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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Journal of Educational Thought / Revue de la Pensée Educative
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0022-0701
Published by U of Calgary Homepage  [18 journals]
  • Education and the Murdering of Children and Teachers by Guns: What Can We
           Do'

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      Authors: Ian Winchester
      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Morality and the Liberal Arts: Six Axes of Connection

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      Authors: Jeffrey Scheuer
      Pages: 5 - 22
      Abstract: Abstract: The universe of liberal education is a moral one because it involves communities, and therefore the potential for competition and conflict. However, the ways in which morality and the liberal arts intersect are complex, problematic, and contested. This essay explores six axes along which liberal education is animated by moral concerns: the axis of policy; that of language
      and communication; within the curriculum (particularly, but not exclusively, in the humanities); in pedagogy; in terms of moral
      agency and character; and finally, in terms of the mission of liberal education. Mapping these six dimensions doesn’t resolve fundamental moral problems, but offers a framework for understanding them more clearly and for managing those
      “essentially contestable” debates that cannot be resolved.
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Sacred Ground: Higher Education and the Importance of Place

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      Authors: Jeffery P. Aper
      Pages: 23 - 30
      Abstract: Abstract: The growing emphasis on cyberspace as a primary locus for the teaching and learning efforts of modern colleges and universities belies larger issues of connection, meaning making, and community necessary to human growth and well-being. College and university campuses can be critical loci of such functions if they are understood as sacred places devoted to ideals of growth, development, community, communication, and especially of freedom of inquiry, expression, and conscience. Though the current pandemic has reinforced reliance on online methods of instruction and interaction, the critical longer term needs of individuals and society at large are served by a renewal of the commitment to college and university campuses as places dedicated to the essential ideals of respectful polity, comity, and mutuality.
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • “What, Then, Is Our Task'”

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      Authors: David W. Jardine, Ellyn Lyle
      Pages: 31 - 42
      Abstract: Abstract: This dialogic inquiry broaches something burgeoningsomething brand new and age-oldas we wonder about our tasks as critical scholars in the field of education. Increasingly, education seems awash in a tide of performing deep-feltness as sometimes over-wrought but maybe well-intended White scholars scramble toward Reconciliation. In conversation with each other, we wonder how honest and difficult conversations that surface more truth about our own ancestors could better prepare us to wade through what arises so that we can arrive at a place where reconciliation might be possible.
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Crisis Response in Higher Education: Insights from Educational Leaders

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      Authors: Glory Ovie
      Pages: 43 - 68
      Abstract: Abstract: Crises can be sudden, disrupt routines of systems, and make significant lasting impact on people’s lives and property. Unfortunately, higher education institutions are not immune to crises and how they respond is crucial and critical. This qualitative narrative inquiry study explored how leaders in a higher education institution responded to crises events. Firsthand accounts were gathered through the purposive snowball sampling technique in conjunction with face-to-face semi-structured interviews and field texts. Interviews were conducted with eleven education leaders and external partners. Findings suggest that several factors such as crisis training for leaders, internal and external collaborations and building a crisis management team were important factors that impacts an effective crises response. The findings, insights, and experiences from this study allow for a deeper understanding, help current and future higher educational leaders better understand crises situations and how they can prepare for future issues.
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Dominant Leadership Styles: A Multi-Flex leadership styles blend towards
           the Educational Effectiveness

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      Authors: Mani Man Singh Rajbhandari
      Pages: 69 - 88
      Abstract: Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore the dominant leadership styles among the four traditional leadership styles: 1) Autocratic, 2) Bureaucratic, 3) Democratic and 4) Laissez –Faire/Free rein/Abdicratic.
      Within these four traditional leadership styles, this study attempts to explore the dominant leadership styles using the theory of multi-flex
      leadership styles blends. A conceptual theoretical construction amongst the
      leadership styles was correlated to categories associated with multi-flex leadership styles. This approach allowed for the four traditional leadership styles to be investigated more thoroughly. These findings that resulted from this exploration highlight how the six multi-flex leadership styles blend with traditional leadership styles. Moreover, blending three or more
      leadership styles produces lesser multi-flex leadership styles that can be associated with more dominant approaches to leadership styles. Dominant leadership styles were predetermined by the context, followership domain and the leader. Any two leadership styles can generate multi-flex
      leadership styles (higher applicability of one styles and lesser to another or vice versa). Thus, the leadership applicability of these styles generate
      twelve sets of multi-flex leadership styles. Not all of these leadership multiflex blends can produce reliable information about contextual settings or the followership domain. Therefore, the appropriateness of leadership blend is a pivotal area that a leader must be aware of in order to understand both the demand from the context, the followership needs and the capability to integrate one dominant style with another. Multi-flex style blend can even be more essential during a crisis. For example, during the COVID-19 pandemic, which instigated the need for change, there was a
      need for a change in leadership styles. The higher applicability of any one leadership style with one that is less applicable can be considered a dominant leadership style. Thus, a higher applicability of any one leadership style using the multi-flex blend approach may be considered a dominant leadership style.
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Diversity and Exclusion: Confronting the Campus Free Speech Crisis

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      Authors: Kevin Gosine
      Pages: 89 - 94
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
      Issue No: Vol. 55, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
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