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  Subjects -> PHILOSOPHY (Total: 762 journals)
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Humanistic Management Journal
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  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2366-603X - ISSN (Online) 2366-6048
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • Love and Organizing in the Context of the Base of the Pyramid: An
           Integrative Justice Perspective

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper provides an overview of the Integrative Justice Model (IJM) for impoverished populations that was introduced in the marketing literature in the year 2009. The IJM was developed as a normative ethical framework to guide the growing corporate interest in the base of the pyramid (BoP) market to be fair and just to all parties but particularly the impoverished customer. In an impersonal marketplace that often exploits the less advantaged participant, the IJM provides five characteristics of “just” market situations. These are an authentic non-exploitative engagement, value co-creation, investment in future consumption, stakeholder interest representation and long-term profit management. At the heart of the IJM is love that flows from a recognition of the inherent dignity of those at the BoP and the need to respect and uphold that dignity in the marketplace. The hope is that as companies embrace the IJM in their functioning it will result in a marketplace that is fair, just, humanistic and loving.
      PubDate: 2024-07-03
       
  • Love in Action: Agreements in a Large Microfinance Bank that Scale
           Ecosystem-Wide Flourishing, Organizational Impact, and Total Value
           Generated

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      Abstract: Abstract Scaling ecosystem-wide flourishing, organizational impact, and the total value generated across an organization’s ecosystem of stakeholders is a manifestation of love in action. Many organizations are figuring out how. With a large, longitudinal dataset this research is uncovering the agreements enabling that scaling. This research note highlights the research design and early findings. The research design is based on interviews, surveys, and systemic strategy. Strategic systems assessment, stakeholder interviews, workshops with leadership, calibration with functional leaders were used to determine what to measure. Wave 1 of data collection was completed in 2021. Wave 2 is in progress, with following waves every 6 months. With survey responses from 70,700 clients and 9,554 collaborators in Wave 1, the mean level of flourishing and organizational impact is high, relative to the levels found in over 164,000 groups surveyed in 126 countries. While the mean level is high, there is a distribution from high to low across the hundreds of service offices of the business, highlighting significant differences in how the offices work, such as putting the person at the center in everything they do, and the quality of the relationships within the company and with their clients. The survey uses established measures. The Total Value Generated framework is new.
      PubDate: 2024-06-27
       
  • The Manager and Love: Evoking a Loving Inquiry in a Group Setting

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      Abstract: Abstract Neuroscientists, psychologists, educators, and management scholars propose that the current emphasis on intellect and reason in education and business over values such as love, connectedness, and compassion are at the root of many business ethical failures and societal problems. They argue not that reason should be abandoned in education and business management but rather that it needs to be balanced with values such as love because these attributes are innately human, enabling wise decision-making. This is a difficult task in the context of the current ethos of intellect and reason that dominates education and management. To correct the imbalance, we must explore ways of preparing future managers to accept the relevance and importance of learning to develop and embody love. Through our research, we provide an experience of community love by creating a caring, receptive, personal container. We engaged in the practice of Collaborative Autoethnography, integrating the Nguni South African concept of Ubuntu, to explore, research, and demonstrate the experience of love in a community setting. To support this practice, we framed it against the background of integrative justice, focusing on authentic engagement without exploitative intent as per Santos and Laczniak’s (2015) Integrative Justice Model (IJM) and built upon some common contexts from which love is considered such as Catholic Social Thought (CST) and indigenous cultures. We analyzed why and how love might be implemented in education and management and how Collaborative Autoethnography can be applied in connecting with others to research, learn from, and build upon the experience of love and connectedness.
      PubDate: 2024-06-24
       
  • Love and Flourishing in a Business Organization: The Practical Wisdom of
           Barry-Wehmiller, Inc.

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      Abstract: Abstract Organizations can encourage the development of networks of loving relations and an overall culture of love that promotes flourishing. Although high-level expressions of this reality are not yet statistically normal, they are morally normative—and much can be gained from studying the relatively successful outliers. These exemplar organizations serve as pathfinders for groups that desire greater flourishing and wonder about practices that might work even in settings currently characterized by zero-sum competition. This article frames meanings of “love” and “flourishing” that are practical in a business context—containing implications for other sectors characterized by a sense of collaboration, including sectors where scarcity and antagonism are normal (i.e., most human systems). For this purpose, we focus on Barry-Wehmiller, Inc. We explore some of the ritualized practices within this corporation, as reflected in the published literature and in the experiences and observations of Brian Wellinghoff (BW’s Senior Director, Leadership and Outreach), that have helped this organization to emerge as a beacon for others. We suggest that the degree to which such rituals are skillfully enacted helps to shape the flourishing experiences of the people within Barry-Wehmiller’s span of care—and serves as a beacon to those in other companies interested in learning from Barry-Wehmiller.
      PubDate: 2024-06-20
       
  • An Anatomy of Human Dignity; Dissecting the Heart of Humanistic Management

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      Abstract: Abstract Human dignity is introduced in the humanistic management school to distinguish humanistic from economistic perspectives on organizational business practices. Placing human dignity at the core of management leads to a different outlook on doing business, organizing and leading. Within the humanistic management literature, there are several distinct paths to ground human dignity in humanistic management. One school views human dignity as a form of motivation, another focuses on its value-laden components, and still others view human dignity as a form of human development. We introduce relational anthropology as a fourth possibility, emphasizing relationality in the notion of human dignity, with love at its core as the essence of human experience. However, as the experience of human dignity is universally human, culturally specific and extremely personal, interpretations of experienced dignity could be very different for different people. We continue to discuss a cosmopolitan view on human dignity, in which we reject both naïve universalism and lazy relativism, pointing to the challenge of leading moral plurality. We close by summarizing the different approaches to human dignity in a conciliatory framework and outline why we believe an explicit emphasis on qualitative, phenomenological research is the best way forward, bringing love to the stage as the potentially unifying principle for humanistic management.
      PubDate: 2024-06-19
       
  • Dignity-Infused and Trauma-Informed, Contemplative Pedagogy for Preventing
           Moral Injury and Promoting Wellbeing

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      Abstract: Abstract Although there is growing recognition that trauma can negatively impact students in business and management, discussions have focused primarily upon medically recognized conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involving serious forms of violence or harm. Notwithstanding the criticality of this focus, there has been limited consideration of moral injury (MI), which occurs when deeply held moral values are violated, resulting in profound relational, spiritual, and psychological suffering. To address the latter, this article focuses on four areas. First, the nature of teaching-related MI is clarified through its elaboration and distinction from PTSD. Second, the violations of moral values associated with MI are problematized within humanistic management education, in which the protection and promotion of dignity and its associated values are seen as foundational for wellbeing. Third, trauma-informed (TI) teaching and a prospective alternative, that of contemplative pedagogy (CP), are evaluated for their potential in the teaching-related prevention of MI and promotion of wellbeing. Despite its potential benefits, TI teaching is insufficient for these purposes. CP offers substantial advantages; however, is best implemented within the context of dignity-infused, TI teaching principles. Fourth, a holistic constellation comprising a dignity-infused, TI-CP for supporting humanistic assumptions in management education as well as a paradigmatic shift from economistic to humanistic management is described. Based on this constellation, and in contrast to an economistic metaphor of education as banking (Freire in Pedagogy of the oppressed. Penguin Books, London, 1970/1993), a humanistic metaphor of gardening for ecological (i.e., relational) vitalization, as well as co-creative humanistic innovation in the management classroom (and beyond) is offered.
      PubDate: 2024-06-19
       
  • The Development of a New Model of Educational Leadership: Leadership for
           Teacher Flourishing

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper contributes to a broader movement in which the telos of leadership is flourishing, and the primary role of a leader is to promote the flourishing of their team members through creating a loving environment. In support of this, we propose a new perspective on, and associated model, of educational leadership: ‘leadership for teacher flourishing’ (LFTF). This model was developed through a literature review and a mixed methods research project across 78 British schools with collaborative and participatory elements which asked how school leaders could improve the flourishing of teachers. The quantitative and qualitative findings suggested that key factors in enabling teachers to flourish, and therefore incorporated into the model ‘LFTF’, were positive relationships; opportunities for growth; positive impact on subjective wellbeing; and increasing teachers’ sense of meaning at work. The ways leaders could impact these factors were reported as: being supportive and compassionate; being trustworthy; giving teachers autonomy; enabling teachers to grow; being appreciative and focusing on strengths; and enabling teachers to do meaningful work. It was also found that not only leaders could influence flourishing; teachers with no formal leadership role could also positively impact teacher flourishing. It is suggested that virtuous dispositions in leaders are required to ensure they are consistent in acting in ways that promote flourishing. We argue that this integration of virtue and a desire to promote flourishing is properly understood as love. The participatory and collaborative phase of the research showed that teachers wanted autonomy in deciding what would help them to flourish. The conclusion sets out the implications of this research for policy on the training and selection of school leaders, to improve not only the flourishing of teachers, but also pupils and communities.
      PubDate: 2024-06-14
       
  • Love and Meaningful Organizing. Introduction to a Special Issue and a
           Tribute to Prof. Dr. Manuel Guillén

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      PubDate: 2024-06-13
       
  • Neither a Beast Nor a God: A Philosophical Anthropology of Humanistic
           Management

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      Abstract: Abstract Is freedom and capability enough to sustain our well-being' For human flourishing to progress, defer, and avoid decline, managers as persons must grow in virtue to transcend to the ultimate source of the good. In our definition of a person we develop an anthropology of gift through the communication of one self to another and whose form is love, the willing the good of the other. We ask four questions about the humanistic manager as a person: what is the goal, end, good; what form, structure guides the manager; what materials, resources, technology, and context does the manager use within the structure to meet the end and exceed the goals, what is the means of effecting the change needed to meet the manager’s goals. Each of these questions form the basis to construct a philosophical anthropology of humanistic management. To these four questions we add three types of finality: the usual absolute terminal and horizontally immanent finalities plus the vertical finality of every growing and developing person among other persons in community. The need for a philosophical anthropology derives from a concomitant ethical requirement of what does and ought the manager, as person, undertake. What and how the person knows, wills, acts on provides the reality within which the manager, as person, operates. Along the way we will visit topics of transcendence, secularism, vulnerability, authentic personhood, and virtue. We conclude with a description, which is a dynamically evolving scheme of the meaning of a manager in the world, the social, and perhaps, the terminal goods of order. We move far from the homo farber of a technology-led world whose thought conforms being. We have begun to extend our manager into the species homo transcendens where being conforms thought and responsible action. We conclude with a sketch on the emerging role of spirituality in the workplace with connections to compassionate leadership, organizations as sites for healing and growth, and examples from the experience of humanistic organization who seem to have survived and thrived centuries of global operations. From an anthropology of gift we can identify several implications for managers. Humanistic management education would subsume the rational choice hegemony of economic modeling to a technological subset of tools, subject to the goals and nature of human persons. The scientism of thinking that psychology, sociology, political science, and economics would suitably describe, explain, and model human decisions would be replaced by an overarching framework leading to higher levels of knowledge, especially wisdom based educational experiences and content based on the natural integrity of human beings as learners. Since all technology follows, rather than leads, persons in an anthropology of gift, workplace practices would be founded in the structures immanent in persons and communities of persons. This would imply practices which transcend appraisal and assessment of performance to heights of contemplation and implementation of meaning in every task. Instead of beginning with a deficit of “what’s in it for me'” practices can begin with the surplus “how can I help you'” Proposed are practices which impound wisdom-based attributes of compassion, active listening, alterity, mercy, companionate and agapic love in decision analyses, interpretations of results, and incentives. The objective of the humanistically managed organization under the aegis of an anthropology of gift would be to minimize the maximum grief for the the most vulnerable. The objective would be applied as a policy across all authorities delegated by jurisdictions over organizations, and by boards, oversight groups, over decisions within organizations. This view from an anthropology of gift is consonant with emerging definitions of organizations as healing spaces where a balance of solidarity and subsidiarity guide decisions as opposed to simplistically applying supply and demand trade-offs.
      PubDate: 2024-06-10
       
  • Dignity, Humanistic Management, and the Process of Social Innovation Query
           ID="Q1" Text="Please confirm if the article title is
           correctly identified. Amend if necessary." Resolved="yes"

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      Abstract: Abstract Numerous social and environmental issues are under increasing time constraints, and society is placing greater demands on organizations that foster greater social inclusion, well-being, and human flourishing. In this regard, social innovation research has gained relevance as it provides a rich context to examine how to generate and prioritize dignity-based organizing more effectively. This research aims to examine how the concepts of dignity and humanistic management can shape social innovation processes that generate better results for organizations and society. Building on humanistic management and social innovation literature, a qualitative case study explores how the notions of dignity and humanistic management practices are present at every stage of the social innovation process (origin, mobilization, execution, and integration). This paper is one of the few studies exploring the relationship between humanistic management principles and social innovation processes, filling a significant gap in the literature with important praxeological implications.
      PubDate: 2024-05-06
       
  • Perceived Drivers of Engagement and Disengagement in Workplace Wellbeing
           Programmes; Qualitative Evidence from Employees in the Republic of Ireland
           

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      Abstract: Abstract This study employs a qualitative approach to investigate the factors influencing engagement in Irish employee wellbeing programmes. Two stages of data collection were conducted, involving 52 employees completing open-ended questionnaires in Stage 1 and 23 participants interviewed in Stage 2. Three themes emerged from the thematic analysis of the data: (1) communicating wellbeing initiatives; (2) creating and maintaining interest in wellbeing; and (3) challenges to employee wellbeing. The three themes and their subthemes provide qualitative evidence from employees on the barriers to and drivers of workplace wellbeing initiative utilisation through the lenses of Resource utilisation Theory and Culture of Health. The findings underscore the importance of supportive environments and effective design in enhancing programme utilisation, along with the need to offer targeted initiatives addressing secondary and tertiary wellbeing issues. By addressing shortcomings in Irish workplaces, this research contributes to advancing the effectiveness and impact of workplace wellbeing initiatives at multiple levels: organisational, individual, and governmental.
      PubDate: 2024-04-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s41463-024-00173-z
       
  • Integrated Self-Determined Motivation and Charitable Causes: The Link to
           Eudaimonia in Humanistic Management

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      Abstract: Abstract This article explores the synthesis between the theories and practice of Humanistic Management and Self-Determination Theory of Motivation (SDT). Moving from Economistic to Humanistic Management involves considering human action as uniting internal and external dimensions, having ethics as a guide for a good life, viewing society as a community of people, and being open to beauty and transcendence. The recently elucidated 50-year legacy of SDT describes it as a truly human science of motivation that takes into consideration our attributes as persons, including our capacities for awareness and self-regulation. It also focuses on one’s capacity for autonomy as it applies to individual functioning, interpersonal relationships, and societal interactions. SDT posits a continuum of motivational regulation ranging from amotivation through controlled to autonomous motivation. The current empirical study of Millennials' motivation to support local and global hunger charities based on social media communication employs the complete SDT continuum. Digitalization and globalization have fundamentally changed the nature of human communication. Millennials are central to the humanistic functioning of today’s society. The study findings of the dominance of integrated personal value autonomy demonstrates the necessity of assessing the complete set of SDT motivations in various contexts and situations. Given that SDT and Humanistic Management investigations have mainly involved corporations, one must also be open to investigating the humanistic management of non-profit social and governmental organizations. The non-greenwashed triple sustainability values of corporate, social and environmental good are pertinent targets for Humanistic Management research and Practices.
      PubDate: 2024-04-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s41463-024-00171-1
       
  • The Humanistic Foundation to Sustainability

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      Abstract: Abstract The problem of the unsustainability of our world has a philosophical reason. This reason, this origin, is an anthropological philosophy, a reductionism. Since the Modern Age the main social organization models have been based on specific anthropological views and each of them has led to social distortions. The anthropological vision that today leads to the distortion of unsustainability is that of homo economicus. This “homo” has three fundamental characteristics: to be a perfect and complete individual; to be rational and self-centric being; to have in business his natural habitat. However, the human being is not just an economic being, but something much more complex. It is a being-with (the person does not have relationships, but is related), a being-for (the person is not only driven by needs, but also attracted by values, he has an end, a purpose) and a being-in (the person lives in a context, a habitat, an environment that he is called to take care of).
      PubDate: 2024-04-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s41463-024-00172-0
       
  • Traveling and Inclusion: A Stakeholder Approach to Tourism Experiences for
           Families with Children with Disabilities

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of this research is to propose a framework to remedy potential dignity violations to families with children with disabilities seeking tourism experiences. We build on a systematic literature review on the topic of tourism of families with children with disabilities to propose a conceptual framework of dignity protection for this segment. This framework analyzes the responsibilities of four stakeholders (service providers, government, other tourists, and families) classified into dignity thresholds, to reduce attitudinal, information, and infrastructure barriers faced by children with disabilities and their families when traveling. This paper is one of the few studies that connects the concept of dignity to the family tourism literature (with a special focus on a type of family variation neglected in terms of adequate tourism experiences) through a stakeholder approach focusing on the collaboration among actors within the industry to advance the creation of suitable tourism experiences for families with children with disabilities.
      PubDate: 2024-02-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s41463-024-00169-9
       
  • Understanding the Caste System and Its Maintenance: Brave New World’s
           World State and Ambedkar’s Stratified Hindu Society in Annihilation of
           Caste

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      Abstract: Abstract Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World contains and resembles a caste system found in Hindu society. While in Hindu society, Brahmins, Kshatriyas, Vaishyas and the Shudras comprise the caste system, in Huxley’s text, there are Alphas, Betas, Gammas, Deltas and Epsilons. With regard to the stratified Hindu society, in Annihilation of Caste, Dr B.R. Ambedkar exposed the viciousness of the caste system and how it stabilized the privilege of those in power to the detriment of the rest. Hence, with Ambedkar’s views regarding caste, the author of this article wishes to understand the caste system in Brave New World and how it is maintained. In other words, the purpose of this article is to investigate how the caste system, as seen in Brave New World, undermines individual reason and, with the fear of excommunication, absence of meaningful relationships, and love for one’s social privilege, maintains a system of graded inequality.
      PubDate: 2024-02-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s41463-024-00170-2
       
  • Employee Cognitive Workaholism and Emotional Exhaustion in a Digital
           Workplace: What Is the Role of Organisations'

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      Abstract: Abstract Using a quantitative methods approach, we examine the organisational drivers of cognitive workaholism and emotional exhaustion amongst a group of employees (N = 187) in a digital workplace based in Berlin, Germany. This study demonstrated that managers could influence cognitive workaholism through the pace of work and an employee’s perceived need to engage in off-hours work. Cognitive workaholism was also found to have a direct impact on emotional exhaustion, as did the relationship with one’s manager. Off-hours work was not found to have a direct impact on emotional exhaustion. Instead, the data suggests that off-hours working hinders an employee’s ability to detach from their work, and therefore higher levels of cognitive workaholism are observed, which then leads to higher levels of emotional exhaustion. This study highlights how management’s distribution of workload can create a situation whereby employees have constant thoughts about work, leading to emotional exhaustion. This is an important topic, given the increasing use of digital technology in modern workplaces. Specifically, off-hours work is easily facilitated through the use of technology, and this study therefore unveils the double-edged sword of technology. Hence, this topic is important for modern organisations seeking to promote sustainable employee workplace wellbeing.
      PubDate: 2024-02-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s41463-023-00164-6
       
  • What Can Moses Teach Organizations’ Leaders About Fatherly Love

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      Abstract: Abstract This study proposes that Moses’ agape and storge love of his people was the motivation for his adoption of fatherly leadership style. The study relies on a direct reading of Hebrew language version of the relevant books of the Old Testament. We provide examples that anchor Moses fatherly leadership style in biblical texts, and reference it to modern leadership thoughts and practical wisdom. Moses’ traits, such as humility, gratitude, forgiveness, and altruism, and his unparalleled grit provided him with the capabilities required to perform as a father leader. This leadership style is characterized by availability (awareness), building community, commitment to the growth of people, disciplining, foresight, healing, involvement, listening, persuasion, providing, relinquishing control, role modeling, showing empathy, stewardship (serving), supporting, and teaching. We provide leaders with a list of fatherly leadership behaviors that lacks the authoritarian component of eastern paternalistic leadership style, and that may be well practiced in the health care, social work, education, sport management and other people service industries.
      PubDate: 2024-02-12
      DOI: 10.1007/s41463-023-00167-3
       
  • The Emerging Concept of the Human-Centered Organization: A Review and
           Synthesis of the Literature

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      Abstract: Abstract Both practitioners and scholars are increasingly interested in the idea of the human-centered organization. This term first appeared in the late 1950s and has gained attention in the last ten years. Awareness of the need for human-centeredness grew during the COVID-19 pandemic, in which many organizational leaders were compelled to focus on employee health, safety, and well-being. In this paper, we review and synthesize the rather fragmented scholarly and practitioner literature on human-centered organization (HCO) to develop an integrated definition and framework. The 26 sources reviewed in depth indicate that the HCO construct is primarily utilized in two ways. First, human-centered design scholars and practitioners conceive of HCOs as employing human-centered design practices. The second discourse involves the humanistic management and culture literature, which conceives of HCOs as embodying humanistic values and cultures. After reviewing these separate discourses, we synthesize them in an integrated definition as well as framework of HCO. The framework starts from humanistic values such as dignity, well-being, and justice, which are pivotal in creating organizational practices characterized by a common good purpose, positive human experiences on the job, team structures to coordinate work, and participatory tools and approaches.
      PubDate: 2024-02-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s41463-024-00168-w
       
  • Soothing the Self-Threat of Idea Theft

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      Abstract: Abstract The creative process has the potential to increase wellbeing and foster human flourishing (Dolan and Metcalfe, 2012; Forgeard and Eichner, 2014; O’Brien and Murray, 2015; Conner et al., 2018; Kaufman, 2018), yet has received little attention in the humanistic management literature. In this paper, we present three experiments showing that idea originators experience greater relationship conflict with counterparts who have committed perceived “idea theft”, i.e., proposed identical or related ideas. We test a model that identifies a mechanism—self-threat—that mediates the relationship between idea theft and relationship conflict and identifies an intervention to ameliorate that self-threat via self-affirmation. Study 1 demonstrates the idea originator’s attribution of malign attributions to, and negative moral emotions toward, the counterpart. Study 2 demonstrates that idea originators ostracize both those who propose identical ideas and those who propose merely related ideas. In Study 3, evidence for self-threat as the mechanism underlying the negative relational consequences is provided via both a direct test of mediation as well as via moderation by self-affirmation. Our research contributes to the nascent idea theft literature and suggests a way to reduce its negative consequences.
      PubDate: 2024-02-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s41463-023-00165-5
       
  • Skillsets for Mindful Stewards of System Transformation

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      Abstract: Abstract This conceptual paper argues that change makers, here called transformation stewards, attempting to catalyze transformational change need three core skillsets specific to stewarding transformative change, and further argues that mindfulness practices can potentially enhance these capacities. One skillset is reflexive systems-based awareness and understanding. Another includes capacities for fostering what gives life in complexly wicked social-ecological systems. A third is having capacity for and willingness to steward whole system change, rather than lead it in the conventional sense, which is made necessary because of the nature of organizing transformation stewards in complex, life-oriented systems. Tentative evidence from the literature supports the idea that a combination of experience and mindfulness practices of various sorts can enhance these capabilities.
      PubDate: 2024-02-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s41463-023-00166-4
       
 
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