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SOCIAL WEB (61 journals)

Showing 1 - 58 of 58 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACM Transactions on Social Computing     Hybrid Journal  
ACM Transactions on the Web (TWEB)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asiascape : Digital Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CCF Transactions on Networking     Hybrid Journal  
Communications in Mobile Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Computational Social Networks     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cyberpolitik Journal     Open Access  
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Data Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Digital Library Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Discover Internet of Things     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Informação & Informação     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Information Technology and Libraries     Open Access   (Followers: 342)
Infrastructure Complexity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Bullying Prevention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Digital Humanities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of e-Collaboration     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of E-Entrepreneurship and Innovation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Entertainment Technology and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Information Privacy, Security and Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Information Technology and Web Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Interactive Communication Systems and Technologies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Interactive Mobile Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Internet and Distributed Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Knowledge Society Research     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Networking and Virtual Organisations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Social Computing and Cyber-Physical Systems     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Social Network Mining     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Virtual Communities and Social Networking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Web Based Communities     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Web-Based Learning and Teaching Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal on Semantic Web and Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Internet Technology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
JLIS.it     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Cyber Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Digital & Social Media Marketing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Social Structure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Medicine 2.0     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Observatorio (OBS*)     Open Access  
Online Social Networks and Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Policy & Internet     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Proceedings of the ACM on Interactive, Mobile, Wearable and Ubiquitous Technologies     Hybrid Journal  
Redes. Revista Hispana para el Análisis de Redes Sociales     Open Access  
RESET     Open Access  
Scientific Phone Apps and Mobile Devices     Open Access  
Social Media + Society     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Social Network Analysis and Mining     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social Networking     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Social Networks     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Social Science Computer Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Synthesis Lectures on the Semantic Web: Theory and Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Teknokultura. Revista de Cultura Digital y Movimientos Sociales     Open Access  
Terminal     Open Access  
Texto Digital     Open Access  
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International Journal of Bullying Prevention
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2523-3653 - ISSN (Online) 2523-3661
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • A Longitudinal Process Model Evaluating the Effects of Cooperative
           Learning on Victimization, Stress, Mental Health, and Academic Engagement
           in Middle School

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      Abstract: Abstract Mental health is a significant concern among young people, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Notably, mental health problems can significantly reduce student performance in school, including both engagement and achievement. Both mental health problems and reduced student performance often arise due to peer victimization, which can include teasing, racial- or gender-based discrimination, and/or physical assault. Stress has been proposed as one mechanism through which victimization influences mental health, and stress can also interfere with academic performance at school, including engagement and achievement. To date, however, no research has evaluated longitudinal associations between victimization and stress, and how these longitudinal patterns may impact adolescent behavior and mental health. In this study, we used data from a 2-year cluster randomized trial of cooperative learning to evaluate an etiological process model that includes (1) longitudinal reciprocal effects between victimization and stress, and (2) the effects of both victimization and stress on student mental health and academic engagement. We hypothesized that victimization and stress would have significant reciprocal effects, and that both would predict greater mental health problems and lower academic engagement. We further hypothesized that cooperative learning would have significant effects on all constructs. We found partial support for this model, whereby stress predicted greater victimization, but victimization did not predict increased stress. While both factors were linked to student outcomes, stress was a more powerful predictor. We also found significant salutary effects of cooperative learning on all constructs. The implications of these results for student behavioral and mental health are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • Participant Role Behavior in Cyberbullying: an Examination of Moral
           Disengagement Among College Students

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      Abstract: Abstract The current study examined the role of moral disengagement in cyberbullying participant role behavior among college-aged individuals. Participants included 434 students who completed surveys measuring their participation in cyberbullying, including online bystander role behaviors, as well as their moral disengagement. Regression analysis results indicated that moral disengagement was positively associated with cyberbullying perpetration, cyberbullying victimization, passive bystanding online behavior, and reinforcing online behavior. The current study furthers knowledge on the associations between online bullying-related behavior and moral disengagement and could lead to necessary cyberbullying prevention and intervention support for young adults.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Scoping Bullying and Cyberbullying Victimisation Among a Sample of Gifted
           Adolescents in Ireland

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      Abstract: Abstract Research has indicated that gifted adolescents experience an increased amount of bullying and cyberbullying compared to their non-gifted peers. However, there has not been a sufficient attempt to investigate the extent of bullying and cyberbullying victimisation among gifted adolescent populations in Ireland. A total of 195 gifted adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18 years completed a comprehensive online survey assessing the bullying and cyberbullying prevalence, wellbeing, indicative mental health, and friendship quality outcomes. The results showed considerably higher prevalence rates of bullying and cyberbullying victimisation among gifted adolescents compared to an all-Ireland national prevalence rate. Bullying and cyberbullying victimisation was associated with higher levels of negative outcomes. Females, LGBTI + , and twice-exceptional participants scored significantly lower on satisfaction with life and significantly higher on negative outcomes compared to other gifted participants. The results are discussed alongside recommendations for anti-bullying policies and teacher education provisions.
      PubDate: 2022-07-26
       
  • The Importance of Being Attentive to Social Processes in School Bullying
           Research: Adopting a Constructivist Grounded Theory Approach

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      Abstract: Abstract School bullying is a complex social phenomenon in need of further exploration regarding its connections to contextual aspects, group norms, and societal structures. This calls for research approaches that can get closer to participants’ experiences and the different social processes involved in school bullying. One such approach is the constructivist grounded theory (CGT) approach, which aims to be attentive to participants’ main concerns and social processes through both analysis and data collection. This approach comes as a theory-method package with its use of a symbolic interactionism perspective. In this paper, I will show how CGT as a theory-method package, as well as symbolic interactionism and sociology of childhood, has been helpful in my research on school bullying (focusing on social structures, norms, and processes). More specifically, I give different examples from the whole research process, e.g., maintaining a focus on participants’ main concerns, the coding process, being guided by sensitizing concepts, addressing issues of social justice and equity — and overall forming and maintaining a theoretically and ethically prepared researcher role. I also suggest that this approach is helpful in dealing with ethical and theoretical challenges when researching topics known to negatively affect people’s lives and wellbeing — and when the social context makes it difficult for participants to address victimizing structures, positions, and processes.
      PubDate: 2022-07-19
       
  • Correction: Q Methodology as an Innovative Addition to Bullying
           Researchers’ Methodological Repertoire

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      PubDate: 2022-07-18
       
  • The Role of Sociocultural Context in Cyberbullying in Israeli Society:
           Comparing Arab and Jewish Parents’ Perceived Knowledge of Their
           Adolescent Children’s Involvement in Cyberbullying

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper examines the relationship between parental monitoring and control, parents’ perceived knowledge of their adolescent’s online activities, and parents’ perceived knowledge of their adolescent’s involvement in cyberbullying, among Israeli Jewish and Arab parents of adolescents. The 407 participants consisted of two groups: Jewish (n = 194) and Arab (n = 213) parents of adolescents in Israel, who were recruited via online social networks and completed an online survey. The self-report questionnaire included the Stattin and Kerr Parental Control and Parental Monitoring Questionnaire (Stattin & Kerr in Developmental Psychology 36:366, 2000), as well as parental knowledge of child online activities and witnessing and experiencing cyberbullying. Parental monitoring and control were perceived as higher by Jewish than Arab parents, while no group differences were found for perceived child disclosure or parental knowledge of adolescent online activity. Parental knowledge of the adolescent witnessing cyberbullying was higher among Arab than Jewish parents, while the opposite was found for parental knowledge of the adolescent experiencing cyberbullying. Parental knowledge of the adolescent both witnessing and experiencing cyberbullying was related to group affiliation, lower parental education, and higher parental perceived knowledge of the adolescent’s online activities. Parents’ perceived knowledge of the adolescent witnessing cyberbullying was further related to higher perceived adolescent disclosure. The study increases our understanding of perceived parental involvement and its relationship with parents’ perceived knowledge of the adolescent’s involvement in cyberbullying in a diverse and multicultural society.
      PubDate: 2022-07-14
       
  • Correction: Understanding Classroom Bullying Climates: the Role of Student
           Body Composition, Relationships, and Teaching Quality

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      PubDate: 2022-07-12
       
  • Anger and Empathy: Exploring the Underlying Emotional Processes of Peer
           Defending Behaviors Using Virtual Reality

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      Abstract: Abstract Witnessing peer victimization is an emotionally salient event, particularly for youth. Given that emotions influence how youth respond to social situations, the emotional experiences of bystanders may influence how they respond to peer victimization. In particular, different defending behaviors may be motivated by different emotional processes among bystanders. The current research used a novel virtual-reality paradigm, Cyberball-VR, to examine the emotional processes underlying how defending occurs in real-time. Cyberball-VR is an adaptation of the Cyberball paradigm in which participants have the opportunity to engage in defending behavior after witnessing social exclusion in the lab. Participants (N = 120) consisted of youth ages 11–14 (49% female). Self-reported data (empathic concern, personal distress, vicarious emotions) and qualitative data (noticing the exclusion and defending during Cyberball-VR) were collected. Witnessing social exclusion in Cyberball-VR elicited changes in vicarious emotions. Noticing the exclusion significantly predicted enacted defending behaviors (comforting and solution-focused), as well as increased vicarious anger. Additionally, empathy (empathic concern and personal distress) and anger interacted to predict different defending behaviors. Results indicated that how youth feel in the moment, as well as their individual tendency to respond to these emotions, influences their subsequent defending behaviors. Potential applications for Cyberball-VR and how it can be used for studying peer defending behaviors are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-07-06
       
  • Bullying by Teachers Towards Students—a Scoping Review

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      Abstract: Abstract Bullying between peers is a well-known fact and during the last 20 years there has been considerable research on this topic. A topic that has received much less attention is bullying by teachers towards students. This article aims to review the research literature that exists on this important topic. The review covers articles about teacher bullying in elementary, primary, lower, and upper secondary schools, in a retrospective, prospective, or current perspective. The results show that teacher bullying occurs within school contexts all over the world in various ways and to various extents. Although the prevalence rates of bullying behaviors from school staff towards students vary greatly, from 0.6 to almost 90%, this review clearly shows there is a need to pay more attention to this challenge. Several studies show that being exposed to teacher bullying can adversely affect a child’s physical and mental health, participation in education and working life, and sense of well-being in adulthood. There is a need to address this topic in practical work, in teacher education, and in anti-bullying programs. Teacher bullying is also an important topic for future research.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
       
  • Open Science: Recommendations for Research on School Bullying

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      Abstract: Abstract The open science movement has developed out of growing concerns over the scientific standard of published academic research and a perception that science is in crisis (the “replication crisis”). Bullying research sits within this scientific family and without taking a full part in discussions risks falling behind. Open science practices can inform and support a range of research goals while increasing the transparency and trustworthiness of the research process. In this paper, we aim to explain the relevance of open science for bullying research and discuss some of the questionable research practices which challenge the replicability and integrity of research. We also consider how open science practices can be of benefit to research on school bullying. In doing so, we discuss how open science practices, such as pre-registration, can benefit a range of methodologies including quantitative and qualitative research and studies employing a participatory research methods approach. To support researchers in adopting more open practices, we also highlight a range of relevant resources and set out a series of recommendations to the bullying research community.
      PubDate: 2022-06-30
       
  • Management of Cyberbullying: A Qualitative Exploratory Case Study of a
           Nigerian University

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      Abstract: Abstract Cyberbullying problem has become a global concern in universities. In Nigerian universities, the concern appears to be blamed on the lack of cyberbullying prevention and management strategies. The purpose of this qualitative exploratory case study was to explore the policy decision makers’ recommendations for the development of cyberbullying management strategies for the staff and students of a Nigerian university. The three theories used to guide the study were Glasser’s (1998) choice theory, Bandura’s (1986) theory of moral disengagement, and Bronfenbrenner’s (1977) social ecological theory. Data for the study were obtained from three sources: interviews, documents, and archival records of the university. Seven participants, all members of the Committee of Provosts, Deans, and Directors (COPD), were used for the study. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the data. Three major themes emerged as findings in the study: cyberbullying awareness, cyberbullying situation in the university, and the university cyberbullying management policy. These findings may help to make university policy makers aware of the significance of cyberbullying policy in Nigerian universities. The findings may also help to make the university management leadership consider the development of research-based cyberbullying awareness raising training programs and cyberbullying management policy for the staff and students.
      PubDate: 2022-06-10
       
  • Re-conceptualizing Peer Victimization as a Potentially Traumatic Event

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      Abstract: Abstract This conceptual paper makes the case that peer victimization should be considered a potentially traumatic event due to the similarities between peer victimization and trauma in terms of definition, outcomes, theoretical frameworks, and measurement. Furthermore, there is a trend to include peer victimization on surveys measuring adverse childhood experiences and other childhood trauma. We conclude with a call for changes to the intervention and prevention efforts in the area of peer victimization. Both whole-school initiatives and programs targeting victimized students should address peer victimization in the same manner as other traumatic events in childhood.
      PubDate: 2022-06-10
       
  • Correlates of Help-Seeking Behaviour in Adolescents Who Experience
           Bullying Victimisation

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      Abstract: Abstract A commonly suggested strategy for addressing bullying is for victims to seek help from a trusted person. Despite this recommendation, there are a group of adolescent victims who choose not to seek help. This study aimed to identify factors associated with not seeking help among adolescents who experienced bullying victimisation. A sub-sample of youth who self-reported being bullied (N = 652) was drawn from an Australian nationally representative household survey of adolescents aged 11–17 years (N = 2,967). Adolescent participants and their parents completed survey items on demographics, bullying experiences, mental health, school, and family characteristics. Overall, 45.3% of bullied adolescents did not seek help. Neither the type, frequency, nor levels of distress caused by the bullying victimisation were associated with help-seeking. Age was no longer associated with increased odds of not seeking help for bullying victimisation, after controlling for mental health, social, and interpersonal functioning. In a multivariate logistic regression model examining demographic, mental health, social, and interpersonal factors, those with poorer prosocial skills, lower perceived social support, and higher internet use had increased odds of not seeking help for bullying victimisation (OR = 2.81, 95% CI = 1.00, 7.93; OR = 2.70, 95% CI = 1.32, 5.52; and OR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.11, 4.33, respectively). Identifying and supporting young people who are socially isolated and/or have poorer prosocial skills may improve help-seeking among adolescents who experience bullying victimisation. This approach has the potential to address victimisation earlier in its course thereby reducing consequent harm.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42380-021-00090-x
       
  • How Adolescents Cope with Bullying at School: Exploring Differences
           Between Pure Victim and Bully-Victim Roles

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of the present study was to investigate the use of specific coping strategies by bullied adolescents, taking account of the distinction between pure victims and bully-victims, as well as gender-specific patterns. Participants were 967 adolescents aged 11–16 years, who responded to self-report questionnaires on school bullying victimization, cognitive coping, and situational coping. Adolescents in the pure victim, bully-victim, and noninvolved groups did not differ in their use of approach coping. However, pure victims and bully-victims used more avoidance coping than noninvolved adolescents. Compared with the latter, pure victims reported greater use of avoidance coping strategies such as internalizing and self-blame, while female pure victims also reported greater use of rumination. Both male and female bully-victims were characterized by higher use of blaming others and self-blame strategies, compared with the noninvolved group. In addition, rumination, catastrophizing, cognitive distancing, and externalizing scores were higher for male bully-victims than for either noninvolved participants or pure bullies. Identifying these differing coping strategies may be useful in developing more effective counselling strategies for the victims of bullying.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42380-021-00095-6
       
  • Fear of Bullying Victimization in Middle School: Types of Victimization
           and Advocacy Considerations

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      Abstract: Abstract This study examines the relation between fear of victimization, types of victimization, and advocacy, adjusted for grade and gender on 834 students from 16 Iranian public middle schools. Multilevel linear modeling was used to explore relations between types of victimization and fear of victimization. The results showed that higher fear of victimization was associated with higher verbal, social, and cyber victimization, and higher peer advocacy. The cyber victimization experience had the most impact on fear of bullying victimization (β = 0.15, P < 0.001). Also, higher teacher and peer advocacy were related to higher fear of bullying victimization (β = 0.11, P < 0.001 for teacher advocacy and β = 0.06, P < 0.05 for peer advocacy). Implications of these findings for school anti-bullying programs as well as directions for future research are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42380-021-00089-4
       
  • Structural Validity of the Bullying Participant Behavior Questionnaire
           with an Elementary School Sample

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      Abstract: Abstract The goal of the present study was to investigate the factor structure of the Bullying Participant Behaviors Questionnaire in an independent elementary school sample. The BPBQ is a self-report inventory that purports to measure participation or experiences in five bullying roles: perpetrator, target, assistant, defender, and outsider. The current sample included 683 primarily White 8–11-year old youth from three elementary schools in the Midwest (46% male students). Analyses generally supported the item assignments to the BPBQ five-factor model (Perpetrator, Assistant, Outsider, Target, Defender). Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the best fitting model consisted of the two general dimensions (Pro-perpetrator, Pro-target) and five group factors: Perpetrator, Assistant, Outsider, Target, and Defender, as was observed with an independent sample of middle school students. There is general support for the factor structure of the BPBQ, but it is particularly useful if interested in the broader Pro-perpetrator and Pro-target dimensions.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42380-021-00091-w
       
  • Risk and Protective Factors in Cyberbullying: the Role of Family, Social
           Support and Emotion Regulation

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      Abstract: Abstract Family and peer effects, as well as socio-emotional skills, are considered to have an essential role in cyberbullying. Although the dynamics of social factors and socio-emotional processes underlying cyberbullying are still open for research to further understand the direct and indirect relationships among the social factors (e.g., peers and family), socio-emotional skills (e.g. emotion regulation) and cyberbullying engagement. Thus, the aim of our study was to test models of cyberbullying perpetration and cybervictimization based on the role of family dynamics (cohesion, adaptability and communication), social support (from family and friends) and emotion regulation difficulties. One thousand, one hundred and five students (552 males, aged 11–19 years) participated in our research. We used self-report questionnaires to measure cyberbullying perpetration and cybervictimization, family functioning, perceived social support and emotion regulation difficulties. Our main findings support the crucial role of family and peers in cyberbullying engagement during adolescence. Perceived support from friends and family serve as protective factors against cybervictimization. Further, perceived support from friends and balanced family cohesion are protective factors against cyberbullying perpetration. On the other hand, emotion regulation difficulties appear to increase the risk of both cyberbullying perpetration and cybervictimization. Our findings confirm and extend the research on the role of family and peer effects, as well as emotion regulation in cyberbullying engagement. Moreover, our results have important implications for prevention and intervention programs involving family and peer support.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42380-021-00097-4
       
  • Bully Participant Role Behavior and Social Support from Teachers and
           Classmates: A Mediation Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract Bullying-related behaviors have been a problem in schools for decades. Unfortunately, engagement in such behavior is associated with a variety of poor outcomes, and thus, it is important to understand the mechanisms behind this phenomenon as well as associated variables, such as perceived teacher support and classmate support. Importantly, research has shown that both types of support are associated with engagement in bullying situations. The current study posits that teacher support will partially explain the association between classmate support and engagement in bullying participant role behaviors. Specifically, the aim of the current study was to investigate the longitudinal associations between bullying participant role behavior and perceived support from teachers and classmates. This study examined direct associations as well as the mediating effect of teacher social support on the association of classmate social support and five bullying participant role behaviors. Data were gathered in the fall of 2015 and the spring of 2016 at a midwestern middle school from 631 students. Analyses indicated that teacher support significantly mediated the association of classmate support and bullying, assisting, and outsider behavior.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s42380-021-00092-9
       
  • Bystander Intervention in Bullying and Sexual Harassment: Role of Personal
           and Perceived Peer Norms

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      Abstract: Abstract This study investigated the extent to which adolescents’ personal normative attitudes (also referred to as personal norms) and perceived peer norms regarding bullying, sexual harassment, and bystander intervention predicted each step of the five-step bystander intervention model (i.e., Notice, Interpret, Accept Responsibility, Know how to Help, Act) for bullying and sexual harassment among two-hundred thirty-three high school students in the Northeastern United States. Interaction effects of gender, personal norms, and perceived peer norms were also assessed. As predicted, perceived peer norms moderated the relations between personal norms and all five bystander intervention steps. However, some effects differed by gender and some differed in direction from predictions. Students who were more anti-bullying/harassment scored higher on some bystander intervention steps when they also perceived their peers to be more anti-bullying and harassment, with some models showing gender differences between male and female students. Personal and perceived peer norms are related to adolescents’ engagement in the bystander intervention model, suggesting that both norms should be targets of interventions encouraging youth to intervene in incidents of bullying and sexual harassment.
      PubDate: 2022-05-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s42380-022-00125-x
       
  • Q Methodology as an Innovative Addition to Bullying Researchers’
           Methodological Repertoire

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      Abstract: Abstract The field of bullying research deals with methodological issues and concerns affecting the comprehension of bullying and how it should be defined. For the purpose of designing relevant and powerful bullying prevention strategies, this article argues that instead of pursuing a universal definition of what constitutes bullying, it may be of greater importance to investigate culturally and contextually bound understandings and definitions of bullying. Inherent to that shift is the transition to a more qualitative research approach in the field and a stronger focus on participants’ subjective views and voices. Challenges in qualitative methods are closely connected to individual barriers of hard-to-reach populations and the lack of a necessary willingness to share on the one hand and the required ability to share subjective viewpoints on the other hand. By reviewing and discussing Q methodology, this paper contributes to bullying researchers’ methodological repertoire of less-intrusive methodologies. Q methodology offers an approach whereby cultural contexts and local definitions of bullying can be put in the front. Furthermore, developmentally appropriate intervention and prevention programs might be created based on exploratory Q research and could later be validated through large-scale investigations. Generally, research results based on Q methodology are expected to be useful for educators and policymakers aiming to create a safe learning environment for all children. With regard to contemporary bullying researchers, Q methodology may open up novel possibilities through its status as an innovative addition to more mainstream approaches.
      PubDate: 2022-05-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s42380-022-00127-9
       
 
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