Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 173 of 173 Journals sorted by number of followers
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 310)
Gender & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
Urban Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Gender & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Gender, Work & Organization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Gender, Place & Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Gender Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Violence Against Women     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Gender, Sexuality & Feminism     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Hypatia : A Journal of Feminist Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Feminist, Gender and Women Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Feminist Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Gender & History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Feminist Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Feminist Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Feminist Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Communication Papers : Media Literacy & Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Gender and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Feminist Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Gender Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Women's History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Political Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Black Women, Gender & Families     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
International Feminist Journal of Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Studies in Gender and Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Violence and Gender     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Feminism & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Gender and Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Modern Women : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
European Journal of Women's Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Assuming Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Contemporary Women's Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Australian Feminist Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Gender, Technology and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Women's History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian Feminist Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Atlantis : Critical Studies in Gender, Culture & Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Gender-Based Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Women Politics & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Nashim : A Journal of Jewish Women's Studies & Gender Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Indian Journal of Gender Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : Feminism, Theory, Technoscience     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Women’s Health Physical Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Gender Studies in Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Clio. Women, Gender, History     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Feminist Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Women's Studies International Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Gender and Power     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Feminist Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Women's Studies : An inter-disciplinary journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Frontiers : A Journal of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Feminist Formations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Medieval Feminist Forum : Journal of the Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
The Women : Annual Research Journal of Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Girlhood Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Lilith: A Feminist History Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Interdisciplinary Feminist Thought     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
History of Women in the Americas     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Women, Gender, and Families of Color     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Women in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Feminist Philosophy Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Politics and Gender     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Women's Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
feminists@law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Women's Studies in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Women in Judaism : A Multidisciplinary e-Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GÉNEROS - Multidisciplinary Journal of Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Women and Gender in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Women & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Nora, Nordic Journal of Women's Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Women: A Cultural Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Legacy : A Journal of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Woman Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of International Women's Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Redescriptions : Political Thought, Conceptual History and Feminist Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Feminist Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Women & Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ninepatch : A Creative Journal for Women and Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Family Strengths     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Women in French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Michigan Journal of Gender and Law     Free   (Followers: 3)
UCLA Women's Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ABO : Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Feminist Modernist Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Columbia Journal of Gender and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the European Society of Women in Theological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
NAN Nü     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Feminist Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Women's Entrepreneurship and Education (JWEE)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Estudos Feministas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Les cahiers du CEDREF     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ayn Rand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Palimpsest : A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
U.S.-Japan Women's Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PALASTReN : Jurnal Studi Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
La Manzana de la Discordia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Gender Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexuality, Gender & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ambigua : Revista de Investigaciones sobre Género y Estudios Culturales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Kvinder, Køn & Forskning / Women, Gender & Research     Open Access  
DUODA : estudis de la diferència sexual     Open Access  
wH2O : The Journal of Gender and Water     Open Access  
iQual : Revista de Género e Igualdad     Open Access  
Raudem : Revista de Estudios de las Mujeres     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for kjønnsforskning     Open Access  
Marwah : Jurnal Perempuan, Agama dan Jender     Open Access  
Journal of Obstetrics and Women's Diseases     Open Access  
Musas : Revista de Investigación en Mujer, Salud y Sociedad     Open Access  
Akdeniz Kadın Çalışmaları ve Toplumsal Cinsiyet Dergisi / Mediterranean Journal of Gender and Women’s Studies     Open Access  
Nomadías     Open Access  
Sawwa : Jurnal Studi Gender     Open Access  
Revista Interdisciplinaria de Estudios de Género de El Colegio de México     Open Access  
Cuestiones de género: de la igualdad y la diferencia     Open Access  
Antyajaa : Indian Journal of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal  
Debate Feminista     Open Access  
Revista Periódicus     Open Access  
Lectora : Revista de Dones i Textualitat     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies     Full-text available via subscription  
La camera blu. Rivista di studi di genere     Open Access  
EGALITA     Open Access  
QJB : Querelles. Jahrbuch für Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung     Open Access  
Revista Feminismos     Open Access  
querelles-net : Rezensionszeitschrift für Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung     Open Access  
Investigaciones Feministas     Open Access  
Agenda     Partially Free  
La ventana. Revista de estudios de género     Open Access  
La Aljaba     Open Access  
Storia delle Donne     Open Access  
Mora (Buenos Aires)     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Andrología     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Impotence Research     Hybrid Journal  
Hawwa     Hybrid Journal  
Aspasia     Full-text available via subscription  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Psychology of Women Quarterly
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.217
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 10  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0361-6843 - ISSN (Online) 1471-6402
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Practitioner’s Digest

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: NP1 - NP7
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Volume 48, Issue 2, Page NP1-NP7, June 2024.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-04-24T09:24:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241251680
      Issue No: Vol. 48, No. 2 (2024)
       
  • Do Sexual Harassment Claimants’ Gender Identity and Race Influence
           Third-Party Observers’ Assumptions About the Harassment Incident'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer L. Mezzapelle, Anna-Kaisa Reiman
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual harassment research typically focuses on White cisgender women. Are harassment targets who are not White cisgender women perceived similarly' In three preregistered studies, participants (Study 1: N = 442; Study 2: N = 2,088, nationally representative U.S. sample; Study 3: N = 577) read about a formal (Studies 1 and 2) or informal (Study 3) sexual harassment claim made by a woman whose gender identity (cisgender vs. transgender) and race (Black vs. White) varied. Details about the incident were redacted, and participants wrote about what they thought the harasser had done. These free-response data indicated that cisgender (vs. transgender) women were seen as more likely to have experienced unwanted references to appearance, unwanted sexual attention (in Studies 2 and 3), or unwanted romantic attention (especially if they were White). Transgender (vs. cisgender) women, regardless of race, were seen as more likely to have experienced gender harassment. The claimant's race had little systematic effect, suggesting that perceivers are less attentive to the potential impact of race (vs. gender identity) on sexual harassment. People's inferences about the types of sexual harassment that women are most likely to face can impact the support claimants may receive when they come forward with a sexual harassment claim. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ's website at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/suppl/10.1177/03616843241252658
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-05-16T07:43:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241252658
       
  • Development and Validation of the Online Sexual Objectification
           Experiences Scale Among College Women

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kyla M. Cary, Megan K. Maas, Ryan P. Bowles
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      In this study, we developed and psychometrically evaluated the Online Sexual Objectification Experiences Scale (OSOES). We collected data from 816 emerging adult college women across two samples. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed three factors: Unwanted Sexual Advances (example item: “How often have you received unwanted messages online asking about your sexual experience'”), Negative Appearance Commentary (example item: “How often has another person insulted you by calling you unattractive online'”), and Indirect Sexual Objectification (example item: “How often have you read a sexual comment posted to a photo of another woman's body online'”). OSOES scores were internally consistent and were strongly correlated with scores of self-objectification, body surveillance, and body shame. OSOES subscale scores also provided evidence of incremental validity in predicting self-objectification and objectified body consciousness above and beyond offline interpersonal sexual objectification. We hope that findings from the present study and the OSOES can be used by researchers, clinicians, and educators to understand the frequency of online sexual objectification experiences among women and as a result, work to mitigate harmful outcomes. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ's website at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/suppl/
      DOI : 10.1177/03616843241250295
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-05-06T05:56:45Z
       
  • Notions of Care Labor Are Antithetical to Profitable Labor

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Grace Flores-Robles, Ana P. Gantman
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      We argue that women in the care workforce face a wage penalty because care work is perceived as something that people, especially women, are meant to do out of love (and for free). We focus on care labor, which is aligned with stereotypes about women's natural abilities as caregivers, to show that low wages cannot be explained by counter-stereotypic behavior alone. Instead, low wages in care labor can be explained by a perceived love versus money tradeoff. This tradeoff exists not only because of intrinsic rewards and fears of commodifying care but because of the idea that trading love for money amounts to trading the sacred for the profane. In other words, care workers are underpaid because many people, either implicitly or explicitly, perceive the very act of making money as counter to care, a stereotypically-feminine form of work. This stereotypical association contributes to the gender pay gap more generally because it implies that the work women are suited for is work that should be done for free. We expand on this idea with future directions and practice implications, which include building communal spaces for care workers to facilitate communication and organizing around higher pay and better working conditions.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-05-06T05:28:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241248366
       
  • Chinese Negative Reactions to Positive Gender Stereotypes: A Perspective
           of Psychological Reactance Theory

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      Authors: Zhen Wang, Li Zhao, Guoguo Zuo, Jian Guan
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Individuals’ lives depend heavily on their freedom, which is why they may respond with reactance if freedom is threatened. Our research, which spans four studies with 1,486 Chinese students as participants, from the perspective of psychological reactance theory, provides evidence that positive gender stereotypes can provoke targets’ negative reactions. In Study 1, participants who heard a speaker state a positive gender stereotype (e.g., “women are beautiful” and “men are strong”) disliked the speaker more, believed that the speaker was more gender prejudiced, and experienced stronger negative emotions than those who heard no stereotype. In Studies 2−4, freedom threat was a crucial mediator in the relation between the positive gender stereotype and targets’ negative reactions. Furthermore, depersonalization also played a parallel mediating role. Although positive gender stereotypes seem superficially complimentary, they may have detrimental effects on interpersonal relations. Our research suggests that people should refrain from using stereotypes in their interpersonal interactions whenever possible. Even though people may sometimes inevitably convey positive stereotypes to others, they should be given the freedom to minimize the negative consequences of such stereotypes. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ's website at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/suppl/
      DOI : 10.1177/03616843241242711
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-05-01T07:13:38Z
       
  • Neoliberal Feminism and Women's Protest Motivation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Renata Bongiorno, Michelle K. Ryan, Olivier Gibson, Hannah Joyce
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      A popular form of neoliberal feminism seeks to advance gender equality in leadership and beyond by encouraging women to be resilient as individuals. By locating career advancement as within an individual's control, recent research has shown that this focus subtly shifts the blame for gender inequality onto women and reduces support for needed structural changes to tackle gender discrimination. We extend research into neoliberal feminism by examining anticipated negative effects on women's protest motivation. Across four studies in the United Kingdom (total N = 1,168), undergraduate women students and employed women with university degrees in both the control and resilience conditions first read about gender inequality. Participants in the neoliberal feminist conditions then read messages promoting individual resilience as key to women's advancement (Study 1–3) or participated in activities designed to build their own resilience as individuals to help them advance (Study 4). In Studies 1, 3, and 4, participants in the neoliberal feminist conditions compared to the control had lower collective action intentions – a negative effect that was either indirect, via reduced perceptions of gender discrimination (Studies 1 and 4) and reduced anger over inequality (Study 1), or direct (Study 3). Together, these studies provided partial support for our hypothesis that neoliberal feminism can undermine women's protest motivation. Future research can help establish how contextual and other factors contribute to the strength of these effects and explore how feminists can better harness messages of resilience. To advance gender equality, our findings suggest that advocates should focus less on individualistic solutions and more on addressing structural barriers, laying the groundwork for effective protest action and social change. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ's website at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/suppl/10.1177/03616843241238176.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-05-01T07:13:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241238176
       
  • Women's Experiences of Sexual Agency Under Constrained Choice: A
           Systematic Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Storm Balint
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      In Western societies, women are encouraged to present themselves in sexualized ways and are expected to experience this as a form of sexual agency. However, research on women's sexual agency is new and still developing, leading to inconsistent definitions and understandings. In addition, women's experiences of and resistance to violations of their sexual boundaries are frequently overlooked. The current systematic review answers research questions on how sexual agency has been conceptualized, how it has been studied in relation to sexual violence, and how women's social positionality influences sexual agency. A systematic strategy was used to search 10 health and social science databases and analyze 95 full-text articles. A feminist social constructionist framework guided this mixed-methods synthesis and provided a framework for addressing the research questions. The findings contribute to a deeper understanding of how society and researchers understand women's sexual agency and how intersectionality is largely ignored. Findings also identify an urgent need for future research to consider the relations between violence against women and women's perceptions of (or lack of) sexual agency. Future policymakers, researchers, and educators should move away from a one-size-fits-all approach in their work and instead, consider the diverse impact of societal expectations on women. By doing so, we can develop policies and programming that are specifically tailored to address the unique needs and challenges faced by women in society.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T08:53:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241245713
       
  • Backlash Against Women and Support for Men' On the Perception of Men and
           Women Researchers in Gender Stereotype-Inconsistent Domains

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anke Heyder, Olivia Kortzak
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Even in academic fields dominated by women students (e.g., educational research), academic careers are characterized by vertical gender segregation in favor of men. This clashes with the public understanding of educational research as a women's domain that is more strongly associated with warmth (a stereotypically feminine trait) than competence (a stereotypically masculine trait), as revealed in our first study. We thus conducted an experimental vignette study of 189 adults from the general public to explore how women versus men researchers working in educational research versus physics (as a contrasting domain clearly dominated by men) were perceived on several dimensions of competence and warmth. Whereas the female researcher in physics was rated as more competent than the female researcher in educational research, the woman in physics was penalized for her gender stereotype-incongruent domain choice by being perceived as less warm. However, the male researcher in educational research was perceived as both warmer and more competent than his man counterpart in physics, and as smarter than the female researcher in educational research. These findings suggest rewards instead of penalties for men pursuing academic careers in initially women-dominated domains, likely contributing to the increasing gender gap in academic careers in these domains.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T06:57:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241236397
       
  • Undergraduate Students’ Definitions of Sexual Violence Labels Across the
           Rise of the #MeToo Movement

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chelsea D. Kilimnik, Leah N. McMahon, Cindy M. Meston
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Examining changes in perspectives of sexual violence across the #MeToo movement is critical to understanding shifts in sociocultural contexts of sexual violence; yet the literature is still nascent. In the present study, we assessed variation across the #MeToo movement in undergraduate students’ (N = 1,028) rape myth acceptance, sexual violence experiences, identification of experiences with sexual violence labels, and self-generated definitions of sexual violence labels (e.g., sexual assault). We also examined the mediating role of the relation between timepoint across #MeToo and students’ self-generated sexual violence definitions. Text analyses revealed seven themes in students’ definitions: Activity, Chronicity, Body, Contact, Gender, Force/Harm, and Consent. Notably, there was greater representation and a higher rate of change in the Contact theme in definitions following the #MeToo movement compared to pre-#MeToo, but only among students with sexual violence history. Rape myth acceptance did not change significantly across the #MeToo movement and did not demonstrate a significant role in time-related variability in students’ definitions. These findings provide support for the role of the #MeToo movement in facilitating more inclusive perceptions of sexual violence among undergraduate students, especially among those with sexual violence histories. We hope that with increased insight into the #MeToo movement's impact on sexual violence perspectives, continued efforts of the movement and prevention initiatives can broaden their reach.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-03-27T07:47:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241239634
       
  • Book Review: HIV endurance: Women’s journeys from diagnosis to aging
           by D’Amore, C. F.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Fayth M. Parks
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-03-22T07:29:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241241238
       
  • The Impact of Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization on Young
           Women's Experiences of Objectification and Sexual Well-Being

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Erin Nolen, Jaclyn A. Siegel, Rebecca R. Mendoza, Catherine Cubbin, Shetal Vohra-Gupta, Laura H. Dosanjh, Helena Lewis-Smith
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization decision overturned two previous rulings that had affirmed the constitutional right to abortion prior to fetal viability. While important work has been published about the legal, moral, professional, and economic ramifications of the Dobbs decision, missing on this topic are the voices of those most affected by these policies. We conducted an online survey to understand how the Dobbs ruling impacted the way women experience their bodies and sexual well-being. Participants were 339 cisgender women residing in the United States aged 19–29 years (M = 24.4, SD = 2.84). Participants identified as Asian/Pacific Islander (23.0%), Black (22.4%), Latina (26.0%), Mixed (3.2%), and White (25.4%). We used codebook thematic analysis to analyze free-text survey responses. We constructed four themes and additional sub-themes related to embodiment in a post-Roe context, which consisted of experiencing objectification (denial of bodily autonomy, experiencing the body as a regulated/surveilled site, feeling dehumanized, and concern for future restrictions to abortion access and civil rights), impact on mental and sexual well-being (vigilance with sex, reduced sexual desire, sexual anxiety, personal safety anxiety), minimized impact (relationship or reproductive status, resource privilege, identifying as pro-life, concern for future), and resistance.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-03-20T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241238174
       
  • A Qualitative Exploration of How Black Mothers Experiencing Poverty Make
           Sense of the Strong Black Woman Stereotype

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marion L. Malcome
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      The strong Black woman (SBW) stereotype is a universal phenomenon understood and experienced by Black women. In this qualitative study, I examined how 16 Black women who are mothers make sense of the SBW stereotype, highlighting how their lived experiences of mothering children in high-burden urban neighborhoods and their experiences at the intersection of race, class, and gender, shape their understanding of the SBW stereotype. Using qualitative phenomenological methods and semi-structured interviews, thematic analysis of interview data revealed three main themes regarding the perception and experience of the SBW stereotype as: (a) ambiguous and contested expectations central to Black motherhood, (b) engenders a sense of loss, and (c) shapes the experience and expression of depression. Study findings support and extend a growing body of work linking the SBW stereotype to depressive symptoms and overall mental health among Black women. This study also highlights the importance of examining how Black women's intersectional identities and contexts, in this case place or where one lives, shape the experience and perception of the SBW stereotype. My hope is that clinicians develop a comprehensive and nuanced understanding of the SBW stereotype and its potential mental health effects for all Black mothers. Findings also suggest a need for clinicians, researchers, and policymakers to create empowering opportunities for Black mothers, especially those mothering in impoverished contexts, to express their authentic and whole selves in service of healing themselves, their families, and communities.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-03-14T05:39:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241233286
       
  • Public Harassment of Runners in the United States: Differences by Gender
           and Sexual Orientation

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      Authors: Cassandra N. Davis, Kayla A. Huber, Patricia A. Frazier
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated runners’ experiences of public harassment and the association between gender and sexual orientation and harassment. We hypothesized that cisgender women and LGBQ+ individuals would report more harassment, fear of harassment, and behavioral changes than cisgender men and straight individuals. Adult United States runners (N = 1,645, primarily cisgender women) completed an online survey assessing lifetime and past-year experiences of harassment, fear, behavioral changes, and harassment attributions. Most participants (84.2%) reported at least one form of harassment while running (M = 3.55 types). Gender interacted with sexual orientation such that sexual minority cisgender women reported significantly more lifetime and past-year harassment than straight cisgender women (gs = 0.44–0.45). For fear and behavioral changes, only gender was significant, with cisgender women reporting more fear and behavioral changes than cisgender men (gs = 0.99–1.06). Cisgender women also were more likely than cisgender men to attribute the harassment to gender (ϕ = .70). LGBQ+ individuals reported significantly more attributions to sexual orientation (ϕ = .16) than straight individuals but not more fear or behavioral changes. This study, the largest investigation of harassment among runners, highlights the need for prevention campaigns to make public spaces safer for all runners.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-03-07T06:32:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241235107
       
  • Book Review: In a human voice by Gilligan, C.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jill Brown, Aisha Rajapakse
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-03-07T06:26:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241236107
       
  • “She Has a Village”: The Intergenerational Benefits of Social Support
           Networks for Black Mothers and Daughters

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      Authors: Lamont S. Bryant, Seanna Leath, Janelle Billingsley, Saidi Moseley
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      In the current qualitative study, we explored the perceived benefits of Black mothers’ villages as cultural resource systems of social support. We used consensual qualitative research methods to analyze semi-structured interview data from 28 Black mothers (25–60 years, Mage = 46) in the United States. We identified seven main themes. For Black daughters, village support offered: (a) models of positive relationships, (b) access to social and enriching activities, (c) natural mentorship, and (d) gendered racial identity affirmation. For Black mothers, village support offered the necessary time and space to: (e) engage in personal restorative practices, (f) find joy in Black mama sister circles, and (g) experience support for educational and occupational opportunities. In addition to appreciation for the various ways village members showed up, mothers valued village members’ contributions to daughters’ self-esteem and gendered racial pride. Narratives highlighted Black mothers’ intentional village-making, underscoring fictive and extended kin networks’ enduring importance in Black girls’ identity development and well-being. Our findings hold implications for culturally relevant socialization frameworks for Black girls and stimulate new discussions on supporting Black mothers and daughters more effectively.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-03-01T08:02:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241233289
       
  • Book Review: The Palgrave handbook of power, gender, and psychology by
           Zurbriggen, E. L., & Capdevila, R.

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      Authors: Janice D. Yoder
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T07:57:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241236118
       
  • Book Review: Gender-critical feminism by Lawford-Smith, H. L.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mutrofin, David Safri Anggara, Muhammad Rezki
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-02-23T07:34:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241234369
       
  • Book Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rebecca R. Suzuki, Anne P. DePrince
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T06:56:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843241233291
       
  • Book Review: Leading gender and diversity change in higher education from
           the margins to the mainstream by Cohen Miller, A., Hinton-Smith, T., Haeri
           Mazanderani, F., & Samuel, N.

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      Authors: Yucky Putri Erdiyanti, Arina Mufrihah, Fathurrahman Priyanta, Cahyo Radityo, Assabiq Yudhy Avanda, Arip Amin
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T07:39:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231225759
       
  • Assessing the Impact of Media on Blaming the Victim of Acquaintance Rape

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      Authors: Claire R. Gravelin, Monica Biernat, Emily Kerl
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Along with the direct trauma of their experience, many rape victims also suffer secondary victimization due to the tendency of others to blame victims for their assault, particularly in cases of acquaintance rape. We explored the role of news media coverage in promoting victim blaming tendencies. In Study 1, a content analysis of articles reporting sexual assaults from two newspapers revealed a tendency for media to overreport stranger rapes and underreport acquaintance rapes, perpetuating the stranger rape as “real rape” prototype. More victim blaming language was also used in reports of acquaintance rape than stranger rape. Perceivers responded to these differences; a high victim blaming news article resulted in greater victim blaming compared to an article low in victim blame content (Study 2 and 3), and exposure to a high blaming article produced greater victim blaming in a subsequent unrelated case of rape and increased endorsement of rape myths (Study 3). These findings demonstrate the importance of the media in shaping public perception of rape victims, particularly in cases of acquaintance rape, and suggest that news media, legislators, and other visible communicators can change the culture of victimization through intentional efforts to delegitimize rape stereotypes in their reporting and dialogs.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T04:57:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231220960
       
  • Struggling at School: Are Exposure to Television's Eurocentric Appearance
           Norms and Objectified Body Consciousness Associated Factors'

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      Authors: Elizabeth A. Daniels, L. Monique Ward, Petal Grower, Stephanie J. Rowley
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Theoretical work on objectified body consciousness, comprised of body surveillance and body shame, proposes several negative sequelae of holding an objectified view of the self (i.e., valuing the body primarily for its attractiveness to others). Few studies have examined associations between objectified body consciousness and academic beliefs and strategies among adolescent girls, especially girls of color. In the present study, we investigated a conceptual model whereby exposure to Eurocentric appearance norms through TV consumption is related to body surveillance and body shame which, in turn, are related to academic beliefs and strategies among a racially diverse sample of United States girls. Participants were 650 self-identified Asian American/Pacific Islander, Black, and White adolescent girls (Mage = 15.45, SDage = 1.50). Higher Eurocentric appearance norms exposure was associated with higher body shame which, in turn, was associated with maladaptive academic beliefs and strategies for all three groups of girls. In contrast, higher Eurocentric appearance norms exposure was associated with higher body surveillance and just one academic belief, and in White girls only. Future work should continue to examine these associations among adolescent girls of color. In addition, we encourage educators to include body image content in media literacy curricula as a means of disrupting associations between Eurocentric appearance norms, body shame, and academic functioning.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T06:50:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231225760
       
  • People Who Accommodate Others’ Sexist Views Are Themselves Perceived
           to Be Sexist

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      Authors: Andrea C. Vial, April H. Bailey, John F. Dovidio
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      We extend work on how, when, and why people accommodate another's bias by drawing from attribution theories and research on evaluative transfer to investigate how observers reasoned about an actor who accommodated the sexist views of another person. As predicted, participants made stronger internal, sexist attributions for actors who accommodated (vs. rejected) another person's sexism (Study 1). Moreover, participants made stronger sexist attributions when a male (vs. female) actor accommodated a man's prejudice against women, and they responded more negatively as a result. The same actor-gender effect emerged in Study 2, except when the decision to accommodate someone else's sexism contradicted the actor's previous hiring intentions. Across studies, stronger attributions to the sexism of the actor were associated with participants’ negative reactions to the decision and proposed penalties for the actor, and partly explained why participants reacted more negatively when a male (vs. female) actor accommodated gender prejudice. To reduce gender employment discrimination, our findings suggest that organizational leaders may develop interventions that rely on social norms, raising awareness among hiring managers that, although accommodating sexism might seem to align with their job duties, others view it negatively and actively penalize individuals who engage in it. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ's website at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/suppl/10.1177/03616843231221501
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2024-01-03T07:06:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231221501
       
  • Book Review: Women, sex, and madness: Notes from the edge by Fahs, B.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sabrina Sims, Jessica L. Barnack-Tavlaris
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T05:09:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231223473
       
  • The Sexual Scripts of Transgender and Gender Diverse Emerging Adults: A
           Thematic Analysis

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      Authors: Michael L. Dolezal, Melissa Decker, Heather L. Littleton
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Rooted in sexual script and gender minority stress and resilience (GMSR) theories, the present study investigated how a nationally recruited sample of 169 transgender and gender diverse (TGD) undergraduates perceived a typical sexual encounter involving a TGD undergraduate (i.e., their sexual scripts), as well as the extent to which various forms of distal stress, proximal stress, and resilience factors were embedded within and affected these scripts. Using thematic analysis, 12 themes were identified within three overarching categories: types of sexual/romantic relationships, gender minority stress experiences, and resilience factors. TGD undergraduates’ scripts in some ways mirrored those of their heterosexual and cisgender peers (i.e., enacting gendered roles in sex initiation, differing emotional responses following sex by gender identity), but scripts also differed in many notable ways. In their scripts, TGD students frequently described how distal (i.e., enacted stigma, trauma history) and proximal (i.e., gender dysphoria, self-stigma) stressors affected the sexual experiences of TGD undergraduates. However, resilience themes such as open communication and discussing one's gender identity were also commonly included and presented as providing protection against minority stress. Results demonstrate how GMSR experiences inform TGD undergraduates’ sexual scripts and suggest several critical potential points of intervention for this population.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2023-12-20T08:39:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231218699
       
  • Sexual Objectification Racial Microaggressions Amplify the Positive
           Relation Between Sexual Assault and Posttraumatic Stress Among Black Women
           

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      Authors: Lee R. Eshelman, Selime R. Salim, Prachi H. Bhuptani, Mariam Saad
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Black women report higher rates of adult sexual assault (ASA) and sexual objectification compared to White women. Sexual objectification serves as a reminder that Black women's bodies are viewed as sexual objects based on racist/sexist ideologies, though trauma research rarely includes race-specific stressors. In this study, we examined sexual objectification racial microaggressions as a moderator of the relation between ASA severity and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms among Black women. Data were collected from 129 Black college and community women (Mage = 33.84). ASA severity was associated with greater overall PTSD symptoms and symptom clusters. The interaction between ASA severity and sexual objectification microaggressions was associated with greater PTSD symptoms and the PTSD symptom cluster, negative alterations in cognition and mood. ASA severity was associated with PTSD at mean and high sexual objectification racial microaggressions but not low levels. Associations with other PTSD symptom clusters were not significant. Findings suggest sexual objectification racial microaggressions amplify the positive relation between ASA and PTSD symptoms, specifically symptoms related to cognition and mood. It is essential that clinicians assess for race-specific stressors during trauma interventions to help reduce mental health disparities. Post-assault interventions should be tailored with multiculturally sensitive practices to address the ways racial discrimination can exacerbate trauma symptoms.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2023-12-04T01:41:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231216649
       
  • Men's Hostile Sexism Predicts Skepticism of Sexual Assault Science

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      Authors: Diana E. Betz, Kelly Deegan, Alex Gomes
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual assault statistics are both widely disseminated and routinely challenged. Two studies investigated reactions to sexual assault research through the lens of ideologically motivated science denial. In particular, hostile sexism was expected to positively predict skepticism of sexual assault research. In Study 1, adult men in the United States (N = 316) reported their hostile sexism, then read one of three research summaries and reported their skepticism of the findings. Although there was no difference in skepticism across conditions, hostile sexism was a stronger predictor of skepticism regarding sexual assault research than of skepticism regarding breast cancer or alcohol abuse research. In Study 2 (N = 254), a standard self-affirmation manipulation failed to alter the hostile sexism-skepticism relation. Given that people deny science when it contradicts their ideology, it was posited that the research substantiating sexual assault had clashed with hostilely sexist views of women. Strategies beyond standard self-affirmation interventions, such as scientific literacy psychoeducation, may thus be needed to effectively communicate sexual assault-relevant science to hostile audiences.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2023-11-27T08:13:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231215373
       
  • At Least She Is Doing Something' Women Do Not Prefer a Woman Who Confronts
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anja K. Munder, Julia C. Becker, Nadja Salvatierra Ruiz, Oliver Christ
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      We examined how female (and male) observers evaluated a woman who confronts gender-based discrimination expressing a distancing motive (distance oneself from other women) compared to different types of nondistancing motives. We were interested in the distancing motive, because it has ambivalent implications for women (opposition to discrimination and potential for prejudice reduction vs. disparaging women). In three preregistered online vignette experiments (N1 = 404 women and men; N2 = 295 women, N3 = 742 women and men; with men as control groups), participants evaluated a female professional who confronted gender-based discrimination, implying either an individual motive (improve individual situation), a group motive (improve women's group status), or a distancing motive, all compared to a condition where the woman did not confront at all. Although women perceived distancing-motivated confrontation as more effective and beneficial for women than no confrontation, they evaluated the distancing-motivated confronter equally negatively as the nonconfronter. Furthermore, effects of gender group (Studies 1 and 2) and feminist identification (Studies 2 and 3) and comparing women's to men's evaluations (Studies 1 and 3) overall indicate that the confrontation motives’ implications (e.g., devaluation of women) for people's identities (e.g., feminist women vs. feminist men) shape the evaluation of a confronter. These results encourage those who have contact with targets of gender-based discrimination to reflect on how their own identity may influence their reaction toward the target.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T12:57:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231207052
       
  • Book Review:>Mary Climbs In: The Journeys of Bruce Springsteen's Women
           Fans by Mangione, L., & Luff, D.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Katherine Skillestad Winans
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2023-11-15T07:58:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231214208
       
  • Reproductive Justice in the Post-Roe v. Wade Era: Examining Reactions to
           Dobbs v. Jackson and Psychological Distress Among Cisgender Women and
           People Assigned Female at Birth

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      Authors: Laurel B. Watson, Jacob M. Germain
      Abstract: Psychology of Women Quarterly, Ahead of Print.
      In the present study, we examined relations among reactions to the Dobbs v. Jackson court ruling (heretofore adverse reactions), psychological distress, collective action, and abortion history among cisgender women and people assigned female at birth. Specifically, we examined the ways in which the relation between adverse reactions to the Dobbs v. Jackson decision and psychological distress may vary according to involvement in reproductive justice and antiabortion collective action and abortion history. Results (n = 894) revealed that adverse reactions were significantly positively related to psychological distress. Furthermore, involvement in reproductive justice collective action was significantly positive to psychological distress whereas the relation between antiabortion collective action and psychological distress was nonsignificant. The positive relation between adverse reactions and psychological distress was exacerbated by high levels of involvement in reproductive justice and weakened by low levels of involvement in antiabortion collective action, and these relations did not vary according to abortion history. In addition, the relation between involvement in antiabortion collective action and psychological distress was significant and positive among those who had had an abortion and nonsignificant for those who had not. These findings reveal the importance of mental health providers attending to their clients’ abortion-related beliefs and histories, involvement in collective action, and psychological distress. Additional online materials for this article are available on PWQ's website at https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/03616843231210219.
      Citation: Psychology of Women Quarterly
      PubDate: 2023-11-06T06:10:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03616843231210219
       
 
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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1648 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (262 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (90 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (56 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (937 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)

WOMEN'S STUDIES (175 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 173 of 173 Journals sorted by number of followers
Women & Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 310)
Gender & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
Urban Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Gender & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Gender, Work & Organization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Gender, Place & Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Gender Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Violence Against Women     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Gender, Sexuality & Feminism     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Hypatia : A Journal of Feminist Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Feminist, Gender and Women Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Feminist Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Gender & History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Feminist Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Feminist Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Feminist Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Communication Papers : Media Literacy & Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Gender and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Feminist Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Gender Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Women's History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Gender, Social Policy & the Law     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Political Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Black Women, Gender & Families     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
International Feminist Journal of Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Studies in Gender and Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Violence and Gender     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Feminist Criminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Feminism & Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Gender and Language     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Middle East Women's Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Early Modern Women : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
European Journal of Women's Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Assuming Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Contemporary Women's Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Psychology & Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Australian Feminist Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Gender, Technology and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Women's History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
WSQ: Women's Studies Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian Feminist Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Religion and Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Psychology of Sexual Orientation and Gender Diversity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Women Against Violence : An Australian Feminist Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Atlantis : Critical Studies in Gender, Culture & Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Gender-Based Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Women Politics & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Gender Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Nashim : A Journal of Jewish Women's Studies & Gender Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Indian Journal of Gender Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Psychology of Women Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Catalyst : Feminism, Theory, Technoscience     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Gender and Behaviour     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Women’s Health Physical Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Gender Studies in Developing Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Clio. Women, Gender, History     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Feminist Anthropology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Women's Studies International Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Gender and Power     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Affilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Feminist Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Women's Studies : An inter-disciplinary journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Frontiers : A Journal of Women Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Feminist Formations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Feminist German Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Medieval Feminist Forum : Journal of the Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
The Women : Annual Research Journal of Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Genre, sexualité & société     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Girlhood Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Lilith: A Feminist History Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Interdisciplinary Feminist Thought     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
History of Women in the Americas     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Women, Gender, and Families of Color     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Women in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Feminist Philosophy Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Politics and Gender     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Meridians : feminism, race, transnationalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Women's Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
feminists@law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Women's Studies in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Women in Judaism : A Multidisciplinary e-Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GÉNEROS - Multidisciplinary Journal of Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Women and Gender in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Women & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Nora, Nordic Journal of Women's Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Women: A Cultural Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Legacy : A Journal of American Women Writers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Journal of Women and the Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Canadian Woman Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of International Women's Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Redescriptions : Political Thought, Conceptual History and Feminist Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Feminist Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Women & Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ninepatch : A Creative Journal for Women and Gender Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Family Strengths     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Women in French Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Michigan Journal of Gender and Law     Free   (Followers: 3)
UCLA Women's Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ABO : Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Feminist Modernist Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Columbia Journal of Gender and Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Whatever : A Transdisciplinary Journal of Queer Theories and Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the European Society of Women in Theological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
NAN Nü     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Feminist Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Recherches féministes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
William & Mary Journal of Women and the Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Women's Entrepreneurship and Education (JWEE)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos Pagu     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Estudos Feministas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Les cahiers du CEDREF     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ayn Rand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Palimpsest : A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
U.S.-Japan Women's Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Women’s Health, Issues & Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
OA Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PALASTReN : Jurnal Studi Gender     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Gênero e Diversidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
La Manzana de la Discordia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Gender Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexuality, Gender & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ambigua : Revista de Investigaciones sobre Género y Estudios Culturales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Queer Cats Journal of LGBTQ Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sextant : Revue de recherche interdisciplinaire sur le genre et la sexualité     Open Access  
Simone de Beauvoir Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Kvinder, Køn & Forskning / Women, Gender & Research     Open Access  
DUODA : estudis de la diferència sexual     Open Access  
wH2O : The Journal of Gender and Water     Open Access  
iQual : Revista de Género e Igualdad     Open Access  
Raudem : Revista de Estudios de las Mujeres     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for kjønnsforskning     Open Access  
Marwah : Jurnal Perempuan, Agama dan Jender     Open Access  
Journal of Obstetrics and Women's Diseases     Open Access  
Musas : Revista de Investigación en Mujer, Salud y Sociedad     Open Access  
Akdeniz Kadın Çalışmaları ve Toplumsal Cinsiyet Dergisi / Mediterranean Journal of Gender and Women’s Studies     Open Access  
Nomadías     Open Access  
Sawwa : Jurnal Studi Gender     Open Access  
Revista Interdisciplinaria de Estudios de Género de El Colegio de México     Open Access  
Cuestiones de género: de la igualdad y la diferencia     Open Access  
Antyajaa : Indian Journal of Women and Social Change     Hybrid Journal  
Debate Feminista     Open Access  
Revista Periódicus     Open Access  
Lectora : Revista de Dones i Textualitat     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies     Full-text available via subscription  
La camera blu. Rivista di studi di genere     Open Access  
EGALITA     Open Access  
QJB : Querelles. Jahrbuch für Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung     Open Access  
Revista Feminismos     Open Access  
querelles-net : Rezensionszeitschrift für Frauen- und Geschlechterforschung     Open Access  
Investigaciones Feministas     Open Access  
Agenda     Partially Free  
La ventana. Revista de estudios de género     Open Access  
La Aljaba     Open Access  
Storia delle Donne     Open Access  
Mora (Buenos Aires)     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Andrología     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Impotence Research     Hybrid Journal  
Hawwa     Hybrid Journal  
Aspasia     Full-text available via subscription  

           

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