Subjects -> COMPUTER SCIENCE (Total: 2313 journals)
    - ANIMATION AND SIMULATION (33 journals)
    - ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (133 journals)
    - AUTOMATION AND ROBOTICS (116 journals)
    - CLOUD COMPUTING AND NETWORKS (75 journals)
    - COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE (11 journals)
    - COMPUTER ENGINEERING (12 journals)
    - COMPUTER GAMES (23 journals)
    - COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (25 journals)
    - COMPUTER SCIENCE (1305 journals)
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    - IMAGE AND VIDEO PROCESSING (42 journals)
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    - INTERNET (111 journals)
    - SOCIAL WEB (61 journals)
    - SOFTWARE (43 journals)
    - THEORY OF COMPUTING (10 journals)

E-LEARNING (30 journals)

Showing 1 - 30 of 30 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Technology for Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 139)
Aprendo con NooJ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Educational Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Computer Assisted Language Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Computer Speech & Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Education in the Knowledge Society     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Educational Technology Research and Development     Partially Free   (Followers: 45)
eLearn Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Open, Distance and E-Learning - EURODL     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Human-centric Computing and Information Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Interdisciplinary Journal of e-Skills and Lifelong Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge, and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Adult Education and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Ambient Computing and Intelligence     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Computer-Assisted Language Learning and Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Online Pedagogy and Course Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Research Studies in Educational Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Computers in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Machine Learning Research     Open Access   (Followers: 62)
Jurnal Inovasi Teknologi Pendidikan     Open Access  
Jurnal Komtika     Open Access  
Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy     Open Access  
Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Research in Learning Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 72)
RIED. Revista Iberoamericana de Educación a Distancia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RU&SC. Revista de Universidad y Sociedad del Conocimiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tidsskriftet Læring og Medier (LOM)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
UOC Papers. Revista sobre la sociedad del conocimiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
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Educational Technology Research and Development
Number of Followers: 45  
 
  Partially Free Journal Partially Free Journal
ISSN (Print) 1556-6501 - ISSN (Online) 1556-6501
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Learner-generated material: the effects of ubiquitous photography on
           foreign language speaking performance

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      Abstract: Abstract The widespread availability of mobile phones has facilitated mobile learning and ubiquitous learning in language education. Although numerous benefits have been documented, the evidence for speaking fluency enhancement is relatively scant. Firmly grounded in humans’ cognitive structure and learners’ prior knowledge, this study proposes a ubiquitous photography strategy as a form of generative learning strategy. Specifically, besides the photos in English textbooks, foreign language (FL) learners at the college level were encouraged to use their mobile phones to capture photos to practice visual prompted oral tasks. Their learning experience was measured by a self-report questionnaire, triggering their perceptions of mental effort, task complexity, and learning preferences. Their learning outcome was measured by speech analysis of their oral performance, targeting fluency, and vocabulary diversity. Data analysis revealed that ubiquitous photography induced a better learning experience and enhanced their speaking outcomes to various extents. Results contribute to the potential of integrating ubiquitous learning and generative learning strategies in FL classrooms.
      PubDate: 2022-08-09
       
  • The influence of external concept structures on an individual’s
           knowledge structures

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      Abstract: Abstract This experimental investigation considers how the inherent conceptual structure of external representations influences individuals' knowledge structure, and in addition proposes a measure of global collective knowledge to account for the influence of pre-existing knowledge structure. In two studies, undergraduates in a hospitality management course completed a pre-knowledge structure (pre KS) measure, a prior knowledge pretest, then read parallel versions of either a text or a table about the Internet of Things, then completed a post knowledge structure (post KS) measure, and finally completed a comprehension posttest. Analysis of the comprehension posttest data showed that the text group significantly outperformed the table group (p < .05) mainly due to performance on factual and main idea items, but not inference items. The pre- and post-KS data were analyzed as Pathfinder networks. Descriptive comparisons of between group networks (group–group) and within group networks (pre-post) showed that the table and text between-group networks were quite alike before reading and were even more alike after reading (i.e., peer convergence of local collective knowledge structure). The within-group network overlap from pre-to-post was also substantial. In addition, pre-to-post similarity with the expert shows the text group networks became more like the expert referent but the table group networks became less like the expert referent. Exploratory findings for this global collective knowledge network approach based on Google Ngram frequency dependencies were partially supported. For theory building, the results show how the influence of external representations can be framed in terms of a representation's inherent conceptual structure. For practice, this list-wise measure for eliciting knowledge structure provides a quick way to elicit individual and group-level knowledge structure networks that can be used in ordinary classrooms for formative and summative assessment.
      PubDate: 2022-08-08
       
  • The interaction effects of an instructor’s emotions in instructional
           videos and students’ emotional intelligence on L2 vocabulary learning

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      Abstract: Abstract Language learning has long been a topic of interest, and instructional videos which allow students to learn anywhere and anytime have become an important language learning tool. However, the emotional characteristics of both instructors and students, which have the potential to influence students’ second language learning from instructional videos, have yet to be fully explored. The current study investigated the interaction effects of an instructor’s emotions (positive vs. negative vs. neutral) and students’ emotional intelligence (low vs. high) on students’ second language vocabulary learning from instructional videos with consideration of attention paid to the learning material (i.e., average fixation time, referring to the duration of each fixation on the learning material), learning experience (i.e., motivation, engagement, interaction), and learning performance (both immediate and delayed). Results showed that (1) only the interaction effect on attention was verified, and that (2) students with high emotional intelligence showed a larger average fixation time in the positive condition than in the negative condition, while (3) students with low emotional intelligence showed a smaller average fixation time in the neutral condition than in the negative condition. Furthermore, the results verified the benefits of the instructor’s positive emotion on students’ motivation, interaction, and immediate performance. Our findings shine a light onto the influence of an instructor’s emotions and students’ emotional intelligence on second language learning, and provide practical implications for the design of instructional videos and second language learning.
      PubDate: 2022-08-05
       
  • Empathy and empathic design for meaningful deliverables

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      Abstract: Abstract With the challenges of a global pandemic, political and social unrest, and the consequences these issues bring, there is a universal call for empathy as we attempt to maneuver through this tumultuous time. For instructional designers, this includes employing empathy and empathic design as they grapple with how to design instructional interventions for learners. Empathy is the first stage in the design thinking process, now a popular buzz word in design research and practice. It suggests that empathy results in a design that meets the audience needs. But how do we know if this is true' As professors of instructional design and researchers of design practice, we teach empathy for action as a means for design students to act by producing a meaningful design deliverable. Over a 15-week semester, we taught and measured designer empathy and empathic design with 31 graduate students while they worked in design teams, participating in authentic design projects with two nonprofit organizations. Results indicate that 75% of the instances of empathy were students showing sensitivity to the end-learners’ experiences and situations, 52% were directed toward identifying with the end-learners’ thoughts and feelings. This did not necessarily translate to the designed deliverables as only three of the nine student teams created final meaningful design deliverables. We report on our instructional process, our research results and provide the framework for what we believe is needed to bridge the connection of empathy, empathic design, and meaningful design deliverables.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03
       
  • Can videos affect learning outcomes' Evidence from an actual learning
           environment

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      Abstract: Abstract We examine the effect of an innovation in an educational context, a class of 500 + first-year economics students at a well-known Australian university. We study whether introducing content in the form of a multimedia presentation has a detectable effect on specific categories of student knowledge. The multimedia presentation has a narrator presenting concepts with images, words, and worked examples. Our key outcome measure is the probability of answering questions correctly on a mid-term test. A quasi-experimental design is followed to offer a causal interpretation of the results. We find that the multimedia presentation markedly increases students’ academic outcomes on the test compared to those that did not view the presentation, especially in regards to procedural and evaluative knowledge. An additional survey reveals gains in students’ metacognitive knowledge. These findings suggest that multimedia presentations contribute to improved student learning outcomes and offer valuable options at a time of increased online course delivery. The findings also highlight the relevance of investing in education and resources to develop the necessary design skills among academics and staff.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03
       
  • Development of the Design Thinking and Instructional Lessons (DTAIL)
           model: a creative approach for teachers

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      Abstract: Abstract The educational landscape continues to become increasingly complex, which suggests a need for a teacher-driven creative approach to developing instructional lessons. This article introduces the Design Thinking and Instructional Lessons (DTAIL) model and describes its three-phase development. In Phase I, the Design Thinking literature and the first draft of the model are described. In Phase II and III, two design studies conducted with STEM K-12 public school and community college in-service teachers participating in summer research experience for teachers (RET) programs in the United States are described. In addition, during the second design study, ten teacher-participants were observed as they implemented their lessons and were interviewed concerning how and to what extent they perceived the DTAIL model to resonate with their approach to developing instructional lessons. Revisions to the model were made based on data analysis from those three design phases. Findings suggest that Design Thinking models that facilitate teacher-driven design of instructional lessons might usefully include design stages with an explicit depiction of rotation and recursiveness. In addition, Design Thinking models should also depict (1) iteration, reflection, and revision; (2) a chaotic fluctuating problem–solution space, and (3) circling backward to eventually narrow the problem space toward a satisficed solution. Furthermore, the majority of teacher-participants found the DTAIL model to resonate with their approach to developing instructional lessons.
      PubDate: 2022-08-03
       
  • Does slow and steady win the race': Clustering patterns of students’
           behaviors in an interactive online mathematics game

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      Abstract: Abstract Online educational games have been widely used to support students’ mathematics learning. However, their effects largely depend on student-related factors, the most prominent being their behavioral characteristics as they play the games. In this study, we applied a set of learning analytics methods (k-means clustering, data visualization) to clickstream data from an interactive online algebra game to unpack how middle-school students’ (N = 227) behavioral patterns (i.e., the number of problems completed, resetting problems, reattempting problems, pause time before first actions) correlated with their understanding of mathematical equivalence. The k-means cluster analysis identified four groups of students based on their behavioral patterns in the game: fast progressors, intermediate progressors, slow progressors, and slow-steady progressors. The results indicated that students in these clusters, with the exception of slow progressors, showed significant increases in their understanding of mathematical equivalence. In particular, slow-steady progressors, who reattempted the same problem more often than other students, showed the largest absolute learning gains, suggesting that behavioral engagement played a significant role in learning. With data visualizations, we presented evidence of variability in students’ approaches to problem solving in the game, providing future directions for investigating how differences in student behaviors impact learning.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • A concept mapping-based prediction-observation-explanation approach to
           promoting students’ flipped learning achievements and perceptions

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      Abstract: Abstract Previous research has illustrated the potential of flipped learning for assisting teachers in designing meaningful activities to promote students’ higher order thinking skills; however, several previous studies have challenged the effects of flipped learning on students’ learning. One of the key problems is the lack of an effective learning approach or tools to engage students in the flipped learning activity. In this study, a concept mapping-based Prediction-Observation-Explanation (POE) approach was incorporated into flipped learning (called CPOE-FL) to enhance students’ scientific learning. Furthermore, a three-group experiment was conducted to assess the effects of the three flipped learning models, comprising the CPOE-FL approach, the POE-FL (incorporating POE into flipped learning) approach, and the C-FL (conventional flipped learning) approach. The experimental results displayed that the CPOE-FL approach can benefit the learning achievements and self-efficacy of the students with respectively lower prior knowledge and lower initial self-efficacy, in comparison with the POE-FL and C-FL approaches. Both the CPOE-FL and POE-FL approaches promoted the students’ inner learning motivation, while the CPOE-FL approach enhanced the students’ critical thinking. This proposed approach could provide a good reference for researchers or school teachers intending to implement POE-based flipped learning in the future.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Impacts of an AI-based chabot on college students’ after-class review,
           academic performance, self-efficacy, learning attitude, and motivation

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      Abstract: Abstract Review strategies after learning new knowledge are essential for students to consolidate the key points, understand the subject content, analyze aspects of the learning topics, and summarize the knowledge content of learning while mastering new knowledge. However, educators have found that students generally have difficulties seeking help when they encounter learning problems. This could significantly affect their after-class review performances. To cope with this problem, an after-class review approach with an AI (Artificial Intelligence)-based chatbot is proposed in this study to provide students with immediate and quality feedback during the learning process. Moreover, a quasi-experiment was conducted to explore students’ learning motivation, attitude, and academic performance when using the AI-based chatbot. Participants were two classes of students from a university in Taiwan. One class with 18 students was the experimental group and the other with 20 students was the control group. The experimental group used the AI-based chatbot in the after-class review, while the control group used the conventional after-class review approach. Research results showed that the application of AI-based chatbots in the review process of public health courses could improve students’ academic performance, self-efficacy, learning attitude, and motivation. In other words, chatbots could help students become more active in the learning process. It is noted that after students asked questions, providing them with sufficient feedback during the review process could make them feel recognized and help to establish a relaxing and friendly interaction, thereby improving their academic performance.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Connecting learning and playing: the effects of in-game cognitive supports
           on the development and transfer of computational thinking skills

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      Abstract: Abstract Prior studies on game-based learning provide limited and mixed results in the transfer of skills learned during game play to contexts outside of the game. This study tested the effects of playing a blocked-based programming educational game implemented with in-game cognitive supports on students’ ability to learn and apply computational thinking (CT) skills in near and far transfer tasks. With 79 students randomly assigned to one of two conditions, the control group received basic game supports and the treatment group received cognitive supports in addition to the basic game supports. After two hours of total gameplay over the course of four days, both groups performed equally well, and students’ CT skills were improved significantly at the near transfer level but not at the far transfer level. Students in the control condition performed significantly better on far transfer compared to the students in the treatment condition. Regression analyses indicated that the overall use of the cognitive supports was infrequent, but the amount of time spent voluntarily using cognitive supports with help on goal setting and worked examples predicted far transfer performance. How students use the cognitive supports (subverting the use of cognitive support to conscientiously learn the computational skill by using them more as game cheat sheets) might explain these findings. Design implications and directions for future research on facilitating learning transfer with in-game supports are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Explicit instruction in the context of whole-tasks: the effectiveness of
           the task-centered instructional strategy in computer science education

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      Abstract: Abstract Novice programmers, who have yet to form effective mental models of the domain, often experience high cognitive load, low confidence, and high anxiety, negatively affecting learning and retention rates. These cognitive and affective limitations pose an instructional challenge. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of a whole-task instructional approach compared with a part-task instructional approach for novices learning to program from a cognitive and affective perspective. A fully randomized between-subjects controlled experiment was designed, including two online instructional conditions (whole-task vs. part-task). The whole-task condition followed the Task-Centered Instructional Strategy and included explicit instruction in the context of whole tasks. The part-task condition followed a part-task instructional strategy and included the same explicit instruction, yet in the context of objectives and topic-related tasks. Based on Bandura’s triadic model (Bandura, Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory, Prentice-Hall, 1986), we propose a conceptual model, which we used to hypothesize that the Task-Centered Instructional Strategy may be more effective for novices learning to program. Sixty-five students with no programming experience volunteered to participate in the study and were randomly assigned to one of the conditions. Participants in the whole-task condition performed significantly better on the near and far transfer posttests. In accordance with our model, confidence and cognitive load during learning were found to be significant partial mediators of the effect of instructional strategy on performance. Overall, we found that the task-centered instructional strategy, combining explicit instruction with whole-tasks, is effective for addressing the cognitive and affective considerations relevant to novices in computer science education.
      PubDate: 2022-07-26
       
  • Design and development of an online formative peer assessment environment
           with instructional scaffolds

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      Abstract: Abstract Although formative peer assessment (FPA) has become a prevailing learning activity in different educational settings, there are not enough suggestions on how to structure it with instructional supports in online environments to optimize its benefits. Therefore, this study aims to propose design guidelines for the development of an effective online FPA environment with instructional scaffolds in the context of writing activities at high schools. To this end, an online FPA environment was designed on the basis of an assessment model for regulated learning and teachers’ and students’ experiences. It was evaluated and refined three times. The formative evaluation findings suggested designing an online FPA environment with preparatory activities, information resources, goal setting and planning, anonymity, criteria form, sustainable and supportive dialog, motivational elements, and an easy-to-use interface. As a result, 11 design guidelines were produced. Overall, this research provides a better understanding of the essential design elements of online FPA environments.
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
       
  • Exploring teachers’ emotional experience in a TPACK development task

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      Abstract: Abstract Teacher emotions could make a difference to the development of technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK), a complicated knowledge essential for effective teaching with technology. Both experienced and novice teachers reported having experienced a series of emotional challenges as they acquire technology integration skills. Self-regulated learning (SRL), a series of cognitive and metacognitive learning processes in problem-solving, is associated with learners’ emotions as well. In this paper, we examine the influence of teaching experience and SRL on teachers’ emotions in the context of TPACK development. Particularly, we identify two distinct groups of teachers based on the extent to which they experience positive and negative emotional experience in the task using the clustering analysis method. Binary logistic regression was applied to test whether the model of teaching experience and SRL can predict previous emotion groups. Although the overall model was significant, only SRL was a significant individual predictor in this context. Regression analysis revealed a positive association between SRL and teacher emotions. We used a qualitative method to analyze teachers’ think-aloud protocols to further determine teaching experience and SRL’s influence on teacher emotions. The results supported previous findings that SRL can positively predict teachers’ emotions during the TPACK development task. Implications were discussed for providing emotional support to teachers during TPACK development.
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
       
  • The effects of a game-enhanced learning intervention on foreign language
           learning

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      Abstract: Abstract The rich multimedia-enhanced language content offered by modern commercial off-the-shelf games and students’ interest in playing such games has motivated efforts for seeking effective means to integrate them into the curriculum to enrich and enhance foreign language learning. Despite the general interest and appeal of game-enhanced learning in foreign language learning, there is a need for strategies for effective curriculum integration and empirical studies to test the effects of such interventions systematically. This study aims to contribute to this need by investigating the effectiveness of a ten-week-long game-enhanced language learning intervention on English foreign language learning. The study employed an embedded mixed methods design, including a controlled experiment and semi-structured interviews. The experiment group (n = 38) participated in a game-enhanced language learning program that was designed based on the Play Curricular activity Reflection Discussion (PCaRD) framework, whereas the control group (n = 38) received conventional instruction. Students took the TOEFL-ITP and L2 motivational self-system questionnaire before and after the intervention, whereas qualitative data were gathered via semi-structured interviews. The results indicated that both groups had significantly improved their scores, yet no significant differences were found in their post-test scores. The motivation questionnaire revealed a significant difference in cultural interest and attitudes to target community dimensions in favor of the game-enhanced condition. Moreover, the interview results indicated that participants had positive attitudes towards integrating commercial games into their language classrooms. Although the experimental group did not significantly outperform the control group, the game-enhanced intervention provided an equally effective learning experience with improved motivational attributes.
      PubDate: 2022-07-19
       
  • Immersive virtual reality in STEM: is IVR an effective learning medium and
           does adding self-explanation after a lesson improve learning outcomes'
           

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      Abstract: Abstract The goal of the current study was to investigate the effects of an immersive virtual reality (IVR) science simulation on learning in a higher educational setting, and to assess whether using self-explanation has benefits for knowledge gain. A sample of 79 undergraduate biology students (40 females, 37 males, 2 non-binary) learned about next-generation sequencing using an IVR simulation that lasted approximately 45 min. Students were randomly assigned to one of two instructional conditions: self-explanation (n = 41) or control (n = 38). The self-explanation group engaged in a 10 min written self-explanation task after the IVR biology lesson, while the control group rested. The results revealed that the IVR simulation led to a significant increase in knowledge from the pre- to post-test (ßPosterior = 3.29). There were no differences between the self-explanation and control groups on knowledge gain, procedural, or conceptual transfer. Finally, the results indicate that the self-explanation group reported significantly higher intrinsic cognitive load (ßPosterior = .35), and extraneous cognitive load (ßPosterior = .37), and significantly lower germane load (ßPosterior =  − .38) than the control group. The results suggest that the IVR lesson was effective for learning, but adding a written self-explanation task did not increase learning after a long IVR lesson.
      PubDate: 2022-07-18
       
  • Exploring collaborative caption editing to augment video-based learning

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      Abstract: Abstract Captions play a major role in making educational videos accessible to all and are known to benefit a wide range of learners. However, many educational videos either do not have captions or have inaccurate captions. Prior work has shown the benefits of using crowdsourcing to obtain accurate captions in a cost-efficient way, though there is a lack of understanding of how learners edit captions of educational videos either individually or collaboratively. In this work, we conducted a user study where 58 learners (in a course of 387 learners) participated in the editing of captions in 89 lecture videos that were generated by Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR) technologies. For each video, different learners conducted two rounds of editing. Based on editing logs, we created a taxonomy of errors in educational video captions (e.g., Discipline-Specific, General, Equations). From the interviews, we identified individual and collaborative error editing strategies. We then further demonstrated the feasibility of applying machine learning models to assist learners in editing. Our work provides practical implications for advancing video-based learning and for educational video caption editing.
      PubDate: 2022-07-15
       
  • Did library learners benefit from m-learning strategies'
           Research-based evidence from a co-citation network analysis of the
           literature

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      Abstract: Abstract Mobile learning strategies have been employed for social learning activities, including library- and museum-supported learning. Previous studies have reviewed the literature from the technological aspect. However, a retrospective study from the perspective of bibliometric and network structure has not yet been provided. The aim of this study was therefore to systematically review journal papers on library-supported mobile learning (LibML). A coding framework including library types, mobile learning strategies, and research issues was adopted based on the literature and was used to screen and categorize the research papers. A co-citation network analysis was then adopted to analyze and visualize the structural relationships among the papers. A total of 53 eligible articles with 1370 citations in follow-up studies were collected from the Scopus database. The results showed that two main research streams of LibML were identified from the overall network structure, including library- and museum-supported mobile learning. In terms of the mobile learning strategy, library-supported research mainly focused on self-directed learning, whereas museum-supported research emphasized inquiry-based learning. In terms of research issues, most library-supported research focused on patrons’ affective engagement, whereas museum-supported research emphasized learning performance. This study provides a citation-based approach to reveal the research trends and mainstream LibML research. The main contribution of combining co-citation and social network analysis is to provide a visualized network diagram of LibML research. Limitations of the methodological approach are noted. Discussion and future directions from the follow-up study are provided.
      PubDate: 2022-07-05
       
  • Implementation of learning by design in a synchronized online environment
           to teach educational robotics to inservice teachers

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      Abstract: Abstract Teaching educational robotics is of growing interest in K-12 settings. Yet, immense efforts are needed to move the field forward by framing the teaching of robotics with pedagogically sound theories as well as appropriate instructional design models and strategies. To meet this need, the authors designed and implemented an online educational robotics course for inservice teachers who had little or no prior experience in teaching robotics, by applying instructional design factors as well as teaching and facilitation strategies derived from the learning by design (LBD) framework. Action research employing mixed methods was carried out to examine the effects of instructional design factors implemented in the online educational robotics course. An online survey indicated that the participating teachers increased their self-efficacy in robotics, use of problem-solving and collaboration strategies, and confidence in robotics knowledge and teaching. In addition, by the end of the course, the participating teachers demonstrated sufficient robotics content knowledge. As revealed in their reflective essays, they also developed learning strategies, such as case-based reasoning, sketches, trial and error, and evaluating capacity while completing the robotics open-ended project. Further, they realized the constraints of learning educational robotics online and the benefits of collaboration. This study sheds light on the design components of a robotics course grounded in LBD that are effective for preparing teachers in an online environment to implement robotics in their classrooms.
      PubDate: 2022-06-30
       
  • Development and students’ evaluation of a blended online and offline
           pedagogy for physical education theory curriculum in China during the
           COVID-19 pandemic

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      Abstract: Abstract The outbreak and continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic has challenged the implementation of physical education theory (PET) curriculums among global colleges and universities. This study aimed to describe the design and students’ evaluation of a blended “Sports Multimedia Courseware Design” course among Chinese university students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using information communication technologies, a 4-month blended course was developed, which consisted of 36 credits (18-credit online self-learning + 18-credit offline group-learning). A total of 1300 Chinese university students who majored in physical education, completed the blended course from Mar to Jun 2020, among which 238 (69.75% males; 21 ± 1.2 years) were randomly recruited to evaluate the course in terms of three aspects: (1) online self-learning, (2) offline group-learning, and (3) overall learning outcomes. A descriptive analysis was conducted using the IBM SPSS 27.0. Students’ overall positive evaluation supported a successful development and implementation of the blended course. Over 90% of students fulfilled the learning tasks and satisfied with the online learning resources. About 83% of students indicated high levels of autonomous motivation and engagement in online self-learning. Approximately 88% of students showed positive attitudes to the offline group-learning content, while the participation rate (60%) was relatively lower than of the online self-learning. Over 50% of the students indicated self-improvements in diverse aspects after attending the blended course. Blended online and offline pedagogy shows apparent promise in delivering the PET course among Chinese university students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Further application and comprehensive evaluation are warranted in the future.
      PubDate: 2022-06-27
       
  • A systematic review of augmented reality game-based Learning in STEM
           education

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      PubDate: 2022-06-24
       
 
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