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Journal of Philosophical Logic
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.886
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-0433 - ISSN (Online) 0022-3611
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Wright’s Strict Finitistic Logic in the Classical Metatheory: The
           Propositional Case

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      Abstract: Abstract Crispin Wright in his 1982 paper argues for strict finitism, a constructive standpoint that is more restrictive than intuitionism. In its appendix, he proposes models of strict finitistic arithmetic. They are tree-like structures, formed in his strict finitistic metatheory, of equations between numerals on which concrete arithmetical sentences are evaluated. As a first step towards classical formalisation of strict finitism, we propose their counterparts in the classical metatheory with one additional assumption, and then extract the propositional part of ‘strict finitistic logic’ from it and investigate. We will provide a sound and complete pair of a Kripke-style semantics and a sequent calculus, and compare with other logics. The logic lacks the law of excluded middle and Modus Ponens and is weaker than classical logic, but stronger than any proper intermediate logics in terms of theoremhood. In fact, all the other well-known classical theorems are found to be theorems. Finally, we will make an observation that models of this semantics can be seen as nodes of an intuitionistic model.
      PubDate: 2023-01-21
       
  • The Logic of Framing Effects

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      Abstract: Abstract Framing effects concern the having of different attitudes towards logically or necessarily equivalent contents. Framing is of crucial importance for cognitive science, behavioral economics, decision theory, and the social sciences at large. We model a typical kind of framing, grounded in (i) the structural distinction between beliefs activated in working memory and beliefs left inactive in long term memory, and (ii) the topic- or subject matter-sensitivity of belief: a feature of propositional attitudes which is attracting growing research attention. We introduce a class of models featuring (i) and (ii) to represent, and reason about, agents whose belief states can be subject to framing effects. We axiomatize a logic which we prove to be sound and complete with respect to the class.
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • A Class of Implicative Expansions of Belnap-Dunn Logic in which Boolean
           Negation is Definable

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      Abstract: Abstract Belnap and Dunn’s well-known 4-valued logic FDE is an interesting and useful non-classical logic. FDE is defined by using conjunction, disjunction and negation as the sole propositional connectives. Then the question of expanding FDE with an implication connective is of course of great interest. In this sense, some implicative expansions of FDE have been proposed in the literature, among which Brady’s logic BN4 seems to be the preferred option of relevant logicians. The aim of this paper is to define a class of implicative expansions of FDE in whose elements Boolean negation is definable, whence strong logics such as the paraconsistent and paracomplete logic PŁ4 and BN4 itself are definable, in addition to classical propositional logic.
      PubDate: 2023-01-09
       
  • Editorial Introduction: Substructural Logics and Metainferences

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      Abstract: Abstract The concept of substructural logic was originally introduced in relation to limitations of Gentzen’s structural rules of Contraction, Weakening and Exchange. Recent years have witnessed the development of substructural logics also challenging the Tarskian properties of Reflexivity and Transitivity of logical consequence. In this introduction we explain this recent development and two aspects in which it leads to a reassessment of the bounds of classical logic. On the one hand, standard ways of defining the notion of logical consequence in classical logic naturally induce substructural logics when admitting more than two truth values; on the other hand, these substructural logics give rise to hierarchies of metainferences that can be used to approximate classical logic at different levels.
      PubDate: 2023-01-04
       
  • Valueless Measures on Pointless Spaces

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      Abstract: On our ordinary representations of space, space is composed of indivisible, dimensionless points; extended regions are understood as infinite sets of points. Region-based theories of space reverse this atomistic picture, by taking as primitive several relations on extended regions, and recovering points as higher-order abstractions from regions. Over the years, such theories have focused almost exclusively on the topological and geometric structure of space. We introduce to region-based theories of space a new primitive binary relation (‘qualitative probability’) that is tied to measure. It expresses that one region is smaller than or equal in size to another. Algebraic models of our theory are separation σ-algebras with qualitative probability: \((\mathbb {B}, \ll , \preceq )\) , where \(\mathbb {B}\) is a Boolean σ-algebra, ≪ is a separation relation on \(\mathbb {B}\) , and ≼ is a qualitative probability on \(\mathbb {B}\) . We show that from algebraic models of this kind we can, in an interesting class of cases, recover a compact Hausdorff topology X, together with a countably additive measure μ on a σ-field of Borel subsets of that topology, and that \((\mathbb {B}, \ll , \preceq )\) is isomorphic to a ‘standard model’ arising out of the pair (X, μ). It follows from one of our main results that any closed ball in Euclidean space, \(\mathbb {R}^{n}\) , together with Lebesgue measure arises in this way from a separation σ-algebra with qualitative probability.
      PubDate: 2022-12-12
       
  • Metainferential Reasoning on Strong Kleene Models

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      Abstract: Abstract Barrio et al. (Journal of Philosophical Logic, 49(1), 93–120, 2020) and Pailos (Review of Symbolic Logic, 2020(2), 249–268, 2020) develop an approach to define various metainferential hierarchies on strong Kleene models by transferring the idea of distinct standards for premises and conclusions from inferences to metainferences. In particular, they focus on a hierarchy named the \(\mathbb {S}\mathbb {T}\) -hierarchy where the inferential logic at the bottom of the hierarchy is the non-transitive logic ST but where each subsequent metainferential logic ‘says’ about the former logic that it is transitive. While Barrio et al. (2020) suggests that this hierarchy is such that each subsequent level ‘in some intuitive sense, more classical than’ the previous level, Pailos (2020) proposes an extension of the hierarchy through which a ‘fully classical’ metainferential logic can be defined. Both Barrio et al. (2020) and Pailos (2020) explore the hierarchy in terms of semantic definitions and every proof proceeds by a rather cumbersome reasoning about those semantic definitions. The aim of this paper is to present and illustrate the virtues of a proof-theoretic tool for reasoning about the \(\mathbb {S}\mathbb {T}\) -hierarchy and the other metainferential hierarchies definable on strong Kleene models. Using the tool, this paper argues that each level in the \(\mathbb {S}\mathbb {T}\) -hierarchy is non-classical to an equal extent and that the ‘fully classical’ metainferential logic is actually just the original non-transitive logic ST ‘in disguise’. The paper concludes with some remarks about how the various results about the \(\mathbb {S}\mathbb {T}\) -hierarchy could be seen as a guide to help us imagine what a non-transitive metalogic for ST would tell us about ST. In particular, it teaches us that ST is from the perspective of ST as metatheory not only non-transitive but also transitive.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • One Step is Enough

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      Abstract: Abstract The recent development and exploration of mixed metainferential logics is a breakthrough in our understanding of nontransitive and nonreflexive logics. Moreover, this exploration poses a new challenge to theorists like me, who have appealed to similarities to classical logic in defending the logic ST, since some mixed metainferential logics seem to bear even more similarities to classical logic than ST does. There is a whole ST-based hierarchy, of which ST itself is only the first step, that seems to become more and more classical at each level. I think this seeming is misleading: for certain purposes, anyhow, metainferential hierarchies give us no reason to move on from ST. ST is indeed only the first step on a grand metainferential adventure; but one step is enough. This paper aims to explain and defend that claim. Along the way, I take the opportunity also to develop some formal tools and results for thinking about metainferential logics more generally.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • MTV Logics

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      Abstract: Abstract This essay introduces a novel framework to studying many-valued logics – the movable truth value (or MTV) approach. After setting up the framework, we will show that a vast number of many-valued logics, and in particular many-valued logics that have previously been given very different kinds of semantics, including C, K3, LP, ST, TS, RMfde, and FDE, can all be unified within the MTV-logic approach. This alone is notable, since until now RMfde in particular has resisted attempts to provide it with the same kind of many-valued semantics as the other logics in this list. New proofs of the duality between LP and K3, and of the self-duality of C, ST, TS, and RMfde, are presented. The essay will conclude with a discussion of directions that further research might take.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Higher-level Inferences in the Strong-Kleene Setting: A Proof-theoretic
           Approach

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      Abstract: Abstract Building on early work by Girard (1987) and using closely related techniques from the proof theory of many-valued logics, we propose a sequent calculus capturing a hierarchy of notions of satisfaction based on the Strong Kleene matrices introduced by Barrio et al. (Journal of Philosophical Logic 49:93–120, 2020) and others. The calculus allows one to establish and generalize in a very natural manner several recent results, such as the coincidence of some of these notions with their classical counterparts, and the possibility of expressing some notions of satisfaction for higher-level inferences using notions of satisfaction for inferences of lower level. We also show that at each level all notions of satisfaction considered are pairwise distinct and we address some remarks on the possible significance of this (huge) number of notions of consequence.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Empty Logics

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      Abstract: Abstract TS is a logic that has no valid inferences. But, could there be a logic without valid metainferences' We will introduce TSω, a logic without metainferential validities. Notwithstanding, TSω is not as empty—i.e., uninformative—as it gets, because it has many antivalidities. We will later introduce the two-standard logic [TSω, STω], a logic without validities and antivalidities. Nevertheless, [TSω, STω] is still informative, because it has many contingencies. The three-standard logic [ \(\mathbf {TS}_{\omega }, \mathbf {ST}_{\omega }, [{\overline {\emptyset }}{\emptyset }, {\emptyset } {\overline {\emptyset }}]\) ] that we will further introduce, has no validities, no antivalidities and also no contingencies whatsoever. We will also present two more validity-empty logics. The first one has no supersatisfiabilities, unsatisfabilities and antivalidities∗. The second one has no invalidities nor non-valid-nor-invalid (meta)inferences. All these considerations justify thinking of logics as, at least, three-standard entities, corresponding, respectively, to what someone who takes that logic as correct, accepts, rejects and suspends judgement about, just because those things are, respectively, validities, antivalidities and contingencies of that logic. Finally, we will present some consequences of this setting for the monism/pluralism/nihilism debate, and show how nihilism and monism, on one hand, and nihilism and pluralism, on the other hand, may reconcile—at least according to how Gillian Russell understands nihilism, and provide some general reasons for adopting a multi-standard approach to logics.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Meta-inferences and Supervaluationism

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      Abstract: Abstract Many classically valid meta-inferences fail in a standard supervaluationist framework. This allegedly prevents supervaluationism from offering an account of good deductive reasoning. We provide a proof system for supervaluationist logic which includes supervaluationistically acceptable versions of the classical meta-inferences. The proof system emerges naturally by thinking of truth as licensing assertion, falsity as licensing negative assertion and lack of truth-value as licensing rejection and weak assertion. Moreover, the proof system respects well-known criteria for the admissibility of inference rules. Thus, supervaluationists can provide an account of good deductive reasoning. Our proof system moreover brings to light how one can revise the standard supervaluationist framework to make room for higher-order vagueness. We prove that the resulting logic is sound and complete with respect to the consequence relation that preserves truth in a model of the non-normal modal logic NT. Finally, we extend our approach to a first-order setting and show that supervaluationism can treat vagueness in the same way at every order. The failure of conditional proof and other meta-inferences is a crucial ingredient in this treatment and hence should be embraced, not lamented.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Metainferences from a Proof-Theoretic Perspective, and a Hierarchy of
           Validity Predicates

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      Abstract: Abstract I explore, from a proof-theoretic perspective, the hierarchy of classical and paraconsistent logics introduced by Barrio, Pailos and Szmuc in (Journal o f Philosophical Logic, 49, 93-120, 2021). First, I provide sequent rules and axioms for all the logics in the hierarchy, for all inferential levels, and establish soundness and completeness results. Second, I show how to extend those systems with a corresponding hierarchy of validity predicates, each one of which is meant to capture “validity” at a different inferential level. Then, I point out two potential philosophical implications of these results. (i) Since the logics in the hierarchy differ from one another on the rules, I argue that each such logic maintains its own distinct identity (contrary to arguments like the one given by Dicher and Paoli in 2019). (ii) Each validity predicate need not capture “validity” at more than one metainferential level. Hence, there are reasons to deny the thesis (put forward in Barrio, E., Rosenblatt, L. & Tajer, D. (Synthese, 2016)) that the validity predicate introduced in by Beall and Murzi in (Journal o f Philosophy, 110(3), 143–165, 2013) has to express facts not only about what follows from what, but also about the metarules, etc.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Metasequents and Tetravaluations

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      Abstract: Abstract In this paper we treat metasequents—objects which stand to sequents as sequents stand to formulas—as first class logical citizens. To this end we provide a metasequent calculus, a sequent calculus which allows us to directly manipulate metasequents. We show that the various metasequent calculi we consider are sound and complete w.r.t. appropriate classes of tetravaluations where validity is understood locally. Finally we use our metasequent calculus to give direct syntactic proofs of various collapse results, closing a problem left open in French (Ergo, 3(5), 113–131 2016).
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Derivability and Metainferential Validity

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of this article is to study the notion of derivability and its semantic counterpart in the context of non-transitive and non-reflexive substructural logics. For this purpose we focus on the study cases of the logics ST and TS. In this respect, we show that this notion doesn’t coincide, in general, with a nowadays broadly used semantic approach towards metainferential validity: the notion of local validity. Following this, and building on some previous work by Humberstone, we prove that in these systems derivability can be characterized in terms of a notion we call absolute global validity. However, arriving at these results doesn’t lead us to disregard local validity. First, because we discuss the conditions under which local, and also global validity, can be expected to coincide with derivability. Secondly, because we show how taking into account certain families of valuations can be useful to describe derivability for different calculi used to present ST and TS.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Deep ST

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      Abstract: Abstract Many analyses of notion of metainferences in the non-transitive logic ST have tackled the question of whether ST can be identified with classical logic. In this paper, we argue that the primary analyses are overly restrictive of the notion of metainference. We offer a more elegant and tractable semantics for the strict-tolerant hierarchy based on the three-valued function for the LP material conditional. This semantics can be shown to easily handle the introduction of mixed inferences, i.e., inferences involving objects belonging to more than one (meta)inferential level and solves several other limitations of the ST hierarchies introduced by Barrio, Pailos, and Szmuc.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Classical Logic is not Uniquely Characterizable

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      Abstract: Abstract I show that it is not possible to uniquely characterize classical logic when working within classical set theory. By building on recent work by Eduardo Barrio, Federico Pailos, and Damian Szmuc, I show that for every inferential level (finite and transfinite), either classical logic is not unique at that level or there exist intuitively valid inferences of that level that are not definable in modern classical set theory. The classical logician is thereby faced with a three-horned dilemma: Give up uniqueness but preserve characterizability, give up characterizability and preserve uniqueness, or (potentially) preserve both but give up modern classical set theory. After proving the main result, I briefly explore this third option by developing an account of classical logic within a paraconsistent set theory. This account of classical logic ensures unique characterizability in some sense, but the non-classical set theory also produces highly non-classical meta-results about classical logic.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Supervaluations and the Strict-Tolerant Hierarchy

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      Abstract: Abstract In a recent paper, Barrio, Pailos and Szmuc (BPS) show that there are logics that have exactly the validities of classical logic up to arbitrarily high levels of inference. They suggest that a logic therefore must be identified by its valid inferences at every inferential level. However, Scambler shows that there are logics with all the validities of classical logic at every inferential level, but with no antivalidities at any inferential level. Scambler concludes that in order to identify a logic, we at least need to look at the validities and the antivalidities of every inferential level. In this paper, I argue that this is still not enough to identify a logic. I apply BPS’s techniques in a super/sub-valuationist setting to construct a logic that has exactly the validities and antivalidities of classical logic at every inferential level. I argue that the resulting logic is nevertheless distinct from classical logic.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Conservative Translations Revisited

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      Abstract: Abstract We provide sufficient conditions for the existence of a conservative translation from a consequence system to another one. We analyze the problem in many settings, namely when the consequence systems are generated by a deductive calculus or by a logic system including both proof-theoretic and model-theoretic components. We also discuss reflection of several metaproperties with the objective of showing that conservative translations provide an alternative to proving such properties from scratch. We discuss soundness and completeness, disjunction property and metatheorem of deduction among others. We provide several illustrations of conservative translations.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • Elementary Belief Revision Operators

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      Abstract: Abstract Discussions of the issue of iterated belief revision are commonly accompanied by the presentation of three “concrete” operators: natural, restrained and lexicographic. This raises a natural question: What is so distinctive about these three particular methods' Indeed, the common axiomatic ground for work on iterated revision, the AGM and Darwiche-Pearl postulates, leaves open a whole range of alternative proposals. In this paper, we show that it is satisfaction of an additional principle of “Independence of Irrelevant Alternatives”, inspired by the literature on Social Choice, that unites and sets apart our three “elementary” revision operators. A parallel treatment of iterated belief contraction is also given, yielding a family of elementary contraction operators that includes, besides the well-known “conservative” and “moderate” operators, a new contraction operator that is related to restrained revision.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
       
  • The Final Cut

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      Abstract: Abstract In a series of works, Pablo Cobreros, Paul Égré, David Ripley and Robert van Rooij have proposed a nontransitive system (call it ‘K3LP’) as a basis for a solution to the semantic paradoxes. I critically consider that proposal at three levels. At the level of the background logic, I present a conception of classical logic on which K3LP fails to vindicate classical logic not only in terms of structural principles, but also in terms of operational ones. At the level of the theory of truth, I raise a cluster of philosophical difficulties for a K3LP-based system of naive truth, all variously related to the fact that such a system proves things that would seem already by themselves repugnant, even in the absence of transitivity. At the level of the theory of validity, I consider an extension of the K3LP-based system of naive validity that is supposed to certify that validity in that system does not fall short of naive validity, argue that such an extension is untenable in that its nontriviality depends on the inadmissibility of a certain irresistible instance of transitivity (whence the advertised “final cut”) and conclude on this basis that the K3LP-based system of naive validity cannot coherently be adopted either. At all these levels, a crucial role is played by certain metaentailments and by the extra strength they afford over the corresponding entailments: on the one hand, such strength derives from considerations that would seem just as compelling in a general nontransitive framework, but, on the other hand, such strength wreaks havoc in the particular setting of K3LP.
      PubDate: 2022-11-14
      DOI: 10.1007/s10992-022-09682-4
       
 
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