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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Andrews University Seminary Student Journal
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2576-063X
Published by Andrews University Homepage  [5 journals]
  • ADVENTISM IN EAST AFRICA: WERE THE INITIAL MISSION STRATEGIES
           EFFECTIVE'

    • Authors: Christopher R. Mwashinga
      Abstract: The Seventh-day Adventist Church (SDA) is one of the fastest-growing Christian denominations in the world. Studies show that the SDA Church in Africa in general and East Africa, in particular, has recorded tremendous growth since it was introduced in the region in the early 1900s. This article surveys the first fifty years of the beginning and development of the SDA Church in East African (1903–1953). It focuses on the three initial mission strategies employed by early Adventist missionaries to East Africa, including education, medical care, and publishing work. Early Adventist missionaries to East Africa established educational and medical institutions alongside publishing houses to reach indigenous people in the region. These entities, which were strategically scattered throughout the region, provided education, medical services, and Christian literature to the local populations. By using church membership growth as an evaluative criterion, the article concludes that the three mission strategies were effective in fulfilling the goal of Christian world mission, which is to make disciples of all nations and win converts to Christianity. The article reveals that dedication and hard work on the part of the Adventist missionaries and native Africans, coupled with clear mission strategies, facilitated the rapid growth of Adventism in East Africa in the first fifty years.
      PubDate: Mon, 11 May 2020 12:11:31 PDT
       
  • A REVIEW OF THE HISTORICAL ROOTS OF THE UNION CONFERENCE ORGANIZATIONAL
           STRUCTURE IN THE SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH AND INTER-STRUCTURAL
           ACCOUNTABILITY

    • Authors: Eric Louw
      Abstract: Over the last few years, a debate regarding the inter-structural relationship of each level of the Seventh-day Adventist Church has grown to the point where it can be polarizing, regardless of which side of the debate one is on. This tension has likely come about, at least in part, as a response to the ongoing gender role debate, which has given rise to the emergence of an “us vs. them” mentality between those who agree and disagree with the decisions of the General Conference Sessions and its Executive Committee. This paper looks at some of the historical data related to the 1901 reorganization in the Seventh-day Adventist Church. This may help alleviate some of this “us vs. them” tension by familiarizing each side with some of the lesser-known historical details so that continued dialogue includes a more complete, common understanding. It evaluates the historical roots from which the Seventh-day Adventist Church developed union conferences, why union conferences were needed, and how they related to the General Conference shortly after their formation. A few discoveries are made: (1) The Seventh-day Adventist Church was a pioneer in the way that union conferences were organized to address the needs of local fields; (2) the reorganization was necessary in order to reach the world more effectively by minimizing the obstacles caused by the limitations and abuse of the centralized decision-making of a few leaders; (3) there appears to have been the clear intention that union conferences would remain accountable to the General Conference on matters of policy; and (4) union conference autonomy was built on a foundation of bilateral trust, which was necessary to press forward in the mission of the church. How these discoveries specifically apply to more recent debates are left to the discretion of the reader, though pertinent questions for further evaluation and study are suggested.
      PubDate: Mon, 11 May 2020 12:11:23 PDT
       
  • THE CONTRADICTORY INTERPRETATIONS OF GENESIS 4:7—ELLEN G. WHITE VERSUS
           THE THEOLOGY OF ORDINATION STUDY COMMITTEE POSITION 1

    • Authors: Michael F. Younker
      Abstract: Reflecting a widespread tension throughout the world of biblical interpretation, Ellen G. White and the Theology of Ordination Study Committee Position 1 (TOSC1) propose contradictory interpretations of Genesis 4:7. Given the content of Genesis 4:7, which addresses issues relating to psychology and authority, which are often connected with Genesis 3:16 and gender, and its use by the TOSC1, the promotion of the TOSC1 interpretation of Genesis 4:7 within Seventh-day Adventist circles as well as broader Christianity will encourage further unpleasant confrontations concerning the issues related to the psychology of gender and authority in Scripture.
      PubDate: Mon, 11 May 2020 12:11:16 PDT
       
  • THE SEVENTY-WEEKS PROPHECY OF DANIEL 9:24–27 AND FIRST-CENTURY AD JEWISH
           MESSIANIC EXPECTATION

    • Authors: David J. Hamstra
      Abstract: For Christians who interpret the seventy weeks of Daniel 9:24–27 by correlating the coming of the messiah with the arrival of Jesus Christ, the question of whether Jesus could have been identified as the predicted messiah at the time of fulfillment is theologically significant given biblical claims of prophetic intelligibility. There is a consensus among scholars affirming the view that interpretation of the seventy-weeks prophecy led to a climate of messianic expectation among certain sectors of first-century Jewish society. This position is supported by the explicit connection of the seventy weeks to the anticipated arrival of a messiah in Melchizedek (11Q13). Josephus provides an independent line of circumstantial evidence that dates this expectation to the first century. This warrants the theological conclusion that the prophecy was, in principle, intelligible to those among whom it was fulfilled.
      PubDate: Mon, 11 May 2020 12:11:08 PDT
       
  • EUCHARIST AS SACRIFICE: A STUDY INTO THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE EUCHARIST AS A
           SACRIFICE OF THE BELIEVER IN THE FIRST AND SECOND CENTURIES

    • Authors: David Williams
      Abstract: The sacrifice of the believer at the Eucharist can nowhere be found in the Adventist understanding of the Lord’s Supper. However, Adventists may find value in reexamining the early church’s teachings on sacrifice. While the early church deviated from Scripture in its primary teachings on the Eucharist, they maintained the scriptural notion of the spiritual sacrifice of the worshiper— something Adventists would do well to practice. This article examines the liturgical orders and teachings of the apostolic fathers, apologists, and early liturgical orders of the first and second centuries. The author considers four major issues relating to the Eucharist as sacrifice: first, martyrdom as sacrifice in the first century; second, the transition from the Old Testament concept of sacrifice to the spiritual sacrifice of the believer; third, the Eucharist as a business transaction; and fourth, the priesthood at the Eucharist.
      PubDate: Mon, 11 May 2020 12:11:00 PDT
       
  • Editorial

    • Authors: Denis Kaiser
      PubDate: Mon, 11 May 2020 12:10:53 PDT
       
  • Full Issue

    • PubDate: Mon, 11 May 2020 12:10:45 PDT
       
 
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