrics in Mobile-Wireless Information Systems

      Authors: Ruti Gafni

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/88
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • An Integrated ICT Management Framework for Commercial Banking
           Organisations
    • An Integrated ICT Management Framework for Commercial Banking Organisations

      Authors: Simon Mukenge Tshinu, Gerrit Botha, Marlien Herselman

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/89
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Performance Attributions: A Cross Cultural Study Comparing Singapore,
           Japan and US Companies
    • Performance Attributions: A Cross Cultural Study Comparing Singapore, Japan and US Companies

      Authors: Hendrik Halim, Irene Keng Howe Chew

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/90
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Improving Security for SCADA Control Systems
    • Improving Security for SCADA Control Systems

      Authors: Mariana Hentea

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/91
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Knowledge Production in Networked Practice-based Innovation Processes –
           Interrogative Model as a Methodological Approach
    • Knowledge Production in Networked Practice-based Innovation Processes – Interrogative Model as a Methodological Approach

      Authors: Vesa Harmaakorpi, Arto Mutanen

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/92
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • From Tailored Databases to Wikis: Using Emerging Technologies to Work
           Together More Efficiently
    • From Tailored Databases to Wikis: Using Emerging Technologies to Work Together More Efficiently

      Authors: Amanda Regolini, Frédéric Berger, Emmanuelle Jannès-Ober, Luuk Dorren

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/93
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Designing an ‘Electronic Village’ of Local Interest on
           Tourism: The eKoNES Framework
    • Designing an ‘Electronic Village’ of Local Interest on Tourism: The eKoNES Framework

      Authors: Demosthenes Akoumianakis

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/94
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Expectancy Theory and Behavioral Intentions to Use Computer Applications
    • Expectancy Theory and Behavioral Intentions to Use Computer Applications

      Authors: Lori Baker-Eveleth, Robert W. Stone

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 3 (2008)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/95
      Issue No: Vol. 3
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 2, 2007
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 2, 2007

      Authors:

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/640
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Driving Creativity: Extending Knowledge Management into the Multinational
           Corporation
    • Driving Creativity: Extending Knowledge Management into the Multinational Corporation

      Authors: James W. Gabberty, Jennifer D. E. Thomas

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/96
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Information Retrieval Systems: A Human Centered Approach
    • Information Retrieval Systems: A Human Centered Approach

      Authors: Panagiotis Petratos

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/97
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Experiences in Building and Using Decision-Support Systems in Postgraduate
           University Courses
    • Experiences in Building and Using Decision-Support Systems in Postgraduate University Courses

      Authors: Arthur Tatnall , Stephen Burgess

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/98
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Towards Network Perspective of Intra-Organizational Learning: Bridging the
           Gap between Acquisition and Participation Perspective
    • Towards Network Perspective of Intra-Organizational Learning: Bridging the Gap between Acquisition and Participation Perspective

      Authors: Miha Škerlavaj, Vlado Dimovski

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/99
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • The Technology Ownership and Information Acquisition Habits of HBCU
           Freshmen
    • The Technology Ownership and Information Acquisition Habits of HBCU Freshmen

      Authors: Nicole A. Buzzetto-More , Retta Guy

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/100
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Criteria for the Evaluation of Business Process Simulation Tools
    • Criteria for the Evaluation of Business Process Simulation Tools

      Authors: Vesna Bosilj-Vuksic, Vlatko Ceric, Vlatka Hlupic

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/101
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Integrated Information Systems - A Challenge for Long-Term Digital
           Preservation
    • Integrated Information Systems - A Challenge for Long-Term Digital Preservation

      Authors: Viveca Asproth

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/102
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • An Evolutionary Software Project Management Maturity Model for Mauritius
    • An Evolutionary Software Project Management Maturity Model for Mauritius

      Authors: Aneerav Sukhoo, Andries Barnard, Mariki M. Eloff, John A. Van der Poll

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/103
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • A Methodology for Increasing Business Process Maturity in Public Sector
    • A Methodology for Increasing Business Process Maturity in Public Sector

      Authors: Mojca Indihar Stemberger, Andrej Kovacic, Jurij Jaklic

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/104
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Approach to Building and Implementing Business Intelligence Systems
    • Approach to Building and Implementing Business Intelligence Systems

      Authors: Celina M. Olszak, Ewa Ziemba

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/105
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • A Generic Agent Framework to Support the Various Software Project
           Management Processes
    • A Generic Agent Framework to Support the Various Software Project Management Processes

      Authors: Rita C Nienaber, Andries Barnard

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/106
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • An Improved Assessment of Personality Traits in Software Engineering
    • An Improved Assessment of Personality Traits in Software Engineering

      Authors: Adesina S. Sodiya , Olumide Babatope Longe, S. Adebukola Onashoga, Oludele Awodele, L. O. Omotosho

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/107
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Towards a Methodology to Elicit Tacit Domain Knowledge from Users
    • Towards a Methodology to Elicit Tacit Domain Knowledge from Users

      Authors: Wernher R. Friedrich, John A. Van der Poll

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 2 (2007)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/108
      Issue No: Vol. 2
       
  • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 1, 2006
    • Printable Table of Contents: IJIKM, Volume 1, 2006

      Authors:

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/641
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Predicting Internet-based Online Community Size and Time to Peak
           Membership Using the Bass Model of New Product Growth
    • Predicting Internet-based Online Community Size and Time to Peak Membership Using the Bass Model of New Product Growth

      Authors: David R. Firth, Cameron Lawrence, Shawn F. Clouse

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/109
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • A Framework for Designing Nursing Knowledge Management Systems
    • A Framework for Designing Nursing Knowledge Management Systems

      Authors: Tzyh-Lih Hsia, Li-Min Lin, Jen-Her Wu , Hsien-Tang Tsai

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/110
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Do Project Management Tools and Outcomes Differ in Organizations of
           Varying Size and Sector'
    • Do Project Management Tools and Outcomes Differ in Organizations of Varying Size and Sector?

      Authors: Kimberly Furumo, J. Michael Pearson, Nancy L. Martin

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/111
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Measurement of Supply Chain Integration Benefits
    • Measurement of Supply Chain Integration Benefits

      Authors: Peter Trkman , Ales Groznik

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/112
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Business Intelligence Systems in the Holistic Infrastructure Development
           Supporting Decision Making in Organisations
    • Business Intelligence Systems in the Holistic Infrastructure Development Supporting Decision Making in Organisations

      Authors: Celina M. Olszak, Ewa Ziemba

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/113
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Adaptation of a Cluster Discovery Technique to a Decision Support System
    • Adaptation of a Cluster Discovery Technique to a Decision Support System

      Authors: Namdar Mogharreban

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/114
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Towards a Typology of Virtual Communities of Practice
    • Towards a Typology of Virtual Communities of Practice

      Authors: Line Dube, Anne Bourhis, Real Jacob

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/115
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • The Underlying Issues in Knowledge Elicitation
    • The Underlying Issues in Knowledge Elicitation

      Authors: Eric C. Okafor, Charles C. Osuagwu

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/116
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Applicability of Process Maps for Simulation Modeling in Business Process
           Change Projects
    • Applicability of Process Maps for Simulation Modeling in Business Process Change Projects

      Authors: Ales Popovic, Mojca Indihar Stemberger, Jurij Jaklic

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/117
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • TQM for Information Systems: Are Indian Organizations Ready'
    • TQM for Information Systems: Are Indian Organizations Ready?

      Authors: Jamshed Siddiqui, Zillur Rahman

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/118
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Knowledge Conversion and Transfer: A Mathematical Interpretation
    • Knowledge Conversion and Transfer: A Mathematical Interpretation

      Authors: Firas M. Alkhaldi , Anne Venables

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006). Details

      IJIKM, Volume 1 (2006)
      DOI: https://doi.org/10.28945/119
      Issue No: Vol. 1
       
  • Gender Differences among IT Professionals in Dealing with Change and Skill
           Set Maintenance
    • Gender Differences among IT Professionals in Dealing with Change and Skill Set Maintenance

      Authors: Brian H. Cameron, Loreen Butcher-Powell

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